Scott Cash in the Attic


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Scott

Antiques series. Aled Jones and Jonty Hearnden assist Diana Scott in raising £800 to pay for a luxury cruise on the QE2. Items include Indian silver and a Persian tray.


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Hello and welcome to the show that helps you raise money by rooting out

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the valuables in your home and selling them at auction.

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Today, I'm on my way to meet a lady who wants to turn her treasured possessions

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into a Transatlantic trip.

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Coming up on Cash In The Attic, our expert uses his charm on our well travelled host.

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-I've been admiring your small drawers.

-Oh, really?

-Steady on!

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There's some good news about an exotic heirloom.

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-Wow! That's brilliant!

-Yes.

-Fantastic.

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And at the auction, there's a surprise in store for one unsuspecting item.

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-Block his ears.

-He didn't hear that!

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Be there when the hammer falls.

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I'm in South London to meet a lady who's called us in

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to help her meet her faraway friend in style.

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Diana Scott has enjoyed a particularly interesting life.

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Brought up in India on her father's coffee plantation,

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she returned to the UK in the 1950s

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and went on to have a successful career in the civil service.

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She met her husband in the early 1960s

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and they went on to enjoy 40 years of happy marriage.

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Her husband passed away ten years ago,

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but Diana still travels widely and loves to play a few hands of bridge with her friend Joan,

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who'll be helping on today's rummage, so while our expert Jonty starts the hunt for collectibles,

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I'll go to meet our intriguing host.

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-Ah, ladies. Look at you two, thick as thieves!

-How are you how are you?

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-Nice to see you. You're Diana, yes?

-Hello.

-And who have we got here?

-This is Joan.

-Hi, Joan.

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-You've been dragged along.

-Not exactly dragged.

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Go on then, Diana. Why have you called us in here?

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I want to flog a few things, so I can get to New York to see a friend of mine,

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-an ex-office colleague who's not well.

-Have you been before?

-Yes, several times. I love New York.

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-Do you?

-Absolutely. How did you two meet?

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-Was it anywhere as glamorous as New York?

-No Balham!

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-Close!

-Close.

-How much are you hoping to raise?

-800 upwards.

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-I want to go on the QM2.

-Oh, wow! So two grand would be better. Lovely.

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-Three, if you like. I could have a private cabin.

-You could take this lovely lady with you.

-Of course.

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Yes, and if one shares a cabin, it is cheaper.

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Single cabins are extremely expensive. They're more than double.

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You're talking yourself onto the trip already!

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The good news is that I come as a duo as well.

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Not as formidable, us two, though. I've got Jonty Hearnden with me.

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An expert. He's already started. The plan is you go upstairs and carry on and we'll meet Jonty.

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-Lovely.

-OK.

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'Given Diana's travel experiences, I'm hoping we'll find some pieces of international interest,

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'as we search through her comfortable and orderly home.

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'Talking of comfortable and orderly, Jonty Hearnden has spent years appraising collectibles,

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'so if anyone can spot a prized piece, he's the man that can.'

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-What did I tell you, look, we have an expert.

-Hello.

-Hello.

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-How are you doing? Nice to see you. I've been admiring your small drawers.

-Oh, really?

-Steady on!

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He's a smooth talker!

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What have we got here?

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This particular chest of drawers is actually almost 200 years old, which is quite amazing.

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-What's the history?

-It belonged to my grandparents

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and has been handed down through the family.

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-Did you know how old this was?

-No, I didn't.

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I had no idea it was that old, no. I'm very pleased to hear that.

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It's so nice to see a smaller piece,

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but they're made and constructed in exactly the same way

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as you would do a regular bedroom chest of drawers.

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But this bow front was very popular in the early part of the 19th century.

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And the timber, of course, used is mahogany,

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which was very popular in the 19th century, all the way through

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the 19th century, mahogany was more often than not the timber of choice.

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Is it in good nick?

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There are a few chips

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and breaks where you would tend to see them, so it's really round the side of the drawers

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and often the handles as well, but having said that, it's pretty good condition.

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The way you can date it clearly is not so much

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the shape of the furniture, but just look at the handles.

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-I see.

-These ebony handles here, these are Regency handles.

-Oh.

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So early 19th century.

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So circa 1815 to 1830, this piece of furniture would have been made.

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The question is, we need to get this lady to New York, what's it worth?

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The value of this particular piece will be between 150 and maybe £250 at auction.

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-Oh, good.

-You're not smiling. You are now!

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-Are you happy with that?

-Oh, yes. That's good.

-Absolutely.

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-It's CHEST a start!

-Yes.

-Sorry. I'm here all day.

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'Nothing wrong with a well placed pun.

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'As our rummage really gets under way, Joan finds this piece,

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'in the form of a Victorian mourning brooch, which belonged to Diana's grandmother.

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'Queen Victoria wore a mourning brooch after the death of her husband, Prince Albert,

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'which led to them becoming very fashionable.

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'Some brooches even contained locks of the deceased person's hair.

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'This brooch is made of jet, which is essentially fossilised wood,

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'and is very collectible.

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'Jonty estimates a hammer price of £30 to £50.

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'And it looks like Joan is really on form today.'

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-Jonty, look what I've found.

-What have we got here?

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-I think they're tea caddies.

-Are these for sale, do you think?

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-I think they could be.

-OK.

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What we're looking at is a Chinese tea caddy.

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Looking at the decoration, this has all been turned on the lathe

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and also hand carved.

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If you look at the top, this white metal top, this is not silver.

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It gives us some kind of indication of age.

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Can you see how clean and fresh that looks?

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This tea caddy was probably made any time after the Second World War.

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-It's not particularly old. What have we got here?

-This is a metal one.

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Yeah, OK. Again, if I turn that upside down,

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can you see that's rather fresh looking?

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It's not that old. Where would Diana have got these from?

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Hong Kong, I expect.

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Britain and China have this very long history with tea.

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Tea comes from China, but in order for us to acquire tea

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in the early 18th century, we supplied them with opium.

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There's this history, this combination of China,

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the Orient, tea, and to have Chinese caddies as opposed to English made caddies

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sometimes is a little bit special.

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Value wise, we're not going to get a very high figure for them,

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but put the two in together and we'd get roughly £40 to £60 for them.

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Do you think that's going to be OK for Diana?

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I think actually that every little helps. She'll be delighted.

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Pop those down on the table for safe keeping and off we go.

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£40 won't get Diana out of the Solent, let alone halfway across the Atlantic,

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but it's still early.

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There does seem to be a decent range of pieces on offer.

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I spot this elaborate silver plated jardiniere,

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which Diana brought back from India, plus this Indian copper tray

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she picked up at auction in the early 1960s.

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In many parts of India, this sort of silverware was often given

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to the bride as part of her dowry, or used in religious ceremonies.

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It's a decent lot

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and Jonty's hoping for a very attractive £60 to £80 at auction.

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Whilst our expert carries on the good work, I've noticed an intriguing image.

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This is a fantastic photograph.

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My husband used to be an animal photographer.

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-Wildlife, he did, mainly.

-Why did he enjoy animals so much?

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He was very good with animals. He really should have been a vet.

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So what's the story behind this little fella?

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This one was found in the middle of a road down by the roundabout.

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-This squirrel?

-Yes, when he was a baby. He fell out of the tree.

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He leapt out of the car, picked it up and brought it home.

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Of course, it was just about that big, four inches.

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He fed him every two hours with a little pipette of warm milk.

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And we kept him and he used to sit in my dressing gown pocket

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and travel all round the house with me.

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-Really? In the dressing gown pocket?

-Really! So he was hand reared.

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He stayed with us for three years. Oh, he was great fun!

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And then, one day, there was another squirrel out the back there.

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It had no hair on its tail, a dog had got to it. It looked more like a rat.

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We called him Rat Tail. And he took him off nightclubbing, obviously.

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He used to spend nights away from home.

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And one day, he disappeared altogether. Couldn't find him.

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-The weeks went by and Malcolm was really devastated.

-I bet.

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I was sitting here and there was a little tap on the back window

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and I looked out and there was Peanuts.

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I said, "Peanuts!" He kept going towards the back door.

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I went to let him in. I shouted up to Malcolm, "Peanuts is back!"

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I went out.

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Sitting on the table in the garden was another little baby squirrel.

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-He'd brought his little son or daughter to show us.

-Wow!

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-By the time Malcolm got downstairs, he'd disappeared again.

-Oh, no!

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Took his offspring and disappeared. Wasn't that lovely, that he should bring his offspring to see us?

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-What a fantastic story! And you've got this to remember him by.

-Yes.

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-He was adorable.

-What do you think your husband would make of you coming on Cash In The Attic?

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-I don't know. He always said my back view was the best!

-Nonsense.

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-He always did.

-He was better with animals.

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He wasn't telling the truth.

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I think we should carry on with this rummage and get you to New York.

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-Yes.

-We should squirrel yourself, eh?

-Oh, yes! Right.

-Let's go.

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'It's been lovely talking to Diana and I think she's a very determined lady.

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'It's not long before she spots this ornately carved oak chair.

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'It belonged to her grandparents and has been in the family for over a century.

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'Oak has been a desirable material for furniture making for many hundreds of years

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'because it's so hard wearing and has a very attractive grain.

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'This 19th century example should make us

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'a comfortable £60 to £80 at auction.

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'We seem to be turning up some fascinating pieces.

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'Hardly surprising, when you consider our host is such an interesting lady.'

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-What have you got in your hands there?

-It's an inkwell.

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-Isn't that beautiful?

-It is rather lovely.

-Whose was this?

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It came from a great uncle of mine, Henry Capali, on my father's side.

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Yes, it's come down through the family. I think it's rather lovely.

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We've got an inscription just here on the lid.

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It says "HC with love from MKM".

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HC will definitely be Henry Capali, yes.

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Looking at the decoration on the outside of this inkwell,

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it looks silver, but the decoration is not English. Where is it from?

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I think it must have come from India.

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-Henry Capali was a coffee planter out in India.

-If it is Indian, it won't have an hallmarks.

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If you look round the rim, there is no hallmarks on there at all.

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That makes sense. I think that's really beautiful.

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-And it also looks like it's in very good condition.

-Yes.

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-Have you used it, yourself?

-No, I haven't. I think my mother did.

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And my father. But I haven't used it as an inkwell.

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What I find interesting about inkwells, they have been fashionable for a long period of time.

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But by the 1880s, the invention of the fountain pen came in,

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so you didn't need an inkwell.

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You'll find good quality inkwells will probably be

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more 19th century, rather than into the Edwardian 20th century period.

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I think this is charming and there's a lot of people

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who would love to still have this on their desk.

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-They're more decorative than anything else. Is this an object you might think of selling?

-Yes.

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-I think I'll have to part with it.

-I think it weighs against it that it's not British,

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because those hallmarks give it absolute clarity that it's silver.

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In an auction catalogue, you can't call it silver.

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It would be called white metal. But everyone will know it's silver.

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It's good enough quality.

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-At auction, that's £60 to £80 of anybody's money.

-Ooh, good!

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-Happy about that?

-Yes. I'm pleased with that.

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-I'll look after that very carefully. Let's carry on.

-Right.

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We've seen a lot of £60 to £80 estimates from Jonty today.

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But if Diana's going to make it to New York, let's hope

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the inkwell brings in a good deal more than that on auction day.

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£50. £30, bid at £30.

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32, £30.

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32, 35, 35, 38.

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Looks like the bids are flowing, but will it reach that estimate?

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As our rummage continues, there's plenty of evidence of an Indian theme.

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Not least this magnificent beast. I don't mean Jonty.

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-One elephant for you, sir.

-Let's have a look. He's rather handsome.

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-He is.

-Gosh! There's lovely movement to him.

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You see a lot of elephants around, carved elephants, that have

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come from Asia on the high street and the quality is just not there.

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-If I could compare the two, there would be a marked difference.

-Lots of lovely detail.

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That's what you're looking for, be it something carved out of a solid piece of timber,

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or a sculptural piece of work, maybe a bronze.

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It's the detail. Have a look at the top and the detail on the back.

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And on the front, and even the floor that it's standing on here. All hand carved.

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-What about the fact that it's tuskless?

-That can be replaced.

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You could even have some fresh timber there, bleached timber.

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A restorer could easily put that back in.

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-Presumably, he's an Indian elephant.

-Yes. Came from Ceylon.

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Yes. The Indian elephant are a subspecies to the Asian elephant.

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Different to the ones you would see in Thailand.

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They're taller and thinner. But they all have smaller ears than the African elephant.

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But the detail is all there. Look at that. It's so tactile.

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-We'll put it in the auction sale.

-Diana is willing to part with it, but for the right price.

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-So what's it worth?

-I would value him between £50 and £80.

-Aha.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Yes. That would be nice.

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-Time to say goodbye to the item.

-Ah! Ciao bella!

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Yes, ciao indeed!

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Not quite the hefty price we'd really like, but a useful amount towards our £800 target.

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Let's hope it makes its upper estimate and beyond.

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I know Jonty takes great pride in his appearance, so it's fitting

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he finds this silver dressing table set, including mirror,

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brushes, comb and matching compact, all the things he uses daily!

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It belonged to Diana's mother and has a Birmingham hallmark, which dates it to 1929.

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These were popular at a time when grooming

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and dressing was a much more elaborate process than it is today.

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There's plenty of avid collectors of sets like these, and even though it's not in the best condition,

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Jonty still gives it an attractive estimate of £100 to £150.

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This is an oasis of calm in the centre of London.

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All you can hear is birdsong. It's lovely.

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You've led a pretty eventful life.

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I suppose I started travelling when I two and a half.

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That's when I went out to India. We were backwards and forwards.

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I just love travelling,

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I love meeting people and I loved languages at school.

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-That was my forte.

-What was life like in India?

-Oh, I loved it.

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You didn't have to think for a second.

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-What was so special about it?

-Oh, well... The climate.

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We lived on an estate, so there was plenty of space and I had all these pet animals.

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Spotted deer, a lamb, ponies. My father had a beautiful Arab stallion.

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Beautiful.

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I had to go to boarding school

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because there were no schools near the estate.

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I was a bit of a tomboy.

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So I'd be caught sliding down a marquee or climbing a tree.

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If I got out twice in a term, I was very lucky.

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I didn't care for that so much, but otherwise life was good.

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So, cruising to New York. Why cruising?

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-Have you been on a cruise before?

-No. Never.

-A first for you. Fantastic!

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-That's why I'm so keen to do it.

-You're really looking forward to it.

-Really, yes. And seeing my friend.

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-Are you going to go for a long time?

-No, I like to get back to old Paddy.

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You've got to come back for Paddy the dog. You can't stay for too long. After New York, where's next?

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After New York? I had an offer to go to Mongolia, but it's not on my hit-list.

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If you want to get to New York, we should carry on with this rummage and find some treasure somewhere.

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Usually under the bed or in the cupboard! Let's go.

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'It's great to see Diana's passion for travel and new experiences is still very much in evidence.

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'Joan is keeping busy and soon spots this pair of Buddhas,

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'brought back from China by Diana's uncle in the mid 1920s.

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'Made of ivory, figurines like these would have been made

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'for the tourist or export market and appear to be representations

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'of the fat or laughing Buddha, rather than the more formal pieces.

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'International trade treaties mean that only ivory

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'worked before 1947 is legal for sale at auction.

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'Happily, this pair can make the journey to the sale room at £50 to £60.

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'Our rummage continues and it looks like the ladies may well have it covered.'

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-Yes, lovely.

-Have you found anything for me?

-What do you think of this?

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That's very beautiful. We're looking at a shawl.

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-Whose shawl is this, or was this?

-It came down from my grandmother.

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It was a christening shawl, my mother was christened in it.

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-I believe I was christened in it.

-It seems to be in very good condition.

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But looking at the style of these flower heads,

0:19:150:19:19

this looks like it's probably a good 100-years-old.

0:19:190:19:23

-Oh, yes! Must be.

-Isn't it beautiful? What do you think, Joan?

0:19:230:19:27

It's beautiful, the work that's gone into it. It's fabulous!

0:19:270:19:31

-Is this usually packed away?

-Yes, packed away in a drawer.

0:19:310:19:35

What about selling it?

0:19:350:19:37

Obviously, this is a large part of your family history here.

0:19:370:19:41

I've got no-one to pass on to, so I think someone else might like to enjoy it.

0:19:410:19:47

-And maybe another christening will take place in it.

-Who knows?

0:19:470:19:51

The great thing about this shawl, this lovely cream colour, you could wear this at almost any occasion.

0:19:510:19:57

It's a very commercial piece.

0:19:570:19:59

And the detail here is really lovely,

0:19:590:20:03

and a lot of people will greatly appreciate that.

0:20:030:20:06

No holes, anyway.

0:20:060:20:07

Well, that's what I find so incredible,

0:20:070:20:11

because items like this are so susceptible to moth damage,

0:20:110:20:15

-you know, insect infestation.

-Yes.

0:20:150:20:17

So, because you've kept it in such good condition,

0:20:170:20:20

this single item is going to be worth between £50 and £80.

0:20:200:20:23

Oh, that would be nice. Yes, good.

0:20:230:20:25

I think that's a really lovely quality,

0:20:250:20:28

definitely worth putting in the auction, so, well done.

0:20:280:20:30

Right, let's go and find some more stuff, come on.

0:20:300:20:33

Diana is definitely focused on that trip to New York,

0:20:350:20:38

the question is, will we make enough to get her there?

0:20:380:20:41

With our rummage winding down, Jonty spies another oriental piece,

0:20:410:20:45

in the shape of this glazed Chinese jardiniere.

0:20:450:20:47

It hasn't come that far though,

0:20:470:20:49

because Diana picked this one up at £20 at a London restaurant in the 1950s.

0:20:490:20:54

In Chinese tradition, the elaborate dragon decoration represents abundance,

0:20:540:20:59

prosperity and good luck,

0:20:590:21:01

let's hope we can count on some of that

0:21:010:21:03

when it goes to the auction at an estimate of £50 to £80.

0:21:030:21:06

Jonty, what do you think of this necklace, what do you think of that?

0:21:100:21:14

I say, look at that.

0:21:140:21:16

Does this have a story?

0:21:160:21:18

Yes, it was given to my mother by the Maharaja of Mysore at his Durbar,

0:21:180:21:23

and all the ladies who were invited got a special present,

0:21:230:21:25

and she had that, I think it's rather lovely.

0:21:250:21:27

-So, do you remember any grand events yourself?

-Well, I remember that.

0:21:270:21:32

So, you remember being at this very event?

0:21:320:21:35

Oh, yes, I did, it was absolutely splendid,

0:21:350:21:38

all the elephants were trooped on, followed by the horses and the dogs,

0:21:380:21:43

2,000 dogs, imagine, in packs of four coming on with all the things.

0:21:430:21:47

It was absolutely marvellous, then the fireworks were set off,

0:21:470:21:51

and the fountains in the Mysore Palace gardens all came up,

0:21:510:21:55

all different colours, and it was absolutely a night of magic.

0:21:550:21:59

What I would have paid to have been standing there, observing the whole thing.

0:21:590:22:02

Yeah, it was great.

0:22:020:22:03

Because all one sees is those rather faded black and white images

0:22:030:22:07

of those very grand events.

0:22:070:22:09

-It was a privilege just to have been there.

-Oh, absolutely.

0:22:090:22:12

Yes, what's so exciting about this necklace as well

0:22:120:22:15

is that we've got a real sense of weight here.

0:22:150:22:18

We have these lovely, stylised peacocks

0:22:180:22:21

-with their plume of feathers.

-Yes.

0:22:210:22:23

We also have all of this enamel work,

0:22:230:22:25

the drop on here, on the front, it's absolutely beautiful.

0:22:250:22:29

So, would you consider selling this now?

0:22:290:22:32

Yes, I would, it just sits in a box now.

0:22:320:22:35

How much do you think it would be worth?

0:22:350:22:37

Well, let's consider value for a moment.

0:22:370:22:39

-Can we gatecrash this party, please?

-You can, have a look at this.

0:22:390:22:42

You know he's got something up his sleeve when he's presenting something like that.

0:22:420:22:45

So, go on, Jonty, how much?

0:22:450:22:47

We have a bit of an issue

0:22:470:22:49

because we can't tell of the quality of the gold.

0:22:490:22:51

We also have the added issue of the fact

0:22:510:22:54

that we have the enamel here as well, so, that's extra weight.

0:22:540:22:57

So, this is a bit of a guesstimate at the moment,

0:22:570:23:00

but I'm hoping that in my hand here we are looking at between £300-500.

0:23:000:23:07

-Wow!

-Well, that's brilliant.

-Oh, it is.

-Yes, yes.

0:23:070:23:10

Fantastic, so, Diana,

0:23:100:23:12

how much were you hoping to raise for this cruise to New York?

0:23:120:23:16

Oh, 800...more.

0:23:160:23:18

I can tell you, if we take Jonty's lowest estimate on all your items,

0:23:180:23:21

we're looking at making something in the region of £1,000.

0:23:210:23:25

-Ooh!

-That's good, isn't it?

-Lovely.

-That would be great.

-We can all go.

0:23:250:23:28

Wehay, yeah, why not? I fancy a weekend in New York, be lovely.

0:23:280:23:32

Girls, it's been absolutely fantastic,

0:23:320:23:33

really enjoyed meeting you, and we'll see you in the auction.

0:23:330:23:36

-It's been really nice to meet you both.

-Yes.

-Really, a great thrill.

0:23:360:23:40

So, Jonty's not sure as to the quality of this necklace,

0:23:400:23:44

but he's sticking his neck out,

0:23:440:23:46

and giving it a very optimistic valuation.

0:23:460:23:49

In any case, it's a beautiful item to end our fascinating day.

0:23:490:23:52

And there's been no shortage of pieces which should

0:23:520:23:54

create some interest in the sale room. That mahogany chest of drawers

0:23:540:23:57

has been passed down through Diana's family,

0:23:570:24:01

and is almost 200-years-old.

0:24:010:24:03

At £150-£250, let's hope it will furnish our travelling fund.

0:24:030:24:07

At £60-£80, we're hoping that inkwell

0:24:070:24:10

which belonged to Diana's father

0:24:100:24:13

will sell with quite a flourish.

0:24:130:24:15

And that silver, 1920s dressing table set should prove a real beauty

0:24:150:24:21

when it goes under the hammer at £100-£150.

0:24:210:24:25

Still to come on Cash In the Attic, is it a disastrous day for Diana?

0:24:270:24:33

£38.

0:24:330:24:35

Hasn't paid for the taxi fare yet, has it?

0:24:350:24:37

Or will she be sailing in to the sunset?

0:24:370:24:40

We made it.

0:24:400:24:41

It's got you closer to New York, that's why we're here.

0:24:410:24:45

Find out when the final hammer falls.

0:24:450:24:47

Well, it hasn't been that long since we spent a lovely day

0:24:520:24:55

with Diana and Joan rummaging in their house in South London.

0:24:550:24:58

Now, Diana would, ideally, love to cruise her way to New York, wouldn't we all?

0:24:580:25:03

She's brought her stuff to Chiswick auctions,

0:25:030:25:05

let's hope the bidders get on board.

0:25:050:25:07

Well, this is always a busy saleroom attracting a variety of bidders,

0:25:080:25:11

there's plenty of interest in today's lots,

0:25:110:25:14

so I have high hopes for Diana's pieces when they go under the hammer.

0:25:140:25:17

Sadly, Jonty's not able to make it today,

0:25:170:25:20

so, the ladies will have to put up with me.

0:25:200:25:22

Hopefully, I can bring a little of Jonty's effortless gravitas and style.

0:25:220:25:27

Yeah, who am I kidding?

0:25:270:25:28

First things first though,

0:25:280:25:30

and Diana's decided she can't bear to part with that Chinese jardiniere,

0:25:300:25:34

decorated with dragons, we found it in the rummage.

0:25:340:25:38

So, we're one down on the lots already.

0:25:380:25:40

Then there's that lovely Indian necklace,

0:25:400:25:42

given to Diana's mum by a maharajah, no less.

0:25:420:25:45

Which seems to be causing auctioneer, Tom Keane,

0:25:450:25:47

a touch of concern.

0:25:470:25:49

You're looking very stern, why did you want to see me about this?

0:25:500:25:53

-Aled, we've got a problem.

-I don't like it when you say that.

0:25:530:25:57

Oh, well, listen, do me a favour, smell that, will you?

0:25:570:26:00

-Smell it?

-Smell it.

0:26:000:26:02

And tell me what you smell.

0:26:020:26:03

Why do you want me to smell... OK, I'll smell it.

0:26:030:26:05

I'll do what you want.

0:26:050:26:07

-What can you smell?

-Metal.

0:26:070:26:09

-Alloy?

-Yeah, alloy.

0:26:090:26:11

Gold doesn't smell.

0:26:110:26:12

-That does.

-Yeah.

0:26:120:26:14

There's no smell at all off gold,

0:26:140:26:16

so if you ever smell an alloy, sort of, sniff, like you're doing now, it's wrong.

0:26:160:26:20

So, it's not gold, it's a mixture of brass and tin,

0:26:200:26:24

and it's junk jewellery, £40 or £60.

0:26:240:26:28

Uh, easy mistake to make?

0:26:280:26:29

Easy enough, but not many dealers know,

0:26:300:26:33

trust your nose because the smell gives it all.

0:26:330:26:36

Gold doesn't smell, end of.

0:26:360:26:38

So, I suppose I've got to go and tell the ladies the bad news?

0:26:380:26:41

You can give the bad news, not me.

0:26:410:26:43

-Thanks so much.

-Good luck.

0:26:430:26:45

Yes, typical of Jonty not to be here when I need him,

0:26:450:26:48

let's hope Diana and Joan aren't too upset with the news.

0:26:480:26:51

It's an easy mistake to make, apparently,

0:26:510:26:53

but I've just learnt a fantastic lesson from the auctioneer here,

0:26:530:26:57

and he said that gold doesn't actually smell of anything.

0:26:570:26:59

Except perfume if you've got it on your arm.

0:27:010:27:04

But we're looking at probably £40 to £60.

0:27:040:27:07

-Oh.

-But I'm still confident that we will get you on your cruise, OK?

0:27:070:27:11

-Are you?

-Yes, I am.

-Oh, oh!

0:27:110:27:13

I love the fact that Diana's got such a keen sense of humour,

0:27:130:27:16

but I know she really does want to make that trip to New York.

0:27:160:27:19

Fingers crossed, our other items will more than

0:27:190:27:22

compensate for the news about the necklace.

0:27:220:27:24

As the auction gets underway, our first lot is a rather sombre piece,

0:27:240:27:28

that Victorian mourning brooch, if you remember,

0:27:280:27:30

crafted from jet and made fashionable by Queen Victoria.

0:27:300:27:34

OK, first up then is the Victorian brooch,

0:27:360:27:38

tell us the story about this again.

0:27:380:27:40

It was my great grandmother's, it's just been handed down.

0:27:400:27:43

We're hoping for £30-£50,

0:27:430:27:45

that will get you an inch closer to New York.

0:27:450:27:48

We'll be all right, keep smiling. Let's see how we get on, here it comes.

0:27:480:27:52

£30 for it?

0:27:520:27:53

£30 for it? £20 for it?

0:27:530:27:56

A bit at £22, 25, 28?

0:27:560:27:59

28, 30, 32, 35, 38?

0:27:590:28:02

£35, see you at £35, are we done?

0:28:020:28:04

At £35, cheap at £35, selling, all done?

0:28:040:28:07

35, your bid at 35.

0:28:070:28:08

Hey, that's good, Jonty said £30-£50,

0:28:080:28:12

and we're £5 over his lowest estimate.

0:28:120:28:14

-Wow.

-We're up and running.

0:28:140:28:16

Well, I think that's a pretty good start to the auction,

0:28:180:28:21

and hopefully a good omen for the rest of our day here.

0:28:210:28:24

Next up are those mid 20th century Chinese tea caddies,

0:28:240:28:27

which still contain some old tea leaves.

0:28:270:28:29

There's definitely a market for pieces like these,

0:28:290:28:32

but are the right collectors in the room today?

0:28:320:28:35

You found this, didn't you?

0:28:350:28:36

-I did.

-A good find.

0:28:360:28:37

Um, tell us about it.

0:28:370:28:39

They were given to me by my boss,

0:28:390:28:41

I did a reception for him at his house,

0:28:410:28:43

he was pleased at the way it went, so that's my little caddie.

0:28:430:28:46

You're so pleased with them that we're giving them away.

0:28:460:28:49

Well, hopefully not giving them away, we're hoping for £40 to £60.

0:28:490:28:52

Let's hope.

0:28:520:28:54

For the two, £40, should make more, £40?

0:28:540:28:57

£20?

0:28:570:28:58

Bid at £20, 22? Bid at 20, I need 22, at 25?

0:28:580:29:03

25, 28, 30?

0:29:030:29:04

30, 32, 35,

0:29:040:29:07

let's see, 35, 38, 40?

0:29:070:29:09

42?

0:29:090:29:11

We're bid at £40.

0:29:110:29:14

Bottom of the estimate bid, at £40, at £40, £40, selling, all done?

0:29:140:29:17

£40, again, our lowest estimate, but not bad.

0:29:170:29:20

I'm glad you're smiling.

0:29:200:29:24

I'll be weeping in a minute.

0:29:240:29:26

Well, those caddies did, at least, manage their bottom estimate,

0:29:260:29:29

which has got to be a good thing.

0:29:290:29:32

I wonder if our next lot will leave us feeling a little more serene?

0:29:320:29:35

Those two ivory, seated buddhas

0:29:350:29:37

were bought by Diana's uncle in the mid-1920s.

0:29:370:29:39

We're hoping at least one bidder

0:29:390:29:42

will contemplate our estimate of £50-£60.

0:29:420:29:45

For the two, £50.

0:29:470:29:50

£30?

0:29:500:29:51

I'll work it down, £30, £20?

0:29:510:29:52

A bid at £20, at 22 there,

0:29:520:29:54

25? 25, 28? 28.

0:29:540:29:57

30? 32? 35? 35.

0:29:570:30:00

38? 40? 42?

0:30:000:30:03

42, 45? 48? 50?

0:30:030:30:07

Says no, a £48 bid there, 48, I'll take 50, 48,

0:30:070:30:10

all selling and done, 48 and going. Definitely out? Gone, £48.

0:30:100:30:13

£48, that's two pounds below Jonty's lowest estimate,

0:30:130:30:18

but still, still good.

0:30:180:30:20

Marvellous.

0:30:200:30:22

I love you, you've always got a smile on your face.

0:30:220:30:25

Yeah, she might be smiling,

0:30:250:30:27

but Diana's definitely underwhelmed by that result.

0:30:270:30:31

I'm hoping that the intricate Victorian shawl warms things up for us a little.

0:30:310:30:35

Next is the shawl, this was your grandmother's christening shawl, wasn't it?

0:30:350:30:38

Yes, my grandmother, great grandmother, actually.

0:30:380:30:40

My grandmother had four kids so they all had it.

0:30:400:30:43

Are you going to be sad to see it go?

0:30:430:30:45

Not really, it's only lying in a drawer.

0:30:450:30:48

-£50 to £80.

-I hope it gets it.

-Yeah.

0:30:480:30:51

Otherwise you might take it home with you.

0:30:510:30:53

£50 for it? £30 for it? It's worth that.

0:30:530:30:56

-I'm bid at £30, £30 for the antique shawl.

-Come on, £30, please.

0:30:560:31:00

32, 35, 38, 40?

0:31:000:31:03

See you at 38, take 40, 38, is that it?

0:31:030:31:05

At £38, seems cheap at £38,

0:31:050:31:07

I'm going to sell it at £38 and going. All done at £38? Finished.

0:31:070:31:12

£38, how do you feel about that? Oh, you're gritting your teeth, oh, no.

0:31:120:31:18

Are you sad about that?

0:31:180:31:19

-It hasn't paid for the taxi fare yet, has it?

-No, it hasn't.

0:31:190:31:22

It was fantastic, the work on it, um,

0:31:220:31:25

-you didn't put a reserve on it so it's gone to somebody for £38.

-We didn't.

0:31:250:31:29

They've got a bargain, to be honest.

0:31:290:31:30

I think it's a pity that such a beautiful item should be sold for so little.

0:31:300:31:35

It's always worth putting a reserve price on your best items,

0:31:350:31:39

enabling you to remove them from the sale

0:31:390:31:41

if they don't reach the price you want.

0:31:410:31:43

Now, Diana's carved, teak elephant, minus his tusks,

0:31:430:31:47

is a lovely reminder of her time spent in India as a child.

0:31:470:31:51

So, the elephant up next, the tuskless elephant,

0:31:530:31:56

it's got the sort of look on its face saying, please, don't sell me.

0:31:560:32:00

Don't say that, you'll make me feel so sad.

0:32:000:32:02

-It's lovely, isn't it?

-It is a beautiful elephant.

0:32:020:32:04

I found it, I remember, on that shelf, and it weighs a tonne.

0:32:040:32:07

-I know.

-Just like the elephant itself.

0:32:070:32:09

-Will you be sad to see it go?

-Really, yes, but, times must.

0:32:090:32:13

-And also, New York beckons.

-Yes.

0:32:130:32:15

Right, let's see how we get on.

0:32:150:32:17

Start me, £50 for it.

0:32:170:32:19

Start me, £30 for it? Not a hand moving, £20 for it?

0:32:190:32:22

Oh, no.

0:32:220:32:24

£20, £20, start me at £20 for it? A £10 note for it?

0:32:240:32:26

Oh!

0:32:260:32:28

Look at that, five hands go up now, bid at ten there, 15? 15, 18, 20?

0:32:280:32:32

At 18, have I got 20 in front of me?

0:32:320:32:33

20, thank you. 22?

0:32:330:32:35

Room full of people, we've got £20,

0:32:350:32:38

I'll take 22, at £20, you've got it.

0:32:380:32:40

Block his ears.

0:32:400:32:41

Shush, you didn't hear that.

0:32:430:32:46

Poor Jumbo, sadly, we did hear that very disappointing result

0:32:460:32:50

for such an impressive piece of craftsmanship.

0:32:500:32:53

Well, will our next lot do any better?

0:32:530:32:55

It's the ornate, Indian, silver jardiniere and Persian tray,

0:32:550:32:59

another memento from Diana's many travels.

0:32:590:33:02

You don't mind giving it up?

0:33:030:33:05

I do mind, but, you know, I'm on my way out, so...

0:33:050:33:08

Don't say that, you just said you were full of positive energy,

0:33:080:33:11

now you're talking about 'on the way out'.

0:33:110:33:12

Well, let's hope that the jardiniere and the tray are on the way out.

0:33:120:33:16

Hope so, I really do.

0:33:160:33:19

No flagging now, ladies, come on, positive energy.

0:33:190:33:22

Start me £50, please, bid at £50,

0:33:220:33:24

55, say 55? 55,

0:33:240:33:26

60, 5, 70, 5, 80?

0:33:260:33:31

5, 90? 5?

0:33:310:33:33

100, 110, 120, 130, 140?

0:33:330:33:37

130, bid at one 130 in the door, at 130, are we done?

0:33:370:33:42

Who else wants it? At 130 going to go, all done at 130 and gone.

0:33:420:33:46

Good riddance!

0:33:460:33:48

It's got you closer to New York, that's why we're here.

0:33:480:33:51

At last, a result we can really be pleased with,

0:33:510:33:55

that's a decent £50 over Jonty's upper estimate, phew!

0:33:550:33:58

Well, the first half has certainly given us food for thought,

0:33:580:34:02

with many items unable to reach their lower estimates.

0:34:020:34:05

But as we hit the halfway stage of the auction,

0:34:050:34:08

where do we stand with our target?

0:34:080:34:10

OK, ladies, half time and all is not lost, don't look like that.

0:34:100:34:15

I can tell you, at the moment, we've raised £311.

0:34:150:34:18

Oh, yes, just about get on the M4 then.

0:34:180:34:21

We're just outside Southampton at the moment.

0:34:210:34:24

-Yes.

-I'd say all to play for, wouldn't you?

0:34:240:34:27

I think we need to have a little break.

0:34:270:34:30

I think so, a stiff gin.

0:34:300:34:32

Maybe a stiff gin, I think I'll come and join you,

0:34:320:34:35

and we'll come back in about 15 minutes or so.

0:34:350:34:37

-All right.

-OK, lead the way, Joan.

0:34:370:34:40

Well, we're certainly keeping our fingers crossed our fortunes improve in the second half.

0:34:400:34:44

If you'd like to have a go at selling some of your items at auction,

0:34:440:34:49

do bear in mind that various fees do apply, including commission.

0:34:490:34:52

Charges tend to vary from one saleroom to another,

0:34:520:34:55

so it's always worth checking in advance.

0:34:550:34:57

So, as we reconvene for the sale, it's still all to play for,

0:34:570:35:00

with this 19th century silver carved inkwell,

0:35:000:35:03

which Diana inherited from her father.

0:35:030:35:07

So, ladies, let's hope that the writers are in the room now,

0:35:070:35:10

because it's the inkwell up next.

0:35:100:35:12

-Did you ever use this?

-Once, when there was ink.

0:35:120:35:16

Really? Who did you write to, do you remember?

0:35:160:35:19

It wasn't a love letter, please, don't tell me that.

0:35:190:35:22

No, it was to Winston Churchill, I admired him very much,

0:35:220:35:25

he didn't reply, but...

0:35:250:35:26

£50? £30?

0:35:280:35:31

I'm bid at £30, 32? Take 32, at 30.

0:35:310:35:34

Thank you, 35, 38, 40?

0:35:340:35:36

40, 42, 45, 48,

0:35:360:35:39

50, 52, 55, 58?

0:35:390:35:42

60? I'm bid at £58 and I'll take 60, you're saying no,

0:35:420:35:46

at £58, all done and going, all done at £58 then. £58.

0:35:460:35:49

-At least you're making some money.

-Mmm.

0:35:490:35:51

-You wanted to de-clutter, and you've done that.

-Yes, yes.

0:35:510:35:54

-And you're still making money.

-Mmm, how much have I made so far?

0:35:540:35:58

I'll let you know later, that's jumping the gun.

0:35:580:36:01

That's another of our pieces to come in under its lowest estimate, but only just.

0:36:010:36:06

Let's stay positive though,

0:36:060:36:07

because we still have some decent lots to go under the hammer.

0:36:070:36:11

Jonty didn't have to comb the house too much for our next item,

0:36:110:36:14

this Birmingham made silver dressing table set was used by Diana's mother

0:36:140:36:18

in the late 1920s, but will its quality be reflected in the price?

0:36:180:36:22

£100.

0:36:240:36:25

£50?

0:36:270:36:28

I'm bid at £50, £50, take 55, 55, there, 60 there, 65?

0:36:280:36:32

70? 5? 80? 5? 90? 5?

0:36:320:36:37

100? And ten? 120?

0:36:370:36:40

£110, bid at £110, 120, 130?

0:36:400:36:45

New bid at 120, 120, take 130, are we done this time?

0:36:450:36:47

All done at 120? Gone.

0:36:470:36:51

-£120, that's more like it, isn't it?

-That is more like it.

0:36:510:36:54

-Bang in the middle, Jonty said 100-150.

-Oh, good.

-Good.

0:36:540:36:57

The boy done good.

0:36:570:36:58

He certainly did, that's really a really healthy result,

0:36:580:37:01

could things finally be picking up for us?

0:37:010:37:04

Will this cautious crowd be as enthusiastic for our next lot,

0:37:040:37:07

the finely carved, high backed, Victorian chair.

0:37:070:37:10

It's been in Diana's family for over a century.

0:37:100:37:12

You could have sat in that instead of this.

0:37:150:37:17

-I know, it's beautifully cared.

-Absolutely stunning.

0:37:170:37:19

-It's solid, it takes my weight.

-Shush.

0:37:190:37:22

£50 for it.

0:37:220:37:23

£50 for a good chair? £30 for it?

0:37:230:37:25

-Oh, God.

-Bid at £30, £30, give me £32?

0:37:250:37:28

At £30, another bid at 32, 35, 38, 40.

0:37:290:37:33

42? 45? No?

0:37:330:37:36

Your bid at £42, take 45? Selling at 42, are we done?

0:37:360:37:40

Last chance, 42 for the chair, and gone, £42.

0:37:400:37:42

-A bit disappointing that, wasn't it?

-Yes, it was.

0:37:420:37:44

Worry not, darling, it's not as bad as a bad marriage.

0:37:440:37:48

You'll get over it.

0:37:480:37:49

Yeah, there we go, it's not as bad as a bad marriage.

0:37:490:37:52

I suppose that's one way of looking at it, Joan,

0:37:520:37:55

but we will need to make over £300 to meet that £800 target.

0:37:550:38:00

There are just two items left to sell.

0:38:000:38:02

This lovely, early Victorian, bow fronted,

0:38:020:38:04

miniature chest of drawers, belonged to Diana's grandparents,

0:38:040:38:08

and is a fine piece of mahogany craftsmanship.

0:38:080:38:11

Beautiful piece of furniture.

0:38:120:38:14

Beautiful isn't it, yes?

0:38:140:38:16

If I remember rightly, Jonty said it was in good condition.

0:38:160:38:18

Yes, it's in very good condition, yes.

0:38:180:38:20

We're hoping £150-£250, and if we don't get it,

0:38:200:38:24

you could well be going to Newark, not New York.

0:38:240:38:27

Let's hope not.

0:38:270:38:29

I've got two on the telephone waiting to bid,

0:38:290:38:31

and people in the room as well, start me at £150, here it goes.

0:38:310:38:34

At 150, the bid's there at 150, 160, 170, 180, 190?

0:38:340:38:38

200, and 20,

0:38:380:38:40

240, 260, 280, 300?

0:38:400:38:45

320? 320, 340,

0:38:450:38:47

360, 380, 400?

0:38:470:38:50

420, 440?

0:38:500:38:52

460? 480, 500?

0:38:520:38:56

520, 540?

0:38:560:38:58

560? Now at 540, bid at 540, madam, do you want to bid now?

0:38:580:39:03

Bid is at 540, yours if you want it.

0:39:030:39:05

Going to go once at 540, twice, and third time at 540, it's sold.

0:39:050:39:09

-Yes!

-£540.

0:39:090:39:12

We were after £150 to £250 and you got £540 for it.

0:39:120:39:18

-Lovely.

-What did I tell you?

0:39:180:39:20

Your positive energy has gone into the room.

0:39:200:39:23

We're on the way, Di, we're on the way.

0:39:230:39:25

Thanks to that telephone bidder, Diana's got herself

0:39:250:39:28

a fantastic sale. I think we really are back in the running,

0:39:280:39:32

or should that be cruising, for that trip to New York.

0:39:320:39:35

This auction has been quite the rollercoaster ride,

0:39:350:39:37

and our final lot seemed almost destined to stall before we'd even begun.

0:39:370:39:41

We now know it's not gold,

0:39:410:39:42

but I wonder if that ornate, Indian necklace,

0:39:420:39:45

which was a gift to Diana's mum from an Indian maharajah,

0:39:450:39:48

will enchant the bidders. Let's find out, shall we?

0:39:480:39:51

We're saying £40 to £60, who knows,

0:39:520:39:55

wouldn't it be great if it went for £300 to £500?

0:39:550:39:57

It would be a miracle.

0:39:570:39:59

Start me, £40 for it?

0:39:590:40:02

£40 for it, nice necklace? £30 for it?

0:40:020:40:05

Bid at £30, 32, 35?

0:40:050:40:08

35, 38?

0:40:080:40:09

38, 40? 42,

0:40:090:40:11

45, 48?

0:40:110:40:13

48, 50, 55.

0:40:130:40:15

60, 5, 70, 5, 80, 5,

0:40:150:40:19

90? 5, 100? 110?

0:40:190:40:22

120? 130?

0:40:220:40:26

120, bid at 120, the bid at 120, take 130, at 120, are we done?

0:40:260:40:30

Last chance, it's going to go at 120, the bid's there at 120.

0:40:300:40:33

-That's great news.

-Great news, yes.

0:40:330:40:35

-Wow.

-What's Jonty's address?

0:40:350:40:38

He's homeless at the moment I think.

0:40:380:40:41

I'm not surprised.

0:40:410:40:42

Well, I think Jonty's forgiven,

0:40:440:40:46

that's a much better result than we could have imagined,

0:40:460:40:49

and another very attractive amount to go into the cruising kitty.

0:40:490:40:53

After all's said and done, though,

0:40:530:40:54

just how much have Diana's varied selection of pieces managed to make?

0:40:540:40:59

Well, glamorous ladies, I can tell you that your work here is done.

0:41:000:41:03

We've had a few ups and downs, haven't we, it's fair to say.

0:41:030:41:06

You're hoping for £800 to take you on that cruise to New York.

0:41:060:41:12

You've actually raised £1191.

0:41:120:41:17

-Yay!

-Wow, yippee!

0:41:170:41:19

One trip to New York.

0:41:190:41:20

And I must say, it's been lovely meeting you,

0:41:200:41:22

and it's been lovely meeting you as well.

0:41:220:41:24

-And very nice meeting you.

-It's been a pleasure.

-Absolutely.

0:41:240:41:27

I've had lots and lots of fun,

0:41:270:41:28

and you have a fantastic time in New York.

0:41:280:41:31

-Thank you very much.

-Send me a postcard.

0:41:310:41:32

-We will.

-Definitely.

-OK.

0:41:320:41:34

Diana's voyage is a year away,

0:41:400:41:41

but she's so excited about her auction earnings,

0:41:410:41:44

that she couldn't resist popping down to Southampton with friend Joan,

0:41:440:41:48

to sample a taste of what's in store on the majestic Queen Mary II.

0:41:480:41:51

It's absolutely massive, I think, you know,

0:41:510:41:53

it's going to take me a week at least to find my way round to different places.

0:41:530:41:57

But it's gorgeous.

0:41:570:41:59

She's just the largest floating hotel that one can imagine.

0:41:590:42:05

But has their fact-finding mission been a success?

0:42:050:42:10

Absolutely, I can't wait,

0:42:100:42:11

so, next year, I just hope to be on here again,

0:42:110:42:15

we're looking forward to it very much indeed.

0:42:150:42:17

Well, I'm ecstatic that Diana's antique items have done so well for her,

0:42:210:42:25

and we wish her all the best on the high seas, I'm rather jealous.

0:42:250:42:29

If you want to raise money for something special,

0:42:290:42:31

and you think you've got the antiques scattered around your home,

0:42:310:42:34

then why not apply to be on our show?

0:42:340:42:35

Just fill out the form on our website. Good luck to you.

0:42:350:42:39

We'll see you next time on Cash In the Attic.

0:42:390:42:41

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:42:480:42:51

Aled Jones and expert Jonty Hearnden assist Diana Scott in raising £800 to pay for a luxury cruise on the QE2. The veteran traveller's home is full of mementoes she has picked up from all over the world, including Indian silver and a Persian tray.