Morgan-Harvey Cash in the Attic


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Morgan-Harvey

Antiques series. Best friends Dreena and Eleanor from Swansea have a passion for drama. They are keen to arrange a grand day out in London, and Jennie Bond is on hand to help.


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Welcome to Cash In The Attic. We're looking for antiques in your home

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that we can help sell at auction to raise money for something special.

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Today, we're in Wales and we're on a treasure trail that could be paved with drama.

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'Coming up on Cash In The Attic, is our expert David casting aspersions?'

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Look what you paid - £7.50. You're a bit tight, aren't you?

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'Or getting a tad over-confident?'

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-Then we're holding something worth...

-Yes, Yes?

-Hundreds of thousands of pounds.

-If, if?

-If.

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-'Maybe the bidders will bring him down to earth.'

-They should make the money.

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-Please make the money!

-OK, here we go.

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'Find out when the hammer falls.'

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I'm in Swansea and I'm on my way to meet two friends

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with a theatrical flair.

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'Dreena Harvey and Eleanor McLeod are both leading lights of the local theatre scene.

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'Dreena worked for many years as a professional actress and now helps run the nearby Dylan Thomas Theatre.

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'Eleanor is a published children's poet and international drama examiner,

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'so I reckon we're in for a larger-than-life experience at Dreena's home today.'

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-Good morning.

-'Helping out on our dramatic treasure hunt is antiques expert David Harper.

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'With over 20 years in the trade, he's the perfect man for the role.'

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How very nice to be in Swansea, I must say. I love Wales.

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-It's not the best month to come to Swansea, but it's lovely to see you.

-When the sun shines, it looks nice.

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I'll leave you three ladies to gossip. I'll go looking for things.

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He likes to get started. We've got a big day of rummaging ahead of us.

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-Yes, indeed.

-You'll be helping us out, Eleanor?

-Yes.

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We wanted some money to treat each other because we have birthdays at the end of the year

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and we never know what to buy for each other,

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so I treat her to a trip away and she treats me, then we can go together, so we're raising money...

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We're looking for a good London theatre weekend

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with a nice meal and first-class train travel and go and see a show, so that's what we want.

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-What is your target for today?

-400?

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-Yes, 400, 500, as much as we can get.

-We'll go for 400, shall we?

-Yes.

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We'd better get going because there is going to be a lot to do today.

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-We'll go find David, huh?

-Right.

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'Dreena's vibrant home is chock-a-block with antiques and theatrical mementoes,

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'so David is in his element and he's quick off the mark with an interesting find in the front room.'

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-Here he is.

-Hello, you two.

-Found something already.

-Unusual shape.

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Well, I bought these in a little island off Hong Kong called Cheung Chau.

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I was told that they are Emperor wine glasses.

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If we could categorically say that these were made for an Emperor,

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-we're holding something worth...

-Yes, Yes?

-..hundreds of thousands of pounds.

-If, if?

-If, yeah.

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If you have a good look at them, the shape and the size is absolutely bang-on.

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A pair is lovely. Definitely Chinese, that cobalt blue, hand-decorated.

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-And look at the Chinese marks.

-What do you think that says?

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It's a Ming Dynasty mark, so the Ming period is 1350 to 1650 or thereabouts, that 300-year period.

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-He said Ming!

-Ming Dynasty.

-He said Ming.

-"Style".

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LAUGHTER

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-Can you see the double ring around the marks?

-Yes.

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That would also indicate that these things were made for an Emperor.

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So why are you being so doubtful?

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The first thing you look at with Chinese pieces is the quality.

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The mark is secondary because the mark most of the time is wrong.

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In all fairness, the young girl that sold them to me didn't say they were antique.

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She didn't con me at all, so I can't blame her for that.

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I just liked the colour and shape. They're unusual.

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They're really sweet. Also you've got a Chinese teapot.

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-Yes.

-Very nice. Same place you bought it, did you?

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No, this was left over from my mum and we've always had potpourri in it just to scent the room.

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This falls into the same category. Whenever she bought it, it was new.

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-An antique made in China.

-Tell me about that one.

-This was given to me by a dear friend from theatre.

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I think it's very pretty.

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It's oriental again. It's not Chinese. If you look at the base marks, that is not a Chinese mark.

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That to me looks like a Japanese maker's mark, so it's more like a Japanese...

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Again I think it's well into the 20th century. It's not particularly old, but it's very, very pretty.

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-Very delicate.

-Yes. As a collection of oriental pieces in an auction...

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-It's a good idea to put them together.

-What do you think we might get at auction as a lot?

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Well, I think to be real, 30 to 50.

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But if two people don't quite know

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-what they are, they might just keep their hands in the air.

-Let's see what else we can find.

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'Well, we're up and running now on what promises to be a very colourful rummage.

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'Dreena wants to know if three antique boxes inherited from her late partner Geoff

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'will do well at auction. As the oldest of these is Victorian and banded with brass,

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'David reckons they stand a good chance, giving all three a total estimate of £40 to £60.

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'Meanwhile, Eleanor has been getting stuck in to a stack of vintage accessories

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'she's brought along to help the cause.'

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Hello. What have we got here, Eleanor?

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Well, these actually came from my grandmother.

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So these all belonged to Granny?

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Some of the buckles I bought, but the combs are my grandmother's.

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Nice, quality things. What else have we got? We've got some handbags.

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Again I was attracted to things and I'd think, "If ever I do a play where I need a bag..."

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So it was always something feminine and theatrical and... They've still got the prices on.

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I know. Look what you paid - £7.50. You're a bit tight, aren't you?

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LAUGHTER

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The quality of that is amazing, heavy beadwork. Do you know how to tell if that's a real pearl or not?

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-Do you bite it?

-You scrape it on your teeth. Shall I do it for you?

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-Yes.

-If you scrape it on your teeth, if it's gritty, it's a real pearl.

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If it's smooth, it's a fake, so shall we try it?

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Oh!

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It's a fake.

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Sorry about that. It would have been worth seven quid just for the pearl.

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Marvellous. So we've got a bag of bags. How many have we got in there?

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-There must be at least a dozen.

-And then what's in here? Fans?

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We have got fans, yes.

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Unfortunately, they're all a bit damaged now because they've been neglected over the years.

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-Some of them have got nice sticks on them.

-Yeah.

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I'd have thought, as one big lot,

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-50 to 100 for the lot. Is that all right?

-Yes, that's fine.

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'I knew our ladies' theatrical tastes would soon turn up trumps,

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'but how many pounds will get fanned our way on auction day?'

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-£70. With me at 70. 80 straight in...

-Bidders all over the place.

-100.

-Come on!

-110. 120...

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'Find out later on.

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'We're getting into our stride and it's not long before I uncover a collection of teapots.

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'One of them is Kensington Cottage Ware and came from Dreena's mum.

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'David gives all three a value of £20 to £40.

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'While our expert continues the search,

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'I grab a chance to find out more about Dreena and Eleanor's careers.'

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-You're both steeped in a theatrical background?

-Yes.

-We've both been professional actresses.

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-What's the biggest role you've played?

-I worked for the British Council in the '70s and '80s

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to take Shakespeare to schools in Africa, India, Sri Lanka.

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And they were two-handed versions of the Shakespeare plays,

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so we had one actor and one actress.

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And we had to play as many parts as we could,

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so I've played most of Shakespeare's women and quite a few men!

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Good Lord! That's fantastic.

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-A little bird told me that you've worked with Ken Dodd.

-Yes, I did, my very first job in theatre.

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He was wonderful. I do have a certificate of Tickleology from the University of Knotty Ash.

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He could never remember my name

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and I was the only Welsh girl in the show which was at the Palace Theatre in Manchester.

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And he started off calling me Diddy Blodwyn because it was the only Welsh word he knew,

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which got shortened to Didwyn, so for five months I was Didwyn.

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But he's very, very nice.

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-And you still love to go to the theatre?

-We do.

-Yes.

-Which is what today is all about.

-Yes.

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We'd better get back to the rummage and see what David's found.

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It was nice to sit down, though.

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'Eleanor is soon back in the swing and uncovers this lovely silver charm bracelet.

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'Dreena bought it 30 years ago in Swansea but hasn't worn it for ages,

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'mainly because the charms kept snagging on her dress.

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'Some of them are hallmarked silver,

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'so David reckons £20 to £40 should get the bidding going.

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'We're halfway through our rummage,

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'but at £160, we're not quite on track for our £400 target.

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'Maybe David's latest find will do the trick.'

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Dreena! Now then... Whose are these?

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-Ah, these are Eleanor's.

-Oh!

-She's had these a long time.

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-They're sheet music, not posters.

-These are the front covers of the sheet music?

-Yeah.

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So date-wise, what are you thinking?

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Well, from the costumes, I would think they're sort of, I don't know...

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Late '10s, '20s, that sort of thing?

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Yeah, bang on. Down there it says 1917.

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-Really?

-Yes, so that's bang on, First World War.

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-Another period altogether, I mean, well before television.

-Oh, yes.

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Before radio. This is entertainment.

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On a Saturday evening, what would we do?

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We'd get out the sheet music, invite all of our friends

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and have a whale of a time entertaining ourselves,

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playing music and having a blinking good old knees-up.

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Look at the titles of the songs - Supper Dance, Hello Stranger, I'll Be Nice To You.

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THEY LAUGH

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And this one, she is absolutely gorgeous.

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Totally of her time. She almost looks like an Art Nouveau statue.

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-Yes.

-Of 1890, 1900.

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So this again, date-wise, very early 20th century.

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That's a piece of art, so value for the pair, I would have thought 20 to 40.

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-Oh, really? I think she'll be very pleased with that.

-Do you think so?

-I think so.

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'Normally, sheet music doesn't command a high price at auction,

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'but the Edwardian illustrations make a striking lot.

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'It's not long before David makes another eye-catching find -

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'these four little jugs by Royal Doulton.

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'Doulton have produced character designs like this since the 19th century,

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'usually in three different sizes.

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'These miniature chaps are only 20 to 30 years old, but should still prove appealing at £40 to £60.'

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-David, there you are.

-Caught me!

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Eleanor showed me these. They're some rather lovely medals. Where are they from?

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They're my father-in-law's. He gave them to me many years ago.

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He said, "Have these because they bring back very sad memories."

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I said, "Why?" He said, "Because I was so good at sport in school, I won all the prizes."

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He said, "I was bullied by the boys because the boys said, 'You win everything. You're...'"

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-He was too successful?

-He was too successful as a sportsman.

-What a sad story!

-It is rather, isn't it?

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-That's a really sad story.

-And they're lovely.

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They are very, very lovely and they're silver. Let me just check the hallmarks on one of them.

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-They're probably Birmingham.

-What would you be looking for?

-I can see that they're hallmarked.

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Yeah, it's hallmarked Birmingham and I would imagine most of them are

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because Birmingham was and is the big area for producing silver items.

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The anchor mark tells us it was made in Birmingham. I'd better give you a price.

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-40 to 60, I would have said.

-Really?

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-Do you think that's good or bad?

-That's good.

-OK.

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'We're making good progress, but we're not ready to call it a day just yet.

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'Eleanor makes another discovery with this clutch of pocket watches.

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'They're a legacy from Dreena's late partner Geoff

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'whose father was a managing director at Smiths Industries.

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'Sadly, these ex-demonstration models aren't especially rare,

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'so Dreena's happy to see them go to auction with a £50 to £75 estimate.

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'And with a night out in London's Theatre Land at stake,

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'our drama-loving hostess is keen to ensure no drawer is left unopened.'

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David, what do you think of these? Would these be worth anything?

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-What have we got here? A bit of bling?

-This was my mum's old watch.

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Let's have a look at that.

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The strap itself looks like rolled gold.

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-You know what rolled gold is?

-Yes.

-Effectively, a thick gold plate.

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-But the case, looking at the colour, is nine-carat gold.

-Oh!

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Rotary, not a bad maker, is it?

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It's a neat little cocktail watch for a lady.

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-That's bonnie, but these are more commercial, aren't they?

-Yes.

-Let's have a look.

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-The old gold sovereigns, eh?

-Yes.

-That's a half sovereign and that's a full sovereign.

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Edward VII. It's the Edwardian period, 1904.

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These things are still currency.

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You could go anywhere with a couple of these in your pocket and exchange them for local currency.

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Everybody in the world will want them. A full sovereign is making 150, a half sovereign 75 to 80.

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The watch should be up to 50 quid.

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So if we said £200 to £300 for the lot, would that be good?

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Wonderful. Oh, yes. Wait till I tell Eleanor. Oh-ho-ho!

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-Hello, you two.

-Hello, hello.

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-Oh, yes, the sovereigns.

-Yes.

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-Are they sovereigns?

-Yes, one half sovereign, one full sovereign.

-What valuation did you give?

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-200 to 300.

-Oh!

-That's half our total.

-That's good, isn't it?

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-Marvellous.

-Front row seats!

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That is good because I was getting a bit worried. We've found some lovely things, but no huge valuations.

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But that does the business, it really does.

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-I think we could quit at that point. We've done enough rummaging for the day.

-Lovely.

-All right.

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-£400 we said at the start.

-We did.

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Based on David's lowest valuations through the day,

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we reckon at the auction you should make £510.

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-Oh, wow!

-That's great.

-Terrific.

-Lovely.

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'We've good reason to feel optimistic about our finds today.

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'That mixed lot of vintage bags, fans and hair combs should bring us a vibrant result at £50 to £100.

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'And those hallmarked medals could put a smile on someone's face

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'with an appealing £40 to £60 estimate.

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'Let's hope the bidders are willing to go for gold

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'when our nine-carat 1950s watch and sovereigns go under the hammer.

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'Still to come, at least one lot deserves a standing ovation.'

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Yes!

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'But not everything wows the crowd.'

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Cheap. They were cheap for somebody, weren't they?

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'Will we have a hit on our hands? Find out when the final hammer falls.'

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I had a hoot with Dreena and Eleanor sorting through all those boxes of theatrical memorabilia in Swansea.

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A few weeks have gone by and we've brought everything we found to Peter Francis Auctioneers in Carmarthen.

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The girls cannot wait to treat themselves to a West End production with the proceeds,

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so let's hope their items get a really warm reception here today when they go under the hammer.

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-Hi, girls.

-Hello.

-Hello.

-Hello, you two.

-All right?

-These are lovely, aren't they?

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-You're not regretting putting them in the sale?

-Not at all.

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-Have you brought everything along?

-Not quite.

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I'm afraid a teapot got broken, so we decided not to bring the set.

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-Not one of our most valuable items.

-No.

-No.

-And anything reserved?

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Yes, we've put a reserve on the sovereigns of £200.

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It probably didn't need reserving as it would make the money anyway. Gold buyers are in every saleroom.

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-But as a double protection, it's not a bad idea.

-You're sounding very confident.

-Thank you.

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-That's very good, isn't it?

-Excellent.

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-The sale's about to start, so we'd better get going.

-Yes, indeed.

-Great.

-Follow us.

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'A general sale is at Carmarthen every couple of weeks and a great variety of lots are on offer today.

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'Dreena and Eleanor's pieces should fit in splendidly.

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'We take our places just as our first lot goes under the hammer.

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'Dreena got fed up with this bracelet as it snagged her clothes,

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'so £20 to £40 should please her.'

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A silver charm bracelet this time, various charms, heart-shaped padlock.

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Nice mixed charms on there. What shall we say for it?

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£40 to start me? Good Christmas present here. £20 to get on then?

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10? 10 straight in, front of the room. 15. 20...

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-Come on, yes!

-5. 30. 5.

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-40.

-Yes!

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Lost you at the back now. 42 bid. 42 takes it.

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45 if you will? Are you finished and done at 42...?

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-Good start.

-Great start.

-That's all right.

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-I was delighted the auctioneer sold it quite well.

-He described it really nicely.

-Yeah.

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'£2 over our top estimate is a promising start.

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'I only hope Dreena is as impressed with the auctioneer when our next lot goes on sale.

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'It's the china bowl, teapot and drinking cups from the front room.'

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-£30 seems very reasonable.

-I think so.

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-For anything that remotely looks Ming Dynasty, 30 quid is a bargain.

-OK.

-So let's hope, yeah.

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£20 then. 5 then? 25 in the room.

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30 do I see? At £25, gentleman's bid, right-hand side.

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Finished and done at £25...?

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-Yes!

-All right then, if you're pleased...

-What did we put on them?

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-30.

-30 to 50.

-I love it. David's saying no and you're saying yes!

-It's the wrong way round.

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'That's more good news as far as Dreena's concerned,

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'even though we were £5 under estimate.

0:18:570:19:00

'I hope our next lot does better. These silver medals were assayed in Birmingham

0:19:000:19:05

'and awarded to Eleanor's father-in-law at school.'

0:19:050:19:09

-How are you feeling about parting with these?

-I've kept the Victor Ludorum medal

0:19:090:19:14

and I've put it on a silver chain, so I've got that, that's fine.

0:19:140:19:18

-I do hope they do well for you.

-Yeah.

0:19:180:19:21

At £25 with me for all the silver medals. Surely 30 now?

0:19:210:19:25

At £25 with me. Are you finished and done? 30 now surely...?

0:19:250:19:29

BANGS GAVEL

0:19:290:19:32

-Cheap. They were cheap for somebody, weren't they?

-That is cheap.

0:19:320:19:37

-What can you do? You have to let the market decide, don't you?

-Yes.

0:19:370:19:41

'What a shame, but hopefully our next lot is less sentimental -

0:19:420:19:47

'the three wooden boxes Dreena used for storing her bits and bobs.'

0:19:470:19:51

-You put £40 to £60 on them.

-40 to 60. Boxes can do very well.

0:19:510:19:56

-Well, I say that now. I'll tell you what I think in a minute or so.

-Righty-ho.

-Here we go.

0:19:560:20:02

£30 is all I'm bid. At £30, commission bidder again. 5 do I see?

0:20:020:20:06

The three jewellery boxes at 30.

0:20:060:20:08

Seems a little cheap, £30. 35 in the room now, second row. 40 do I see?

0:20:080:20:13

Are you finished and done at 35...?

0:20:130:20:16

-£35. That's all right, isn't it?

-It's £35 I didn't think I had, so...

-Exactly.

-Exactly.

0:20:160:20:21

'We're struggling to make a serious dent in our target, so come on, Carmarthen.

0:20:210:20:27

'What will you make of Eleanor's collection of vintage accessories?

0:20:270:20:31

'Many are Edwardian and were used in theatrical productions over the years.'

0:20:310:20:36

If you get a couple of really interested bidders, they could fly.

0:20:360:20:40

I think of all the items, this is the lot that might just surprise.

0:20:400:20:44

-One way or the other.

-Exactly. I can guarantee that!

-All right, let's see.

0:20:440:20:49

I've got two interested bidders here, starting me away... Where are we?

0:20:490:20:53

50, 60, 70. With me at 70.

0:20:530:20:56

-Yes, bidders all over the place!

-100...

-Come on!

-Yes!

0:20:560:21:00

120. 130.

0:21:000:21:02

140. 150. 160...

0:21:020:21:06

They're scrapping it out. I love it.

0:21:060:21:09

190, fresh bidder. 200.

0:21:090:21:12

And 20. 240.

0:21:120:21:14

240, standing. 260 if you'd like now?

0:21:140:21:17

In the middle of the room at £240. Are you finished and done...?

0:21:170:21:21

Oh, that's brilliant!

0:21:210:21:23

-There you go. Marvellous surprise.

-What do you think?

0:21:250:21:28

I'm delighted because I would have been so sad for those to go for less than that.

0:21:280:21:34

It was great seeing people sticking their hands in the air, scrapping it out. There is no finer sight!

0:21:340:21:41

'Finally, a real hit with the bidders and a huge boost

0:21:410:21:44

'to our total so far.

0:21:440:21:46

'Halfway through the auction, we've now made £367, just £33 away from our target,

0:21:460:21:52

'so despite the mercurial crowd, we're not doing too badly.

0:21:520:21:56

'If you're considering selling at auction, do remember that extra charges like commission will apply.

0:21:560:22:02

'Your local saleroom will advise you on any costs involved.

0:22:020:22:06

'Time to get back to the fray and we're eager to see

0:22:060:22:09

'how Dreena's pocket watch collection fares under the hammer.'

0:22:090:22:13

So you reckon 50 to 75. That seems extremely reasonable for 12 watches, most of which work.

0:22:130:22:19

-Yes, they do.

-That's, well...

-Somebody's got to buy the lot and then sell them individually.

0:22:190:22:25

-It might take them ten years to sell the lot.

-OK.

0:22:250:22:29

Pocket watches, 12 in the lot, £30 to start me?

0:22:290:22:32

-20 then?

-Oh!

-Any interest here at 20?

0:22:320:22:34

I'll take them back!

0:22:340:22:36

£10 with me. 15 I have, right-hand side. 20 now surely?

0:22:360:22:40

£15, gentleman's bid in the aisle. 20 do I see? £15, are you finished?

0:22:400:22:44

20 just beats the hammer. 5 now?

0:22:440:22:47

I've lost you up front. At £20, back of the room, selling...

0:22:470:22:51

-Oh!

-That's a very cheap lot.

0:22:510:22:53

-Very cheap lot.

-That was quite disastrous, wasn't it?

0:22:530:22:57

-That's about £1.20 each.

-Oh, my gosh!

-Ouch!

0:22:570:23:00

'It's certainly a tricky crowd today. Will we do any better

0:23:000:23:04

'with our next lot, those little character jugs?'

0:23:040:23:07

The Royal Doulton has such good quality, amazing quality.

0:23:070:23:12

-So they should make the money. Please make the money!

-OK, here we go.

0:23:120:23:18

At 30 is all I'm bid for the five character jugs. £30 I have. 5 now surely?

0:23:180:23:23

£30 with me, commission bidder again. 35? 35. 38.

0:23:230:23:27

40 for you, sir? £40? 40 is bid, second row. And 5 do I see now?

0:23:270:23:31

In the room selling at 40...

0:23:310:23:34

-233.

-That's not too bad.

0:23:340:23:37

I'm happy. They were in the back of a cupboard.

0:23:370:23:40

-Think of the greater cause, getting you to the West End.

-Yes.

0:23:400:23:44

'Theatre Land is calling and I'm hoping Eleanor's framed sheet music

0:23:440:23:48

'will help the girls on their way.'

0:23:480:23:50

You like these a bit too much, I thought.

0:23:500:23:54

They're very much of an era and again theatrical, so they're absolutely fascinating,

0:23:540:23:59

but time for them to go.

0:23:590:24:01

-What do we think they might be worth?

-20 to 40.

0:24:010:24:05

Two in the lot and I can start at 5.

0:24:050:24:07

£10 with me. At £10. 15 now in the room, right-hand side. £20 now surely?

0:24:070:24:12

£15 on the right-hand side...

0:24:120:24:14

-Oh, they're worth more!

-Are you finished and done at 15...?

0:24:140:24:19

Well, a fiver under. That's all right, isn't it?

0:24:190:24:22

-They've gone, haven't they?

-Yes, but they're a nice buy.

-Yeah, absolutely.

0:24:230:24:28

'Yet another sale below our bottom estimate.

0:24:280:24:31

'I think our ladies were sensible to put a £200 reserve

0:24:310:24:35

'on our final and most precious lot, the gold sovereign, half sovereign

0:24:350:24:40

'and nine-carat watch inherited from Dreena's mum.'

0:24:400:24:43

-So this is going to be a good news lot.

-We hope so.

-A firm prediction.

-I promise you.

0:24:430:24:49

At £200 with me.

0:24:490:24:51

£200 I'm bid. 220.

0:24:510:24:53

240. 260. 280.

0:24:530:24:56

300 in the room now. At the back of the room, lady's bid, 300. Do I see any advance on 300? 320 if you will?

0:24:560:25:03

Are you finished and done at 300...?

0:25:030:25:06

Yes! That's marvellous.

0:25:060:25:08

There you go, a golden lot.

0:25:080:25:11

-£300! Well done.

-Great.

0:25:110:25:13

I could do this again. We've got to have another rummage.

0:25:130:25:17

-It is fun, isn't it?

-It is.

0:25:170:25:19

It always is such a hairy ride because sometimes you're elated

0:25:190:25:23

like with the theatrical memorabilia, how brilliant was that, and the sovereigns,

0:25:230:25:28

then other things you really treasured went for a song.

0:25:280:25:32

But your target was £400 to get you down to the West End and have a really good time.

0:25:320:25:38

-You know you've made it.

-Yes.

-But you've almost doubled it.

0:25:380:25:41

You've made £742.

0:25:410:25:44

-Wow!

-No!

0:25:440:25:46

-London, here we come!

-Oh!

0:25:460:25:49

Just a few weeks after the sale,

0:25:530:25:56

the bright lights of the capital prove an irresistible draw for Dreena and Eleanor.

0:25:560:26:01

Tonight, we're going to do a really good drama. Because of Cash In The Attic, we've done it in style.

0:26:010:26:08

We've travelled first-class, we've had a beautiful meal, some lovely cocktails.

0:26:080:26:13

-Oh, yes.

-And now we're going to enjoy a good night in the theatre.

0:26:130:26:18

That was a suitably dramatic result for Dreena and Eleanor.

0:26:230:26:27

Something tells me they'll be going to auctions again in the future.

0:26:270:26:31

If you'd like to raise money for something special and you've got antiques hidden around your home,

0:26:310:26:37

why not apply to come on the show? You'll find the form on our website.

0:26:370:26:41

Good luck and maybe see you next time on Cash In The Attic.

0:26:430:26:47

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd 2011

0:27:070:27:11

Email subtitling@bbc.co.uk

0:27:110:27:14

Best friends Dreena and Eleanor from Swansea have a passion for drama. They are keen to arrange a grand day out in London and take in a top-class show. Jennie Bond and expert David Harper set to work in Dreena's colourful home.