J Evans Cash in the Attic


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J Evans

Antiques series. Janet Evans wants to treat her family to a London theatre trip. To fund it, she invites Lorne Spicer and Paul Hayes to help de-clutter her Lincolnshire home.


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Welcome to the show that looks around your house,

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finds the hidden treasures, gets them valued

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then sells them for you at auction.

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You know what it's like if you've lived a in a big property

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and it's time to downsize. Leaving the property is one thing,

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but what on earth do you take with you, and what do you sell?

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That's the dilemma facing the lady we'll be meeting later

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on Cash In The Attic.

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On today's Cash In The Attic, we meet a very knowledgeable lady.

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-I think they call that a binnacle.

-There we go.

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A binnacle! You know some interesting words, don't we?

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And this lady's not for turning, in spite of Paul's best efforts.

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-Are you sure it won't go into the bungalow when you move?

-It won't.

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-You don't want it at all?

-No.

-It wasn't a family heirloom?

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-No.

-No sentiment there at all?

-Nothing.

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When it comes to sale day, the auctioneer is certainly on our side.

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Best thing in the room. The best lot of the sale. Fantastic thing.

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Find out just what is so fantastic when the hammer falls.

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Selling!

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Today I've come to Cleethorpes,

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where I'm going to be meeting Janet Evans and her sister.

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They've decided to have a clear-out to raise some money

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so they can have a day trip to the capital city, London.

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She owns and runs this attractive ladies' boutique in Cleethorpes.

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Her younger sister Julie works here part-time too.

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The sisters have always lived in this area of Humberside,

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which is close to Grimsby, and both their husbands work in the fishing industry.

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Janet has lived in this Edwardian semi-detached house

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with her husband Ray for the past 23 years,

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but they're downsizing to a bungalow,

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and have asked for our help with some decluttering.

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-Look at this place!

-Now, this is what I call a hall.

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-Wow!

-Shoes off.

-Right. OK, fair enough.

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Sweeping staircase, and lots of really nice antiques as well.

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-You'll be at home, won't you?

-I'll be really at home here.

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-If you want to go off that way, I'll go and meet the ladies.

-OK.

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Good morning, ladies!

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-Hello. So, it must be your house, Janet.

-Yes, it is.

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It's absolutely stunning. I love the entrance hall.

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Very impressive! But it wasn't you who called in Cash In The Attic.

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-That was you, wasn't it, Julie?

-It is, yes.

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-I'm to blame for that.

-So, what made you think that we should come?

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She's moving. She's supposed to be downsizing.

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-Right.

-I said, "You're going to have to get rid of some of this rubbish."

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If we do manage to sell some of the things you want to get rid of,

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and make some money, what would you like to do with it?

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I would like to take my family and Julie's family to London

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to see a show for the weekend.

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How many people in total do you want to take to London?

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-Eight.

-Eight people. Right. OK.

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Eight people going to London for a show. That's quite a lot of money.

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-What sort of figure have you got in mind?

-£1,000, if poss.

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I'm pretty sure Paul will have found something by now

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-if this room is anything to go by, so shall we go and meet him?

-Yeah!

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He's our man from Morecambe, you know.

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I can see why she needs our help. In the two rooms I've seen so far,

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this place is filled to the brim with ornaments and collectables,

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and there are ten more rooms to explore.

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Paul Hayes's love of antiques started when he was just a teenager,

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and it became his career from a young age.

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The nautical theme in this house is very obvious,

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but the first thing to excite his interest is this painting.

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-Ah, hello!

-There you are, Paul. You've found a few things, then?

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-Look at this! It's amazing.

-I must say, it's a fantastic house.

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You have lots of paintings of ships and marine life.

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Is that something you've been interested in?

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My husband used to go to sea. He used to be a trawler skipper,

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and he used to fish in Iceland and Norway and places like that.

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Were these something he's bought, these paintings?

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No. I bought these years ago, when I worked in a pub,

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and this young artist, John Trickett, used to come in

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and bring his paintings in on a lunchtime.

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He'd probably done one in a morning, and brought one in on a lunchtime,

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and said, "Who wants to buy this? 20 quid."

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You've heard of John Trickett? He's quite a well known artist nowadays.

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-I know he is now.

-Right. Great. This isn't the Cod Wars, the North Sea.

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This represents Trafalgar, the battle between France and England.

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It's very well captured. It's a very popular subject.

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But he's more famous now. He's moved on from marine scenes.

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-Does he not do animals?

-Animals.

-Labradors.

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He's the finest Labrador painter in British...

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-Is that what he's known for?

-Yes.

-So these are his early works.

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-Exactly. This is his Blue Period.

-THEY LAUGH

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And you've got another one. This is more a modern scene.

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That's more like the Norfolk Broads, or maybe a coastal scene.

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But this one here is the main one. It's an oil painting.

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It's very recent, contemporary, but very pleasing.

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In fact, if I said sort of 80 to 120 to give them a chance,

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-how does that sound?

-Yeah. Good.

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It's not a bad return for 20 quid, is it, really?

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-THEY LAUGH

-It's fantastic, eh?

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How exciting! It's nice to actually do a picture for once

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-where you can really identify the artist, isn't it?

-Exactly, yeah.

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-What a great story to tell, as well.

-Well, we'd better get on,

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-because there are loads of rooms to go through.

-OK.

-Follow me!

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That's not a bad start to our rummage here today,

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and I'm itching to begin my search.

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Julie's had time to have a good look around Janet's kitchen,

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and wonders if the brass ship's clock

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might be worth putting up for auction.

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Janet has always liked brass and copper,

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and her attraction to nautical items must reflect her husband's trawling career.

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This clock is quite modern, though, and is battery operated,

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but Paul still hopes it might fetch £50 to £60 at auction.

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In the bedroom, Janet makes a practical decision

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about some attractive Edwardian items.

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Paul, I brought these from upstairs. I've had them about 40 years.

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-OK.

-But I don't want to be spending the rest of my life cleaning silver.

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Oh, wow! These are beautiful. Have these come down the family?

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-My husband bought me them from a jeweller's in Cleethorpes.

-Right.

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These are beautiful. Solid silver, and dead on the turn of the century.

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This is my favourite style. It's called Art Nouveau.

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You've got these wonderful organic forms,

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stylised plants and tendrils, and the muse there in the middle.

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She's playing a harp, or an instrument of some sort,

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and it's a wonderful style. Developed on the continent,

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but became very popular here. But I can see already, this one,

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little bit of over-polishing. You see a little hole there?

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But absolutely fantastic. So, you've got a mirror,

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a hairbrush, and you've got two clothes brushes,

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so this would have been a lady's dressing-table set.

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-Have you noticed the hallmark?

-Er, yes, I have.

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That's the lion passant. That tells me it's solid silver.

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The anchor means it was assayed in the Birmingham area.

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You've got a date letter here,

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and this one is an F, 1905. That's exactly when these were made.

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-So, can you bear to part with them?

-Yes, absolutely.

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-You don't use them any more?

-No.

-So you've got two collectors

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who will go for these - anybody interested in Art Nouveau, or anybody interested in silver.

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So if I said £80 to £120...

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-Brilliant.

-That sounds all right to you?

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-Lovely.

-So they can definitely go?

-Yes.

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Fantastic. So, let's put those down there.

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-Let's keep looking.

-Fine.

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Janet is definitely being very no-nonsense in her approach today,

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and seems happy to be getting rid of stuff. This is a large house

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she's downsizing from, and there really is too much

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to fit into a bungalow.

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'I wonder if she would be happy to part with more paintings.

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'I spot two watercolours by an HS Yeung,

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'which Janet bought after seeing them in the window

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'of her local Chinese restaurant. The owner of the restaurant

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'was the artist himself.

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'Paul gives the two paintings a £50 to £80 estimate.'

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Julie knows how important it is for her sister

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to clear some stuff, and she wastes no time

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in taking some Victoriana from Janet's bedroom

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for evaluation.

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Ah! Now, then... Ooh, look at these!

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Whoa, these are great! So, where have these been hiding, then?

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I've just spotted them upstairs.

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These are wonderful. I can tell instantly who made these.

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It's a firm called Royal Doulton, more famous for the figurines

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or for character jugs and Toby jugs. But the way they're made,

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this is stoneware, and this is almost like icing the cake.

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It's used as a slip, and the slip gives the decoration, all in relief.

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The artist would paint around the edges,

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so each one is individual. Then the rose in the centre.

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It's quite Oriental, almost a pomegranate.

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-Yeah. Love them.

-You can get the name of the potter.

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You've got Royal Doulton mark there, and we got the initials LB,

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which will be an artist. There's the Barlow family, the Butler family,

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sometime around about 1880. But very stylish single-flower vases.

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What you've got to look for is the damage.

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-Can you see there?

-I can.

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Do you think Janet's done that, or has she bought them that way?

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She might have done. Or she might've hit her husband over the head with it.

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-THEY LAUGH

-Well, there we are.

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Stranger things have happened. Usually if they fall off the shelf,

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they're in trouble, aren't they? They're a pair of Victorian vases,

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Doulton Lambeth, good design. Even in that condition,

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if I said 100, maybe 150...

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-Sounds great.

-I think perfect, you'd be looking at 300 on those.

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-Pity.

-You think she's all right with that?

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She'll be pleased with that, I'm sure.

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A fine estimate, but will those cracks make or break Janet's chances

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at auction?

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And we have got five bids on commission.

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I start at £65.

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Find out how much they make a little later.

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All that excitement is still to come.

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But as our search of Janet's house continues,

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Paul has turned his attention to her extensive collection

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of Wedgwood calendar plates. She started collecting these

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when they were commissioned in 1971,

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and she hasn't missed a single year.

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But she's happy to call it a day now,

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and Paul gives them an estimate of £100 to £150 for the lot.

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Well, so far we've potentially raised £460

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towards Janet's goal of £1,000

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to treat all the Evanses to a special London trip.

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You seem a very close-knit family, and you two sisters particularly.

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Yes. Well, we work together, and when I first got married -

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Julie would be ten, I would be 20 -

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and Julie had to come and live with me,

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because I daren't sleep on my own.

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-That must have been quite an adventure for a ten year old!

-Yeah,

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but I daren't be late in, because she was a bully

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and she used to hit me on the head. And her wedding rings were heavy,

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-and it used to hurt!

-THEY LAUGH

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-That were right as rain.

-We worked well together.

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Makes it more fun, though, don't it?

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Tell me a little bit about Cleethorpes.

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It's got such a strong fishing connection,

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and your family has always been involved in it.

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-Is that right?

-Yes, it has,

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Ray's family more than mine. My father went to sea

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and sailed with Ray, but Ray's dad and Ray's granddads

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and uncles and brother, they've all gone to sea,

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up until fishing finished. He come from a real big fishing family, Ray.

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And what about your husband?

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Well, not as much as my sister's,

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but my husband is what you call a fish merchant.

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He sells fish from Grimsby docks.

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-Now, originally your grandmother wasn't from Cleethorpes.

-No.

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-Tell me a bit about her.

-She was from County Durham,

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a place called Houghton-le-Spring,

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and she came from a real big family,

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and the girls were all dancers. And they came here,

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and my grandmother was expecting my mother,

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and danced right up till the day before she had her,

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and had my mother. Three days later she left my mother

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-and went to Mexico for three years.

-That was such radical thing to do at the time!

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People think going to Mexico is nothing new now, don't they,

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-but that was a big trip.

-Oh, yes.

-Three years!

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85 years ago that would have been a big thing.

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It was all sort of done not legally, really, in them days.

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It would've taken them weeks to get to Mexico.

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So a lot of history and memories in this house...

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-Oh, yes.

-..that need to be sorted out.

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Shall we go and see if Paul's found anything we can have a look at?

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-Yes.

-Come on, then.

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'Janet's certainly got her work cut out

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'sorting through 44 years of collecting,

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'but our presence here seems to have motivated her,

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'and she's determined to do it. In her computer room,

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'she comes across some Navy plaques that were given to her father-in-law

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'during the Cod Wars. This series of disputes between Britain and Iceland

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'over fishing rights in the North Atlantic in the 1950s and 1970s

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'caused tensions to run high, and Ray's dad acted as a liaison

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'for the British. He was awarded a plaque

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'for each of the ships he worked on.

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'Paul gives them a value of £20 to £40,

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'and we're not quite done with the nautical theme yet.'

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We've got another picture here. It's lovely.

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Is there any family connection with that?

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-The one in the front was Ray's dad's.

-So they had their own trawlers?

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-They didn't own them. They were skippers of them.

-Right!

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And there's something else I saw, which is this.

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I don't know much about that. We've had that in the family years,

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and it's been in the cupboard. Wherever we've lived,

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-we've dumped it in a cupboard.

-I think it's lovely.

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We should get Paul to have a look at this. Paul?

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-It says rain is expected.

-Thank you very much.

-There we are.

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Ah, this is amazing, isn't it? A bit of nautical history here.

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This is a marine barometer. The basic idea

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is that you have a mercury tube, which is in a vacuum

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in this tube here, and any slight changes in atmospheric pressure

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registers on the mercury quite well. And using this little wheel here,

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you would set it. You see it going up and down?

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So if it was raining you'd set it to there,

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and then you can tell which direction the weather's going in.

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These are wonderful items. What I love about them

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is that they would be screwed into the side of the ship.

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Any bad weather... Look at that.

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-Oh, yeah!

-It stays level. Isn't that fantastic?

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-I think they call that a binnacle.

-There we go.

-A binnacle?

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-Oh, you know some interesting words!

-Well, naval history there.

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Nautical stuff here. Fantastic.

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-Janet's quite happy for it to be sold.

-Yes.

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Right. Well, these do tend to really be in demand.

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You've got the nautical history, the history of barometers.

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This one's from Lisbon, it says, so it's obviously from Portugal,

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that sort of region. But what a fantastic thing to have.

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Very rare indeed, these. This needs a bit of a polish.

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Does it, though? Should it be polished before going to auction,

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or should it go in like that, where it's clearly fresh to auction?

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Well, it's entirely up to you,

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and people do like to see things as they are, untouched,

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-so you're probably right.

-So, what sort of value, then?

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In this present state, you're looking at something that was made

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1900, 1920, that sort of time... Value-wise, very much in demand.

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And if I said at least £150, £200, how does that sound?

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-Good.

-Are you happy with that?

-Yes. Yes, I am.

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We've got nowhere to put it.

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Well, that says "stormy" on there, but we're doing all right so far.

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Let's see what else we can find.

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That barometer has added a great amount to our total,

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but I think we're a fair way off from our target yet,

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so the search of Janet's house continues.

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In the lounge, Julie spots this electroplated spirit kettle

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that belonged to Ray's grandmother.

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A spirit kettle sits on a stand with a burner underneath,

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using alcohol as fuel. Being small enough to be placed anywhere,

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they became a popular Victorian and Edwardian accessory,

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as a servant's help was not required to refresh the hot water.

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Paul reckons it should fetch £25 to £40 at auction.

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Janet certainly has some fascinating items in her home,

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and each one seems to have a story.

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I'd like you to have a look at this clock

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-and see if you think it would be worth going to auction.

-Ah!

0:16:530:16:56

My husband Ray and I bought this clock at auction about 30 years ago.

0:16:560:17:00

Right. Well, we call these a grandfather clock -

0:17:000:17:04

that's any clock that's over five foot -

0:17:040:17:06

but the correct term is a longcase clock.

0:17:060:17:09

-Do you remember how much you paid for it?

-About £100.

0:17:090:17:11

What did you find attractive about it?

0:17:110:17:14

-I think the painting on it.

-Right. These sort of scenes here.

0:17:140:17:17

Right. These are called spandrels,

0:17:170:17:20

and sometimes with these you'll get the four seasons,

0:17:200:17:23

or different sorts of country views.

0:17:230:17:25

This one's quite nice. It's Neoclassical.

0:17:250:17:28

-Do you know how to tell a good grandfather clock from a cheaper one?

-No.

0:17:280:17:32

It's the running time. If I open the door here,

0:17:320:17:34

this should tell... Ah, this is a good one.

0:17:340:17:37

You've got two weights there. That's what drives the movement.

0:17:370:17:40

If you have one weight, that means it only runs for 30 hours.

0:17:400:17:44

You have to wind it every day. When you have two weights,

0:17:440:17:47

that will run for eight days, so you only have to wind it once a week,

0:17:470:17:51

which is far more saleable. Are you sure it's not something

0:17:510:17:54

-that will go into the bungalow when you move?

-No.

0:17:540:17:57

-You don't want it at all?

-No.

-It wasn't a family heirloom?

0:17:570:18:00

-No.

-No sentiment there at all?

-Nothing.

0:18:000:18:03

So what you've got really is a mid-19th-century mahogany

0:18:030:18:07

longcase clock. It runs for eight days,

0:18:070:18:09

which is very good. It's got a lovely painted dial.

0:18:090:18:12

There's no cracks or chips on that,

0:18:120:18:14

and the case looks pretty much original,

0:18:140:18:17

so it's got everything going for it.

0:18:170:18:19

-I think we could be approaching the £1,000 mark here.

-Oh!

0:18:190:18:22

And if I said sort of £600 to £800 to give it a chance,

0:18:220:18:26

-that sounds all right to you?

-It does.

0:18:260:18:29

-Is it the right time to sell it?

-Yep.

0:18:290:18:31

-THEY LAUGH It is.

-Clock that.

0:18:310:18:33

Let's keep looking.

0:18:330:18:35

What a fantastic valuation, and nearly our target figure in one hit!

0:18:380:18:42

But you never know what will happen at auction,

0:18:420:18:45

so we need to find a few more items just in case.

0:18:450:18:48

Janet's house keeps on giving.

0:18:480:18:50

There's a constant supply of fascinating things.

0:18:500:18:53

The next one to head off to the sale is this silver tea service and tray.

0:18:530:18:57

They belonged to Janet's mother-in-law,

0:18:570:18:59

who used to go to lots of junk fairs.

0:18:590:19:02

This is hardly junk, though, as Paul values the lot

0:19:020:19:05

at between £200 to £300. Incredible!

0:19:050:19:08

We're almost done here today,

0:19:090:19:11

but just as we are taking a last sweep of the lounge,

0:19:110:19:14

Janet shows me something else she's been collecting for many years.

0:19:140:19:19

That one's got a little baby on its head.

0:19:210:19:23

-How many of these have you got?

-I haven't counted.

0:19:230:19:26

When did you start collecting them?

0:19:260:19:28

I started collecting them about...um, er...35 years ago.

0:19:280:19:34

So on average, what would you say that you paid per figurine?

0:19:340:19:38

Probably £15, £20.

0:19:380:19:40

-So, this is all going, then?

-Yes.

-OK. Paul?

0:19:400:19:44

-Uh-huh?

-Look. We've found an amazing collection on the fireplace.

0:19:440:19:47

I've heard many things about these figures.

0:19:470:19:50

They're called fairings, where the myth is

0:19:500:19:52

that they came from the Victorian fairs,

0:19:520:19:55

and also that they were done to go on the top of pianos.

0:19:550:19:58

Well, there's two things, yeah. You get a piano baby.

0:19:580:20:01

If you had a grand piano or a baby grand, they would sit on top,

0:20:010:20:05

but the commoner word is the fairing. You're right.

0:20:050:20:08

The word comes from all these wonderful porcelain factories

0:20:080:20:12

in Germany and in France, and what would happen,

0:20:120:20:14

you would have people that would make these in their lunch hour

0:20:140:20:18

and sell them at the fairs, so it was a bit of extra money for them.

0:20:180:20:21

But we're left with a legacy, so this one says,

0:20:210:20:24

-"Let us do business together"...

-HE LAUGHS

0:20:240:20:26

..which is quite sweet, but really they're a remnant

0:20:260:20:29

of the doll-making industry. All the firms made these porcelain dolls

0:20:290:20:33

which were extremely popular in 1880, 1900.

0:20:330:20:35

-Can you give a rough valuation?

-Yeah. Did I hear £10 or £15?

0:20:350:20:39

I think that is about the going rate.

0:20:390:20:42

Some of the bigger ones, maybe £30, £40.

0:20:420:20:44

I mean, if I said 250 upwards, really, for this little lot,

0:20:440:20:48

-how does that sound?

-Good.

-That's not bad, is it?

0:20:480:20:51

That would add in nicely to our total,

0:20:510:20:54

because you wanted £1,000 so the eight of you could go to London,

0:20:540:20:57

which is a lot to spend when you get there, I must say.

0:20:570:21:00

It's good that the value of everything that is going to auction

0:21:000:21:04

comes to £1,705!

0:21:040:21:08

-Good.

-So, are you pleased with that?

-Brilliant.

0:21:080:21:11

Good, Jan, that, isn't it? Great.

0:21:110:21:14

The next time you'll see them, they'll be at the auction house,

0:21:140:21:17

-and we'll see you there.

-Yes.

-Smashing. Lovely!

0:21:170:21:20

I reckon with that result, we're in for a fabulous day

0:21:200:21:24

at the auction. We've uncovered a wonderful variety of pieces

0:21:240:21:27

from Janet's house, including...

0:21:270:21:30

the early 20th-century marine barometer,

0:21:300:21:33

which has been in the family for years.

0:21:330:21:35

That should raise £150 to £200 at auction.

0:21:350:21:39

Then there's the Wedgwood calendar plates Janet has been collecting

0:21:390:21:43

since 1971,

0:21:430:21:45

which received an estimate of between £100 to £150.

0:21:450:21:49

And the Victorian mahogany longcase clock,

0:21:490:21:52

which stands a good chance of making the target in one hit

0:21:520:21:55

if it beats Paul's upper estimate of £800.

0:21:550:21:58

Still to come on Cash In The Attic,

0:22:010:22:04

Janet gets some good advice from sister Julie

0:22:040:22:06

after a disappointing sale.

0:22:060:22:09

Just think how much you'll save on silver polish. Think positive, Jan.

0:22:090:22:13

And there's intrigue

0:22:130:22:15

after the grandfather clock goes before the bidders.

0:22:150:22:18

They've had a telephone bid. I wonder who that was?

0:22:180:22:20

It's not your husband wanting it back, is it?

0:22:200:22:23

Can we solve the mystery? Find out later.

0:22:230:22:26

It's been a few weeks since we visited Janet and Julie

0:22:310:22:34

at their house in Cleethorpes, and we found some very nice items,

0:22:340:22:37

including that ship's barometer and the John Trickett paintings.

0:22:370:22:41

Everything's been packed off to Bamford's auctioneers in Matlock,

0:22:410:22:45

and we're hoping to raise the £1,000 that Janet's looking for.

0:22:450:22:49

I can't actually make the auction today,

0:22:490:22:51

but Paul Hayes is there, so let's see what happens

0:22:510:22:54

when the final hammer falls.

0:22:540:22:55

Bamford's has auction houses in Derby and Matlock,

0:22:570:23:00

and are popular with both dealers and individuals

0:23:000:23:03

looking for a bargain. The auctioneer today is Steven Iredale,

0:23:030:23:07

and Paul is keen to know his opinion on some of Janet's things.

0:23:070:23:11

Now, Steven, I see you've found the barometer.

0:23:120:23:15

-Yeah. I like it.

-I haven't seen one for ages.

0:23:150:23:17

-How rare are these?

-They're not common.

0:23:170:23:19

We've had a few of them over the years.

0:23:190:23:21

It's quite a well known make, Desterro of Lisbon,

0:23:210:23:24

good Portuguese maker. Lots of these things made in Portugal, actually.

0:23:240:23:28

They've got a long nautical history. Mid 19th-century lacquered brass.

0:23:280:23:32

There's something gone on with the dial somehow.

0:23:320:23:34

It's bubbling up. Whether somebody's tried to re-silver it

0:23:340:23:38

or whether it's decomposing a bit, I'm not sure.

0:23:380:23:41

I think if we get the right person with the enthusiasm for it,

0:23:410:23:44

-I think it'll do quite well.

-So you can forecast great things.

0:23:440:23:48

-THEY LAUGH

-I know you're a very busy man.

0:23:480:23:50

-I've got to go and meet the family.

-Aye-aye!

0:23:500:23:52

THEY LAUGH

0:23:520:23:54

Janet's antiques have been on display here

0:23:540:23:57

for a few days, so that potential bidders can view them.

0:23:570:24:00

There must be a bit of a gap in your house,

0:24:000:24:03

because we took quite a lot of stuff.

0:24:030:24:05

-There's nothing left in the hall.

-It's all decluttered?

0:24:050:24:08

-Yes, absolutely.

-I think you've got some fantastic items,

0:24:080:24:11

but they're going to start any minute now,

0:24:110:24:13

-so we need to take our places. I'll follow you.

-Thank you.

0:24:130:24:17

Janet seems fairly relaxed about the auction,

0:24:180:24:21

but Paul, on the other hand, is looking a little nervous today.

0:24:210:24:25

No doubt he's hoping his estimates will prove correct,

0:24:250:24:27

or, better still, be beaten. Let's seen what happens

0:24:270:24:30

with the first one, which has just come up -

0:24:300:24:32

the collection of naval plaques.

0:24:320:24:35

These have the names Tartar and Juno. Were they boats of yours?

0:24:350:24:40

They belonged to my father-in-law

0:24:400:24:42

when he was the liaison officer in the Cod War,

0:24:420:24:46

and he was on the frigates, and every frigate he was on, they made him one of them.

0:24:460:24:50

And £30, please. £30.

0:24:500:24:52

A few of them. £30. 20, then, let's start them.

0:24:520:24:55

-£20.

-Oh, come on!

-15, then. Let's get on. 15.

0:24:550:24:58

Three places. 15. 18.

0:24:580:25:01

20. Two.

0:25:010:25:03

At £20 bid, second row. Two do I see?

0:25:030:25:05

At £20, and two now.

0:25:050:25:07

At £20, and two do I see? At £20, then. All done.

0:25:070:25:11

And selling, second row, at £20.

0:25:110:25:14

-All right with you? That was what we wanted.

-Absolutely.

0:25:140:25:17

Paul breathes a sigh of relief as those plaques reach his low estimate

0:25:170:25:22

and we're off to a good start.

0:25:220:25:24

Let's hope the bidders like Janet's next nautical lot,

0:25:240:25:27

the two signed John Trickett oil paintings.

0:25:270:25:30

I start at £60, and five do I see?

0:25:300:25:32

At £60, and five now. At £60, and five do I see?

0:25:320:25:36

At £60 and five now. Five. 70.

0:25:360:25:40

Five. Go on, it's worth it!

0:25:400:25:43

At £70 and five now. At £70, and five do I see?

0:25:430:25:47

That is so cheap. At £70 and five now.

0:25:470:25:50

At 70... Five. New place.

0:25:500:25:53

80. Five. At £80 here and five now.

0:25:530:25:57

At £80, and five do I see?

0:25:570:25:59

At £80. All done, then.

0:25:590:26:01

Quite sure? And selling at £80.

0:26:010:26:04

There you go. That's bang on, isn't it?

0:26:040:26:06

-Good.

-How much were these when you bought them?

0:26:060:26:09

-Probably about 20 each.

-There you are. After all this time...

0:26:090:26:12

Fantastic.

0:26:120:26:14

The auctioneer really helped that sale reach the peak

0:26:140:26:17

with his enthusiastic auctioneering.

0:26:170:26:19

The next lot belonged to the grandmother of Janet's husband Ray.

0:26:190:26:24

It's the electroplated spirit kettle.

0:26:240:26:26

This is what they used to keep hot water in.

0:26:260:26:29

If you're having afternoon tea, keep hot water in there.

0:26:290:26:32

-All right. That's £25 to £40.

-Mm!

0:26:320:26:35

Starts me at £18, and 20 do I see? At £18. 20.

0:26:350:26:39

Two. Five. Eight. 30... No, at £28.

0:26:390:26:43

30 now. At £28, and 30 do I see?

0:26:430:26:46

At £28. 30, now, someone.

0:26:460:26:48

At £28. And 30 now?

0:26:480:26:50

All done, then? You quite sure? At 28.

0:26:500:26:54

£28.

0:26:540:26:56

Just over Paul's lower estimate. They're doing pretty well so far.

0:26:560:27:00

Now we're back to a marine item yet again.

0:27:000:27:03

It's the battery-operated brass ship's clock,

0:27:030:27:06

in the catalogue for £50 to £60.

0:27:060:27:09

£50? 40, then.

0:27:100:27:13

42. 45.

0:27:130:27:15

43, if it helps you.

0:27:150:27:17

43. 44.

0:27:170:27:19

He's trying, isn't he?

0:27:190:27:21

Don't stop. At 45 bid. Six do I see?

0:27:210:27:23

At £45. And six now.

0:27:230:27:26

At £45. Six do I see?

0:27:260:27:28

You sure? All done, then.

0:27:280:27:30

At £45 and selling.

0:27:300:27:33

Just £5 under Paul's lower estimate.

0:27:330:27:36

The bidders seem to like Janet's collection so far.

0:27:360:27:39

What will they make of the silver dressing set

0:27:390:27:42

that Ray bought for Janet many years ago?

0:27:420:27:44

It's up for £80 to £120.

0:27:440:27:47

-When's the last time you used this?

-I've never used it.

-Never at all?

0:27:480:27:52

Just cleaned it. HE LAUGHS

0:27:520:27:54

Well, it's very well polished. Do you use something like this?

0:27:540:27:58

-Never.

-Never?

-Never.

0:27:580:28:00

I don't think I've got anything silver.

0:28:000:28:02

-So you won't miss it at all?

-No, no.

0:28:020:28:05

I have got nine bids, and they're all almost identical.

0:28:050:28:09

-And £50 is bid.

-£50. We're in.

0:28:090:28:12

At £50, and five now. At £50, and five do I see?

0:28:120:28:16

At £50, then, on commission.

0:28:160:28:19

Oh, he's going to let 'em go.

0:28:190:28:21

All done, then? Five has them.

0:28:210:28:24

At 55 against commission, and I think we're selling.

0:28:240:28:26

At £55. 60 now. At £55.

0:28:260:28:29

60 do I see?

0:28:290:28:31

All done at 55? Number three.

0:28:310:28:34

A flurry of interest shown in the silver dressing-table set,

0:28:340:28:37

but none of the bidders wanted to pay more than £55.

0:28:370:28:41

Maybe Janet had over-polished them a bit.

0:28:410:28:44

The next lot is the two watercolours that Janet bought

0:28:440:28:47

from her local Chinese restaurateur.

0:28:470:28:51

He's very popular, you know, in our area.

0:28:510:28:54

-He's done paintings for the Queen.

-Has he really?

-He has.

0:28:540:28:57

So, does he have a gallery or something?

0:28:570:29:00

Yes. He has a restaurant,

0:29:000:29:02

and he used to have his paintings in the window of the restaurant.

0:29:020:29:06

-Did you buy those paintings from there?

-Yes.

0:29:060:29:08

Well, we're looking sort of £50 to £80, OK?

0:29:080:29:11

£60 for them. 60. £50, then.

0:29:110:29:14

£50? 40, then.

0:29:140:29:17

£40. 40.

0:29:170:29:19

-Ooh, dear.

-30, then, let's start them.

0:29:190:29:22

£30 bid. At £30, and five now.

0:29:220:29:25

At £30, and five do I see?

0:29:250:29:27

At £30, and five. 40.

0:29:270:29:30

And five. At £40 to the left, and five now.

0:29:300:29:33

At £40, and five. Two if it helps you.

0:29:330:29:36

All done, then. At £40.

0:29:360:29:39

There you go. Is that all right with you?

0:29:390:29:42

Can you remember how much you paid for them?

0:29:420:29:44

-More than £40.

-Were they?

-THEY LAUGH

0:29:440:29:47

-But it was a good meal out.

-THEY LAUGH

0:29:470:29:49

Oh, £10 under the lower estimate.

0:29:490:29:52

But Janet doesn't seem too disappointed.

0:29:520:29:54

We've reached our halfway point now. Remind me how much we want to raise.

0:29:540:29:58

-I'd like to raise £1,000.

-About £1,000.

-Yeah.

0:29:580:30:02

Halfway through, and all the items that we've sold up to now,

0:30:020:30:06

we've actually made £268.

0:30:060:30:09

-Well, that's me and you.

-We can go.

0:30:090:30:12

-THEY LAUGH

-Before you get carried away,

0:30:120:30:15

don't forget that you have your grandfather clock,

0:30:150:30:17

lovely barometer and other bits to come, right?

0:30:170:30:20

But let's have a little break before we come back for the second half.

0:30:200:30:24

If you'd like to try your hand at auction,

0:30:250:30:28

bear in mind that there are charges to be paid, including commission.

0:30:280:30:32

The fees may vary from one saleroom to another,

0:30:320:30:34

so it's always worth enquiring in advance.

0:30:340:30:37

Well, we know that Janet's star item is coming up later -

0:30:370:30:40

that wonderful Victorian mahogany longcase clock.

0:30:400:30:43

Paul has spotted several other clocks in the sale,

0:30:430:30:46

and wants to share his experience on what to look for when buying one.

0:30:460:30:50

I wanted to show you some great examples of the type of clock

0:30:510:30:55

you can buy when you come to auction.

0:30:550:30:57

Auction houses seem to be full of these sort of items.

0:30:570:31:00

They're a bit out of fashion, but I think they're fantastic.

0:31:000:31:03

These work on a spring mechanism, so you wind the spring.

0:31:030:31:06

The spring releases the power by the pendulum,

0:31:060:31:09

and that's what gives it its time. This one was made in Austria

0:31:090:31:12

round about 1880, 1900. It's solid mahogany.

0:31:120:31:16

It's very regal. It has these fantastic, imposing columns

0:31:160:31:19

and these finials on the top. These are often eagles

0:31:190:31:22

or sometimes horses, and they get lost,

0:31:220:31:24

so it's nice to find this all complete. So, value-wise,

0:31:240:31:27

maybe £50 to £80. This one is a much better clock, in my opinion.

0:31:270:31:31

This one is American. It's solid walnut.

0:31:310:31:34

It's been beautifully inlaid. Can you see all this inlay

0:31:340:31:37

with satinwood, with a swan and floral decoration?

0:31:370:31:40

It has been restored. This has a replacement dial.

0:31:400:31:43

It looks very fresh, fully working order. Value-wise,

0:31:430:31:45

£100 to £150, and to be honest, both absolute bargains.

0:31:450:31:49

Well, the more expensive American wall clock was a snip at £100.

0:31:510:31:55

The Viennese one, though, reached its upper estimate of £80.

0:31:550:31:59

Janet has six lots left, all with three-figure values -

0:31:590:32:03

the silver tea service and tray, the porcelain figures,

0:32:030:32:06

and the marine barometer. But next up on the podium

0:32:060:32:10

is the pair of damaged Victorian Doulton vases.

0:32:100:32:13

-Were these a family heirloom, Janet?

-No. I bought them years ago.

0:32:130:32:17

-You just liked them?

-I just liked them.

-OK.

0:32:170:32:19

I did notice that they were slightly damaged.

0:32:190:32:22

-What happened?

-They were damaged when I bought them.

0:32:220:32:24

Exactly like that? OK. So, looking £100, maybe £150.

0:32:240:32:28

Circa 1905, a really grand pair of vases there,

0:32:280:32:32

on display on the sideboard.

0:32:320:32:34

And we have got five bids on commission.

0:32:340:32:36

I start at £65. 70 do I see in the room?

0:32:360:32:40

At £65. And 70 now. 70.

0:32:400:32:43

Five. 80. At £75. 80 now.

0:32:430:32:46

At £75. 80 do I see?

0:32:460:32:48

At 75. 80. 80. Five. 90.

0:32:480:32:52

-Oh, it's going up a bit.

-Five. 100.

-Ooh!

0:32:520:32:54

Five. 110. At £105. 110 do I see?

0:32:540:32:58

At £105. 110 now.

0:32:580:33:00

At £105. All done?

0:33:000:33:03

At £105...

0:33:030:33:05

-How's that?

-Yeah!

-That's great, isn't it?

0:33:050:33:08

They were very decorative, but one was damaged.

0:33:080:33:10

-They was very heavy.

-THEY LAUGH

0:33:100:33:13

That's great, 105. That's £5 over what we least expected.

0:33:140:33:18

-So, right. Happy with that?

-Yeah.

0:33:180:33:20

Something else that doesn't have to go back.

0:33:200:33:23

Janet is a woman of few words, but she looks really delighted

0:33:230:33:27

with that sale. Her next lot is a real modern collectable.

0:33:270:33:30

It's the series of Wedgwood calendar plates.

0:33:300:33:33

One was issued every year, and Janet was in from the start.

0:33:330:33:37

-When was the first year you started collecting these?

-1971.

0:33:380:33:41

-And every year since?

-Till now.

0:33:410:33:43

Right. That's quite a big part of your life.

0:33:430:33:46

-Are they quite sentimental to you?

-Where I'm going,

0:33:460:33:48

I won't have the walls to put them on, and nobody else wants them.

0:33:480:33:52

-Have you missed them?

-I have. I've got about 15 nails stuck out.

0:33:520:33:56

THEY LAUGH

0:33:560:33:59

What are we bid for those? £120?

0:33:590:34:02

There is a massive heap of them. 120. £100, then.

0:34:020:34:06

These things cost a fortune new. £100 for them.

0:34:060:34:08

Oh, no!

0:34:080:34:10

-Oh, no!

-£80, then.

0:34:100:34:13

It's not a lot each, it really isn't. £80.

0:34:130:34:16

£80. Absolute heap, isn't there? £70.

0:34:160:34:19

-£60. Let's start, then. £60.

-Oh!

0:34:210:34:24

No? Little bit too much, I think, then. Sorry.

0:34:240:34:29

No. He's withdrawn them, and I think he's done you a favour.

0:34:290:34:32

-Just for all those years.

-They can go back on the nails.

0:34:320:34:35

We'll have Sunday dinner on 'em next time.

0:34:350:34:37

We're about that many for dinner.

0:34:370:34:40

It's a good job you didn't put those nails back in the wall. You can hang them back up again.

0:34:400:34:45

Despite the auctioneer's best efforts,

0:34:450:34:47

no-one wanted Janet's plates, so they'll be packed up again

0:34:470:34:50

and moved into the bungalow. We've been lucky with our nautical items,

0:34:500:34:54

so let's bring out our next example.

0:34:540:34:56

It comes complete with its own binnacle,

0:34:560:34:59

the original bracket that kept it level in all weathers.

0:34:590:35:02

I think it's one of my favourite items today.

0:35:050:35:08

It's been such a long time since I've seen one of these.

0:35:080:35:11

It's that marine barometer. Do you know which boat it came off?

0:35:110:35:14

No. We've had it years, but in the cupboard underneath the stairs.

0:35:140:35:19

Well, it was made in Lisbon by RN Desterro.

0:35:190:35:22

It's not a gentleman I've heard of, but the auctioneer's researched him

0:35:220:35:26

and found he's very well known, so we're looking for 150 plus.

0:35:260:35:29

And we have got seven bids on commission.

0:35:290:35:31

-It starts with me at £160.

-£160, straight in!

0:35:310:35:35

-THEY LAUGH

-£160,

0:35:350:35:37

a rare thing. At £160. 170 do I see?

0:35:370:35:40

At £160. 170 now?

0:35:400:35:43

Good at they come. At £160. 170 do I see?

0:35:430:35:47

170. 180.

0:35:470:35:49

190. At £180.

0:35:490:35:52

190 now. At £180, then. All done?

0:35:520:35:55

Quite sure? At £180.

0:35:550:35:58

There you go! Is that all right with you?

0:35:590:36:01

That's fantastic, isn't it? There was lots of interest.

0:36:010:36:04

He had six commission bids all around the same sort of price.

0:36:040:36:07

Have they found those commission bids, or...

0:36:070:36:10

Somebody's came to view that yesterday,

0:36:100:36:12

and left a bid on it. So six people wanted that,

0:36:120:36:15

and £180 bought it. It's great, isn't it?

0:36:150:36:18

Fantastic! I wonder if the winning bidder will put it on a boat?

0:36:180:36:22

Anything would be better than keeping it in a cupboard,

0:36:220:36:26

as Janet had done. Next to come up is the silver tea service and tray

0:36:260:36:30

that Janet's mother-in-law bought at a junk fair.

0:36:300:36:33

Its value here is £200 to £300.

0:36:330:36:36

You're looking about 1920s. Does that fit in?

0:36:360:36:38

-Yeah. Beautiful. Is it your job to polish it?

-Yes.

0:36:380:36:41

-THEY LAUGH

-All right. You got a teapot,

0:36:410:36:44

the sugar and cream, and you've got the tray that matches.

0:36:440:36:47

-Would you use it?

-If it had been at my house, it would've been brown.

0:36:470:36:51

-HE LAUGHS

-I'd have thought it was brass.

0:36:510:36:53

And it starts with me at £150. 160 do I see?

0:36:530:36:56

At £150 on commission. 160 now.

0:36:560:37:00

At £150. A really pretty set.

0:37:000:37:03

At £150, then. All done? 160 takes it.

0:37:030:37:06

At 160. 170 do I see?

0:37:060:37:09

-At £160. 170 now.

-Ooh!

0:37:090:37:11

All done, then? Against commissions and selling.

0:37:110:37:15

All done at 160?

0:37:150:37:17

There you go. That's not so bad, is it?

0:37:180:37:20

A little bit less than we were thinking. Is that all right?

0:37:200:37:23

Think how much you'll save on silver polish. Think positive, Jan.

0:37:230:37:27

Janet and Julie are very easy to please.

0:37:270:37:31

£40 below Paul's lower estimate doesn't seem to bother them.

0:37:310:37:34

Those Mama and Papa figurines are up next.

0:37:340:37:36

They're also known as fairings, because people used to buy them

0:37:360:37:40

or win them at funfairs. The estimate of £250 to £300

0:37:400:37:44

reflects just how many there are - over 20 in total.

0:37:440:37:49

-Your mantelpiece must look empty without all those.

-It does.

0:37:490:37:53

-Can you dust around it easy now?

-Easy.

-OK.

0:37:530:37:55

These are great, actually. Very collectable items,

0:37:550:37:59

but one or two of them are slightly damaged. What happened there?

0:37:590:38:02

Been in the wars. Kids and stuff like that.

0:38:020:38:05

-Kids and footballs?

-Yeah.

0:38:050:38:08

There we are. A sample being shown, but there are heaps of them.

0:38:080:38:12

All the popular figures. And £250, please.

0:38:120:38:16

250. 200, then.

0:38:160:38:18

-Come on.

-200.

0:38:180:38:20

£200.

0:38:200:38:22

£180, let's start them. £180.

0:38:220:38:25

-180.

-No!

0:38:250:38:27

These might be going back.

0:38:270:38:30

We're below estimate with 180. Who'll bid me way below estimate?

0:38:300:38:34

-Didn't make enough.

-Oh, what a shame!

0:38:340:38:36

-Has he withdrawn them?

-Yes!

0:38:360:38:38

-THEY LAUGH

-That is a shame, isn't it?

0:38:380:38:41

-It's a shame.

-They couldn't get an interest.

0:38:410:38:43

Rather than let them go for a lot less than what we expected...

0:38:430:38:47

That's the first time today Janet's looked upset,

0:38:470:38:50

but I'm not sure whether it's because she hasn't made the money

0:38:500:38:53

or because she'll have to dust them all again.

0:38:530:38:56

It looks like they've saved the best till last.

0:38:560:38:58

It's time for that Victorian mahogany longcase clock

0:38:580:39:02

that Janet bought at auction 40 years ago.

0:39:020:39:04

It's up for £600 to £800, with a reserve of £500.

0:39:040:39:09

OK. Now, it's the moment of truth now.

0:39:110:39:13

It's that fantastic grandfather clock.

0:39:130:39:15

You don't really want to take this one back, do you?

0:39:150:39:18

-No.

-You're not going to get it on the roof rack.

0:39:180:39:21

It ain't coming in the back seat with me.

0:39:210:39:23

Best thing in the room, the best lot of the sale.

0:39:230:39:25

Fantastic thing. 19th-century oak-and-mahogany longcase clock

0:39:250:39:29

by C King of Leicester. About 1840. A very handsome clock.

0:39:290:39:33

We'll start it where it starts on commission with me,

0:39:330:39:36

at £420, and I'll take bids in the room first.

0:39:360:39:40

At 420. 450 do I see in the room?

0:39:400:39:42

At 450. 480. 500.

0:39:420:39:45

-And 20. 550.

-Ooh, hey!

0:39:450:39:48

-550.

-THEY LAUGH

0:39:480:39:51

-Whoo-hoo!

-600.

0:39:510:39:53

600. 620.

0:39:530:39:56

At £600 against the telephone. 20 do I see?

0:39:570:40:00

At £600. And 20, 620, new place.

0:40:000:40:03

-620.

-Ooh!

0:40:030:40:05

620 now. At 620. 30 I'll take.

0:40:050:40:09

And selling, centre of the room. All done?

0:40:090:40:11

Quite sure? At 620...

0:40:110:40:14

Oh, that's good.

0:40:140:40:16

That's fantastic, don't you think?

0:40:160:40:19

Well, you were right to put your reserve on,

0:40:190:40:22

but we didn't need it in the end. And a telephone bidder!

0:40:220:40:25

I wonder who that was. It's not your husband wanting it back, is it?

0:40:250:40:29

-It's not Ray in the car, is it?

-THEY LAUGH

0:40:290:40:32

I've no doubt that excellent final sale

0:40:320:40:34

has made all the difference to Janet's target.

0:40:340:40:37

Over to Paul to tell them the good news.

0:40:370:40:39

OK. Well, it's been a bit of a roller coaster,

0:40:390:40:42

or choppy sea, I think we can say today.

0:40:420:40:44

How have you found this? Have you enjoyed it?

0:40:440:40:47

-Good. I've enjoyed it.

-You wanted £1,000

0:40:470:40:49

for this theatre trip for both of you.

0:40:490:40:51

Well, we actually made here today

0:40:510:40:53

£1,333!

0:40:530:40:56

-Ooh!

-That's good, Jan!

-How great is that?

0:40:560:40:59

Brilliant. And you've got all your bisque figures back.

0:40:590:41:03

-That's good, yeah.

-That's fantastic, isn't it?

0:41:030:41:05

-Are you pleased with that?

-Yeah, lovely.

0:41:050:41:08

In the end, only half of Janet's party could make the trip to London,

0:41:130:41:17

but that means there's more cash to splash on her two children

0:41:170:41:20

Samantha and Simon, and, of course, sister Julie.

0:41:200:41:24

If you'd like to follow me to your private dining area...

0:41:240:41:28

Ladies, gentlemen, welcome to the Royal Room of the Adelphi Theatre.

0:41:300:41:34

-Thank you.

-Come and have some champagne.

0:41:340:41:36

Ooh!

0:41:360:41:38

Thank you.

0:41:380:41:40

-Cheers!

-Bottoms up.

-Here's to a good evening.

0:41:400:41:43

They're being treated to a special package,

0:41:430:41:46

which includes a three-course meal before a West End show.

0:41:460:41:50

Oh, that looks beautiful!

0:41:510:41:54

So, has the treat lived up to their expectations?

0:41:540:41:58

It was brilliant. We've had a wonderful night from start to finish.

0:41:580:42:01

We've had lovely food, lovely hospitality,

0:42:010:42:04

beautiful dining room, lovely show...

0:42:040:42:07

Money can't buy it! Brilliant!

0:42:070:42:09

Fabulous!

0:42:090:42:11

SHE LAUGHS

0:42:110:42:13

Thanks to the auction, Janet had a fantastic night out in London.

0:42:170:42:21

If you've got an idea in mind that you need to raise a bit of cash for

0:42:210:42:25

by selling your antiques and collectables at auction,

0:42:250:42:28

why not apply to come on the show? You'll find more details

0:42:280:42:31

and an application form at our website, which is...

0:42:310:42:34

And I'll see you again next time.

0:42:350:42:38

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:42:380:42:42

E-mail subtitling@bbc.co.uk

0:42:420:42:46

.

0:42:460:42:46

Janet Evans wants to treat her family to a fabulous London theatre trip. To fund it, she invites Lorne Spicer and Paul Hayes to help de-clutter her Lincolnshire home. Among her items headed for auction are paintings and brass items with a nautical theme.