Y Smith Cash in the Attic


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Y Smith

Antiques series. Angela Rippon and expert Paul Hayes help a couple seek out collectables to sell at auction to raise money for their golden wedding anniversary.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Y Smith. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Welcome to Cash In The Attic.

0:00:020:00:04

In life, often special occasions crop up and we could do with a few extra funds

0:00:040:00:09

to really celebrate in style.

0:00:090:00:11

That's the case with the family I'm about to meet, so let's hope we find some hidden treasures in their home.

0:00:110:00:17

'Today on Cash In The Attic, a fascinating piece of social history.'

0:00:360:00:42

October the 5th, 1901, given in Berlin and signed by the Consul-General.

0:00:420:00:49

This is a very early passport. That's what it is.

0:00:490:00:52

'And some incredibly rare English currency.'

0:00:520:00:55

I'm not sure I'd be able to get these past in a shop, Paul. Spot the mistake!

0:00:550:01:01

'They're all up for auction for a very special occasion.'

0:01:010:01:05

-We're going to have a dirty...

-A knees-up.

-We're not going to have a dirty weekend.

0:01:050:01:10

You're allowed. You're married. You've had 50 years' practice. You can do what you like!

0:01:100:01:15

'That all to come when the gavel falls.'

0:01:150:01:18

Today, I'm at Exmouth in South Devon

0:01:180:01:20

and I'm about to meet a couple who have some really interesting items,

0:01:200:01:24

so let's hope they make really interesting prices under the hammer.

0:01:240:01:29

'Yvonne and Gordon Smith met in the 1960s through a church youth organisation and have been married

0:01:290:01:35

'for just shy of 50 years.

0:01:350:01:37

'During their time together, they've lived all over the country

0:01:370:01:42

'and worked in every sort of establishment

0:01:420:01:45

'from banks to prisons.

0:01:450:01:47

'Today, they're enjoying their much deserved retirement.

0:01:470:01:50

'Yvonne indulges her long-held passion for flower arranging whilst Gordon enjoys photography.

0:01:500:01:57

'But with a very special occasion on the horizon, they've called in the Cash In The Attic team to help.

0:01:570:02:03

'Paul Hayes is today's antiques expert, so whilst he starts hunting for valuables, I meet our hosts.'

0:02:030:02:09

Hi, Gordon, Yvonne. Don't those flowers look absolutely beautiful?

0:02:090:02:14

-Flower arranging is a hobby of yours, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:02:140:02:17

-It's a bit more than that. You're pretty good at it.

-I try to be.

0:02:170:02:21

-And Gordon, your hobby is taking photographs, isn't it?

-It has been from quite an early date, actually.

0:02:210:02:28

Now, why have the two of you called in Cash In The Attic?

0:02:280:02:32

Because this year is our 50th wedding anniversary, our golden,

0:02:320:02:37

so we want to go up to where our family is in Lancashire and our grandchildren

0:02:370:02:43

and have a bit of a knees-up.

0:02:430:02:45

You can tell me more about that golden wedding party a bit later on. How much are you hoping to raise?

0:02:450:02:52

-£500.

-500?

-Yes.

-That should make a bit of a knees-up, shouldn't it?

0:02:520:02:57

I've brought Paul Hayes with me and when it comes to raising money for a bit of a knees-up, he's your man.

0:02:570:03:03

Shall we go and find him and see how he's doing so far?

0:03:030:03:07

'I'm hoping that after 50 years together,

0:03:070:03:10

'Yvonne and Gordon will have collected plenty of goodies for us to find today.

0:03:100:03:15

'Paul's wasted no time and it looks as if he's already found something to get excited about.'

0:03:150:03:21

-Hello. How are you? All right?

-That looks a bit heavy.

-It is a bit.

0:03:210:03:25

-If you just grab it there...

-Yeah, let's take a look at this.

0:03:250:03:29

A collection of tiles - where did these come from, Yvonne?

0:03:290:03:33

These were part of an old mahogany fireplace

0:03:330:03:37

which I bought to go into our last house, which was very old.

0:03:370:03:42

Was it in this condition when you got it?

0:03:420:03:44

No, it was covered in hardwood,

0:03:440:03:47

so we removed the hardwood and used the actual fireplace for a long time.

0:03:470:03:53

They don't look chipped or marked in any way at all.

0:03:530:03:56

That's right. The '60s style was to cover anything up behind hardboard, but it's preserved it really well.

0:03:560:04:03

If you had to take the board off, Gordon, that was a carpentry job that you had to do?

0:04:030:04:08

I most certainly did.

0:04:080:04:10

I wanted to try and get the tiles out and the only way I could do it

0:04:100:04:15

was to cut down the sides and take this bit out,

0:04:150:04:18

but even when I'd done that, I couldn't get the tiles out without breaking them,

0:04:180:04:23

so I left them and just had the top part.

0:04:230:04:25

You were looking at the back, Paul. What does that tell you?

0:04:250:04:29

This tells you who made them and these were made by Mintons.

0:04:290:04:33

Mintons are one of Britain's best known ceramic manufacturers of tiles and porcelain.

0:04:330:04:39

They're individually stamped, but it doesn't tell us where they are.

0:04:390:04:43

It says "from the left", so I don't know if it means left of this frame.

0:04:430:04:47

Have you ever speculated on where they might be?

0:04:470:04:50

First of all, I thought they might be French, but I've been to a few old towns in France

0:04:500:04:56

and none of them are recognisable.

0:04:560:04:58

It would be fascinating to find out.

0:04:580:05:00

If we did take it to auction, what do you think we might make on it?

0:05:000:05:05

I really like them and having a set like this is great.

0:05:050:05:08

If I said £60 to £100, how does that sound?

0:05:080:05:11

-It could be a night on the tiles!

-LAUGHTER

0:05:110:05:15

'What an intriguing item to kick off our day here in Exmouth!

0:05:150:05:19

'I have the feeling that the set of tiles is just the tip of the iceberg

0:05:190:05:23

'in a house that looks to be full of collectables.

0:05:230:05:26

'Yvonne heads to the kitchen and digs out a rather unusual cruet set

0:05:260:05:30

'she bought to mark their 25th wedding anniversary.

0:05:300:05:34

'Each piece is individually hallmarked, manufactured in Birmingham in 1943.

0:05:340:05:40

'Paul thinks they could fetch £40 to £60 at auction.'

0:05:400:05:44

Sorry to drag you downstairs, Gordon, but I wanted to ask you about this fantastic clock.

0:05:440:05:49

I love it. Where has that come from?

0:05:490:05:52

-It came from Lancashire.

-All the best things do.

-Yes, they do.

0:05:520:05:56

I went to an auction at a very old cottage which was part of a farm

0:05:560:06:01

and they were having an auction of all their bits and pieces.

0:06:010:06:06

I saw this on the wall. I really didn't go there to buy it, but it was such a nice piece,

0:06:060:06:12

I put my hand up and nobody else put their hand up after me.

0:06:120:06:16

-So you got it?

-I got it for £10, ten shillings.

-That's amazing. What a good price!

0:06:160:06:21

-It wasn't made in Lancashire.

-I don't know where it was made.

-This is Vienna.

-Is it?

-Mm-hm.

0:06:210:06:28

-A very nice Viennese clock.

-Viennese.

0:06:280:06:31

And it dates from about 1880, 1900.

0:06:310:06:33

But the idea with them is that they're wonderfully accurate clocks.

0:06:330:06:38

-How often do you wind it?

-Only about once a fortnight.

0:06:380:06:41

Yeah. This is an eight-day clock.

0:06:410:06:44

It was designed to run at least eight days, so you wind it up once a week.

0:06:440:06:48

The basic concept is you use this wonderful, weight-driven mechanism,

0:06:480:06:53

so the power of the gravity forces the clock to go round

0:06:530:06:56

and the pendulum regulates how long it takes to tick.

0:06:560:06:59

-It's a beautiful example. Will that go to auction?

-Yes.

0:06:590:07:03

I've had it for so long and I have other clocks.

0:07:030:07:06

I'd like somebody else to have a little share of it.

0:07:060:07:10

Why not? The spring-driven examples tend to fetch £100, maybe £150.

0:07:100:07:14

The weight-driven is always better.

0:07:140:07:17

If I said between £250 and £400, I mean, how does that sound?

0:07:170:07:21

That sounds absolutely marvellous.

0:07:210:07:23

'It's a handsome valuation, but will the Viennese clock be to the bidders' taste on auction day?'

0:07:230:07:29

180. 190. 200.

0:07:290:07:32

210. 220...

0:07:320:07:34

'Only time will tell.

0:07:340:07:36

'I spot two rather attractive porcelain figurines in the hallway.

0:07:380:07:43

'They're by Royal Doulton and they're known as the Bridesmaid and He Loves Me.

0:07:430:07:48

'These popular figures were produced from the '40s through to the '60s

0:07:480:07:53

'and are still highly collectable.

0:07:530:07:56

'They've seen better days,

0:07:560:07:58

'but Paul still thinks we should be able to get £40 to £50 for them.'

0:07:580:08:04

Now then, you two, have you found anything interesting?

0:08:040:08:08

You might be interested in that. This was left to me by the priest who married us 50 years ago.

0:08:080:08:13

He asked me to execute his will and, much to my surprise, when I executed it,

0:08:130:08:19

he'd left me all his furniture. There were some really lovely pieces.

0:08:190:08:23

-This is one of them.

-That's a type of console table. You often find this demi-lune or half-moon shape,

0:08:230:08:30

pressed against a wall with a big mirror on the back.

0:08:300:08:33

It would be the first thing you'd see coming into a hallway.

0:08:330:08:37

This is typically late 18th century, early 19th century, so it's 200 years old.

0:08:370:08:42

This one wasn't always against the wall. It has wheels on the bottom.

0:08:420:08:46

You would take this out and add it on the end of a Georgian dining table.

0:08:460:08:51

That would mean you could sit more people around it.

0:08:510:08:55

This is made from flame mahogany and it's a very distinctive grain.

0:08:550:09:00

-It looks like it's almost on fire.

-I've never noticed that before.

0:09:000:09:04

It needs a bit of restoration to bring this colour back up

0:09:040:09:08

and you've got a bit of water damage on here. Somebody had a plant pot on here.

0:09:080:09:12

Well, I ain't gonna say who did that.

0:09:120:09:16

That can be restored, no problem.

0:09:160:09:18

There's no splits or cracks or chips or anything like that.

0:09:180:09:22

That could be restored and brought back to life and make that flame mahogany come back again.

0:09:220:09:28

If we said around the £100 mark,

0:09:280:09:30

sort of 60 to 100, how does that sound?

0:09:300:09:35

-That sounds pretty good.

-That sounds very reasonable.

0:09:350:09:38

-Excellent. Let's keep looking. We're not quite there yet.

-OK.

0:09:380:09:43

'It's clear that our hosts have collected some super pieces over their time together

0:09:430:09:48

'and Gordon proves this when he adds another clock to the list of items heading off to the saleroom.

0:09:480:09:55

'This brass carriage clock was given to him when he retired from his job at the local prison.

0:09:550:10:00

'It is in good working order and Paul thinks any collector would be happy

0:10:000:10:05

'to pay £80 to £120 for it.

0:10:050:10:07

'Now, that's what we like to hear.'

0:10:080:10:11

Gordon and Yvonne, 50 years of marriage, your golden anniversary coming up...

0:10:130:10:18

That's quite a record. How did you two meet?

0:10:180:10:21

I met her in the church where I used to go.

0:10:210:10:24

She was in charge of the Girls' Brigade and I was in charge of the Boys' Brigade.

0:10:240:10:31

I was there one evening when she was leading the Girls' Brigade in the march up the road.

0:10:310:10:37

She was passing by with these church girls behind her.

0:10:370:10:42

I'm marching up like this and I thought, "She seems a pretty strong character, that one there."

0:10:420:10:48

I wasn't aware that he was watching me while I was marching!

0:10:480:10:53

I didn't know that you were into uniforms!

0:10:530:10:56

LAUGHTER

0:10:560:10:58

You have two children, a son and a daughter. They live up in the north.

0:10:580:11:02

-Is that why you're going up there for the party?

-Yes.

0:11:020:11:06

What have you got planned?

0:11:060:11:08

We're hoping to go to Southport which is where our daughter and son-in-law and their children live.

0:11:080:11:14

And my youngest son and his family will all come over for a party to Southport,

0:11:140:11:20

then we're going to have a knees-up.

0:11:200:11:23

'While I've been hearing all about those party plans, Paul has continued hunting for valuables.

0:11:230:11:30

'He's come across more figurines.

0:11:300:11:32

'Yvonne bought this pair at auction for £5

0:11:320:11:35

'when they were in a terrible state and she restored them to their former glory.

0:11:350:11:40

'They're made of spelter, the alloy commonly used as a cheap alternative to bronze.

0:11:400:11:46

'Paul thinks these could snatch upwards of £60 on sale day.'

0:11:460:11:49

-I don't know whether these are of any interest. I've had these put away for quite some time.

-Look at that.

0:11:490:11:55

-It's a piggy bank in a frame! I've got a couple of fivers. What have you?

-I've got ten £1 notes.

0:11:550:12:02

-Do you remember the old £1 note?

-Yeah.

-How old are those?

-We're looking early '80s.

0:12:020:12:07

'82, '83, they introduced the pound coin. How did you get hold of these?

0:12:070:12:12

I worked in the bank and each week, we would have new notes come down from the Mint.

0:12:120:12:18

I knew I wouldn't be getting any more of those, they would all be in coins,

0:12:180:12:23

so I thought I'd keep just ten of them.

0:12:230:12:26

I'm not sure that I'd be able to get these past in a shop, Paul. Spot the mistake!

0:12:260:12:32

-Yeah, they're amazing.

-What's going on here?

-Again they came down in the Mint.

0:12:320:12:37

I spotted that they were not quite the ticket, so I thought, "Hmm, I'll keep a couple of them."

0:12:370:12:43

-I've never seen anything like that. They're amazing. They shouldn't have left the Mint?

-No.

0:12:430:12:49

-Has something like this got a value to it?

-Yes, people love to collect bank notes from all over the world.

0:12:490:12:55

They also look for imperfections. Sometimes you get the wrong printing or it hasn't been cut properly.

0:12:550:13:01

-That makes them very collectable.

-You paid a fiver each for these?

-Yes, I just put £10 in the till.

0:13:010:13:08

LAUGHTER

0:13:080:13:10

-That is amazing!

-These pound notes you can take to the bank and get their face value,

0:13:100:13:15

but a collector would pay more than face value, maybe £10 or £15?

0:13:150:13:19

Those, however, I would say about £20 each. They're so collectable and so different.

0:13:190:13:25

So we're looking at maybe £50 as a parcel.

0:13:250:13:28

-That's not a bad return on 20 quid.

-Yeah, I'm glad I put them up in the loft.

0:13:280:13:33

That's what you call cash in the attic! Shall we go and see what else you've got in the house?

0:13:330:13:39

'We are unearthing some truly fascinating items.

0:13:390:13:42

'I can't wait to see what bidders make of our imperfect bank notes.

0:13:420:13:46

'In the hallway, Gordon has decided that the time has come to part with another flawed item.

0:13:460:13:52

'This Royal Doulton setter and pheasant would be worth upwards of £150 in mint condition,

0:13:520:13:59

'but this one has a nasty crack at the base

0:13:590:14:02

'and as a result, 30 to 50 is all we can expect.

0:14:020:14:05

'What a pity!'

0:14:050:14:08

-What did you want to show me?

-Have a look at these.

-These are great. These are Lladro.

0:14:080:14:13

-Have you bought these in Spain?

-We did. This one was our first one.

0:14:130:14:17

-That was in Minorca.

-Right.

0:14:170:14:20

That was the first time I'd seen Lladro and I thought they were so attractive.

0:14:200:14:25

I like the colours, I like the elongated figures.

0:14:250:14:28

Some of this Spanish pottery has a very distinctive style,

0:14:280:14:32

these muted browns and blues, but that sums up the 1960s and '70s.

0:14:320:14:37

That Spanish style was all about this look, very skinny, very tall.

0:14:370:14:41

A lot of the paintings of the day are done like that.

0:14:410:14:44

You have a bit of damage. Restoration makes a massive difference,

0:14:440:14:49

but value-wise, allowing for the bits of damage,

0:14:490:14:53

-if I said £200, maybe £250...

-Really?

0:14:530:14:56

-Does that sound all right?

-It sounds fine to me.

0:14:560:14:59

-I'll tell you something. That would be worth at least that on its own if it was perfect.

-Don't tell me!

0:14:590:15:05

-Sorry. Let's blame Gordon.

-Yeah, let's blame Gordon.

-Talking of which, let's go and find him.

0:15:050:15:11

Those are great. Those are going.

0:15:110:15:14

'If only the figurines hadn't been so damaged,

0:15:140:15:17

'but then again, Gordon and Yvonne have moved all over the UK during their time together,

0:15:170:15:22

'so we should be thankful they survived at all.'

0:15:220:15:25

How did you come to settle here in Exmouth?

0:15:250:15:29

When we bought our first house, we had some really good neighbours who we stayed extremely friendly with.

0:15:290:15:35

They had moved down to Devon and we moved up to Lancashire.

0:15:350:15:40

We always came down here quite regularly to see them.

0:15:400:15:43

We thought if we had to move anywhere, Exmouth would be a nice place.

0:15:430:15:48

-You went into the prison service, didn't you?

-I decided the prison service was a good place to be in.

0:15:480:15:55

And I wanted to go to Exeter Prison.

0:15:550:15:57

So I had a word with Yvonne and we decided, seeing as our friends were down here

0:15:570:16:03

and that's what I wanted to do, we would come down here.

0:16:030:16:07

You, Yvonne, went back to banking and you landed rather a plum place to work, didn't you?

0:16:070:16:13

It certainly was.

0:16:130:16:15

It was at the Royal Marine Commando Training Centre

0:16:150:16:19

where they train all the Royal Marine personnel -

0:16:190:16:24

young officers, recruits,

0:16:240:16:26

NCOs.

0:16:260:16:28

It was a hormone check every morning.

0:16:280:16:30

LAUGHTER

0:16:300:16:33

-You met lots of members of the Royal Family.

-Yes.

0:16:330:16:36

Princess Di was the first one who came,

0:16:360:16:39

then the Queen,

0:16:390:16:41

and of course, Prince Edward came there to do some Young Officer Training as well.

0:16:410:16:47

-While all of this was going on, you were also a marriage guidance counsellor?

-Yes.

0:16:470:16:53

So what would you say is the secret to having a happily married life for 50 years?

0:16:530:16:58

Well, I would say tolerance and understanding.

0:16:580:17:01

And a will to make things work.

0:17:020:17:05

I think really it's just a case of determining that you are going to stick at it, no matter what.

0:17:060:17:12

The celebration is coming up, so let's see what else we'll take to auction to make that party special.

0:17:120:17:19

'Our day here in Exmouth is drawing to a close, but Paul Hayes shows no sign of slowing down.

0:17:190:17:25

'He's attracted to this Victorian, button-back armchair which Yvonne and Gordon are happy to part with.

0:17:250:17:31

'On its own, it could fetch £80 to £120,

0:17:310:17:34

'but the couple are also keen to sell two Edwardian tub chairs.

0:17:340:17:38

'Paul thinks, as one lot, they could bring in

0:17:380:17:41

'£150 to £200.'

0:17:410:17:43

I don't know whether you'd find this interesting,

0:17:460:17:49

but this I found in the papers of the priest who married us when he died.

0:17:490:17:53

I've never seen anything like it

0:17:530:17:55

and it's obviously his father's travel documents of some sort or another.

0:17:550:18:01

What an impressive-looking document! Royal coat of arms on the top there.

0:18:010:18:05

"By Her Britannic Majesty's Ambassador

0:18:050:18:08

"Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to His Majesty the German Emperor, King of Prussia,

0:18:080:18:15

-"to allow Mr Wallace Thompson..." That was him?

-Yes.

0:18:150:18:18

"..a British subject travelling on the continent to pass freely and without hindrance." What's the date?

0:18:180:18:24

October the 5th, 1901,

0:18:240:18:28

given in Berlin and signed by the Consul-General.

0:18:280:18:31

This is a very early passport. That's what it is. What do you know about Mr Wallace Thompson?

0:18:310:18:37

He was an engineer of some sort. I think he was a civil engineer.

0:18:370:18:41

-He certainly had a lot to do with bridge-building.

-We should get Paul to look at this.

0:18:410:18:47

Paul! Do you want to come and join us a minute?

0:18:470:18:50

-Take a look at that.

-Wow!

0:18:500:18:52

-It's an early passport.

-I've never seen one like that before.

-Yeah.

0:18:520:18:57

1901, that is very early for passports.

0:18:570:18:59

The British passport came out some time around the First World War.

0:18:590:19:04

The German Emperor at the time, the King of Prussia, was the Kaiser.

0:19:040:19:09

That was Wilhelm II.

0:19:090:19:11

-That's who we went to war with?

-Yeah. There might have been some tension at that time

0:19:110:19:16

and they needed a document to get through borders.

0:19:160:19:20

Would somebody bid for that, Paul?

0:19:200:19:22

Lots of people are interested in old documents. People will go for certain examples.

0:19:220:19:27

But anybody interested in travel would go for this.

0:19:270:19:31

I think we should put it in with a relatively low estimate to give it a chance.

0:19:310:19:36

-Who knows what it will bring on the day? If I said £50 to £80...

-Really?

0:19:360:19:40

Yeah, it's great. I love that.

0:19:400:19:42

Let's add that £50 to everything else that we've looked at today.

0:19:420:19:47

I know you want to raise £500 for this wonderful celebration of your golden wedding anniversary.

0:19:470:19:53

But I think that we just might be able to make as much

0:19:530:19:58

-as 1,070.

-You're joking!

0:19:580:20:01

You've got to be joking. That's two bottles of champagne now then!

0:20:010:20:05

You are going to have an absolutely wonderful golden wedding celebration.

0:20:050:20:10

'Gordon and Yvonne are clearly over the moon at the prospect of raising so much money.

0:20:100:20:17

'What a delightful collection of treasures we have heading for the saleroom!

0:20:170:20:22

'There are old bank notes, including those rare faulty fivers.

0:20:220:20:26

'We're hoping that the bidders are going to dig deep and pay upwards of £50.

0:20:260:20:31

'The early passport that dates from 1901.

0:20:310:20:34

'Paul hasn't seen one before and I doubt that the bidders will have either.

0:20:340:20:39

'This important piece of social history could bring in another £50 to £80.

0:20:390:20:44

'And the magnificent Viennese wall clock.

0:20:440:20:47

'Gordon bought it for £10 and ten shillings,

0:20:470:20:50

'but if it reaches its £250 estimate,

0:20:500:20:53

'it could mean the golden wedding celebrations will go with a bang.

0:20:530:20:57

'Still to come on Cash In The Attic, spectacular results leave some of us lost for words.'

0:21:000:21:05

What do you think of that, Gordon?

0:21:050:21:08

-He's speechless.

-I'm speechless, yeah.

0:21:080:21:11

'Though not every sale goes according to plan.'

0:21:110:21:15

-That's a real disappointment, isn't it?

-Yes.

-It is.

-Somebody's got a real bargain there.

0:21:150:21:21

'Will the auction result have us opening the bubbly early or putting it on ice?

0:21:210:21:26

'Find out very soon.'

0:21:260:21:28

We really did find some fascinating items at Yvonne and Gordon's home,

0:21:310:21:36

including this very impressive Viennese clock,

0:21:360:21:39

and we've brought all of them to the Lyme Bay Auction Rooms at Seaton in Devon.

0:21:390:21:45

£500 is their target, so that they can have a slap-up celebration for their golden wedding anniversary,

0:21:450:21:51

so I rather hope that the bidders who come here today will help to make that happen.

0:21:510:21:57

'This family-run business started 30 years ago.

0:21:570:22:00

'It's very popular with the locals and is based in a pretty seaside town on the Devon-Dorset border.

0:22:000:22:07

'They always have a very wide range of antiques on sale, so we've got high hopes of a full house today.

0:22:070:22:13

'Before the auction, our expert Paul did some more research on one of the items

0:22:130:22:18

'which he thinks will do really well for the Smiths.'

0:22:180:22:22

-Good morning, Paul.

-Good morning, Angela.

0:22:220:22:26

Have you cracked the code as to where these tiles are?

0:22:260:22:29

I feel like an armchair detective. Part of this job is research and I do really enjoy doing this.

0:22:290:22:35

-With the help of our team here, we've come up with exactly where these tiles are.

-Fantastic.

0:22:350:22:41

They're a set of 12 tiles and they are all different views of Europe.

0:22:410:22:45

Not many in London itself, just in the provinces and in Europe.

0:22:450:22:49

This one definitely is the village of Splugen in the Alps.

0:22:490:22:53

-Great holiday destination.

-Lovely name - Splugen.

0:22:530:22:56

Famous for these buildings near the edge of the water.

0:22:560:22:59

This one is Conwy Castle and I think this one over here is Rodez Cathedral.

0:22:590:23:05

They're all over the place, but I think they're fantastic.

0:23:050:23:09

What gave it away, at the bottom of this one is a set of initials - LTS, which is LT Swetman.

0:23:090:23:15

He was the engraver working at Mintons in the late 19th century.

0:23:150:23:19

Gordon and Yvonne have just arrived. Shall we tell them what they've had over the fireplace all these years?

0:23:190:23:25

See if they fancy a holiday in Splugen!

0:23:250:23:29

'Research is just like a jigsaw puzzle and I love it when all the pieces come together.

0:23:290:23:34

'And that name, LT Swetman, was the final piece to complete this picture.'

0:23:340:23:39

Remember the tiles? How could you forget them? They've been over the top of your fireplace!

0:23:390:23:45

We think we've located where some of those places are.

0:23:450:23:48

They're all views from the late 19th century throughout Europe.

0:23:480:23:52

-One of them in particular is my favourite - the village of Splugen.

-Where's that?

-In the Alps.

-Oh.

0:23:520:23:58

-They're very interesting and very collectable.

-Oh, good.

0:23:580:24:02

-You've put a reserve on the clock.

-Yes.

-How much?

-250.

0:24:020:24:06

-Because that's got quite a lot of sentimental value for you both.

-Yes.

0:24:060:24:10

-You bought it for next to nothing, didn't you?

-Yes.

0:24:100:24:14

-How much?

-£10.

-For a tenner. And you've got a £250 reserve on it!

0:24:140:24:19

-That'll be a good return. That should set the tone for the day.

-Fantastic.

-I hope it does.

0:24:190:24:24

Let's go and take our places and get started.

0:24:240:24:28

'With the auction under way, we begin our sale with the Royal Doulton gun dog,

0:24:280:24:33

'the first of several lots by this ever collectable manufacturer.'

0:24:330:24:37

-Who bought that one?

-I did.

-For...?

-£65...

0:24:380:24:43

30 years ago?

0:24:440:24:46

We've got 30 to 50 on it, Paul. That's a bit of a comedown.

0:24:460:24:50

Yes, but this one has been damaged. With it being a hunting dog, it's had a few accidents.

0:24:500:24:55

It would have been worth at least £60, but I put this in between 30 and 50.

0:24:550:25:00

Several commission bids. Start me straight off at £30.

0:25:000:25:04

-£30, we're in already.

-£30 there. 35.

0:25:040:25:08

-40. 45. 50.

-Wow!

-55.

-It's going well.

0:25:080:25:12

It's in the room at 55. 60.

0:25:120:25:15

65? £60 to my left, at 60.

0:25:150:25:18

65 anywhere? And I will sell at £60...

0:25:180:25:22

£60, which is over Paul's estimate.

0:25:230:25:26

-Yeah.

-He's clever, isn't he?

-It's almost what you paid for it without the damage.

-Exactly.

0:25:260:25:32

'As luck would have it, the bidders weren't too put off by the crack

0:25:320:25:36

'and we have our first contribution to the party fund.

0:25:360:25:40

'Our next lot has also seen better days, but nothing some restoration won't sort out.

0:25:400:25:45

'It's the mahogany table left to our couple by the priest who married them 50 years ago.'

0:25:450:25:50

-One less piece of furniture?

-That's right, to polish.

-£60 to £100 is what we've got on it, Paul.

0:25:530:25:59

It's very plain, very elegant, it doesn't take up a lot of room, so it should be away at £60.

0:25:590:26:05

60? No? £50 then?

0:26:050:26:08

-Oh, no.

-30?

0:26:080:26:10

That's got to be worth £30. Nobody want it? £20? Nobody want it?

0:26:100:26:15

I'll take £20.

0:26:150:26:17

22 anywhere? 22. 25?

0:26:170:26:20

-28. 30.

-We're moving.

0:26:200:26:23

£30 now. At 30. It's in the room at 30. 35 anywhere? 35 anywhere?

0:26:230:26:28

I will sell at £30...

0:26:280:26:31

-That's a real disappointment, isn't it?

-Yes.

-It is.

0:26:310:26:35

-Somebody's got a real bargain there.

-Yeah.

0:26:350:26:38

'That is a lot less than we'd hoped

0:26:380:26:41

'for such a lovely piece of furniture,

0:26:410:26:44

'especially when you think how much new ones cost these days.

0:26:440:26:48

'Silver is doing well at the moment, so our next lot should do better.'

0:26:480:26:52

This is a little silver cruet set. How did you come by this?

0:26:520:26:56

It was a present for our silver wedding, so it's 25 years old now.

0:26:560:27:00

It's a very usable piece of silver, these cruet sets.

0:27:000:27:04

If you're entertaining or you have a restaurant, they're nice things to have. So, yes, £40 to £60 for it.

0:27:040:27:10

-This time, we'll start off at £30.

-We're starting at 30.

-£30.

-32.

0:27:100:27:14

35. 38. And 40.

0:27:140:27:17

Still with me at £40.

0:27:170:27:19

-40. 45. 50.

-Bang on your estimate.

0:27:190:27:22

Still with me at £50. On the book at 50. £50 with me. 55 anywhere?

0:27:220:27:26

I will sell at £50...

0:27:260:27:29

-£50, right in the middle of your estimate.

-That's great, isn't it?

0:27:290:27:33

'Another good result,

0:27:330:27:35

'but I wonder if the cruet set will ever be used again

0:27:350:27:39

'or just melted down, as is sadly often the case with these items?

0:27:390:27:43

'Something that never goes out of fashion, though, is hard cash.'

0:27:450:27:48

It's quite difficult to put a price on this, but they could be very valuable.

0:27:480:27:53

It's the sort of thing that collectors tend to go for. There's something unusual about them.

0:27:530:27:59

I stuck my neck out here and put these in at £50 which is far more than the face value.

0:27:590:28:05

Let's hope someone puts them away for ten years to see what happens.

0:28:050:28:09

Very unusual lot. A lot of interest on the internet.

0:28:090:28:13

-Interest on the internet!

-I'll start here at £50...

-50!

0:28:130:28:16

With me at 50. 55 and 60. Still with me at £60.

0:28:160:28:19

-£60!

-62. 65. Still with me at £65. 70 anywhere?

0:28:190:28:24

70 anywhere? It's now in the room at £70.

0:28:240:28:27

70. 75 anywhere? 75 anywhere?

0:28:270:28:30

No? I'll sell it to the room for £70...

0:28:300:28:34

Terrific!

0:28:340:28:36

Perhaps I should go to the bank and get some more!

0:28:360:28:39

LAUGHTER

0:28:390:28:41

'That's what you call a great transaction.

0:28:410:28:44

'Yvonne's old bank notes certainly accrued a much better interest

0:28:440:28:48

'than any bank could offer.

0:28:480:28:50

'Next up, more Royal Doulton,

0:28:500:28:53

'a name that's always guaranteed to gain interest at auction.'

0:28:530:28:58

These are very collectable items, a fraction of what they cost in the shop. I put these in at £40 to £50.

0:28:580:29:05

Quite rare ornaments. What shall we say? £50 to start?

0:29:050:29:09

50? £40 for 'em?

0:29:090:29:12

Anybody? Got to make £40, surely? £30 then?

0:29:120:29:16

Nobody interested? 30, thank you, sir. £30. 32 anywhere?

0:29:160:29:19

32 anywhere? 32.

0:29:190:29:22

35. 38. 40. 42.

0:29:220:29:25

45. 48. 50?

0:29:250:29:28

£48 in front. At 48. 50 anywhere?

0:29:280:29:31

50 anywhere? I will sell at £48...

0:29:310:29:34

-Very good.

-How's that?

-Just two below Paul's highest estimate.

-That's all right - £48.

0:29:350:29:41

'Paul's estimates are proving to be spot-on

0:29:410:29:45

'and our kitty for the knees-up is starting to pile up nicely.

0:29:450:29:49

'Our next lot is something of an unknown entity.

0:29:490:29:53

'It's the Prussian document, an early kind of passport from 1901.

0:29:530:29:57

'It'll be fascinating to see what the bidders make of it.'

0:29:570:30:01

-We've not found out much more about this.

-I've never found another one on the market.

0:30:010:30:06

I put this in at between £50 and £80. Let's just see how it goes.

0:30:060:30:11

There are some other documents in the sale, so fingers crossed.

0:30:110:30:15

Quite a bit of interest on this one. I'll start off at £30.

0:30:150:30:18

-£30 to start.

-30 already.

-32.

0:30:180:30:20

35. 38.

0:30:200:30:23

It's now in the room at £38. 40 anywhere?

0:30:230:30:26

40 anywhere? We'll sell... 40. 45. 50.

0:30:260:30:30

-Oh, good.

-55. 60. 65. 70.

0:30:300:30:34

-75. 80.

-Wow!

-85. 90.

0:30:340:30:37

-95. 100?

-They're desperate for it.

0:30:370:30:41

To my right at 95. 100 anywhere? 100 anywhere?

0:30:410:30:45

I will sell at £95...

0:30:450:30:47

That's a terrific result. I bet when it was used, it didn't cost him £95 to travel round the whole of Europe!

0:30:470:30:53

'After a hesitant start, the bidding really took off, didn't it?

0:30:540:30:58

'We sold it for £15 over Paul's top estimate.

0:30:580:31:03

'What a first half we've had!

0:31:030:31:05

'So how have we done at this midway stage?'

0:31:050:31:09

-We're more than halfway to your £500.

-Really?

0:31:090:31:13

Because we've made...three hundred and fifty-three pounds.

0:31:130:31:18

-Great.

-Marvellous.

-And you're aiming at 500 for the golden wedding.

-Yeah.

-Yes.

0:31:180:31:23

-Have you got it all planned out?

-We have.

-What are you going to do?

0:31:230:31:27

We're going to get the family together up north where they live

0:31:270:31:31

and we're going to have a nice meal in a nice hotel.

0:31:310:31:35

-We're going to have a dirty...

-A knees-up.

-We're not going to have a dirty weekend.

0:31:350:31:40

You're allowed. You're married. You've had 50 years' practice. You can do what you like! £353 so far...

0:31:400:31:46

You've still got some great items to come up.

0:31:460:31:49

Paul, you want to have a look at some of the other things here.

0:31:490:31:53

-It's always good to have a look round in the auction house and I'll show you something very unusual.

-OK.

0:31:530:31:59

'So now we all know what Yvonne really has in store for their anniversary weekend!

0:32:010:32:06

'If you're thinking of heading to auction to raise money for something special,

0:32:060:32:11

'then do remember that fees like commission will be charged.

0:32:110:32:15

'Your local auction house will be able to advise you on the small print.'

0:32:150:32:20

Paul, there are lots of fascinating things here in this auction room.

0:32:200:32:24

-What's taken your eye?

-I always look for things I haven't seen before and I love the area of medals.

0:32:240:32:31

This is a whole group of medals belonging to one gentleman.

0:32:310:32:35

This is one you'll see quite a lot. He was in the Royal Air Force and he was Flight Lieutenant Stonestreet.

0:32:350:32:41

That's his Efficiency Medal. There's nothing unusual there, but along with it are these.

0:32:410:32:46

These are presented from the people of China for good deeds done by non-Chinese people

0:32:460:32:51

in aid of the greatness of China. Look at the quality of them!

0:32:510:32:55

-They're beautifully decorated. This is enamel?

-Solid silver and enamel.

0:32:550:32:59

And the tiger is very much a power symbol, a managerial symbol in China.

0:32:590:33:04

They're fascinating things and just something that I've never seen before.

0:33:040:33:10

-I don't know how he got them.

-I wonder what he did for them?

-Exactly, yes.

0:33:100:33:14

-What do we think they might make?

-They're absolutely beautiful.

0:33:140:33:18

Just for rarity and novelty value,

0:33:180:33:21

they must be £300 to £500.

0:33:210:33:24

As the internet is such a massive thing now, people from all over the world can view what's happening here

0:33:240:33:30

and who knows what these will fetch?

0:33:300:33:32

Being sold in Seaton, Devon today, the world tomorrow!

0:33:320:33:35

That's something we've got to keep our eye on.

0:33:350:33:39

-Meanwhile, I think we'd better get back to our auction.

-OK.

0:33:390:33:43

'And we don't have to wait too long for that fascinating collection of medals to come up.'

0:33:430:33:49

I will sell at £1,100...

0:33:490:33:52

'More than twice their top estimate

0:33:520:33:54

'and once again they prove the popularity of this area of collecting.

0:33:540:33:59

'It's time for the second half of our sale and let's hope the bidders are still feeling generous

0:33:590:34:05

'as up first are the spelter figurines.'

0:34:050:34:09

-I bought them at auction. They were all rusty.

-Really?

-Yeah.

-Who cleaned them up?

0:34:090:34:14

Well, Gordon tried with water. It made them worse.

0:34:140:34:18

I tried olive oil and they are as you see them now. They're lovely.

0:34:180:34:23

-Were they very expensive when you bought them?

-£5.

-£5. Gosh!

0:34:230:34:27

Right, I put these in at 60 to 100, so you're doing all right.

0:34:270:34:32

-I shall be more than happy.

-How much for the elbow grease?

0:34:320:34:36

Complete with plinths as well, these two. What shall we say for those? £100 for them?

0:34:360:34:42

100? Anybody? £80 for them? Give me 50?

0:34:420:34:46

-50, thank you, sir.

-50.

-£50 there. 55 anywhere?

0:34:460:34:50

They should fetch a lot more than this. At 50. 55 anywhere?

0:34:500:34:54

55 anywhere? I will sell at £50. Anybody...?

0:34:540:34:58

-That's amazing. You've just got to show a bit of elbow grease.

-And olive oil.

-Yeah.

0:34:580:35:04

'You learn something new every day.

0:35:040:35:07

'Sadly, no amount of olive oil can help the condition of our next lot.'

0:35:070:35:12

-They have got a bit of damage on them, Gordon.

-They have, yes.

0:35:120:35:16

How has that happened?

0:35:160:35:18

When our children were growing up, playing football, ping-pong on the table and... Oh!

0:35:180:35:25

And you had to mend them?

0:35:250:35:28

Yeah, almost one a week.

0:35:280:35:31

That might affect the restoration cost which we've got to look at.

0:35:310:35:35

I was quite optimistic in the house. I said between £200 and £250.

0:35:350:35:40

The auctioneer had a look at them. He thinks they might not fetch that.

0:35:400:35:44

Let's see how we get on.

0:35:440:35:47

Anybody start me off at 200?

0:35:470:35:49

£200 on them then?

0:35:490:35:51

No? Nobody? 150?

0:35:510:35:53

Nobody interested? £100 surely?

0:35:530:35:57

-£100?

-Come on!

0:35:570:35:59

100. Thank you, sir. £100. At 100. They've got to make more than this, surely? £100 I have.

0:35:590:36:05

110. 120. 130.

0:36:050:36:07

-140.

-Now they've started, they've just got to keep going.

0:36:070:36:12

£140 I have. 140. I'll take 5? 145? £140 to my right.

0:36:120:36:16

At 140. 145 anywhere? 145 anywhere?

0:36:160:36:20

I will sell at £140...

0:36:200:36:23

-Bearing in mind they did have that damage, that's not bad.

-No.

0:36:230:36:28

'You know, considering the importance of condition to buyers,

0:36:280:36:32

'I think we should be quite satisfied with that,

0:36:320:36:36

'but no concerns about the condition

0:36:360:36:38

'of the fully functioning brass carriage clock.'

0:36:380:36:42

Where has this come from? Was it like a presentation piece?

0:36:420:36:46

Yes, it was presented to me by the officers of Exeter Prison

0:36:460:36:51

on my retirement from the prison service.

0:36:510:36:54

-It's a gold watch or a gold clock, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-What a nice thing to have! Lovely little items, these.

0:36:540:37:00

-I said 80 to 120.

-We should do well on this.

0:37:000:37:03

100? Nobody? £50 then?

0:37:030:37:06

Anybody interested? Got to be worth £50, surely, this one? Nobody interested at 50?

0:37:060:37:12

Give me 30? 30, thank you, sir. 30. 32. 35.

0:37:120:37:16

38. 40. 45.

0:37:160:37:19

50. 55.

0:37:190:37:21

They take a bit of get going, but once they get going, they keep going.

0:37:210:37:26

60 anywhere? One more? In the room at 55...

0:37:260:37:30

-There you go, 55.

-£55?

-That's quite low.

0:37:300:37:33

'How disappointing! I thought once the bidding got into its stride,

0:37:330:37:37

'we'd reach Paul's lower estimate.

0:37:370:37:40

'Sadly, it wasn't to be. I do hope this isn't a sign that the clock lovers are absent from the room

0:37:400:37:46

'as we have another timepiece up next,

0:37:460:37:50

'our highest valued lot of the day.'

0:37:500:37:52

-So, a £250 reserve - optimistic or about right, Paul?

-That's about right. I'm glad of that.

0:37:530:38:00

That's the bottom of my estimate, £250 to £400. It should sell for that sort of figure.

0:38:000:38:06

-You're right to put your reserve on there. Let's hope it goes. Fingers crossed.

-OK.

0:38:060:38:11

I've got bids on this. I must start at 150.

0:38:110:38:13

-He's started at 150.

-150. 160 anywhere?

0:38:130:38:17

-160 anywhere? 150 I have with me. 160.

-160 there.

0:38:170:38:21

170. 180. 190?

0:38:210:38:23

No. £180. With me at 180. 190.

0:38:230:38:27

200. 210.

0:38:270:38:29

220. No? £220. Still with me at 220.

0:38:290:38:32

230 anywhere?

0:38:320:38:35

One more? 220 with me. 230?

0:38:350:38:37

Nobody interested?

0:38:370:38:40

Sorry, not sold.

0:38:400:38:42

-I think because the reserve was on there, he has to take that off.

-Yes.

0:38:420:38:47

'Despite getting within a whisper of its reserve,

0:38:470:38:50

'the clock remains unsold and now the Smiths have a choice -

0:38:500:38:54

'to enter it into another sale or take it home.

0:38:540:38:57

'But it's not good news for our target though

0:38:570:39:00

'as we were counting on the clock making a substantial addition to that party fund.

0:39:000:39:06

'When the Victorian chairs failed to get the bidders on their feet...'

0:39:060:39:10

£80...

0:39:100:39:12

'..they sell for just over half their estimate.

0:39:120:39:16

'We're beginning to worry if the crowd

0:39:160:39:19

'have spent all their hard-earned cash already.

0:39:190:39:22

'Let's hope not as we have one lot still to sell and it's a hidden gem -

0:39:220:39:27

'the set of Minton tiles once covered by Gordon and Yvonne's fireplace.'

0:39:270:39:32

People now buy these individually and make them into teapot stands.

0:39:320:39:36

-That's how I managed to find the exact same ones online.

-Oh, right.

0:39:360:39:40

-Yeah, very good. OK...

-So we've got these in at, what, £60 to £100?

0:39:400:39:45

Just over a tenner each. Let's see how they get on.

0:39:450:39:49

There's a set of 12 of these in the series. There's five of them. Lots of interest again on the internet.

0:39:490:39:55

-On the internet.

-Straight in at £100. 100.

0:39:550:39:58

£100 with me. 110. 120.

0:39:580:40:00

-He started at 100!

-130. 140.

0:40:000:40:03

150. 160. 170.

0:40:030:40:05

180. 190.

0:40:050:40:08

It's in the room at 190. 200. 210. 220.

0:40:080:40:12

230. 240.

0:40:120:40:14

260. 280...? No.

0:40:140:40:17

-270?

-Gosh!

-Unbelievable.

0:40:170:40:19

-At the back at 260. 270 anywhere?

-£260!

-270 anywhere?

0:40:190:40:23

I will sell at £260...

0:40:230:40:26

What do you think of that then, Gordon?

0:40:280:40:31

-He's speechless.

-I'm speechless, yeah.

0:40:320:40:35

-That was buried behind the wall. You unearthed those.

-That's right.

0:40:350:40:39

'Well, how about that? Talk about finishing the day on a high!

0:40:390:40:44

'I think that really does make up for the disappointment of the unsold clock.

0:40:440:40:49

'I'm wondering just how much we have raised?'

0:40:490:40:52

Without the clock, you still have done incredibly well today.

0:40:520:40:56

I know £500 is what you're hoping to raise towards your celebrations for your golden wedding anniversary.

0:40:560:41:02

I think we heard at the halfway point what you intend to do with some of the money,

0:41:020:41:07

but you're probably going to be able to have a really wonderful weekend away with the family

0:41:070:41:13

because what you've actually made in total is £938.

0:41:130:41:17

-That's all right, innit?

-And that's without the clock?

0:41:170:41:21

-That's without the clock.

-It's great, isn't it?

-That's fantastic.

-That's wonderful.

0:41:210:41:27

What a great way to celebrate your golden wedding anniversary, a very, very special anniversary!

0:41:270:41:33

Thank you very much for your help and your help.

0:41:330:41:37

Having recovered from their exciting day, Yvonne and Gordon are at home planning their party.

0:41:410:41:46

Well, to be accurate, Yvonne is busy planning the party with her daughter in Lancashire.

0:41:460:41:53

Anyway, how are the arrangements going for us to...for the knees-up?

0:41:530:41:58

Oh, good. That's great.

0:41:580:42:00

So there's a date in the diary and with a full family turnout expected,

0:42:000:42:05

how are the couple feeling five decades after tying the knot?

0:42:050:42:09

I can't believe it's 50 years.

0:42:090:42:12

I think if you can go through the ups and downs of 50 years,

0:42:120:42:16

then I think we deserve a knees-up, more than a knees-up.

0:42:160:42:21

And the family. It'll be nice to get the family all together because we're all a bit scattered now.

0:42:210:42:26

It'll be absolutely fabulous to come together as a family again.

0:42:260:42:30

If there's something special you would like to raise money for

0:42:330:42:37

and you have things lying around the house you could take to auction,

0:42:370:42:41

get in touch with the programme. All our details are on our website.

0:42:410:42:45

We look forward to seeing you on Cash In The Attic.

0:42:460:42:50

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd 2011

0:43:090:43:13

Email subtitling@bbc.co.uk

0:43:130:43:16

Yvonne and Gordon Smith from Devon want to organise a party to celebrate their golden wedding anniversary. Angela Rippon and expert Paul Hayes help them seek out collectables to sell at auction, including a set of rare Minton tiles, in the hope of raising 500 pounds.