Devine Cash in the Attic


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Devine

Antiques series. Linda and John Devine welcome Lorne Spicer and Jonty Hearnden into their Bedfordshire home in the hope of raising £300 to buy their grandchild some presents.


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Welcome to Cash In The Attic. This is the show that has a good look through your home,

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finds all the antiques and collectables you no longer want and takes them to auction.

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Today, we're going to meet a couple who are to become grandparents - again!

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Coming up on Cash in The Attic - a charming reminder of domestic bliss from the past century.

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If that's anything to go by, no wonder he went back on tour.

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He's sitting there being nagged by his wife and barked at by the dog.

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Have we been inspired to make do and mend?

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Whatever happened to pass-me-downs?

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I'm sure Jonty must have an old buggy somewhere,

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one of those Silver Cross prams we can hand down.

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When we get to auction, will the thrill prove too much?

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I could barely write it down I was so excited!

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That's £20 over our estimate.

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Find out when the final hammer falls.

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Today I've come to Bedfordshire to meet a divine couple

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who've called in the Cash In The Attic team

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to help them raise the money for their fifth grandchild.

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Linda Devine is a policeman's daughter

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and she has been married to a policeman since 1967.

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John's now retired from the force and works as a security consultant

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while Linda spends three days a week as a school registrar.

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They've had plenty of opportunities for travel and collecting souvenirs

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as both their children and four grandchildren live abroad.

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It's 14 years since they moved into this four-bedroom home in Bedfordshire

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and, apparently, the house is full of mementos.

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They say if you want to know the time, ask a policeman,

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but if you want to know about antiques you should ask Jonty Hearnden.

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Hi, Jonty, how are you?

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'Our expert's had a lifetime in the business

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'so he should know what's what.

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'We've heard Linda's into her collectables, so I wonder what's in store for us today?'

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-Ah, good morning.

-Good morning.

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-Nice to see you.

-Thank you.

-How you doing?

-Very well, thank you.

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I'm a bit concerned by the absolute perfect nature of your house.

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-Is there going to be enough stuff for us to rummage?

-I hope so, yes.

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I do like to keep everything tidy.

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-OK.

-So they might be hidden away in cupboards?

-They might well be.

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-How much are you looking to raise?

-About £250-£300.

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-That's not too bad then.

-I think we can manage that, hopefully.

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-Do you want to get cracking?

-I shall start looking. Is that all right?

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Yes, by all means.

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£250-£300. What do you want to spend that money on?

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It's for my daughter who lives in Tenerife,

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who is going to have a baby next month.

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-We want to buy some clothes and equipment for her.

-Right, OK.

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-So, this is grandchild number three, is that right, for her?

-For her.

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And you've got a son who lives in a far-flung country.

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I have indeed, in Kazakhstan. He has two boys.

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I will have five grandchildren in total.

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-Do you get to see them very often?

-Yeah, we see them quite often.

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We go to Tenerife three or fours times a year.

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My son and children come across about the same number of times.

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That's nice, isn't it?

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You said you had lots of stuff hidden away.

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Where's that come from? Is that inherited items?

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Some of it, very small amount is, the rest of it I bought myself.

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-Did you go through a collecting phase?

-I did. I had a...

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Oh, right. You're nodding away there.

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-I take it you did and you didn't!

-I didn't!

-Right, OK.

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I love going to car-boot sales, I love going to antique fairs

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and I just accumulated it over the years

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but there's a time to get rid of stuff, so.

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Right, so we need to raise the £250 at least,

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hopefully a little bit more.

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-Shall we see if Jonty's found anything in the back of your cupboards?

-Yes.

-Come on then.

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It hasn't taken him long to turn up something

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that should kick-start our search.

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Ah, Jonty, we've been looking for you. You've found the kitchen.

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Oh, yes. Look at this.

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-It's a mountain full of blue and white we've got here.

-It is.

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What I'm looking at here is a little mould.

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Because we've got a fish at the bottom here,

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this is not a jelly mould, this is probably a pate mould.

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There's a set of three of them here so some of them

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could easily be for jelly as well.

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It's quite unusual to see a little set like that.

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I also noticed that, Lorne, if you look at the top here,

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we've got these three very large, substantial jugs

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and tankard at the back.

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Can you see there's the same pattern that appears all the way through your cabinet, practically.

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It's pure coincidence. I didn't buy them for that reason.

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I liked them and bought them but all at different times.

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Because all of these items here are transfer printed.

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-Do you understand how transfer printing works?

-Not really, no.

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It literally is, rather than something being hand-painted on,

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it is transfer, like you used to do as kids.

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-Oh, yes.

-We used to get the transfer done in a very similar way.

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It's fired in a kiln at a high temperature.

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But you can see how it works. If I just put this mould down.

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Have a look at this little line across there.

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That's literally the two transfers being sandwiched together.

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That's the reason why we've got the line down there. It does happen.

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You can often see that.

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It shouldn't necessarily be there but, more often than not, it does appear.

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Up in the potteries in Stoke-on-Trent,

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years ago when they used to make the blue and white,

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they got paid piecework, so they got paid per piece they made.

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Items like this where the transfers weren't quite right, they used to call Friday pieces

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because everybody was desperate to get away on the Friday.

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-That's probably a Friday piece.

-But still a very attractive Friday piece.

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My hunch is, this particular design is not very old.

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I would suggest it is post the Second World War.

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If Jonty's suggesting we sell all that type of blue and white in one lot...

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What we need to do, Lorne, what I've done is

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plucked out these three up here, because they're fabulous,

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our moulds and this piece.

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I quite like this item here.

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Put those together and we've got a complete set.

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And we're looking, sort of really, at between £50-£100.

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Lovely. That sounds good to me.

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OK, if we say £50, that's the £50 of the £250 done.

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-That would be brilliant.

-We just need a few more of those.

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Thank you.

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Most of it is marked Victorian Ironstone

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and the classic blue and white design is still incredibly popular

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so I'm sure our selection will have its admirers at auction.

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In the conservatory, John's investigating a plant stand.

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Linda bought it a few years ago for about £8.

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Quite a bargain as it turns out

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because Jonty values it at £10-£20 for auction.

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We carry on searching for collectables

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and pretty soon I discover a set of framed cartoon prints

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which might be worthy of Jonty's expert appraisal.

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There you are. Look what I found up in the bedroom

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in one of the cupboards.

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I didn't know whether this might help us at all?

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We've got four prints there, have we?

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-Have they been up in the cupboard a long time?

-They have indeed.

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-A long, long time.

-They're quite old too.

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Where were these from?

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The two in the black frames I bought at an antiques fair

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but the other two I had framed by a friend of mine quite a long time ago.

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I think your friend did a good job of framing these.

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These caricatures sum up their time.

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This is early 19th century, Georgian England.

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Particularly, I love this one with the cartoon characters here.

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It looks like we've got the same cartoon character in all four.

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Doctor Syntax, absolutely.

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Doctor Syntax was a fictitious character

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and he was a white wigged clergyman.

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Here we can see him in the horse and cart.

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He's in all four of these.

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What was the whole raison d'etre of this character?

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At this time they were lampooning politicians.

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He was visualised by Thomas Rowlandson,

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who was one of England's famous caricaturists

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of the early 19th century. We've got his name down here in this corner.

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A lot of hours would have gone into every single one of these.

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These are reproductions.

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If that's anything to go by, no wonder he went back on tour.

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He's sitting there being nagged by his wife and barked at by the dog!

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I think these have faded quite a lot.

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Wherever they've been, they've been in the light.

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The Georgian colours here,

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this house, for example, the rectory he's about to move into,

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I think would have been a stronger pink.

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The problem that we've got

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is that we've got quite a lot of fading, as we've discussed.

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So, I can only put £20-£40 on them.

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-OK.

-You seem quite disappointed with that.

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I would be very disappointed to let them go for that, for the £20, I think.

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What we can do is put a reserve on them.

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We can discuss that with the auctioneer.

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As long as we put the reserve on them so they're protected

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and you understand if they don't make that figure they'll come back home.

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Hopefully that'll keep everybody happy. The worst thing is to let them go for less than you want.

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I think £20 for the four would be not good.

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OK, let's find what else we can find, shall we? Come on then.

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Our estimate for these prints remains a modest £20-£40

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but Linda thinks we need a reserve of £50.

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Thinking of more items to sell, she remembers this 35-piece tea set

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which lives in a charming display cabinet.

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The set is by Royal Albert, once part of Royal Doulton,

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and is in the Old Country Roses pattern, which is incredibly popular.

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All being well, it should make us £40 to £60 at auction.

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A cup of tea would be welcome right now

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but first, I have questions to put to our divine hosts.

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So how did the two of you meet?

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Well we met at a cricket match which my father was playing in.

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He was a policeman and it was at Hendon.

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John was a cadet at the college at the time

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and they were short of a player so he volunteered to join the team.

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That's when I first met him. So that's how it all started.

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So there was a strong police connection?

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-You really met that way, really.

-Absolutely, yeah. Yeah.

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1962 was when I was in the Police Cadets.

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Then in 1967 we got married.

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Tell me a little bit about sport because you're quite a sporting family, aren't you?

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Yes. I mean, I love my football. I'm very much into the Arsenal,

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whereas John is more into the golf and the cricket.

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So between us we have a very big sporting, you know, delight, really.

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What is it about the football you enjoy so much?

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Erm, you sort of have a team that you support from childhood.

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My father was an Arsenal fanatic and I suppose it was bred in me

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and I look at them as sort of part of the family.

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You haven't gone down the football route, have you?

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Well, my father played cricket all his life and cricket was our love.

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My mother really loved cricket and of course, we began to love it as well.

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I played cricket for the Metropolitan Police.

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I then played cricket for Stanwell, Middlesex, and took up golf.

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So Linda goes off to the Arsenal to watch the football and I go off to play golf.

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And then obviously you went on to have the two children.

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When did you realise they had a bit of a travelling bug?

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Well, we've always encouraged it, really.

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When they were children we actually bought a place in Tenerife

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and my daughter in particular really loved it and always said she was

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going to live there one day and we said, "No, you won't,"

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but she eventually did

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and she left when she was 18 and she's still there.

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My son has always loved travelling, he always did,

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and his love of languages, he went abroad to work and that was it.

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How many languages are spoken in this family?

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I would say Andrew speaks, he certainly speaks French, German

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and Dutch, although Russian would be his best.

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My daughter speaks Spanish, of course.

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The two boys speak Spanish because they went to Spanish schools.

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Andrew's children speak English, Kazakh and Russian.

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Jonty just speaks one language, which is posh. Shall we see whether he's got anything else to sell?

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OK. Thank you.

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Posh or not, you can't beat Jonty's eye for quality silverware.

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And in his search upstairs,

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he's found a great-looking haul of treasure.

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-Linda, are you there?

-Yes.

-Look what I've found.

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Oh, right. OK, yes.

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Now there is time to make tea. I've got the teapot.

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-It's a box, but they're not silver, they're silver-plated.

-OK, right.

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-So everything in here is plated?

-It is.

-Not genuine silver?

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-Not genuine silver.

-Are you sure about that?

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-I think I'm more or less 100%, yes.

-OK.

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-Well, it makes a difference in price, really.

-Of course it does.

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We've got all sorts of things, a pair of candelabra, but this is a nice teapot.

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-Where's it from?

-There's a sugar bowl as well. That came from my grandmother.

-This one here?

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Again, used to sit on the sideboard, but the rest of it I bought myself.

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-Are you willing to sell all of the collection?

-Yes.

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I don't use it any more. It's too much to clean.

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Do you understand the concept of silver plate?

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-Do you know how it's put together?

-Is it put on copper?

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Yes, that's right.

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It's electroplated so it's actually just a very fine layer,

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usually on copper, of silver.

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That's what happens when you clean or rub too vigorously.

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Literally, the silver layer will wear off.

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Let me just get this out and look at this.

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-Can you see how the copper is coming through?

-Yes.

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-That's why I knew it had copper under it all.

-Right.

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So that's a very good way of telling whether something is plated.

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-Ultimately, one is looking for hallmarks.

-OK.

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Not so long ago, I would have put very little value on a whole box like this.

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There wasn't any real market for it. It all just seems to be coming back.

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-Oh, good.

-There's a bit of revival on all of this, now.

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One might be pleasantly surprised just how much we're going to get for all of this.

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-I would put £80 to £120 on this little collection.

-Really?

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And who knows where it's going to go?

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We won't have to wait long to find out.

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The candelabra, serving trays, condiments and teapots

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go together as a job lot.

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I wonder if the bidders will dig deep for the silver plate.

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£80, anywhere? £80.

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It's probably going to come down low before it gets going.

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Looks like this could be exciting.

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Our treasure hunt in Bedfordshire rolls on

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as Jonty continues his sweep of the bedrooms,

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he finds some more 19th-century framed prints.

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They're by the artist Leslie Matthew Ward

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who was known by his signature, Spy.

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And he was famous for sending up the gentry of the time.

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The smaller picture is by George Studdy, creator of Bonzo the cartoon dog.

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Linda paid about £8 for each print,

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but Jonty values the five together at £20 to £30.

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'I'm downstairs and I soon come across

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'this generous pocket watch, an heirloom which Linda inherited from her uncle.

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'The hallmark reveals it was made in Chester in 1899,

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'and it's worth a further £20 to £30.'

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-Linda?

-Yes.

-Tell me about this kettle on a stand, here.

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It was my grandmother's. I remember it as a child.

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It was always on her sideboard. I was never allowed to touch it.

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It was passed to my father, obviously,

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when my grandmother died, and he gave it to me.

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-Was your grandmother German, by any chance?

-No.

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-Any relations from Germany at all?

-Not as far as I'm aware, no.

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-the reason I ask the question is because this kettle is German.

-Is it?

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On the underside, apart from it being black,

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because it's been used, there's a little mark here that says GBN.

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Geruda Bing Nuremberg. Geruda Bing were known for making toys.

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-Right.

-But they did make kettles on stands like this.

-I've no idea.

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I've never heard of any German connection.

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-It's interesting, how it's made its way here.

-That's right.

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If you look at the style, it's really quite simple, isn't it?

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You've got a simple handle, there, and also the top here, again, is very stylised.

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That's because it's more influenced by the Art Nouveau style

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which is very flowing, rather than fussy.

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Because this was made about 100 years ago.

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-We have a bit of a problem going on here, haven't we?

-We do.

-You can tell me what the problem is.

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Well it's obviously the bracket or hinge has come off, here.

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So we have the damage but if you turn it round on the other side,

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you can see few more dents and another support missing, there.

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Bit of a problem because when it comes to metal, it's quite difficult to repair.

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A Bing kettle like this in good condition is possibly £100,

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but not in this condition.

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-It's more like £20 to £40.

-Is it? Right, OK.

-Sorry to disappoint you.

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-No, no. that's fine.

-Are you happy?

-I've got to, I don't need it, so yes.

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-That's fine.

-So if we're not allowed to use this, I can't have a cup of tea, can I?

0:16:560:17:00

Not really. There's one downstairs. You can have one downstairs.

0:17:000:17:03

-Shall we go downstairs, then? I'll put that back on the stand, there.

-OK.

-Right.

0:17:030:17:07

-There's no time for tea. We've got more work to do.

-OK.

0:17:070:17:11

I wonder how that kettle got to be in Linda's family.

0:17:110:17:13

It's a shame it wasn't in better condition but it makes a useful contribution to the fund.

0:17:130:17:18

We may be searching for items to sell but there's always time

0:17:180:17:21

to consider heirlooms which must stay within the family.

0:17:210:17:24

-So this is all related to your dad, is it?

-It is, yes.

0:17:240:17:27

He was in Bomber Command during the war, Second World War.

0:17:270:17:31

Obviously, his medals.

0:17:310:17:34

When he was in the police force he was in traffic

0:17:350:17:38

and he actually met Prince Philip, as you can see.

0:17:380:17:41

Log book and information about the squadron that he was with.

0:17:410:17:45

Very proud of him.

0:17:450:17:47

-Your interest in WWII, has that come directly from your dad?

-To a degree. I love history.

0:17:470:17:51

I love the Russian revolution, I like the First World War

0:17:510:17:55

and the Second World War but because he was in the Second World War

0:17:550:17:59

and heavily involved in it, I suppose it did.

0:17:590:18:01

Tell me a little bit about what he did in the war?

0:18:010:18:04

He was in Wellingtons. He flew Wellington bombers.

0:18:040:18:07

He was an aircraft gunner and also a navigator. He did the whole war.

0:18:070:18:11

He signed up in 1939 at 19 years of age and came out in 1946.

0:18:110:18:17

But he never spoke about it, ever. A lot of people didn't.

0:18:170:18:20

It wasn't until really he was more or less at the end of his life

0:18:200:18:25

that I actually found out exactly what he did.

0:18:250:18:28

-But he had that picture painted which I've got upstairs.

-I've seen that.

0:18:280:18:32

Which was the actual plane that he flew.

0:18:320:18:35

-I take it none of this is going up for sale?

-Definitely not.

0:18:350:18:38

This is going to stay in the family.

0:18:380:18:40

We'll keep all of this out of Jonty's hands so they don't get sold.

0:18:400:18:43

-Shall we see whether he's found anything that can sell?

-OK.

0:18:430:18:47

'It was a privilege to hear Linda share her father's story.

0:18:470:18:50

'It's hard to imagine what he must have gone through during the war.'

0:18:500:18:54

Back to our treasure hunt and Jonty takes a look at the 1930s walnut display cabinet

0:18:540:18:58

now it's been cleared of the Royal Albert tea set.

0:18:580:19:02

They're not as popular as they were but it's still a neat example

0:19:020:19:05

and could fetch £20 to £40.

0:19:050:19:09

Hurry up, Jonty.

0:19:090:19:11

We need you to give us your thoughts about another cabinet.

0:19:110:19:13

There you are, John. What are you looking at?

0:19:130:19:16

-I'm looking at a cabinet we bought in Ampthill.

-When did you buy it?

0:19:160:19:19

-Probably about ten years or more.

-OK. And why did you buy it?

0:19:190:19:23

I think mainly to store video tapes, which are a bit obsolete now.

0:19:230:19:26

I don't think it was made for that purpose.

0:19:260:19:29

I wouldn't think so! When you bought it, did you know how old it was?

0:19:290:19:34

-Not at all.

-You bought it just because you liked it?

0:19:340:19:38

We liked it and it suited a purpose at the time.

0:19:380:19:40

-How much did you pay for it?

-£30 to £40. It wouldn't have been more.

-OK.

0:19:400:19:45

If you look at the style, it has a Victorian feel.

0:19:450:19:48

Pieces of furniture like this would've been made initially as bedside tables.

0:19:480:19:52

You've got the door down below.

0:19:520:19:54

-Is it just the one door we have here?

-Just the one.

-Oh, it opens up.

0:19:540:19:58

Concertinas somewhat. OK. And then we've got the octagonal top, also.

0:19:580:20:03

Originally bedside tables would've had some pot stored down beside.

0:20:030:20:09

-Yes. Just in case you got caught short.

-Short in the night.

0:20:090:20:13

So this piece of furniture here is a 20th-century interpretation

0:20:130:20:17

of a 19th-century bedside table.

0:20:170:20:20

And I suppose the big giveaway, possibly,

0:20:200:20:22

and I haven't obviously done this, is to open up the door here

0:20:220:20:26

and see this piece of timber here?

0:20:260:20:29

Again, this is not how a 19th-century piece of furniture would have been constructed.

0:20:290:20:35

And the timber itself is probably a timber that's stained to look like

0:20:350:20:39

-a tropical hardwood and it probably is a cheaper timber as well.

-Yes.

0:20:390:20:43

Hopefully we'll get your money back. It'll be there or thereabouts.

0:20:430:20:46

-£30 to £50 at auction. Are you happy about that?

-Happy to do that, yes.

0:20:460:20:50

You're going to have to find another space to house those video tapes.

0:20:500:20:54

-The loft?

-Great.

-HE LAUGHS

0:20:540:20:56

I'd have thrown them in the bin to be honest

0:20:560:20:59

but the cabinet could still have its uses.

0:20:590:21:02

Jonty's estimate means more good news for John and Linda's expectant daughter in Tenerife.

0:21:020:21:07

We're making good progress but we're not ready to call it a day just yet.

0:21:070:21:11

John's a big cricket fan and this tankard commemorated 100 years of the Ashes in 1982.

0:21:110:21:17

The Churchill character jug is by Royal Doulton, made in 1991,

0:21:170:21:22

and modelled by Stanley James Taylor.

0:21:220:21:24

Grouped together with more jugs of various designs,

0:21:240:21:28

the whole collection could make £20 to £30.

0:21:280:21:31

We're almost out of time but not before Linda shows us one last souvenir.

0:21:310:21:36

Oh, wow!

0:21:360:21:38

Where on earth did you get these?

0:21:380:21:40

We bought those in St Petersburg in 1990, 1991,

0:21:400:21:44

when my son was at university, from a very old gentleman,

0:21:440:21:47

a very old man in one of the main streets.

0:21:470:21:50

I don't know what they are, but we just liked the look of them and paid very little money for them.

0:21:500:21:55

It's quite an odd time for you to be there, though. Not many tourists around.

0:21:550:21:59

There weren't any at all.

0:21:590:22:01

People were selling everything,

0:22:010:22:02

from toilet rolls to tinned soups.

0:22:020:22:06

Everything to get roubles.

0:22:060:22:08

And there was a guy there that just had those in front of him.

0:22:080:22:10

-I asked if we could have a look, and we did.

-Yes.

0:22:100:22:14

And we just paid 20 roubles, maybe.

0:22:140:22:18

How much is that in pounds?

0:22:180:22:20

About £4, I think.

0:22:200:22:22

But to him, that was probably a lot of money.

0:22:220:22:25

I suppose we're looking at a set of six commemorative coins,

0:22:250:22:29

But they're not necessarily metal.

0:22:290:22:30

If you pick one of those up, have a feel of that.

0:22:300:22:33

They're cold, yes.

0:22:330:22:35

But they are not heavy enough to be a metal.

0:22:350:22:37

So, I believe these to be more of a resin, rather than a metal.

0:22:370:22:40

Right, OK.

0:22:400:22:42

But they're very nicely carved...

0:22:420:22:44

-Well, these would be made from a mould.

-Mm.

0:22:440:22:48

There would be one person creating the art imagery.

0:22:480:22:53

And then the rest would be from a mould.

0:22:530:22:55

-OK.

-If you look closely, here,

0:22:550:22:57

we have Lenin on the top, here,

0:22:570:22:59

overseeing these other characters.

0:22:590:23:01

Starting, probably, from the Russian revolution to the modern spaceman.

0:23:010:23:07

-So, this is a celebration of Communism.

-Yes.

0:23:070:23:10

-How's your Russian?

-Not good.

-Because on the reverse, there's all this Russian writing.

0:23:100:23:15

I think they're worth putting in the auction sale,

0:23:150:23:17

and I think the value would be around the £30 mark.

0:23:170:23:20

So £30-£50.

0:23:200:23:22

-OK.

-Shall we tell the others?

-Please, yes.

0:23:220:23:24

-Lorne, John. Are you there?

-Yes, we are, actually, yeah.

-A-ha!

0:23:240:23:28

Do you remember these?

0:23:280:23:30

I do remember them, but...

0:23:300:23:32

Have a look at these, Lorne. Did you but these together?

0:23:320:23:35

Yes, I'm sure we must have done,

0:23:350:23:37

because we were in St Petersburg together.

0:23:370:23:39

I have no recollection except buying from an old man in the street.

0:23:390:23:42

Let's hope your good karma comes back to you at the auction.

0:23:420:23:45

-May well do.

-What did you value them at, Jonty?

0:23:450:23:47

I think they're worth around the £30,

0:23:470:23:50

so I would say £30-£50 at auction.

0:23:500:23:51

Right. Yes, that's fine.

0:23:510:23:54

That's fine.

0:23:540:23:55

Now, you wanted £250, didn't you,

0:23:550:23:57

towards some stuff for the new grandchild, over in Tenerife?

0:23:570:24:00

We did.

0:24:000:24:01

I know you're a bit disappointed with the valuation of the etchings.

0:24:010:24:04

I'll leave these to one side for the moment.

0:24:040:24:07

The value of everything going to auction comes to £340.

0:24:070:24:11

But, if you get the £50 you want for those pictures,

0:24:110:24:13

-that'll take it to £390.

-Lovely. That's great.

0:24:130:24:17

That'd be good, wouldn't it?

0:24:170:24:18

You might be able to buy a whole buggy for that.

0:24:180:24:21

A motorised one!

0:24:210:24:22

THEY LAUGH

0:24:220:24:23

Gosh! Isn't the stuff expensive nowadays?

0:24:230:24:26

Especially in Tenerife.

0:24:260:24:28

-Whatever happened to pass-me-downs?

-I don't know.

0:24:280:24:30

I'm sure Jonty must have an old buggy somewhere,

0:24:300:24:32

one of those Silver Cross prams we can hand down.

0:24:320:24:35

-Absolutely, yeah. I remember those.

-A sedan chair..

0:24:350:24:37

-OK. Are you looking forward to the auction?

-I am, yes.

0:24:370:24:41

-OK.

-See you there.

-Next time we see you, we'll be there.

0:24:410:24:44

-OK. Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

0:24:440:24:46

Little by little, we made our target,

0:24:460:24:49

with just a bit to spare.

0:24:490:24:51

It'll be interesting to see how we get on at auction.

0:24:510:24:54

These prints of the fictitious 19th-century vicar

0:24:540:24:57

Dr Syntax might have raised a laugh.

0:24:570:25:01

Let's hope they can meet Linda's £50 reserve.

0:25:010:25:04

Will we find a buyer for those blue and white jugs and jelly moulds?

0:25:040:25:07

They could decorate our fund with another £50-£100.

0:25:070:25:11

And the assorted silver plate could also prove popular,

0:25:110:25:14

and make between £80 and £120.

0:25:140:25:17

Still to come on Cash In The Attic.

0:25:170:25:20

How will we cope when the bidding hots up?

0:25:200:25:24

-Then suddenly...

-..the price goes up.

0:25:240:25:26

If it was me, I'd be sitting with steam coming out of my ears.

0:25:260:25:30

And when we do make a sale, will we all share Jonty's enthusiasm?

0:25:300:25:34

It's walking. It's walking.

0:25:340:25:36

It's stumbling, rather than walking, at £30.

0:25:360:25:39

Here comes the final hammer.

0:25:390:25:42

It's been a while since we met Linda and John

0:25:460:25:48

at their beautiful Bedfordshire cottage.

0:25:480:25:50

They're looking to raise money to help their daughter

0:25:500:25:53

prepare for the birth of their daughter's child,

0:25:530:25:55

their new grandchild.

0:25:550:25:57

We found plenty of items we've brought here

0:25:570:25:59

to Sworders Auction House in Stansted Mountfitchet.

0:25:590:26:02

All we need to do today, of course,

0:26:020:26:04

is hope that the bidders are willing to dig deep into their pockets.

0:26:040:26:07

Sworders holds a general sale every week here at Stansted Mountfitchet,

0:26:070:26:11

and the Devines' heirlooms should fit in perfectly

0:26:110:26:14

with the various items on sale today.

0:26:140:26:16

But as they check out the competition,

0:26:160:26:19

I hope our couple don't get sidetracked.

0:26:190:26:21

Good morning!

0:26:210:26:23

Hi, guys. How are you?

0:26:230:26:24

When I last saw you,

0:26:240:26:25

it was before you were going to make your trip with the family.

0:26:250:26:29

And you were expecting another grandchild. What's the latest?

0:26:290:26:33

We've got a lovely little grandson called Leo.

0:26:330:26:35

-How wonderful!

-And he's gorgeous.

-How lovely!

0:26:350:26:37

So you managed to see him, as well?

0:26:370:26:39

We saw him, had a cuddle, and then left for the airport.

0:26:390:26:41

How lovely!

0:26:410:26:44

So, are we too late to make this money for him?

0:26:440:26:47

No, no. We'd love to buy something special for him, so yes.

0:26:470:26:50

-All right. Shall we go and make some money?

-Come on, guys.

0:26:500:26:53

We couldn't have wished for a better start to our auction.

0:26:530:26:56

And that's before anything has even gone on sale.

0:26:560:26:59

I'm keeping my fingers crossed that Linda and John's pieces do well for little Leo,

0:26:590:27:03

especially as the auctioneer has advised our couple

0:27:030:27:06

to merge a number of their lots together,

0:27:060:27:08

in an effort to maximise interest and potential takings.

0:27:080:27:11

First to go under the hammer is the silver pocket watch,

0:27:110:27:14

dated 1899 and hallmarked in Chester.

0:27:140:27:19

Where was this from?

0:27:190:27:20

It came from my aunt. It was her husband's, and she gave it to me.

0:27:200:27:24

It's a family thing, really.

0:27:240:27:27

What do you want for this, Jonty?

0:27:270:27:28

£20-£30. There's a bit of damage there, as well.

0:27:280:27:32

So don't get too excited.

0:27:320:27:34

-But £20-£30 should be fine to get it away.

-Let's see.

0:27:340:27:38

£20 to start me. I'm bid £20. Any interest at £22?

0:27:380:27:41

Opening bid of £20, then, for the pocket watch. Any further interest?

0:27:410:27:44

£22 there. £25.

0:27:440:27:47

£25, £28.

0:27:470:27:49

£28, £30.

0:27:490:27:50

£32. £32, sir.

0:27:500:27:52

£32, £35, £38.

0:27:520:27:53

No. £35. Still in the centre at £35.

0:27:530:27:56

(Yes).

0:27:560:27:57

Any further interest?

0:27:570:27:58

I'll sell for £35.

0:27:580:28:00

I always think it must be so frustrating

0:28:000:28:03

for the buyer who thinks they're going to get it for 20 quid.

0:28:030:28:06

-Then suddenly...

-...the price goes up.

0:28:060:28:08

THEY LAUGH

0:28:080:28:10

If it was me, I'd be sitting there with steam coming out of my ears.

0:28:100:28:13

But the good thing is that means it's more money for you.

0:28:130:28:15

He's got steam coming out his ears, but we're all smiling.

0:28:150:28:18

And so we should be.

0:28:180:28:21

£5 over our top estimate is an encouraging start.

0:28:210:28:23

Let's see if our next lot, the Royal Albert china tea set,

0:28:230:28:26

can also draw in the bidders.

0:28:260:28:28

The service is the company's most popular design,

0:28:280:28:32

and was a classic item on wedding lists in years gone by.

0:28:320:28:35

It's also in great condition.

0:28:350:28:37

It's the Royal Albert Country Roses, which I think

0:28:380:28:40

has probably got to be the most manufactured design known to mankind

0:28:400:28:45

in this country.

0:28:450:28:46

-But it is very desirable.

-It is.

0:28:460:28:48

When I've seen it all out in the auction room,

0:28:480:28:50

on the table it's displayed on,

0:28:500:28:52

there is so much of this set.

0:28:520:28:55

I put £40-£60 on it.

0:28:550:28:58

I think that's quite conservative.

0:28:580:28:59

I wouldn't be surprised if it makes a lot more,

0:28:590:29:02

as there's so much of it.

0:29:020:29:03

So, who's going to buy it, Jonty? Is there someone in the auction room,

0:29:030:29:06

or will it be a phone bid, or what?

0:29:060:29:08

I don't think necessarily it will find a home in the UK.

0:29:080:29:12

It could be in any corner of the globe.

0:29:120:29:15

On the Continent, in America,

0:29:150:29:17

but not necessarily the buyers in the UK.

0:29:170:29:19

-Right.

-Not necessarily so.

0:29:190:29:22

£50, anywhere?

0:29:220:29:24

That's got to be worth £50, surely.

0:29:240:29:26

Yes!

0:29:260:29:28

-£55, £60. £65.

-Come on!

0:29:280:29:31

£60.

0:29:310:29:32

Any bids at £65?

0:29:320:29:34

I'll sell for £60.

0:29:340:29:37

Any further interest? £60.

0:29:370:29:39

£60. Bang on the top estimate.

0:29:390:29:41

Good.

0:29:410:29:44

That's a very satisfying boost

0:29:440:29:46

to the fund for little Leo and the family.

0:29:460:29:48

Now it's time for our first merged lot of the day.

0:29:480:29:52

The auctioneer has decided it's best to put together

0:29:520:29:54

that collection of silver plate

0:29:540:29:55

with a battered German spirit kettle.

0:29:550:29:58

Interestingly enough, when we came to your house,

0:30:010:30:03

we found various bits and pieces.

0:30:030:30:05

We lotted them up and put them into the auction house, as expected.

0:30:050:30:09

They seem to have taken matters into their own hands.

0:30:090:30:11

They've combined some of these things.

0:30:110:30:13

So the next lot are a huge quantity of electroplated items.

0:30:130:30:17

Yes, because in that is our lovely spirit kettle that we looked at.

0:30:170:30:21

Remember the Bing piece?

0:30:210:30:23

But because it's so badly damaged,

0:30:230:30:25

I would imagine that they'd probably put it, as Lorne suggested,

0:30:250:30:29

in with our other items as well.

0:30:290:30:31

I think what we have to bear in mind

0:30:310:30:33

is an auction house always knows its own local market

0:30:330:30:35

and the type of dealers, and what they'll be looking for.

0:30:350:30:38

They probably assume that whoever wants one of it will want the rest.

0:30:380:30:42

The new estimate for this is £100 to £160.

0:30:420:30:45

So that's what we're aiming to net.

0:30:450:30:48

A mixed lot, there. £80, anywhere? £80? £50.

0:30:480:30:52

It's probably going to come down low, before it gets going.

0:30:520:30:55

£40 to start me, anywhere? Anyone tempted?

0:30:550:30:57

It might not get picked at all.

0:30:570:30:59

..£40? £30, to start me?

0:30:590:31:02

No? I'm afraid we'll have to pass on that.

0:31:020:31:06

-LINDA: That's a shame.

-Right. Now, that IS a disappointment.

0:31:060:31:08

It is a disappointment.

0:31:080:31:10

She took it right down, to start at £40.

0:31:100:31:12

Obviously, you can't start below that. It gets ridiculous.

0:31:120:31:15

But unfortunately, there didn't seem to be any interest at all.

0:31:150:31:18

-Oh, dear.

-That's life.

0:31:180:31:20

I don't know whether you want to leave it here,

0:31:200:31:21

to go into another auction?

0:31:210:31:23

Probably let it go into another auction.

0:31:230:31:25

-Can we do that?

-Of course you can. We'll sort all that out.

0:31:250:31:27

Oh, dear. Clearly no-one was on the lookout

0:31:270:31:30

for a bulk buy of EPNS and brass.

0:31:300:31:32

I can't help wondering how our other merged lots will do later on.

0:31:320:31:36

Next up is another large lot.

0:31:360:31:39

At least these are going on sale as we intended.

0:31:390:31:41

Jonty's given this group of blue and white jugs and jelly moulds

0:31:410:31:44

a confident £50 to £100 estimate.

0:31:440:31:47

This is quite interesting, because there was loads of stuff here.

0:31:470:31:50

The classic stuff that, in the '80s,

0:31:500:31:52

-everybody wanted to display on a dresser.

-Yes.

0:31:520:31:54

Did you purposefully put together this collection?

0:31:540:31:57

I did. Most of it, anyway.

0:31:570:31:59

Some of it came from my family.

0:31:590:32:01

But the rest of it I bought myself.

0:32:010:32:03

-Don't you miss it?

-Not at all.

0:32:030:32:04

-Really?

-Not at all.

0:32:040:32:06

I'd like to get rid of everything, really.

0:32:060:32:08

Now, Jonty, what do we want for this?

0:32:080:32:09

It's interesting you say you're now keen to get rid of it.

0:32:090:32:13

It seems to be the fashion at the moment to sell these sorts of items,

0:32:130:32:16

so it's going to be interesting to see what happens in the room.

0:32:160:32:19

I put £50-£100.

0:32:190:32:22

But let's just wait and see, eh?

0:32:220:32:23

Because this auction house is based in mid-north Essex,

0:32:230:32:27

where there's lots of country cottages,

0:32:270:32:30

-there might be somebody.

-Yes.

0:32:300:32:31

It's better than taking it to a London auction house.

0:32:310:32:33

You've more chance, I think.

0:32:330:32:35

But, having said that, we'll just have to see.

0:32:350:32:37

It's straight in at £40, with me.

0:32:370:32:39

£42 in the room?

0:32:390:32:41

£40, with commission, for all the china there. Any further interest?

0:32:410:32:45

I'll sell to the opening bid, then, with commission, at £40.

0:32:450:32:48

Any bids in the room? £40.

0:32:480:32:50

Right. This is someone who left a commission bid.

0:32:500:32:53

It's £40. She's sold the whole collection for that. Is that OK?

0:32:530:32:56

Well, yes. I got rid of it, so that's the main thing.

0:32:560:32:59

It would have been nice to make a little more than £40,

0:32:590:33:03

but with the reaction in the room,

0:33:030:33:04

we should perhaps be grateful for that commission bid,

0:33:040:33:07

especially as we're already halfway through our auction today.

0:33:070:33:11

You wanted to make at least £250. Hopefully a little bit more.

0:33:110:33:14

We've sold half of our lots so far, and we've banked £135.

0:33:140:33:18

Oh, well, that's not so bad.

0:33:180:33:20

Don't forget you have a couple of no-sales there,

0:33:200:33:23

so at some point those things will sell.

0:33:230:33:25

And you've still got some very nice lots to sell this afternoon.

0:33:250:33:28

Yes. We've got a few good items to look forward to. All right?

0:33:280:33:31

-Time for a little bit of a break?

-Yes, thank you.

-Follow me!

-OK.

0:33:310:33:36

Let's hope the break signals a change in our fortunes.

0:33:360:33:38

If you'd like to try buying or selling some of your items this way,

0:33:380:33:41

it's worth bearing in mind that auction houses charge various fees.

0:33:410:33:45

including commission and VAT.

0:33:450:33:48

Your local saleroom will advise you on those extra costs.

0:33:480:33:52

We have experienced a couple of no-sales,

0:33:520:33:54

but it's a common occurrence at auction.

0:33:540:33:57

Even the most imposing items can suffer.

0:33:570:33:59

Jonty's intrigued by a pair of impressive Chinese pitchers

0:33:590:34:02

that didn't find a buyer at a previous sale.

0:34:020:34:06

This is what I call a very substantial pair, Jonty.

0:34:060:34:09

They're amazing, aren't they?

0:34:090:34:11

Incredible. I suppose they have to be a good three and a half feet

0:34:110:34:14

in height?

0:34:140:34:16

They're typically Chinese, absolutely covered with detail.

0:34:160:34:19

Presumably, everything on here means something.

0:34:190:34:23

You're absolutely right. Full of symbolism.

0:34:230:34:25

We have our stylised applied dragon, and our Dogs of Fo,

0:34:250:34:29

and lions on the side. Very typically Chinese.

0:34:290:34:32

In fact, the style of this vase, they're actually from Canton.

0:34:320:34:35

Quite near Hong Kong, in fact.

0:34:350:34:37

But for centuries, Canton exported vase of this particular style.

0:34:370:34:42

So, what sort of age have these got?

0:34:420:34:45

They look like they're mid-19th century,

0:34:450:34:48

but the closer I've looked and studied these,

0:34:480:34:51

they don't have very much age to them at all.

0:34:510:34:54

I believe these vases have been produced in relatively recent times.

0:34:540:34:58

In the last 30 years, in fact.

0:34:580:35:02

It's difficult for us here in the West

0:35:020:35:03

to spot a genuine Chinese antique

0:35:030:35:06

from something literally made yesterday.

0:35:060:35:08

Absolutely. And the way to tell is to have a look at the detail.

0:35:080:35:13

Let's take these two panels on the front, here.

0:35:130:35:16

Take a closer look. And if you were to compare those

0:35:160:35:19

to a vase from the 19th century,

0:35:190:35:22

the quality of the painting itself

0:35:220:35:24

would be so much better

0:35:240:35:26

on a 19th-century vase.

0:35:260:35:28

So, do they have a value?

0:35:280:35:29

They have a vast value. £4,000 to £5,000.

0:35:290:35:31

Oh, that's a lot of money, isn't it?

0:35:310:35:33

I think we need to go into importing and exporting.

0:35:330:35:36

Sadly for us,

0:35:360:35:38

there's nothing approaching the monetary value of those vases

0:35:380:35:41

amongst our remaining lots.

0:35:410:35:42

But there's still plenty to look forward to,

0:35:420:35:45

including those Dr Syntax prints,

0:35:450:35:46

with their evocative scenes of Georgian England.

0:35:460:35:49

They've been grouped together with Victorian spy pictures,

0:35:490:35:52

for £40-£70.

0:35:520:35:54

But first, another collection of merged items.

0:35:540:35:56

The auction house recommended

0:35:560:35:58

putting the Royal Doulton Winston Churchill character jug

0:35:580:36:02

together with the Russian medallions.

0:36:020:36:04

Knowing the local market as well as they do,

0:36:040:36:06

they recommended a revised estimate of £20-£30.

0:36:060:36:11

The only similarity is the fact that they're probably ceramic...

0:36:110:36:14

-All right.

-..rather than resin.

0:36:140:36:17

That's the only connection.

0:36:170:36:19

Therefore, what the auction room are telling us

0:36:190:36:22

is that they don't covet those medallions you bought in Russia.

0:36:220:36:26

So they really don't have very much value at all.

0:36:260:36:28

They're of social interest, but not of financial interest.

0:36:280:36:32

£40, for all that lot, anywhere?

0:36:320:36:34

£40? £30?

0:36:340:36:35

Doulton character jug included. £30?

0:36:350:36:38

Oh, come on!

0:36:380:36:40

£20, I'm bid. £22, there.

0:36:400:36:41

£25. £28. £30.

0:36:410:36:44

Seated on my right at £28. £30, there.

0:36:440:36:46

£32? £30, there. Was that £32 in the centre somewhere?

0:36:460:36:50

Amazing.

0:36:500:36:51

£38, dead centre. £38. Any bids at £40?

0:36:510:36:55

So, for £38, any more bids? £38.

0:36:550:36:58

-£38.

-£38, so what's your view on that?

0:36:580:37:01

Erm, well, I know what I paid for the jugs, so...

0:37:010:37:05

Which was?

0:37:050:37:06

I paid £40 for that, a long time ago.

0:37:060:37:08

Oh, dear.

0:37:080:37:10

Well, often when you put things in,

0:37:100:37:12

you're not hoping to get your money back, you want it cleared.

0:37:120:37:14

-Happy with that?

-Yes.

0:37:140:37:16

At £8 above estimate,

0:37:160:37:17

I guess we'll have to accept

0:37:170:37:19

the wisdom of the auctioneers on this one.

0:37:190:37:22

I'm fascinated to see how John and Linda's mixed set of prints

0:37:220:37:25

will do in front of our Essex bidders.

0:37:250:37:27

Remember those Dr Syntax prints we all looked at?

0:37:270:37:30

Rather bizarre character that he was.

0:37:300:37:34

They have been combined also with the Spy prints.

0:37:340:37:37

It all makes sense that they've all been put together.

0:37:370:37:39

£40-£70 is what we're looking for.

0:37:390:37:42

Hopefully.

0:37:420:37:43

£40, anywhere?

0:37:430:37:44

£40? £30?

0:37:440:37:47

The Spy prints, there. £30.

0:37:470:37:48

£32? The lady right at the back there.

0:37:480:37:51

£30, the opening bid. £32?

0:37:510:37:54

I'll sell for £30, then, the opening bid. Any further interest?

0:37:540:37:58

£30.

0:37:580:38:00

-Oh.

-£30. Considering the age of those Dr Syntax,

0:38:000:38:03

that's quite amazing.

0:38:030:38:05

But I think it really indicates fashionable trends at the moment.

0:38:050:38:08

And unfortunately, until that sort of appears in vogue...

0:38:080:38:12

Yes, I think that's the case.

0:38:120:38:13

And I suppose it's better than having to take them home.

0:38:130:38:16

That's the spirit, John.

0:38:160:38:18

And it's also another £30 towards the fund for little Leo.

0:38:180:38:21

Let's hope the 1930s walnut display cabinet

0:38:210:38:24

will swell the coffers even further.

0:38:240:38:26

Surely worth £20-£40 of anybody's money.

0:38:260:38:29

Going back 10 to 15 years, people were fighting over these,

0:38:290:38:32

big time.

0:38:320:38:34

I'm not sure that's the case now, but where was this one from?

0:38:340:38:36

I bought it, quite a while ago, from a fair.

0:38:360:38:40

I can't remember what I paid for it,

0:38:400:38:42

but at the time, I bought it to display my china,

0:38:420:38:45

which I'm now getting rid of, so it has to go.

0:38:450:38:47

Obviously no problems selling this.

0:38:470:38:49

Jonty, how do we stand on price with these case now?

0:38:490:38:51

There's always a market for everything.

0:38:510:38:53

The value for your display cabinet now is £20-£40.

0:38:530:38:57

So it should walk out at that sort of figure.

0:38:570:39:01

If we sell a walnut display cabinet for £20-£30

0:39:010:39:03

that can physically walk out the room,

0:39:030:39:05

I think we might have undersold it!

0:39:050:39:07

-SHE LAUGHS

-That's for sure.

0:39:070:39:09

£40, anywhere? £40?

0:39:090:39:10

Please!

0:39:100:39:12

-£30, I'm bid.

-Ooh, £30.

0:39:120:39:14

- Opening bid of £30. - Come on, come on!

0:39:140:39:17

-I'll sell for your bid of £30.

-It's walking.

0:39:170:39:20

It's walking. It's walking. Can you see it walking?

0:39:200:39:23

Stumbling, rather than walking, at £30!

0:39:230:39:25

-That's good.

-Oh, dear!

0:39:250:39:26

I hope it doesn't say anything on the way out!

0:39:260:39:29

Another £30 for the good cause.

0:39:290:39:32

So, for our final lot of the day.

0:39:320:39:34

Or, to be exact, our last two lots that are merged into one.

0:39:340:39:38

It's the reproduction oak cupboard and the 1920s plant stand.

0:39:380:39:42

The auctioneers' new estimate for them is £40-£60.

0:39:420:39:45

I'm not sure what's going on with the auction,

0:39:470:39:49

cos a lot of your lots have been combined.

0:39:490:39:51

Our next one has, "A reproduction oak pot cupboard,

0:39:510:39:53

"together with a 1920s plant stand."

0:39:530:39:55

I'm not sure the buyer of one is necessarily going to want the other.

0:39:550:39:58

So what is the reasoning behind this?

0:39:580:40:01

They're both pieces of furniture.

0:40:010:40:03

Again, it's probably the plant stand that has so little value,

0:40:030:40:06

that they've put the two together.

0:40:060:40:08

Because the cabinet we looked at at the top of the stairs,

0:40:080:40:11

certainly does have some use.

0:40:110:40:13

A lot of function there.

0:40:130:40:14

Plant stands, just not so fashionable at the moment.

0:40:140:40:17

So the auctioneers decided again to put the two together.

0:40:170:40:20

-£40, I'm bid.

-Ooh, hello!

0:40:200:40:23

£40. £42. £45.

0:40:230:40:24

Goodness.

0:40:240:40:26

£50. £55.

0:40:260:40:28

£60, there?

0:40:280:40:29

Quite good.

0:40:290:40:31

The latest bid, still with you at £60.

0:40:310:40:33

£65?

0:40:330:40:35

£60, then.

0:40:350:40:37

£60.

0:40:370:40:38

I could barely write it down, I was so excited.

0:40:380:40:41

That's £20 over our estimate. Good grief!

0:40:410:40:43

And they combined the lots.

0:40:430:40:45

I think that's fantastic.

0:40:450:40:47

I feel quite flushed after that, do you?

0:40:470:40:49

Yes, very much. That's great.

0:40:490:40:50

And another strong result.

0:40:500:40:52

It seems the auction house

0:40:520:40:54

has perfectly judged their local bidders.

0:40:540:40:56

Thanks to all those combined lots, today's sale has flown by.

0:40:560:40:59

And it's time to reveal the grand total.

0:40:590:41:01

In fact, we have now banked £293.

0:41:030:41:07

-Are you serious?

-Absolutely!

-I didn't realise it was that much.

-That's great!

0:41:070:41:10

-That's good.

-That's really good.

0:41:100:41:12

You still have some items you can either take home

0:41:120:41:15

or leave in for next time.

0:41:150:41:16

-Well done, guys.

-Thank you very much.

0:41:160:41:18

With those proceeds burning a hole in her pocket,

0:41:220:41:24

Linda wastes no time looking out for some baby essentials

0:41:240:41:28

for her new grandson.

0:41:280:41:30

The money I wanted to raise was for my new grandson,

0:41:300:41:34

who was born in Tenerife.

0:41:340:41:36

Fortunately we were there, so we were able to see him.

0:41:360:41:39

He was just born, and warm and cuddly.

0:41:390:41:42

Everything was great. The money that I've raised at yesterday's auction

0:41:420:41:47

will be for him.

0:41:470:41:48

I'd like to buy something that will be good for him for the future,

0:41:480:41:51

such as the rocker with the hi tech music.

0:41:510:41:55

I do like the pushchair as well, so hopefully, I'll come back, we'll purchase that

0:41:550:42:00

and then we'll be off to Tenerife. I've had a lot of the items that I got rid of a long time

0:42:000:42:06

and they're no use to me,

0:42:060:42:08

but the money will be very useful for my daughter and Leo.

0:42:080:42:11

So, it was a good choice. I'm really pleased I went for it.

0:42:110:42:14

Linda Devine and her husband John welcome Lorne Spicer and expert Jonty Hearnden into their Bedfordshire home. Linda is soon to become a grandmother, and wants to raise £300 to buy the baby some presents. Which of her mementos is worth the most on sale day: a Royal Albert tea set, or the cabinet in which it is displayed?