Allum Cash in the Attic


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Allum

Antiques series. Jane and Geoff Allum want to buy a new painting by their favourite local artist to suit their 17th-century barn conversion. Angela Rippon is on hand to help.


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Welcome to the programme that loves to help you raise money for a special project or treat

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by finding things that you can sell at auction.

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Today's family decided they would move to the country,

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but will the things they take to auction reflect their city life? Find out on Cash In The Attic.

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'Coming up: a unique letter associated with Captain Scott's ill-fated expedition to Antarctica.'

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He was in the party that found Scott's body on the ice barrier.

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'Plus some very pretty hand-painted porcelain from the 1920s.'

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Is this a tea set or a coffee set?

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In the north of England, you'd require a bigger cup than that! Not worth wasting the teabag!

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'On auction day, our hosts explain why they have so many paintings.'

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-We can't stop!

-We don't stop.

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'Will we be as pretty as a picture when the hammer falls?'

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I'm in East Sussex today on my way to meet Jane and Geoff,

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who will part with some of their possessions so that they can buy a new piece of art.

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'It was love second time around for Jane and Geoff Allum,

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'who left behind the hustle and bustle of London to enjoy a gentler pace of life in East Sussex.

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'They share many passions, such as collecting antiques and renovating properties.

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'It's clear that they're rather good at both. They fell for this house the first time they set eyes on it.

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'And the grounds are pretty impressive, too.

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'See that boat - Geoff rowed it across the Atlantic.

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'I'm not sure what our expert John Cameron is like at rowing, but he's good at peddling antiques.

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'While he makes a start in the house, I'm going to meet the family.'

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Hi, Jane and Geoff! I have to say this house is full of nooks and crannies

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with the most amazing, eclectic collection of bits and pieces.

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-Are you both inveterate collectors?

-We can't stop ourselves.

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-We buy junk all the time - it's mostly junk!

-I'm sure it's not!

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But you have a wonderful knack of being able to make everything look absolutely right in a house

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-which is how old?

-About 1630, we think. It's one of the oldest timber-frame buildings

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-in Sussex, so it's pretty old.

-It's absolutely fantastic.

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I can't wait to have a good look around, so you'd better tell me now why you've called us in?

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We've got lots of bits and pieces that we don't really look at

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-and we should condense it down and buy one nice piece.

-What sort of thing are you thinking of buying?

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We've seen some paintings in a local gallery. They're not a load of money, but it would be nice to have.

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Roughly how much do you think we might make? What's your goal?

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Well, we hope about 500, but we'll wait for the expert.

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Well, that expert is John Cameron and he's already rummaging.

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I think we'd better go and find him and see what he thinks.

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'Now I wonder where John's disappeared to. He's going to be like a child in a sweet shop today

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'with so much to look at in so many rooms. It is a treat to be in such a delightful building.'

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Geoff, this is a wonderful glory hole. I'm not surprised that John has got started in here.

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There's plenty in here. I've just come across a letter that's interesting, signed Tryggve Gran.

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Tryggve Gran. With Robert Scott at the South Pole, 1910-1913.

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-How did you get a letter from him?

-I had a correspondence with him years ago.

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We exchanged a few letters and we talked about rowing the Atlantic, which I did.

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And he talked about the Antarctic.

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-You had an interest in the Antarctic. Is that how you knew who he was?

-Yeah.

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We took a copy of The Worst Journey In The World on our rowing boat.

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-And so I knew all about his role in Scott's expedition.

-Which was what?

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He was the Norwegian ski expert that Scott employed. None of the English sailors he took could ski,

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so he employed Tryggve Gran. He was an Olympic skier.

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And he taught them to ski.

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Then, subsequently, he was in the party that found Scott's body on the Great Ice Barrier

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and built the cairn in memorial.

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-What was he talking to you about in this letter?

-The effect of the cold on the younger men

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and how they suffered worse than the older men in the Antarctic, and in my case, too.

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-You'd suffered from frostbite.

-Yes.

-John, this is not actually about the expedition itself

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-so does it still have a value?

-There is a lot of interest in anything like this,

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especially related to tragic expeditions, things like this and Mallory and Irvine,

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the Titanic. Any correspondence directly relating to those events

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are always very popular.

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This is unrelated to the expedition, but there would be interest.

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Taking that into consideration,

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I'd be tempted to put £100-£200 on it and see where you go.

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What a wonderful thing to start off with. I don't know if you've looked round, but there are so many things,

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we're going to have a great day. Shall we go and see what else we can find?

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'A great valuation, which gives us our first contribution.

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'Jane is downstairs in the dining room, having decided it's time to part with an old stein

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'that belonged to her stepfather.

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'It was in the 16th century that lids were first attached to mugs and jars to beat disease.

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'In Europe at the time, there were problems with vermin and flies,

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'which lead to outbreaks of bubonic plague. No such problem these days.

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'Steins are mainly produced for the tourist market.

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'This could wet someone's whistle with a £30-£50 estimate.

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'How close to the mark is John's estimate, though? Close enough!'

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£30 for it? Thank you.

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-Straight in at £30.

-30 quid right away.

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35? 38. 40.

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42. 45.

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'Stand by for a bidding war.

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'As the search in this 17th-century converted barn continues, I've spotted a watercolour.

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'It's one of a pair of rural scenes given to Geoff's mum by a friend,

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'but they're not to Geoff's and Jane's taste. They were painted by an artist called Martin in 1983.

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'Despite his research, John has been unable to identify the artist

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'and his estimate of £40-£60 reflects this.'

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John?

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-Hi, Jane.

-I've got a collection of these, but I'm ready to sell this one.

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Woodblock print, still life by John Hall Thorpe. You have a number.

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I've only got four in here and a couple more downstairs. My sister's borrowed two.

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-What made you collect Hall Thorpe?

-I was given one by my stepfather.

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I just thought it was a one off and then I saw another and rather liked it.

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I found there were plenty more.

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I just bought this one because I saw it in a market in France.

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It's got to be worth something.

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They're woodblock prints, which reproduces pictures en masse

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by cutting the design into the wood.

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He was an Australian artist who trained at the Sydney Art School,

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before becoming an engraver and designer for the Sydney Mail, and he worked on the newspaper.

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He developed his own very distinctive style, which was very popular at the time.

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People were buying Oriental items.

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It's nice, even though it's faded.

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We should still be hoping for around £100-£200.

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-All right.

-OK?

-I should think so.

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-Jolly good. Keep hold of this one. You don't want to sell the others?

-No.

-All right, come on.

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'We've already uncovered some lovely collectables in this property.

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'Its lucky residents fell in love with it the moment they set eyes on it.'

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You live in the sort of house that most people dream of living in in the country.

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But you very nearly didn't get it, did you, Jane?

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No, we were trying to buy the house and somebody zipped in and took it from under our noses,

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so we went away and were a bit sad,

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got on with our lives and then, eight years later, I looked on the internet and there it was.

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-We thought we'd have another look!

-And here you are.

-Here we are.

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-Did you do all the work on the renovation?

-It was pretty well like this when we got it, Angela,

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although we did do quite a lot of work because it was a bit rundown. We've put in a staircase

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and put in a new terrace. Stuff like that, just bits and pieces, really.

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-We do everything ourself.

-Literally, you are into do it yourself.

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-Oh, yeah.

-We have to be.

-Why?

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Because after you've bought it, you haven't any money left!

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But this isn't the first major job you've taken on like this. You did something very similar in France.

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Well, a much bigger project in France. That was a wreck. We really built that up,

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-so we have learnt over the years.

-That meant living in France for three years.

-Yeah.

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Our son went to the International School in Toulouse and we mixed the concrete mixer every day!

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Tell me about the painting you want to put here. A local artist?

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Charlotte Snook. She's an artist we've seen in Hastings, which is local to us.

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-We like her work.

-Have you decided where you're going to put it?

-No, we haven't.

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It depends how big it is and how much money we make!

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We're not going to make anything sitting here, are we?

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It is such a large house, we'd better get back to work again.

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I'll see you later. Let's see what else we can find.

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'Going by John's lowest estimates, we stand to make £270 with everything we've found up until now,

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'so we're not doing badly at all.

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'John has disappeared into what was the cow shed and comes across a Victorian washstand.

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'This was another purchase by Jane's stepfather, but it's been relegated to the back of the property.

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'It's a heavy piece with a marble top,

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'but if we can get it to auction, John thinks it'll fetch £50-£100.

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'I'm searching in a bedroom,

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'but I'm not sure this African necklace will be of interest.

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'Luckily, John's indoors again, so maybe he's having more luck.'

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-Yes, John?

-An interesting book. You've got one or two more here.

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Grey Owl.

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Yeah, yeah. Grey Owl. Funny character. He was an Englishman

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who went to Canada, became a trapper, then a conservationist.

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He passed himself off as an Indian and was presented to the King and Queen and lectured the princesses,

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and he was, in actual fact, born in Hastings.

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-Not an Indian at all.

-He's quite a famous guy.

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-There have been films about him.

-With Pierce Brosnan.

-He was actually born, as you say, in Hastings.

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-Archibald Belaney.

-Yeah.

-And he went out to Canada to work as a fur trapper

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-and I believe he married an Indian woman.

-Yes.

-But it was an affair with a Mohawk Iroquois.

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She persuaded him to stop trapping

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and to write down his experiences

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and try to make something of them by publishing books.

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He was hugely successful. As you say, lectured to high society and convinced everybody.

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-He really does look like an Indian!

-He used to, apparently,

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practise in front of the mirror to look like an Indian.

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Underneath his own photograph, he's written, "I am an Indian. I speak with a straight tongue."

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-That's very interesting, given that he wasn't and he didn't!

-Ironic!

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-A remarkable story. How many of these have you got?

-Oh, I guess 10 or 12.

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Four or five of them signed, perhaps.

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What I need to do is get them all together, see which ones are

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first editions or second editions.

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Whatever we can find there. And then look at them for condition.

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-That's the real key thing with books. From there, we can estimate.

-Thank you.

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'Another fascinating discovery and a further search uncovers a further ten copies of his books.

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'The four signed ones will be the most sought after,

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'but as one lot John thinks £80-£120 is a realistic estimate.

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'Let's see how they fare on sale day.

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'Jane is continuing her search in the living room and adds this mahogany cabinet

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'to the ever-growing list of items that are going to auction.

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'She bought it in West London in the 1980s for £20.

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'John thinks it could fetch £50-£75. Sounds like a canny investment to me.

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'The goodies are really turning up thick and fast and I may have found something else with real potential.'

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I found this rather pretty tea set.

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John, take a look at the mark on that. Where did you get these?

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We bought them in Yorkshire. We went on a little holiday and saw them. They were so pretty,

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-I treated myself.

-It's quite nice. The pieces are made of earthenware and they are hand-painted.

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The little design is put on before the enamels.

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I love those organic handles. They're very typical in a sort of '20s and '30s style,

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similar to Carltonware and Clarice Cliff, in a way.

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Interesting if you turn them and have a look at the mark. It's Burleighware.

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Burleigh is a company with a very long family history. The company goes back to 1851.

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A good year for the Great Exhibition and the interesting thing about this mark on the bottom

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is it says "Registered in Australia". Why the did that was

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a lot of English pottery was having great success internationally.

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There were very competitive markets in the Far East, Japan, making copies and exporting them back.

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In order to protect their markets, they realised there was a loophole.

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If you registered a design in Australia, Japan weren't allowed to copy Australian designs

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because of their proximity.

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-This was how to stop it. So they registered that design in Australia.

-A wise move.

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They all look in perfect order. Is it a tea set or a coffee set?

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Well, I think the size of the cups would suggest coffee. Certainly in the north of England,

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you'd require a bigger cup than that for a cup of tea! Not worth a teabag!

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-So what money could we put on these at auction?

-I think £50-£70

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would get the bidding started.

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-Who knows where you go from there?

-Let's just put these back.

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That is such a pretty little set, but, gosh, there's lots more stuff here to find!

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'Geoff is searching through boxes in the loft and digs out a set of 1930s Art Nouveau plates.

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'They're by the manufacturer Eichwald, which produced majolica at their factory in Bohemia,

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'now part of the Czech Republic.

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'These plates were quite possibly among the last ceramics to have been made at the factory,

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'as production ceased there in 1939.

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'John thinks any collectors might be willing to pay £30-£50.

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'There's something to look at wherever you turn in this property.

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'Geoff told me they are feverish collectors and he's not kidding,

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'but I get the impression they always need to do something,

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'whether it's buying antiques, renovating properties or, in Geoff's case, rowing the Atlantic

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'back in 1971.'

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-This is such a lovely room. What's there?

-This is a photograph I said I'd find for you of us

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-just after we'd rowed the Atlantic.

-Us being you and...?

-My cousin Don.

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-We'd landed on the beach in Barbados.

-I've seen the boat in which you rowed across the Atlantic.

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-How big is it?

-It's 19 feet long. It's about the size of a family car.

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Whatever made you and your cousin think that you wanted to do that?

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It's men showing off, I think. It's what men do.

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-But the Atlantic is big - 3,000 plus miles.

-It is big.

-How did you navigate?

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With a sextant. The same way Columbus did it.

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And the stars and the sun and navigation books.

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-So what was the worst moment?

-When we ran out of water on the eighth week.

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We had to go down to half a pint a day each and it was 100 degrees, so that was shocking.

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-And the best moment?

-The best moment was when we picked up a water bag.

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My cousin picked up a water bag when we saw land and he held it up and poured two pints down his throat

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and handed it to me. And we drank as much as we wanted, then we rowed in and landed.

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But whatever else happens, you and your cousin still hold the record for being the first.

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We were the first east/west crew, double crew.

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And we did it in the fastest time, which stood for 26 years.

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-Which was how long exactly?

-73 days and six and a half hours.

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You really do have to write this account. It's a most extraordinary story.

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-But we haven't got time now because we need more things for auction.

-Absolutely.

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I am so impressed with that story. It's amazing!

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'I'm not even going to waste my breath asking if we can take his faithful boat to auction,

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'but might John have found something that accompanied Geoff at sea?'

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Jane? I found this compass in your desk over there.

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-This isn't the compass that Geoff used to cross the Atlantic?

-No.

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We found it in Donald's flat, his cousin he rowed with.

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It was something somebody gave him when they heard he'd rowed the Atlantic. They gave him this.

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-It's a rather nice little present.

-Not with a leather case?

-No.

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It's a hand-held field compass, a First World War compass.

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Sometimes referred to as a marching compass. These would have been made in really huge numbers

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and dished out to the troops in the trenches.

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These would have been used to find your way across open territory.

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You literally lift it up like that, the front cover comes up and that glass has a faint line.

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That's your object line, so you focus on something.

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This one has a little prism viewer.

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And you line up the two. Then you've got your magnetic north.

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If you look through the prism, you can then read what's on the scale.

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You can fix your bearings and that's the direction you head.

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It hasn't been over-polished. Just a shame it lost that case.

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-Would Geoff be happy for us to sell it?

-I'm pretty sire, yeah.

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Jolly good. Even without the case, we should be looking at £30-£50.

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-Oh, pretty good.

-Happy with that?

-Yeah, absolutely.

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I don't need this to navigate round your house, but let's carry on.

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'Another useful addition to our target, but sadly time is running out on our day here.

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'I decide to conduct one last sweep around the house.

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'My effort pays off when I come across this pair of brass sconces.

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'Geoff bought them at a car boot sale back in the 1980s,

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'but they've never been used in anger or for decoration, so he's happy to sell

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'and John thinks they could bring in £30-£50.

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'And just when we thought we'd searched every last nook and cranny, Jane comes up with more goodies.'

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-Angela, shall I show you these?

-Oh, aren't they sweet?

-Yeah.

-Little embroidered pictures.

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We've got The Good Old Days. A lovely mail coach and four.

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And The Present Time - 60 miles an hour. Geoffrey?

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John?

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-Aren't these sweet, John?

-Yeah, they are interesting.

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-Where are they from?

-They're from my mum's house. And her mum's before that.

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They've always had them on the wall. Possibly my great-grandmother's.

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-Do you remember seeing them in the house?

-Yes, always. Always.

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-Did they fascinate you as a boy?

-Particularly by The Present Time - 60 miles an hour.

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Even as a young boy, I knew that was old-fashioned!

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-They're an obvious pair.

-Yes, and they seem to have the original mounts.

-They have.

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They're known as Stevengraphs, a name given to them after the designer who invented the process

0:22:000:22:07

of producing these silk pictures. A man called Thomas Stevens.

0:22:070:22:12

He was a silk worker, who plied his trade in the Coventry area,

0:22:120:22:16

before setting up his own firm at the tender age of 26 years old.

0:22:160:22:20

By modifying a portable loom and using a graph system that could reproduce original drawings

0:22:200:22:26

to recreate these images in silk.

0:22:260:22:29

I must admit I love that rather lovely sort of muted colour that you've got on them.

0:22:290:22:36

-This is the mail coach, but they're not mail coach colours.

-That is a critical point.

0:22:360:22:41

Originally, those colours would have been much more vivid. They have suffered some fading.

0:22:410:22:47

You do see a lot of these at auction and the condition is key,

0:22:470:22:51

so although we do still have colour, they were more vivid than that.

0:22:510:22:55

-What age would you put on them?

-Certainly the 19th century,

0:22:550:22:59

but probably framed again in the early 20th.

0:22:590:23:03

In spite of the fact that they've faded, I think that adds to them. I like that subtle colouring.

0:23:030:23:09

How much might they make at auction?

0:23:090:23:11

-These days in this condition, I'd expect about £40-£60.

-OK.

0:23:110:23:17

-Does that sound about right?

-It does.

0:23:170:23:19

If we add that £40 to all the other things John has looked at today, taking the lowest estimates,

0:23:190:23:25

I know you want to raise £500, but I think with a bit of luck we might make as much as £630.

0:23:250:23:33

-Oh.

-You can buy a bigger picture!

-Oh, yeah, absolutely.

0:23:330:23:37

-Thank you.

-Let's see what happens when we get it to auction.

0:23:370:23:40

'I've thoroughly enjoyed my day in the countryside, and what a wealth of collectables we found.

0:23:400:23:47

'Hoping to fund their new piece of artwork, we have the letter from Tryggve Gran,

0:23:470:23:53

'the ski instructor on Captain Scott's Terra Nova expedition.

0:23:530:23:57

'It's a unique item of great value with a £100-£200 estimate.

0:23:570:24:01

'Those signed copies of Grey Owl's books by the British-born conservationist

0:24:010:24:08

'whose ethics inspired millions. Maybe we'll see a few naturalists.

0:24:080:24:12

'The estimate is £80-£120.

0:24:120:24:15

'And let's not forget the brass field compass. It may not have helped Geoff on his Atlantic row,

0:24:160:24:22

'but we all hope it will help navigate us towards our target and sail past the modest £30 mark.

0:24:220:24:29

'Still to come: a very determined bidder for the stein.'

0:24:310:24:37

-He's not even taking his hand down!

-70. 5.

-Wow!

-80. 5.

0:24:370:24:42

'The dealers seem impressed by Geoff's Atlantic rowing record.'

0:24:420:24:46

-It was written to me in about 1971.

-When you rowed across the Atlantic?

-That's right.

0:24:460:24:52

No wonder you lost weight!

0:24:520:24:55

'Find out how our expedition goes when the hammer finally falls.'

0:24:550:24:59

What a fantastic house Jane and Geoffrey have and they both have extremely good taste,

0:25:050:25:12

but now it's time for some of those things to go, so we've brought them here to the Chiswick Auctions

0:25:120:25:18

and hopefully they will raise at least £500 so that Jane can buy a piece of local art.

0:25:180:25:24

Now it's all down to the bidders.

0:25:240:25:27

'These weekly auctions always attract a good mix of buyers looking for something special.

0:25:280:25:34

'I wonder what they'll make of our selection

0:25:340:25:38

'and a unique letter to Geoff from a Norwegian Antarctic explorer.'

0:25:380:25:42

-Having a last read of it?

-Yes, before it goes for sale.

-Yes.

0:25:420:25:47

-Any regrets about selling it now that it's here?

-Yes, yes, sort of,

0:25:470:25:53

-but we have got a reserve on it.

-What's the reserve?

-I think it's £100.

0:25:530:25:58

It's an unusual thing, a one off, but £100 doesn't seem unreasonable.

0:25:580:26:03

-And I think we might get some internet interest because of the international interest.

-Yeah.

0:26:030:26:09

He was an important person. He was with Scott at the South Pole,

0:26:090:26:12

but he was also the first person to fly the North Sea,

0:26:120:26:16

so he was quite an important character in early exploration.

0:26:160:26:20

-Put a reserve on anything else?

-Yeah, on the Hall Thorpe.

0:26:200:26:24

-Just 100.

-I think that was faded, but still a nice example.

0:26:240:26:28

So £100 again isn't out of the way.

0:26:280:26:31

-Have you got your eye on a piece of art yet?

-We have something in mind.

-Great!

0:26:310:26:36

'One thing Jane and Geoff forgot to mention is that they've decided not to sell those silk pictures.

0:26:360:26:43

'The value in monetary terms is much less than the sentimental as they've been in the family over 100 years,

0:26:430:26:50

'which means we'll have to make up the £40 on all the other lots if we're to make the target.'

0:26:500:26:56

Geoff, we've got a WWI brass trench compass.

0:26:560:27:00

Is this a family heirloom or did you buy it cos you liked it?

0:27:000:27:04

-This came from my cousin Don, the Atlantic rower.

-But you didn't use it to row the Atlantic?

0:27:040:27:11

He had one on one of his voyages a lot worse than that.

0:27:110:27:15

Cos he lost his main compass. He would have been pleased of that.

0:27:170:27:22

This one is dated. It is an Admiralty piece, official military.

0:27:220:27:26

The compass is in good condition. I'd be disappointed if it didn't sell for around our estimate.

0:27:260:27:32

£30? £30 for it? A bid of £30.

0:27:320:27:35

-Straight away.

-35. 38. 40.

0:27:350:27:38

42. 45? At £42.

0:27:380:27:42

£42. 5 I'll take. 45, new bidder.

0:27:420:27:44

At 48? £45. That's the money, £45.

0:27:440:27:47

48 for it? 48 there. 50. 52.

0:27:470:27:50

55? £52.

0:27:500:27:53

£52 and going. All done. At £52. All out?

0:27:530:27:57

-Brilliant.

-Fantastic.

0:27:570:28:00

-You've got to think of the history. It was 1915, it was in the trenches in France.

-Amazing.

0:28:000:28:06

When you think of what action that might have seen.

0:28:060:28:09

'Hopefully it's gone to someone who appreciates its worth.

0:28:090:28:14

'Maybe it will become part of an existing collection.'

0:28:140:28:18

-Next up we have our Gothic sconces. Where did these come from, Geoff?

-A car boot sometime,

0:28:180:28:24

about 30 years ago.

0:28:240:28:26

-Don't ask me how much we paid!

-We've carried them around for years!

-I've got £30-£50.

0:28:260:28:33

A couple of people were looking.

0:28:330:28:35

Hopefully that'll go past my estimate.

0:28:350:28:39

£50? £20?

0:28:390:28:41

I'm bid at 20. 22. At 22.

0:28:410:28:44

25. 28. 30.

0:28:440:28:47

32. 35. 38.

0:28:470:28:49

40. 42?

0:28:490:28:52

The bid's here at £40. 42? At £40, are you all out?

0:28:520:28:55

I'm selling at £40. Are we done at £40?

0:28:550:28:59

-40. Right in the middle, John.

-I'm happy with that.

-Well done. Exactly. Very good.

0:28:590:29:05

'With luck, the winning bidder will make use of them instead of just moving them around! Next,

0:29:050:29:11

'the pair of watercolours of rural scenes. The artist's name is Martin and they were painted in 1983.'

0:29:110:29:18

-You have quite a lot of pictures, all over the place. You like collecting pictures.

-We do.

0:29:180:29:24

-We can't stop ourselves.

-We can't.

0:29:240:29:27

-But we need to clear out sometimes and these two are going.

-To make room for your new ones.

-Exactly.

0:29:270:29:34

-They're very atmospheric.

-Aesthetically pleasing.

0:29:340:29:38

They give a lovely country feel.

0:29:380:29:41

I've got £40-£60 because I couldn't find anything about the artist.

0:29:410:29:46

I'm sure it's an amateur artist.

0:29:460:29:49

Start me at £40? £40 for the two? £30?

0:29:490:29:53

£30? £20? No bid at £20.

0:29:530:29:57

I'll pass on. £20? No bid at £20? A bid at £20.

0:29:570:30:01

With the bidder at £20. I'll sell at £20. Take 2. At £20.

0:30:010:30:05

Only at £20. Going to go at £20. Are we done?

0:30:050:30:09

-That's disappointing.

-Yeah.

-But probably an amateur artist.

-Yes.

0:30:090:30:14

-I was hoping to get that for each of them, not for the pair.

-Not to worry, not to worry.

0:30:140:30:20

'So they have some much-needed wall space for their new painting and £20 towards its purchase.'

0:30:200:30:27

Next up are three Eichwald pottery plates that are decorated in the Austrian secessionist style.

0:30:280:30:34

-What was the story with these, Jane?

-Well, I used to do antiques

0:30:340:30:37

in a little dabbly way years ago and it's something I bought,

0:30:370:30:42

but I don't have them out any more so there doesn't seem any point.

0:30:420:30:46

Well, I think they're very stylish. I've got £30-£50 on them. Hopefully, they'll make that.

0:30:460:30:53

£30? £20?

0:30:530:30:55

£20. I've got £20. 22?

0:30:550:30:58

At £20. Is that it at £20? I'll take 22. At £20.

0:30:580:31:02

The bid I've got is £20. At £20, going.

0:31:020:31:06

-20. A bit lower than our estimate. We thought 30 they might make, but 20... Pleased?

-That's fine.

0:31:060:31:13

They're gone, they're gone.

0:31:130:31:16

'Jane has just the right attitude. She's not hung up on each sale,

0:31:160:31:21

'just focusing on the end figure being somewhere near what they want.

0:31:210:31:25

'Their next offering is the collection of Grey Owl books,

0:31:250:31:29

'written in the 1930s.'

0:31:290:31:32

An Englishman who went to Canada, reinvented himself as an Indian,

0:31:320:31:37

and it wasn't until after he died that people found out he wasn't.

0:31:370:31:41

-He wrote a number of books and they're quite hard to get hold of.

-And these are signed.

-Some of them.

0:31:410:31:48

And some are first editions.

0:31:480:31:51

£100 the lot?

0:31:510:31:53

I thought you would. £50 the lot. A bid of £50.

0:31:530:31:57

At £50. Take 55. 55. 60.

0:31:570:32:00

65. 70. 70. 75.

0:32:000:32:03

80.

0:32:040:32:05

80. 5?

0:32:050:32:08

82 if it helps. £80. Take 82.

0:32:080:32:11

5 or 2, I don't mind. Are you going to bid?

0:32:110:32:15

£80. At £80. All done.

0:32:150:32:17

-£80.

-Bottom of the estimate.

0:32:170:32:19

-Fantastic.

-You're going well.

-Fantastic.

-Great.

0:32:190:32:24

'That very good result is welcome after our last few low sales.

0:32:240:32:29

'So far we've raised £212 towards Jane and Geoff's new art,

0:32:290:32:33

'but I'll keep that to myself.

0:32:330:32:36

'If you'd like to have a go at buying or selling at auction,

0:32:360:32:41

'do bear in mind that fees such as commission will be added to your bill.

0:32:410:32:46

'This varies, so it's always worth checking in advance.

0:32:460:32:51

'Jane and Geoff's next lot to go is that large stein with a pewter lid.'

0:32:510:32:55

-Did anybody ever drink out of these things?!

-It would be difficult!

0:32:550:33:00

-Or are they just dust collectors?

-Well, it was in our house!

0:33:000:33:05

-Why did you buy it, then?

-It was my stepfather's and he liked it.

0:33:070:33:12

We brought it home, but it's been in a box ever since. It's silly.

0:33:120:33:17

Somebody, I'm sure, will like it.

0:33:170:33:19

£30-£50 to stand on a shelf or to use it, John?

0:33:190:33:24

This one's got nice decoration. The Prussian artillery. So hopefully we'll hit our mark.

0:33:240:33:30

-£30 for it? Thank you.

-Straight in at £30.

-30 quid.

0:33:300:33:35

35. 38. 40.

0:33:350:33:38

42. 45?

0:33:380:33:41

42. 45. 48? 48.

0:33:410:33:43

50. Take 2. 52. 55? 55. 58.

0:33:430:33:47

-He's not even taking his hand down!

-70. 5. 80. 5. 90.

0:33:470:33:52

He wants it!

0:33:520:33:55

120. 130. 140. 150. 160.

0:33:550:33:59

Crikey!

0:33:590:34:01

At 150. It'll go.

0:34:020:34:05

-Well...

-Fantastic.

0:34:050:34:08

That was £150 there.

0:34:080:34:10

Amazing. Blasted my estimate, no pun intended. Definitely the Prussian scene sold that.

0:34:100:34:18

-The bidder just kept his hand raised.

-He never took it down!

-I know him. He's very determined.

0:34:180:34:24

So there was a bidding battle there.

0:34:240:34:27

I'm really pleased.

0:34:270:34:30

'And who wouldn't be at three times the upper estimate? We're surprised!

0:34:300:34:35

'We don't have much time to recover before their next lot,

0:34:350:34:39

'the Burleighware coffee... or tea set comes up.' Jane, I seem to remember finding this

0:34:390:34:46

in that lovely cabinet you had. It looked absolutely lovely there.

0:34:460:34:50

-It looks lovely here. Why are you selling it?

-My days of Deco

0:34:500:34:55

are over. I think I'm moving off and I'm preferring more modern things.

0:34:550:35:01

I've enjoyed it and I'm looking forward to buying something new.

0:35:010:35:06

-Do you remember how much you paid?

-Gosh, probably about £15.

-We've got £50-£70 on it, John.

0:35:060:35:12

-That would be a pretty good investment.

-We've got some wonderful shapes here.

0:35:120:35:19

I love the little handles. It's nice, condition's good.

0:35:190:35:22

50-70 doesn't sound unreasonable.

0:35:220:35:25

£50 for it. £50 for it. A bid of £50. Take 55.

0:35:250:35:31

-OK, got it in the end.

-Yes.

0:35:310:35:34

70. 75. 80.

0:35:340:35:36

85. 90. 95.

0:35:360:35:38

-- 100.

-Well done!

-- Fantastic!

0:35:380:35:41

130. 140. 150.

0:35:410:35:44

160. 170?

0:35:440:35:47

160 bid. At 160.

0:35:470:35:49

170? At 160. Is that it? All done at 160? 170? Bidder at 160 and going.

0:35:490:35:56

-Another incredible price!

-Almost £100 over your top estimate.

-That I can live with!

0:35:560:36:03

-You've obviously got a great eye, not just for a bargain, but for a bit of real quality.

-Thank you!

0:36:030:36:09

'Absolutely incredible. And again quite unexpected.

0:36:090:36:14

'I'm not sure how much more excitement we can take!'

0:36:140:36:18

Our next piece of furniture has seen a drop in demand. It is a nice Victorian mahogany cabinet.

0:36:180:36:24

-I've got £50-£75 on this. Is this going to be missed?

-I don't think so.

0:36:240:36:29

It wouldn't be here if it was!

0:36:290:36:32

Hopefully we'll get that. Condition wasn't that bad on it and there are still buyers.

0:36:320:36:38

£50 for it? £40?

0:36:380:36:41

-I'm bid £40.

-£40 we've got.

-42. 45.

0:36:410:36:44

48. 50. 5.

0:36:440:36:46

55. 60?

0:36:460:36:49

At £55. You want 60? 65. 70. 75. 80.

0:36:490:36:53

80. 85?

0:36:530:36:55

A bid of £80. I'll take 85. All done for £80. Going.

0:36:550:37:00

-You look really surprised!

-We are!

0:37:000:37:04

'Jane paid around £20 for that cabinet back in the 1980s,

0:37:040:37:09

'so £80 makes a significant and welcome return. Now it's time for the woodblock print

0:37:090:37:15

'by John Hall Thorpe, originally painted in 1925.'

0:37:150:37:19

-Nice picture, slightly faded, but typical for the artist. Any regrets?

-No.

0:37:190:37:25

It's not the best example and I've got a lot that are much crisper.

0:37:250:37:29

I would like to get that one in a nice, crisp condition.

0:37:290:37:34

-I did try to prise some of the others from you.

-No, no.

0:37:340:37:39

£100 for it?

0:37:390:37:42

£80 for it?

0:37:420:37:43

Start me at £80 for it. A bid of £80?

0:37:430:37:47

Nobody to buy at £80? I'll pass the lot.

0:37:470:37:51

-You've put £100 on this.

-Yes.

0:37:510:37:54

-Sorry, no bids.

-No bids. But thank goodness you put a £100 reserve on it.

-Mm.

0:37:540:38:00

-It'll go back and join the rest of them.

-Maybe. Maybe.

0:38:000:38:04

-It might stay here.

-It could.

-It could stay here!

0:38:040:38:08

'That's true. It may meet Jane's reserve on another day,

0:38:080:38:13

'but it's the first of their lots to go unsold today.

0:38:130:38:17

'Next, the Victorian wash stand. Jane and Geoff kept it in the cow shed!'

0:38:170:38:23

-Are these things still fashionable?

-They're harder to sell these days,

0:38:230:38:28

but this one has nice features - brass towel rails, marble top, the splashback.

0:38:280:38:33

So it's got some nice features. I'd hope we'd get towards our bottom estimate. It's a nice thing.

0:38:330:38:40

£50 for it? £40 for it?

0:38:400:38:42

A bid of £40. At £40. 42?

0:38:420:38:45

At £40. 42? 42, thank you. 45.

0:38:450:38:49

45...

0:38:490:38:51

-48? 48. 50. 5.

-OK.

-Come on.

0:38:510:38:55

55. 60. 5? 60 bid.

0:38:550:38:57

Take 5. At £60.

0:38:570:39:00

-For the wash stand. It's going to go. You've got it - £60.

-Not bad for something in the cow shed!

0:39:000:39:06

Fantastic.

0:39:070:39:09

'The second half of the auction has been very successful.

0:39:090:39:14

'Their final lot is the letter to Geoff from the Norwegian involved in Captain Scott's last expedition

0:39:140:39:20

'in Antarctica, to the South Pole. How is that going to fare here?'

0:39:200:39:25

- A framed, typewritten letter. How do you pronounce that? - Tryggve Gran!

0:39:250:39:30

A Norwegian author, explorer and pilot. Dated and inscribed. Tell me about him.

0:39:300:39:36

Tryggve Gran was an explorer. He was on Scott's last expedition.

0:39:360:39:41

He signed that "With Robert Scott at the South Pole, 1910-1913".

0:39:410:39:46

- It was written to me in about 1971. - When you rowed the Atlantic. - That's right.

0:39:460:39:52

No wonder you lost weight!

0:39:520:39:54

Right, Tryggve Gran and it's signed by him as well. I'm bid £80 to start me.

0:39:540:40:02

Commission bid of £80. 85.

0:40:020:40:04

Thank you. 90. 95. 100. 110.

0:40:040:40:07

Your bid at 110. Take 120. At 110. At 110.

0:40:070:40:12

That's it... 120.

0:40:120:40:14

130. 140.

0:40:140:40:16

140. 150. 160?

0:40:160:40:19

Bid's here at 150. Selling now at 150. Last chance.

0:40:190:40:23

It goes at 150.

0:40:230:40:25

-150. right in the middle of the estimate, John.

-Fantastic.

0:40:250:40:29

Pleased? £150 of history there.

0:40:290:40:32

'It would be fascinating to know why the winning bidder wanted that,

0:40:320:40:36

'but he was a bit camera shy.'

0:40:360:40:38

There were quite a few big surprises today.

0:40:380:40:42

-There were.

-A few surprises.

0:40:420:40:44

The tea service did particularly well.

0:40:440:40:49

-And there was a surprise with the wash stand.

-And the stein!

0:40:490:40:53

-Yes!

-That was incredible.

-Good heavens.

0:40:530:40:56

I hope you'll be equally surprised by what you made in total. How much is this piece of art?

0:40:560:41:02

-It's about 500.

-About 500.

-Yes.

0:41:020:41:05

Well, you can probably buy something else as well. You've made £812.

0:41:050:41:09

-That's fantastic! It is fantastic. Fantastic.

-More stuff!

-More stuff!

0:41:090:41:15

-Yes. You never stop.

-No.

0:41:150:41:19

-Really good.

-Fantastic.

0:41:190:41:22

-Thank you.

-Well done.

0:41:220:41:24

It's been a little while since the auction and Jane and Geoff have chosen their new painting.

0:41:280:41:34

It's still part of this exhibition in Hastings, but after that, it'll take pride and place in their home.

0:41:340:41:40

So they've come to view it and meet the artist herself, Charlotte Snook.

0:41:400:41:45

-So here we are.

-Looks fantastic.

-Do you like it with the others? Do you see the connection?

-Yes.

0:41:450:41:52

-And the black frame.

-'It's nice to see the painting'

0:41:520:41:56

framed properly and hanging in an exhibition with all its partner paintings, as it were.

0:41:560:42:02

And to meet Charlotte again.

0:42:020:42:04

I imagine it's going to look wonderful in the grand hall of their 17th-century barn conversion.

0:42:040:42:11

It's a great bonus that Charlotte's paintings are quite small. It won't take up much room

0:42:110:42:17

and we've cleared so much space that we're really, really pleased.

0:42:170:42:22

We've had a great time. We really enjoyed the whole thing.

0:42:220:42:26

I do love seeing the expression on people's faces when they realise they've made far more money

0:42:310:42:37

than they ever thought they might. Jane and Geoff did really well.

0:42:370:42:41

I do hope they enjoy that new piece of art that they have in their home.

0:42:410:42:46

If there's something you would like to raise money for, then why not get in touch with the programme?

0:42:460:42:52

You'll find all our details on our website.

0:42:520:42:56

We look forward to seeing you on Cash In The Attic.

0:42:560:43:00

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd - 2011

0:43:160:43:20

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Jane and Geoff Allum want to buy a new painting by their favourite local artist to suit their 17th-century barn conversion. So they have decided to sell some of their unwanted possessions, including a letter written to Geoff by an explorer who was on Scott's last Antarctic expedition. Angela Rippon and John Cameron are on hand to help.