Leyland Cash in the Attic


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Leyland

Antiques series. John Leyland needs 1,000 pounds to restore his beloved Ford Consul. Chris Hollins and expert John Cameron help him decide what to send to auction.


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Welcome to the Cash In The Attic, the show that finds hidden treasures in your home

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and helps to sell them at auction.

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Today, we are about to meet a family who want to raise cash

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to resurrect an old favourite.

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'Coming up on Cash In The Attic,

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'has our expert got caught in the middle of a family dispute?'

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-Do you think we should sell it?

-Yep.

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-Don't ask Dad, just sell it!

-SHE GIGGLES

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'The daughter of the house

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'thinks these grandfather clocks are a waste of time.

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'Or does she?'

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Do you hate them now?

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-No.

-Isn't that one mine, Dad, didn't you say?!

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'And, at auction, what do we have to do to make our contributor smile?'

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Is there any person in the history of Cash In The Attic

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when it went over the reserve price went, "Oh no"?

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'Find out more when the hammer falls.'

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Today we are in Surrey to meet a father and daughter

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who want to clear out their house

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and put bit of history back on the road.

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John Leyland has two passions - antiques and family.

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A father and a grandfather, John has three daughters, including

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28-year-old Laura, who's here today with daughter, two-year-old Jordan.

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John recently got the auction bug

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and has already parted company with many treasures.

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But there's still plenty in his South London home for us to consider.

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There's one thing, however, that won't be leaving

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and that's the cherished 1958 Consul.

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Ah, there he is.

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'Helping me is antiques expert John Cameron,

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'whose 20 years in the business will prove invaluable

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'in today's rummage.'

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-A good old clock.

-Hello. Nice to see you.

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All right. And you?

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What a lovely kitchen you've got here.

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Intros - you must be John, Laura, this is another John.

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Just call me JC today.

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Exactly. Tell me, who called the Cash In The Attic team?

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-That would be Laura.

-Me.

-Why?

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-I was helping clear out some junk.

-It's not junk.

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One man's junk is another man's treasure.

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That's right. It's all my treasures.

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I'd better go and find this ju...treasure.

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Good idea. I'm going to find out more about these.

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I think we're in for some trouble!

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What do we want to raise this money for?

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I've got a lovely Mark 11 Consul

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that hasn't seen the road for over ten years now.

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-10?!

-It would be nice to see it...

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-Plus, all right. 15 years.

-I was a baby. I'm 28 now.

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It would be very nice to see it running again and back on the road.

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-How much is that going to cost?

-At least 1,000, thereabouts.

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Maybe more.

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£1,000? We've got our work cut out.

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-I've just noticed a little bump.

-Yeah.

-Are you up to some work today?

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As long as it doesn't get too exciting, I should be all right.

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If you're in trouble, shout and we'll get John on the case.

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-We better get back to some work.

-Very good.

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You and I will go and find JC. Laura, you're off that way.

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'Busy, busy. Laura wasn't wrong

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'when she talked of her dad's need to declutter.

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'John should have a field day.'

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John, however many times you ask, she's not going to dance with you!

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She's lovely, though, isn't she?

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She is. She's quite decorative, too.

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John, I was hoping you would shed some light on this.

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Where did it come from?

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I bought it down the local auction rooms, some ten or 15 years ago.

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She's been sitting in the corner ever since.

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When I first saw it, it attracted me straight away.

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I thought there's a nice, 19th-century,

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neo-classical bronze sculpture. But, up close, I was disappointed.

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It wasn't spelter, even.

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Let me have a feel.

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-It's made of resin. It's composition.

-Is it really?

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-That's amazing.

-This is a 20th-century piece,

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-which is a shame.

-Yeah.

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But it's been patinated to look like bronze -

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much in the 19th-century taste.

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I couldn't quite work out whether she was Diana or Venus.

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I tried to work out from her attributes.

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She's holding aloft a torch, or a light,

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so she's the illuminati, but I couldn't work out

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what she was carrying.

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Whether they were palm leaves,

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or whether there were arrows that would tie in to Diana.

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But she's definitely classically inspired, isn't she?

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-Definitely.

-John, why did you buy it?

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As a collectable, or something for your house?

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Both. I wanted to use it

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and also have it as a decorative piece for the lounge.

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I certainly think she has impact.

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That's something I look for when looking at decorative items.

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She certainly turns your head.

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Not vast sums of money. If it was bronze,

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we would be looking at quite a few hundred pounds.

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If there was an artist's name on a bronze, then even more.

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But it is a composition piece, but decorative.

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I'll say £80 to £120.

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-Fair dos.

-She can go?

-Yeah.

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£80-£120 is not a bad start.

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-Yeah.

-Let's see if we can build on that.

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OK.

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As we search around John's home,

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I get the feeling we've just touched the tip of the iceberg.

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This place is absolutely brimming with treasures,

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like this carved oak barometer.

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This model is Victorian and belonged to John's grandparents.

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It should fetch us a cool £30-£50.

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-I see you found the bus.

-Yes. How could I miss the bus?

-The old 93.

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-A fabulous bus.

-I noticed it's an Epsom bus.

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It's our local bus that runs up and down here,

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which I get on virtually every day, still.

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-You bought the bus because of that?

-Yes, in a local auction.

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How long have you had it?

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I've had it 15, 20 years, maybe.

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Do you know anything about the bus itself, the make?

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-I believe it's Tri-ang, I'm not too sure.

-It is.

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You're right. It doesn't have any other labels on it,

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but I've seen this model before.

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-If you think about this side, there's a recess.

-Yeah.

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That's where the label would have gone.

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-It would have had Tri-ang along there.

-Right.

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But Tri-ang is a great British firm.

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It's instantly recognisable as a toymaker.

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They had their origins back in the middle of the 19th century, in the 1850s.

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-And their very famous triangle logo.

-Yeah.

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It was a great British company. They made all manner of different toys,

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everything, across the board, and, sadly,

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after failing sales in the 1970s,

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the company was broken up, but one that has left an enduring legacy.

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-So do you think we could take this to auction?

-Certainly.

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I've had loads of fun out of it, so why not somebody else for a while?

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-Fantastic.

-I can see it in a local pub. It would look nice.

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It's great. I do love it. It's a fantastic thing.

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Because of the condition, I'd be slightly conservative

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-and go with 40 to 60 as an estimate.

-Yeah.

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But I've seen them make up to £100.

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-Yeah. Good.

-You OK with that?

-That would be fine, yeah.

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-OK, well, ding-ding, all aboard. Let's see what I can find.

-OK.

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With that estimate,

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it's a shame three of those didn't come along all at once!

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See? Buses, get it? Never mind.

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It's not long before I find more toys

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in the shape of these straw-filled animals.

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John's daughters used to play with these.

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They're showing signs of wear, but that's not a bad thing -

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many collectors prefer these sorts of toys

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to be in an as-found condition.

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John estimates that these cuddly creatures

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should fetch £30-£50 at auction.

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We'll leave John rummaging around this house.

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My goodness, has he got his work cut out!

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You said your dad was a hoarder, but I've never seen anything like it.

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Where have you got all this stuff from?

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From the local auction, mainly.

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Are you a collector, as well?

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I used to quite enjoy going with him.

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I must admit, some of the stuff he came home with I was happy about.

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I used to get excited.

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He got me my first job in the auction room.

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His mate was the auctioneer. I used to stand there and hold things up

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and guard the cabinet. I loved it.

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It was my first bit of pocket money when I was at school,

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so, yeah, my first job.

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Tell me about the family.

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I was chatting to your dad

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and he said he's used to being bossed about by women.

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How many in your family?

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-There's my mum, and I've got two sisters.

-And two granddaughters.

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Yeah, and my two little girls, so he's outnumbered, aren't you?

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-I am, always have been.

-I'm finally getting him a boy.

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-We know there's a baby boy in there?

-Yeah.

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-You're pretty happy, Granddad?

-Very good.

-Broken the tradition.

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By the time he's old enough to ride a mountain bike with me,

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I'll probably be too old.

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So you are into mountain biking.

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What is it about being on a bike?

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You forget your problems. You get on that bike...

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Escape all the women!

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And escape from the women, definitely!

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Pedal like hell! LAUGHTER

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-What's up with him?

-He has to take everything to the extreme.

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He can't just have a nice bike ride, otherwise I might go with him.

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But it's always got to be hills and rain and snow.

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SHE LAUGHS

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That's it. Fabulous.

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How have you felt about today?

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Because we have been trying to get rid of a fair amount of stuff?

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It's been a bit of fun.

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It will be sad when I see everything finally go,

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but it'll be nice to see the money to do the old Consul up.

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You'll have to show me that later on.

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But that's enough resting and chatting.

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-More work. Come on.

-OK.

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After you, Laura.

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John certainly seems to have a lot of energy for his years.

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It's a good thing, too, as there's plenty of work to do.

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As Laura continues her search around the house,

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we three chaps seem to have wound up in the garage.

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Hey, boys, you're looking tired over there. Come on.

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I like this.

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Where did you get this from?

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My mate, Dave, moved from a local house to Seaford.

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He was left with this.

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He had a garage sale, this was left over

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and he said, "Do you want it?", so I said "I'll have it, definitely."

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We can see on the front it's the Bally Manufacturing Company Ireland,

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but that's actually an American company based in Nevada.

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-Yeah.

-A great place to have slot machines!

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So have you had this working?

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It was working. We had it going probably about two years ago,

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18 months, I can't remember now.

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It was working fine and suddenly smoke started coming out.

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-Smoke?

-Off a unit inside.

-OK.

-So we haven't tried it since.

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I've always wanted one of these, I really have.

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The one-armed bandit has to be the great icon.

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The big cranking one arm,

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and a bandit because it left you penniless!

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The original fruit machines, as we call them,

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the original bandit machines,

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the reels evolved out of a poker game, so they had card suits

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and you would make up a poker hand. It would pay out based on that.

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I think it was prizes rather than money. Cigars and things like that.

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But it was the Bell-Fruit Gum Company

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that started to put fruit on the reels instead.

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And the prizes then were fruit gums that came out.

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That's where we get the word "fruit machines".

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-It's in a state that requires restoration. This is a project.

-Yes!

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But if you have a games room, a boy's room,

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and you had this working, it's a great thing.

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At auction, I'd go for

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-£50-£100 in this state.

-This amazes me.

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I wouldn't have thought that much, because it's a pretty ugly thing.

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He obviously doesn't like them!

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But if you think someone is going to go to auction

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and try and sell it, who's going to buy one?

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The people that buy this will know exactly what's on the inside

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and will know it's a minor thing to get going again.

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Somebody who specialises.

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Go on the internet I'm sure you'll find someone

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dealing in second-hand one-armed bandits.

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I'm sure there are.

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That Ford Consul means John has his hands full

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when it comes to restoration projects.

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Maybe it's a good idea to send this fruit machine to auction,

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but will our bidders gamble on it?

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30 for a one-armed bandit? 32. 35.

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35. 38. 40. 42.

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45...

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We'll find out soon enough.

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As time marches on, John discovers these three mantle clocks,

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a pair of 19th-century slate-and-marble French models,

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and an Edwardian cocked-hat mantle clock.

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I've been told John has another two boxes of clocks in his attic,

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so I'm sure he won't miss these, especially as our expert reckons

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they should make £100-£150 for the three.

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John, my dad reckons this is worth something.

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Let's have a look, Laura. Right.

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Interesting. It's a watercolour.

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It looks like the River Nile.

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It's also signed "John Varley" in pencil and "98".

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Does that mean anything?

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No, but I know John Varley is a good artist,

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because my dad's awlays gone on about it.

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-So you do listen?

-A little bit!

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I don't really appreciate pictures of boats and water.

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-He's got about 1,000 of them!

-OK. It's quite a nice picture.

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Very typical of his work. John Varley, I know of his watercolours.

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He travelled extensively throughout the Middle East.

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He was born around 1850 and lived to the 1930s.

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But the nice thing about this picture is,

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when John Varley's work comes up at auction,

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they're nearly always landscapes

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and it's nearly always the Nile scenes,

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his Egyptian scenes, that make most money.

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-Any idea what Dad paid for this?

-It came from a house clearance, I believe.

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I think it was about 35 quid.

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That was quite a good buy. How long ago?

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Um, I remember it from being a child,

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so probably about 15, 20 years, at least.

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My only criticism of this picture is this foxing.

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Can you see these little spots?

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-Yeah.

-It's like rust. It's caused by iron impurities in the paper.

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If I had this picture at auction today, I wouldn't hesitate

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to put an estimate of 300-500 on it.

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Definitely more interested in the cash than that picture,

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-to be honest!

-Do you think we should sell it?

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-Yep. Don't ask Dad, just sell it!

-SHE GIGGLES

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OK, well, we'd better take this

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before it ends up on the last boat to Cairo.

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-Definitely!

-Come on, let's see what else we can find.

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No hesitation from Laura there, was there?

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If we are to reach the £1,000 target to restore

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John's beloved Ford to its former glory,

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that watercolour will go a long way to raising the money.

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It looks like Laura's on a roll

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as she finds this reproduction art-deco lamp.

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It's another result of John's hanging around in auction rooms.

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Repro pieces tend to attract lower bids,

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but there's still a market for it and John prices it at £30-£50.

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John, John, I know you're giving it a polish, mate,

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-but it needs a bit more than that!

-It needs a lot more.

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Come here and just talk me through this little beauty of yours.

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-What is it?

-A 1958 Mark II Highline Consul.

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A year later they went to a lower line. This was our everyday car.

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I bought it in 1980, '79 or '80.

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Er, it was on the road for approximately four years.

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I took it off the road to give it a respray and to do her up

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and, I'm afraid, things happened

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and time went on and kids came and it just got left, I'm afraid.

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-Why is this so special to you?

-To me?

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When I was a teenager, my first car was one of these.

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I've always had a soft spot for them. They're a nice-looking car.

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They're amazing for a 1958 car.

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In the year it was made, people were still riding

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in sit-up-and-begs with rod brakes.

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This was quite futuristic in its day.

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What do you need to do to get it roadworthy?

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It needs a respray to make it look nice,

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but, mechanically, it needs the brakes going over.

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They've perished. The exhaust has perished,

0:15:560:15:59

and just a general service. It should go after that.

0:15:590:16:03

You're going to do all the work yourself?

0:16:030:16:05

I should be able... I probably won't do the respray. I'll get someone to do that.

0:16:050:16:09

They don't like you spraying cars in private areas any more.

0:16:090:16:13

How long have you been a mechanic?

0:16:130:16:16

I started an apprenticeship '63, '64.

0:16:160:16:19

This car, thinking about it,

0:16:190:16:21

it would have been about six or seven years then.

0:16:210:16:24

You've got a smile on your face when you talk about it.

0:16:240:16:27

-You're looking forward to it?

-I'd love to get it going.

0:16:270:16:30

It would be nice to see it on the road.

0:16:300:16:32

OK. Let's get back. You want £1,000. I think you'll need about five.

0:16:320:16:37

-Maybe.

-Come on, let's get some work done.

0:16:370:16:40

'You can see why John's eyes light up

0:16:400:16:42

'when he talks about that car of his.

0:16:420:16:44

'I really hope we can make his target.

0:16:440:16:46

'And, on the subject of motoring,

0:16:460:16:48

John's discovered some original 1960s British racing programmes.'

0:16:480:16:52

-John.

-Hello.

-These look very interesting.

0:16:520:16:56

-Something we could send to auction if you're willing to get rid of them.

-Yeah?

0:16:560:17:00

What can you tell me about them? Where did they come from?

0:17:000:17:03

I bought them from a local auction. Approximately 10, 15 years ago.

0:17:030:17:08

I bring them out occasionally and look at them, admire them,

0:17:080:17:11

then put them away again.

0:17:110:17:13

I never quite knew what to do with them.

0:17:130:17:15

There's so many, you can't frame them.

0:17:150:17:17

I don't know, you know.

0:17:170:17:19

I think these are great. There's about ten there.

0:17:190:17:24

Each one is like this.

0:17:240:17:26

It has the programme and the photographs inside.

0:17:260:17:29

I think they would mount up.

0:17:290:17:31

It would look very good, but you'd need a big wall.

0:17:310:17:34

I think these could be mounted up and made into great displays.

0:17:340:17:38

-Did you ever go to any motor racing?

-Yes, back in the '60s.

0:17:380:17:43

And, lately, Silverstone with my good friend,

0:17:430:17:48

who raced Caterham 7s.

0:17:480:17:50

We've got Silverstone,

0:17:500:17:52

and Goodwood there, the British Grand Prix.

0:17:520:17:55

I'm guessing these have been bought by subscription.

0:17:550:18:00

I think they will have covered the event in a motoring magazine,

0:18:000:18:03

done a review of it, and probably advertised,

0:18:030:18:07

buy your programme and photographs as part of that article.

0:18:070:18:11

I think somebody has built this collection up over time like that.

0:18:110:18:15

Do you remember what you paid for them?

0:18:150:18:17

I'm not 100% sure,

0:18:170:18:19

but no more than 100. Probably about 60.

0:18:190:18:23

Oof! I was going to say around £100.

0:18:230:18:26

I would estimate 70 to 100.

0:18:260:18:30

They're worth... That's £10 each.

0:18:300:18:31

-I think they should be worth more.

-Yeah, course, should be.

0:18:310:18:35

If you're willing to sell, they'll be a great lot.

0:18:350:18:37

-I love them. I think they'll go down well. Shall we sell them?

-Yes.

0:18:370:18:41

They're going to sell them.

0:18:410:18:42

As we continue searching around the house,

0:18:420:18:45

the motoring memorabilia keeps on coming

0:18:450:18:47

as expert John discovers these hood ornaments.

0:18:470:18:50

These were really popular back from the 1930s

0:18:500:18:53

and originally had built-in thermometers to gauge the temperature.

0:18:530:18:57

By the 1960s, they'd become more decorative, like these examples.

0:18:570:19:02

John thinks they should bring in £30-£50.

0:19:020:19:05

Finally, we turn out something that John didn't buy at auction -

0:19:050:19:09

this art-deco glass and chrome centrepiece bowl

0:19:090:19:13

which was passed on to him by his aunt.

0:19:130:19:15

Made in the 1920s,

0:19:150:19:16

we reckon it might notch up £40-£50 at auction.

0:19:160:19:19

-You found the clock, then? Yeah?

-Quite hard to miss, this one.

0:19:200:19:24

That's right. There's another one in the other room, a bigger one.

0:19:240:19:27

-A bigger one? A better one than this?

-Yeah.

0:19:270:19:29

OK. Let's have a look at that one.

0:19:290:19:31

-I've had a good look at this. Show me the other.

-OK.

0:19:310:19:34

So this is the other one. It's a bit bigger.

0:19:350:19:38

-Yeah. A lot bigger.

-What's the story with this one?

0:19:380:19:41

This came from our local auction rooms

0:19:410:19:44

about 15 years ago, approximately.

0:19:440:19:45

What about the other one we looked at in the kitchen?

0:19:450:19:48

The other one came from a good friend of mine in Suffolk.

0:19:480:19:51

He and I swapped it for a nice P5P Rover.

0:19:510:19:54

You swapped it for a car?

0:19:540:19:56

I did, yes. It's different.

0:19:560:19:58

-Do you think you might have got...

-No money changed hands.

0:19:580:20:01

..the better end of the deal?

0:20:010:20:02

I hope I did, but who knows? I'll find out soon.

0:20:020:20:06

I have to say, having looked at that one

0:20:060:20:08

and looked at this one briefly, I prefer this one.

0:20:080:20:12

That one there, which is Robert Bunyan, Lincoln,

0:20:120:20:15

the case has had lots of alterations.

0:20:150:20:18

Selling that at auction, people will pick up on that. This one here,

0:20:180:20:22

interesting.

0:20:220:20:24

From a distance, I thought it was a North Country clock.

0:20:240:20:27

When you look at the dial, on that it says "John Griffiths, Bethesda".

0:20:270:20:32

That's in Wales.

0:20:320:20:33

So, movement and case look contemporary to me.

0:20:330:20:36

I've learned something today,

0:20:360:20:38

I can't always call these North Country clocks now,

0:20:380:20:41

because that's one of those things that we've taken as gospel

0:20:410:20:46

and is not, strictly speaking, true.

0:20:460:20:48

Interesting other feature - painted dial, arched top,

0:20:480:20:52

very typical of the early 19th century.

0:20:520:20:55

But, at the top, at first I thought you've got a moon phase

0:20:550:20:58

as an automaton, which changes as the month goes by,

0:20:580:21:02

-and tells you the phase of the moon. It's actually painted.

-Yeah.

0:21:020:21:05

So it's a faux moon phase.

0:21:050:21:09

John, I've never seen one like that.

0:21:090:21:11

You like these clocks.

0:21:110:21:13

There's someone not a million miles away

0:21:130:21:15

who can't stand these things, can you?

0:21:150:21:18

LAUGHTER

0:21:180:21:19

Give use your honest opinion, what you think of the clocks?

0:21:190:21:22

I think they're a bit of a waste of space, to be honest.

0:21:220:21:25

Basically, that's the technical term for saying she hates them.

0:21:250:21:28

-So what are they worth?

-If we sell them at auction

0:21:280:21:32

I'd be looking for them to make together about £1,400-£1,800.

0:21:320:21:36

Do you hate them now?

0:21:360:21:37

No. Isn't that one mine, Dad, didn't we say?(!)

0:21:370:21:40

LAUGHTER

0:21:400:21:42

I've always loved and admired the beauty of them, you know(!)

0:21:420:21:46

-Yeah, very good.

-Brilliant.

0:21:460:21:48

I think we've done well today.

0:21:480:21:50

With those clocks, that's pushed us over a little bit.

0:21:500:21:53

Because, conservatively, we think at auction we could raise £2,200.

0:21:530:22:00

How does that make you feel?

0:22:000:22:02

-It's pretty good, isn't it?

-Not bad for a load of old rubbish.

0:22:020:22:04

Well done, everybody. Fingers crossed. Off to auction.

0:22:040:22:08

"A load of old rubbish"?

0:22:080:22:10

I'd rather say "a great return on so many quirky collectables".

0:22:100:22:15

There's the Tri-ang bus from a route close to his home.

0:22:150:22:18

Tri-ang's always a collectable, so, despite the wear and tear,

0:22:180:22:22

it should make us £40-£60.

0:22:220:22:24

We've got that one-armed bandit.

0:22:260:22:28

Let's hope we hit the jackpot with £50-£100 estimate.

0:22:280:22:31

Plus, there's the Varley Junior watercolour.

0:22:330:22:36

John bought it around 20 years ago for £20.

0:22:360:22:40

We hope this picturesque view of the River Nile might fetch £300-£500.

0:22:400:22:46

Still to come on Cash In The Attic -

0:22:480:22:50

one family heirloom fails to impress the crowd.

0:22:500:22:54

Mmm. A little underdone there. Disappointed?

0:22:540:22:59

Er, yes, a little bit. It would've been nice if it had made more.

0:22:590:23:02

But which of John's auction finds turns out a very bright result?

0:23:020:23:07

-Are you happy with that?

-I'm very happy with that.

0:23:070:23:10

Find out when the gavel drops.

0:23:100:23:13

It's been a while since we spent that day with auto-mad John

0:23:170:23:20

and his daughter Laura and, my goodness, his house in South London

0:23:200:23:23

was a treasure trove.

0:23:230:23:25

It threw up a few surprises and we brought them here,

0:23:250:23:27

to the Chiswick auctions in West London.

0:23:270:23:29

Let's hope everybody here is in generous mood,

0:23:290:23:32

so we can get his pride and joy back on the open road.

0:23:320:23:35

'And the man of the moment is here, but there's no sign of Laura.'

0:23:350:23:40

-Hello, John, nice to see you, how are you? Hello.

-On your own?

0:23:400:23:43

Yes, where is she?

0:23:430:23:45

She gave birth yesterday morning. Eight-and-a-half-pound boy.

0:23:450:23:49

Congratulations! Well done, you've got the grandson you wanted.

0:23:490:23:53

We've had some excuses to get out of Cash In The Attic!

0:23:530:23:55

That's a good one, isn't it? HE LAUGHS

0:23:550:23:57

Can't get much better.

0:23:570:23:59

-Anything you're looking for?

-I'm interested to know

0:23:590:24:01

how the John Varley watercolour will go. I really like that.

0:24:010:24:04

Quite popular. Should do well.

0:24:040:24:06

Having had longer to look at the clocks, and in a better light,

0:24:060:24:09

I'm noticing more damage and wonder if I've overcooked the estimate.

0:24:090:24:13

-But we're here now, we'll find out.

-He doesn't care.

0:24:130:24:16

He's got his grandson. But the auction is about to start,

0:24:160:24:18

so we better get down to business. After you.

0:24:180:24:22

'John must be over the moon with a new addition to the family.'

0:24:220:24:26

'Let's see if we can make it a double celebration

0:24:260:24:28

'and make £1,000 to restore his other pride and joy,

0:24:280:24:32

'that Ford Consul.

0:24:320:24:34

'First, the cuddly creatures I came across in one of John's cabinets.'

0:24:340:24:39

As it says in the catalogue, they need a trip to the doll's hospital.

0:24:390:24:42

-I'm hoping we get about 30 quid.

-Yeah.

0:24:420:24:44

In need of TLC. Let's see what we can do. £30?

0:24:440:24:49

£20?

0:24:490:24:51

We'll start with £10, then.

0:24:510:24:53

£10. We're in.

0:24:530:24:55

That's good. Yeah.

0:24:550:24:57

At £10. At 10. Lots of love needed.

0:24:570:24:59

At £10. At £10. Going at £10. Gone at £10.

0:24:590:25:03

Well, they've got a home to go to.

0:25:030:25:05

Hopefully, they'll enjoy them more than I did.

0:25:050:25:08

I didn't think they were going to sell,

0:25:080:25:11

-then I'd have had the stuffing knocked out of me!

-Yeah!

0:25:110:25:13

Yes, you would. Not the best start, but these chaps are the first lot.

0:25:130:25:17

Maybe the number 93 Tri-ang bus will put us back on track.

0:25:170:25:21

Trundles along the road, the 93, still today,

0:25:210:25:24

about, what, 50ft from me?

0:25:240:25:28

So there should be a lot of people who like that.

0:25:280:25:31

And Routemasters are always popular.

0:25:310:25:33

-Good condition, John?

-It's not bad condition.

0:25:330:25:36

It is missing the Tri-ang labels, but it's good, we know it's Tri-ang.

0:25:360:25:39

I don't think 40 to 60 is an over-estimate. Let's see.

0:25:390:25:43

£20. £20 for it?

0:25:430:25:45

A bid at £20. 22. 25. 28.

0:25:460:25:50

30. 32.

0:25:500:25:51

35. 38. 40. 42.

0:25:510:25:54

45. 48. 50.

0:25:540:25:57

55.

0:25:570:25:58

52 over there? 52. 55?

0:25:580:26:01

-55.

-Keep going.

-58?

0:26:010:26:03

£55.

0:26:030:26:05

58 there. 60?

0:26:050:26:07

65.

0:26:070:26:09

70. 5.

0:26:090:26:11

-At £70.

-That's good. Looking good.

0:26:110:26:13

No? At £70.

0:26:150:26:16

-All done at £70.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:26:160:26:18

-Yeah.

-What a result.

-£70.

-That's all right. You're on cue there.

0:26:180:26:22

'Yes. It just goes to show you,

0:26:220:26:24

when it comes to antiques and collectables,

0:26:240:26:26

'good names like Tri-ang are still sought after.'

0:26:260:26:29

Up next, my favourite description of the day -

0:26:290:26:31

the art-deco lamp with the "scantily clad lady".

0:26:310:26:36

-I do love that.

-What, scantily clad ladies?

0:26:360:26:39

Yes, I do like that. But what about the lamp?

0:26:390:26:41

Reproduction. Decorative figures.

0:26:410:26:44

I've got £30-£50. Worth it for my money.

0:26:440:26:47

£50 for it?

0:26:470:26:48

£20 for it?

0:26:480:26:50

I'm bid at £20. 22. 25?

0:26:500:26:52

25. 28.

0:26:520:26:53

-Better.

-30.

-Yes, yes.

-38.

0:26:530:26:57

40. 42.

0:26:570:26:58

45. 48.

0:26:580:27:00

50. 55.

0:27:000:27:02

That's a bit better, isn't it?

0:27:020:27:03

55 over there? Hand's up, 55. 60?

0:27:030:27:05

5.

0:27:050:27:07

At £60.

0:27:070:27:09

65? At £60.

0:27:090:27:11

All done at £60.

0:27:110:27:13

-Oh!

-Not bad.

-That's all right. That's reasonable. That's OK.

0:27:130:27:17

Not bad? This is brilliant!

0:27:170:27:19

'Yes, it is brilliant. I don't know if it was her scanty attire,

0:27:190:27:23

'but this lady and her lamp have come in

0:27:230:27:25

'at £10 over John's top estimate.'

0:27:250:27:28

-Up next, the old one-armed bandit.

-Yeah.

0:27:280:27:30

-Your pride and joy in that garage.

-Yeah.

0:27:300:27:33

It isn't working, but they're iconic-looking things.

0:27:330:27:37

If you had a bar area at home

0:27:370:27:38

it wouldn't look out of place just as a decorative object.

0:27:380:27:41

It would be a bonus if it's working, but I've said £50-£100.

0:27:410:27:45

Do you think it will hit the jackpot for us?

0:27:450:27:47

-It would be nice if it does.

-Right, let's see.

0:27:470:27:50

One-armed bandit. £100 for it?

0:27:500:27:53

£50 for it?

0:27:530:27:54

-£30 for it?

-Oh, no.

0:27:560:27:58

Not a hand moved.

0:27:580:27:59

£30 for a... I'm bid at £30. 32. 35.

0:27:590:28:01

35. 38. 40.

0:28:010:28:03

42. 45. 48.

0:28:030:28:05

50. 55.

0:28:050:28:07

55. 60.

0:28:070:28:09

5. 70. 5.

0:28:090:28:11

It's getting there.

0:28:110:28:13

It's on its way.

0:28:130:28:15

At £70. That's the money.

0:28:150:28:17

All done at £70.

0:28:170:28:18

'£70 for something that isn't working.

0:28:180:28:21

'Let's hope that this bidder knows what he's doing

0:28:210:28:24

'and is just the man to restore it to working order.'

0:28:240:28:27

Bit of a fan of the art-deco period, John?

0:28:270:28:29

I love the art deco, it's great. This was a family piece.

0:28:290:28:32

It was my aunt's,

0:28:320:28:33

so I've got lots of memories of it from when I was a small child.

0:28:330:28:37

A period piece. I've got £40-£50. Any regrets?

0:28:370:28:41

It's a shame it's going out of the family,

0:28:410:28:43

but we're only caretakers of these things.

0:28:430:28:46

They've got to move on eventually.

0:28:460:28:48

£30? £30? £20?

0:28:480:28:50

£20. £10 for it?

0:28:500:28:52

Come on.

0:28:520:28:54

12. 15.

0:28:540:28:56

15. 18.

0:28:560:28:58

18. 20.

0:28:580:29:00

22?

0:29:000:29:02

22. 25?

0:29:020:29:03

25. 28?

0:29:030:29:04

It's creeping along.

0:29:040:29:06

At £25.

0:29:060:29:07

At 25. I'm going to sell at £25. We done?

0:29:070:29:12

Mmm. A little underdone there.

0:29:120:29:15

Disappointed?

0:29:150:29:16

Er, yes, little bit. It would've been nice if it made a bit more.

0:29:160:29:20

As we say, we need it to get the Consul on the road,

0:29:200:29:23

so the more the better, really. But, yeah.

0:29:230:29:26

'Hmm. That wasn't the figure we were hoping for,

0:29:260:29:29

'but we've got to keep our fingers crossed

0:29:290:29:31

'that the lots still to come will help push us to that £1,000 target.'

0:29:310:29:36

I think you're going to start crying now -

0:29:360:29:39

for a motor-racing fan, auto fan,

0:29:390:29:41

we're going to lose some 1960s Silverstone and other racing programmes and photos.

0:29:410:29:46

Are you sure?

0:29:460:29:48

Er, I hope... There's a chance I might take them home,

0:29:480:29:51

if they don't make the reserve. If they make the reserve, that's great.

0:29:510:29:55

-What's the reserve you put on them?

-£70.

0:29:550:29:58

£70, our bottom estimate. A great collection.

0:29:580:30:00

We have photographs of the races and the programmes.

0:30:000:30:03

I know you're really fond of these.

0:30:030:30:05

If they don't make £70, you'll be happy to take them home.

0:30:050:30:08

£50?

0:30:080:30:11

£40 for the lot?

0:30:110:30:13

A bid at £40. 42.

0:30:130:30:15

At £40.

0:30:150:30:16

42. 42.

0:30:160:30:18

45. 48. 50.

0:30:180:30:20

55. 60.

0:30:200:30:21

-5. 70...

-Oh, dear.

0:30:210:30:24

Looks like they're going.

0:30:240:30:26

Yes or no? At £80.

0:30:260:30:28

£80. £80 all done.

0:30:280:30:30

-£80.

-Oh, well.

0:30:300:30:32

Now, they made the reserve, but you don't sound too pleased.

0:30:320:30:36

No. I wouldn't have minded taking those home again.

0:30:360:30:39

They're something you can look at for hours

0:30:390:30:41

and get loads of pleasure out of.

0:30:410:30:43

And they don't take too much space up.

0:30:430:30:45

He's the only person in the history of Cash In The Attic,

0:30:450:30:48

when it went over the reserve price went, "Oh, no."

0:30:480:30:53

'Oh, John, maybe you should have chosen a higher reserve to ensure they remained with you.'

0:30:530:30:58

'But never mind,

0:30:580:30:59

'it's not a bad price and every little helps the target.'

0:30:590:31:02

'Speaking of which, how are we doing so far?'

0:31:020:31:05

We've still got a long way to go. You wanted to raise £1,000.

0:31:050:31:09

-The halfway total is £315.

-All right.

-Yeah.

0:31:090:31:15

Still, the face hasn't moved! Still not giving much away.

0:31:150:31:19

-Yeah. We're on course, I think.

-I think we're doing extremely well.

0:31:190:31:24

-You've got some major items to come.

-Yes.

-Some major items to come.

0:31:240:31:28

The clocks and the John Varley watercolour.

0:31:280:31:30

All the big money's in the second half.

0:31:300:31:32

'If you'd like to try selling some of your treasures at auction,

0:31:320:31:36

'be aware there are fees, such as commission, to take into account,'

0:31:360:31:40

'so it's best to check in advance.

0:31:400:31:42

'It's always possible to spot a bargain at auction

0:31:420:31:45

'and John's busy eyeing up something that could make a great investment.'

0:31:450:31:49

-Hello, do you reckon that goes with your shoes?

-Do you think so?

0:31:510:31:54

It kind of brings out the colour of my tie!

0:31:540:31:57

-Very nice handbag. It's tin!

-That's because it's a biscuit tin.

0:31:570:32:01

-Are they worth anything?

-Indeed. They're very collectable, in fact.

0:32:010:32:04

This was an early example of customer commercialism.

0:32:040:32:09

How companies built customer loyalty, much like cigarette cards.

0:32:090:32:13

They had some wonderfully novel examples. These all date

0:32:130:32:16

from the early 20th century.

0:32:160:32:17

All Huntley & Palmer, one of the biggest names in tins

0:32:170:32:20

and quite a collectable lot.

0:32:200:32:22

What should I look for?

0:32:220:32:23

These are not bad condition. There are scratches.

0:32:230:32:26

-Condition everything?

-Condition is very important.

0:32:260:32:30

That has picked up a few knocks.

0:32:300:32:33

Novelty is a key thing when looking at value.

0:32:330:32:35

I've seen biscuit tins make several hundred pounds each.

0:32:350:32:38

But the rarer an item is, the more damage a collector will accept.

0:32:380:32:42

Go on, is it worth anything? Can I put any money in my purse?

0:32:420:32:45

200-300, the estimate. They may well top that top estimate.

0:32:450:32:48

I'd have still paid more for what goes in them.

0:32:480:32:50

Biscuits, I love them. Let's get back to the auction.

0:32:500:32:53

These tins may be devoid of biscuits,

0:32:540:32:56

but that didn't stop them from selling on the day

0:32:560:32:59

for a mouth-watering £260.

0:32:590:33:01

As we resume the auction, John's collection of clocks

0:33:030:33:06

is our next lot to go under the hammer.

0:33:060:33:09

All mantle clocks, they're in good working condition,

0:33:090:33:12

so let's hope they hit that £100-£150 valuation.

0:33:120:33:14

-Three together. They're not big sellers, but they're not bad.

-No.

0:33:170:33:20

-They're decorative.

-I've got 100 to 150.

0:33:200:33:22

I'm hoping we'll get in the estimate.

0:33:220:33:24

Start me...£100.

0:33:240:33:27

£100 for the lot. £80?

0:33:280:33:30

I'm bid £80.

0:33:300:33:32

That's good.

0:33:320:33:34

At 90? 5. £90 bid.

0:33:340:33:37

That's very good, isn't it? It's going the right way.

0:33:370:33:40

At £90.

0:33:400:33:41

Are we done at £90?

0:33:410:33:44

All out and going at £90 and gone.

0:33:440:33:46

-Laura, she'll be surprised that.

-Really?

0:33:460:33:48

-She thinks they're all rubbish.

-She did, didn't she?

0:33:480:33:52

She did. She rubbished them all.

0:33:520:33:54

Even so, I'm a bit disappointed by that.

0:33:540:33:56

I thought we'd get within our estimate.

0:33:560:33:58

-We're 10 quid under.

-Yeah. Not too bad.

0:33:580:34:00

It's quite good.

0:34:000:34:02

'And John's daughter, Laura, thought they were all junk!

0:34:020:34:06

'Our next item is the large resin sculpture

0:34:060:34:08

'John once picked up at auction.

0:34:080:34:10

'He's now returning it, but will it make our estimate?'

0:34:100:34:13

I like it. A lot of people don't, though, do they?

0:34:130:34:16

-What do you think?

-It's a decorative thing.

0:34:160:34:18

You have to have the interior for that. It's priced to sell.

0:34:180:34:22

We've got £80-£120. Missing this one, John?

0:34:220:34:25

I don't know. I don't suppose I will.

0:34:250:34:27

I don't use it any more, although it's pretty and in good condition.

0:34:270:34:31

So hopefully it will fetch a few bob.

0:34:310:34:33

A lamp there. What's it worth? Quite a lot for the money.

0:34:330:34:36

£50 for it? £50 for it?

0:34:360:34:39

A cheap lamp at 50.

0:34:390:34:40

60?

0:34:420:34:43

60? 5.

0:34:430:34:44

70. 5.

0:34:440:34:46

-Yes! Come on.

-It's going. Yes.

0:34:460:34:49

80. 5. At 85. 90?

0:34:490:34:52

-5.

-Keep going.

0:34:520:34:54

-100.

-It's got to do it.

0:34:540:34:55

110. 120.

0:34:550:34:57

130. 140.

0:34:570:34:59

150.

0:34:590:35:01

160. 170.

0:35:010:35:03

170 now?

0:35:030:35:05

160. Are we done at 160?

0:35:050:35:07

170. 180.

0:35:070:35:09

-It's going!

-It's going, yeah.

-It keeps going.

0:35:090:35:12

180. A bid at 180. Are we done at 180?

0:35:120:35:14

The original bidder at 180. It's going to go at 180. 180, your bid.

0:35:140:35:18

-180!

-That's good.

-Are you happy with that?

-I'm very happy with that.

0:35:180:35:22

-He's quite a cool customer.

-He is.

0:35:220:35:24

Granddad again last night, just sold a lamp for 180 quid

0:35:240:35:27

and he's standing there, "Yeah, not bad."

0:35:270:35:29

-That's all right.

-It's lovely, that.

0:35:290:35:31

'Yes, John's cool as a cucumber,

0:35:310:35:33

'though I think he must be pleased with that result.

0:35:330:35:36

'Almost as difficult to gauge is our next item -

0:35:360:35:39

'this oak barometer that's been passed down through John's family.'

0:35:390:35:43

I've seen a lot of barometers

0:35:430:35:45

and they've had mixed responses on this programme.

0:35:450:35:47

How will we get on with this one?

0:35:470:35:49

This is not a bad barometer. It's Victorian.

0:35:490:35:51

It's an aneroid barometer in working order.

0:35:510:35:54

I've got £30-£50, not a lot of money. Any family history with this?

0:35:540:35:57

It used to be my grandparents'.

0:35:570:35:59

I remember seeing this as a small child. I always admired it.

0:35:590:36:02

Hopefully, it will fetch a bit more than the 30.

0:36:020:36:05

£30 for it?

0:36:050:36:06

£30 for it? £20 for it?

0:36:060:36:07

Come on!

0:36:070:36:09

£20 bid.

0:36:090:36:11

22. 25.

0:36:110:36:13

28. 30.

0:36:130:36:15

32? At £30.

0:36:150:36:17

32? At £30. At £30.

0:36:170:36:19

No money for this barometer at £30.

0:36:190:36:21

£30. At £30. Are we done? 32. 35.

0:36:210:36:24

Still less than half price. 35 and £32.

0:36:240:36:28

I'm going to sell it at £32.

0:36:280:36:29

-32. That went cheap.

-Bottom estimate,

0:36:290:36:32

-but I was hoping it would do better than that.

-Yeah.

0:36:320:36:35

That's a shame. It's a decorative piece.

0:36:350:36:37

'Hm. That was a pretty lukewarm response from the bidders,

0:36:370:36:41

'but every pound counts towards getting John's Consul on the road.'

0:36:410:36:45

Next up is my favourite lot today, it's the John Varley watercolour,

0:36:450:36:49

the Nile scene. Where did this come from?

0:36:490:36:52

I bought it at a house clearance down in Hove some 15 years ago,

0:36:520:36:56

-something like that.

-What did you pay? Do you remember?

0:36:560:36:58

I'm not 100%, but I think it was about £40... CHRIS INHALES SHARPLY

0:36:580:37:02

..which I thought was a snip.

0:37:020:37:04

-45, I think it was.

-You had a result.

-I know that.

0:37:040:37:08

-Are we going to make a profit?

-I think so.

0:37:080:37:10

-Don't tell me you brought this back on your pushbike.

-No!

0:37:100:37:13

£200 for it?

0:37:130:37:15

£200 for it. Start me at £200. It must be worth £200.

0:37:150:37:17

£200 for it?

0:37:170:37:19

It's struggling to get a bid of £200.

0:37:190:37:21

It's struggling.

0:37:210:37:23

£200 to start. No bid at £200?

0:37:230:37:24

Shall I pass the lot?

0:37:240:37:26

Nobody to buy at £200. Disappointing.

0:37:260:37:28

Worth three or four. £200 for it?

0:37:280:37:30

£200. No bid. I do apologise.

0:37:300:37:34

That is a big surprise.

0:37:340:37:35

I was talking to the auctioneer before the sale

0:37:350:37:37

and he sold two John Varleys here a couple of weeks ago

0:37:370:37:40

and they made good money.

0:37:400:37:41

I don't know what happened. Just not the buyer here today.

0:37:410:37:45

You've got a choice - take it home or you ask them to re-enter it.

0:37:450:37:48

I still think it's priced correctly.

0:37:480:37:50

But that has made a different to our target today.

0:37:500:37:52

'Hm. It certainly has.

0:37:520:37:54

'John has decided to take this home.

0:37:540:37:55

'Although it means we're down on our total,

0:37:550:37:58

'I don't think he's too upset at keeping it.'

0:37:580:38:00

'With two lots to go, we can't afford to take anything else home

0:38:000:38:04

'if he wants to make his target,

0:38:040:38:06

'but will these 1960 hood ornaments entice our bidders?'

0:38:060:38:09

-We're not asking for much, are we?

-£10 each.

0:38:090:38:12

Very popular with vintage-car enthusiasts,

0:38:120:38:15

because they put them back on the vintage cars now.

0:38:150:38:18

They should sell at that sort of money,

0:38:180:38:20

but we've had a few shocks,

0:38:200:38:21

-so I'm not going to count any of my chickens.

-Yeah.

0:38:210:38:24

£30? Quite collectable these, I'm told.

0:38:240:38:27

£20. 20 bid. 22.

0:38:270:38:29

25. 28?

0:38:290:38:31

30. 32.

0:38:310:38:32

35. 38. 40. 42.

0:38:320:38:36

At £40. At £40. 42?

0:38:360:38:38

45. 48. 50?

0:38:380:38:40

55. 60?

0:38:400:38:42

65.

0:38:430:38:44

70. At £65.

0:38:440:38:46

All done at 65 and going.

0:38:460:38:49

For £65.

0:38:490:38:51

-£65.

-£65.

-And a number of different bidders in the room for them.

0:38:510:38:55

-There were, yes.

-Just goes to show, popular items.

0:38:550:38:58

-All of them with greasy hands.

-Yeah!

0:38:580:39:00

Smelling of car oil.

0:39:000:39:02

-Nuts, like you. Love their cars.

-Yeah.

0:39:020:39:05

'It's good there are some motoring enthusiasts in the crowd,

0:39:050:39:09

'but as we come to our final items

0:39:090:39:11

'we could really do with some horologists in the room.

0:39:110:39:13

'The auctioneers have split these two clocks into separate lots

0:39:130:39:17

'in the hope of maximising their sale potential.'

0:39:170:39:21

The first one up is the oak-cased one with the Lincoln movement.

0:39:210:39:25

-Which one was your favourite, John?

-Um, the other one.

0:39:250:39:29

I know it wasn't your favourite.

0:39:290:39:31

It was the first one I bought.

0:39:310:39:33

The larger one I bought at a local auction in Cheam some years ago.

0:39:330:39:38

The other one I swapped for a car.

0:39:380:39:40

-Swapped for a car again.

-Yeah.

-Who got the best end of the deal?

0:39:400:39:44

I did think, before I spoke to you, that I had, but maybe not.

0:39:440:39:49

Since they've come into the sale room I've had a closer look.

0:39:490:39:52

In better light, I've noticed more damage to both of them,

0:39:520:39:55

so I think my estimate is optimistic.

0:39:550:39:57

Is that worth...£500 for it?

0:39:570:40:00

£300 for it?

0:40:020:40:04

Can't get a bid at £300. I'm going to pass the lot.

0:40:040:40:07

£300 for it? Nobody at £300? Give me £300 for it.

0:40:070:40:12

No bid to start me? All finished? No? No offers.

0:40:120:40:14

-Oh!

-Not a bid.

0:40:140:40:17

That's not good, because we need to sell the clocks to hit our target.

0:40:170:40:21

-Yeah.

-Ouch.

0:40:210:40:22

£500 for this one. £500 for it.

0:40:220:40:25

£400 for it?

0:40:260:40:27

Start me at £400. £400 for it?

0:40:270:40:30

Again, no bid at £400. I'll pass the lot.

0:40:300:40:32

£400? No bids at £400.

0:40:320:40:36

At the £400 mark. I'm afraid, no offers.

0:40:360:40:38

-Oh, dear.

-Well, that is very disappointing.

-Yeah.

0:40:380:40:41

-Our big lots have let us down today.

-Yeah.

-OK.

-Really big time.

0:40:410:40:47

-You've got over £1,500 of unsolds.

-Yeah.

0:40:470:40:53

'Ouch. John's probably wishing he hadn't swapped his car for this clock,

0:40:530:40:57

'but given his love of auctions,

0:40:570:40:59

'I'm sure he'll have another go selling them in the future.'

0:40:590:41:02

That is it. I don't think I've ever experienced such misfortune -

0:41:020:41:07

mixed fortunes.

0:41:070:41:08

We started so well and coughed and spluttered over the line.

0:41:080:41:12

-Lots I thought wouldn't do terribly well have done OK.

-Yes.

0:41:120:41:15

The big lots we were relying on...

0:41:150:41:17

The lots you can sell month in month out, the clocks and a decent painting by a decent artist,

0:41:170:41:22

no bids at all.

0:41:220:41:23

I know you wanted to raise £1,000.

0:41:230:41:27

Well, today, we have raised

0:41:270:41:30

£682.

0:41:300:41:33

-That's a shame, isn't it?

-It is a shame.

0:41:330:41:36

-I could do the front of the car.

-The front of the car.

-Optimistic.

0:41:360:41:39

-But you've got 1,500 quids' worth.

-Is the engine front?

0:41:390:41:43

-Yeah.

-That's a start. It really is a start.

-Yeah.

0:41:430:41:45

Oh well, John didn't quite make the £1,000 he needed

0:41:510:41:54

to get that Consul back on the road.

0:41:540:41:56

But the £682 he did raise will go a long way.

0:41:560:41:59

In the meantime, to see how splendid they can look

0:41:590:42:01

when restored to their former glory,

0:42:010:42:03

he's gone along to meet another Ford Consul fanatic.

0:42:030:42:07

The car's in lovely condition.

0:42:090:42:10

It's fantastic - like the day it left the factory, probably.

0:42:100:42:13

Very nice, yeah.

0:42:130:42:15

If mine looks anything like that, I'll be well pleased.

0:42:150:42:18

It would be fantastic to get it done in time

0:42:180:42:21

to maybe do the London to Brighton Old Crocks ride,

0:42:210:42:24

the Mark II day, as they have.

0:42:240:42:26

There's quite a lot of Consuls still on the road

0:42:260:42:29

and it'd be lovely to see it mixed in with the rest of them,

0:42:290:42:32

where it should be.

0:42:320:42:34

John Leyland needs 1,000 pounds to restore his beloved Ford Consul to its former glory. Chris Hollins and expert John Cameron help him decide which collectables he might send to auction. They uncover some classic car memorabilia along the way.