Episode 18 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


Episode 18

Chefs Rosemary Shrager and Jean-Christophe Novelli take to the road through Yorkshire to see who can buy antiques that will cook up profits at auction.


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Transcript


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'Some of the nation's favourite celebrities.'

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Why have I got expensive tastes?

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'One antiques expert each.'

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La belle epoch?

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'And one big challenge -

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'who can seek out and buy the best antiques at the very best prices...'

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Answers on a postcard.

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'..and auction for a big profit further down the road?'

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I love it! Ah!

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'Who will spot good investments and listen to advice?'

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-You like it?

-I think it's horrible.

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'And who will be the first to say, "Don't you know who I am?"'

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Well done, us!

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'Time to put your pedal to the metal.

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'This is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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'Yeah!'

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'On this Road Trip, we're really cooking

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'with a couple of culinary maestros who are also close mates.'

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Hello, everybody.

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Shall we wave? Hello!

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'Coo-ee! Jean Christophe Novelli and Rosemary Shrager.'

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-Hello!

-It's Rosemary and Raymond!

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BOTH LAUGH

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Yes. Hello!

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I must say that I do have a few antiques. I do like antiques.

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'Jolly good.

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'Jean Christophe is a French master of the culinary art

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'who first came to Britain in the early 1980s.

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'Since then, he's opened a string of restaurants,

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'winning four consecutive Michelin stars.

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'Sacre bleu! If that wasn't enough, he also owns a cookery school

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'and brightens up Britain's cooking shows with his handsome physog!'

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That's all the work making you look 20 years younger!

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They're wasting the budget!

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-I'm really looking forward to it.

-It's going to be fabulous.

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-I tell you something...

-In Yorkshire.

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-Watch the road!

-Ooh! The brakes.

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'That looks, um, terrifying.'

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-You've been to antiques shops?

-Oh, yes. I love antiques shops.

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'Rosemary Shrager is a chef who's worked for top restaurateurs and in stately homes,

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'run no less than three cookery schools and published books

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'which bring her stellar skills to the masses.

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'She's also a regular on the gogglebox,

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'where she's tutored all and sundry

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'and traded baking for bush tucker on I'm A Celebrity.

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'Rather you than me, Rosemary.

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'Today, our gastronomic guy and gal are driving a red-blooded American classic,

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'a 1965 Ford Mustang.'

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I wonder who our antique experts are going to be.

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-Do you have a clue?

-No, I don't.

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'But I do. Hello! Paul Laidlaw and Margie Cooper.'

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-Us and two chefs, eh?

-LAUGHS

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"I like this vase." "Do you, chef? Yes, chef. Buy it, chef!"

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'Paul Laidlaw's a canny Scott's auctioneer

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'who's quite clear that he's happier in a saleroom than a kitchen.'

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If you ever see me get two courses within a reasonable time of one another,

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you are likely to see a grown man cry, shout or break something.

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'Margie Cooper is a dealer and silver specialist,

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'who always charms with her ready laugh.'

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LAUGHS

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-I don't envy them their career. I'd rather have ours.

-Oh, what?

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'Quite right, Margie.

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'This lover of silver has definitely set her sights on gold in this race.'

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It's not much fun coming second.

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-It's the lengths you'll go to achieve that.

-Cross the line.

-Absolutely.

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I crossed over to the dark side years ago, of course!

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'I've got my eye on you, Paul.

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'They're piloting a snow white starlet, a 1960s Morris Minor.

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'Today, they'll begin in Gomersal, West Yorkshire,

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'tour through the lovely West Riding

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'and end up at auction in the fine city of Sheffield.

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'Margie and Paul have decided which of the chefs they're going to claim for their respective teams.'

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So you're taking Rosemary and I'll have Jean Christophe.

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Good idea.

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And may the best man win! PAUL LAUGHS

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Yes, chef!

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'And the competition is already heating up.'

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Get me into the shop, I'll find the right thing. I'll beat you.

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A dozen eggs! We could stop and get some eggs.

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'There are two good eggs waiting for you in a nearby car park.'

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There we are!

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'Both teams are aiming for the same first shop,

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'each armed with a £400 budget.'

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ENGINE STARTS

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'Rosemary and Paul are motoring off in determined fashion.'

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-Have you known Jean Christophe long?

-I've known him for over 20 years.

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-Oh, my word!

-I used to work for him. He's absolutely fabulous.

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Today, everything goes out of the window because I'm very competitive.

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'Meanwhile, though they're headed to the same place,

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'Jean Christophe and Margie seem to have driven off into a rain shower.

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'That cloud must be following you.'

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Argh!

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Right...

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What's that?

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Look at our wonderful technique.

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We're getting more wet doing this than if we'd not bothered!

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-That's very clever.

-Oh, hang on!

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Are you in?

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BOTH LAUGH

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'What a palaver! But they're back on the road.

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'Unsurprisingly, Rosemary and Paul are the first

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'to make it to today's inaugural shop, the Old Silk Mill.'

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-Ooh, we're here!

-Look who's NOT here.

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Ha! No, they're not! They're not here yet!

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That is good news.

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'They're meeting dealer Simon.'

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Hello. I'm Simon. Welcome to the Old Silk Mill.

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I'm Paul. Good to see you.

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'Time for this brand new team to get browsing.'

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-Lovely welcome. What a lovely spot.

-Isn't it nice? Sweet little chair.

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-I love the feel of that.

-Yeah.

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'Soon, Paul's spied something over yonder.'

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Two hand lanterns appealing to different markets.

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'He's found two lanterns of differing design.

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'One made to be mounted on an early motor car,

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'and the other a hand lantern issued by the London Midland and Scottish Railway,

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'a precursor to British Rail.

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'They both date from the early 20th century.'

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Value, that's the punchline.

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-Too much.

-They're worth £20, £30 each.

-Yeah.

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But... I'm not getting a good vibe?

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-Is that not you? Are these just...?

-That's not. That would be me.

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'Ticket price on that lamp is £48,

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'but Paul's sending Rosemary off with strict instructions.

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'Go for it, girl!'

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-WHISPERS:

-Ruthless! I'm thinking a tenner!

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'Watch out, Simon! Here comes trouble. Big time.'

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What would be your best price?

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I'm in a generous mood. 30. You're going to hate me for this.

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But please, um...ten?

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You can have it for 20, definitely.

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15? Please?

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Seeing as it's you, Rosemary, 15.

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Thank you!

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'Put him down. That's a good deal, but Paul's still got his eye on the other lantern.'

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Can I push it further? Next to it... Now, Rosemary doesn't like it.

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If that's 15, the two could be 25, couldn't they?

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That's not as valuable as that.

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What about 28 for the pair?

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Shall we do 28? OK, let's do 28. As long as I get another cuddle.

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You can have another cuddle!

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'Another cuddle? Gosh! I think Simon might be a fan of yours, Rosemary.

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'After a hesitant start, Rosemary seems to be getting the hang of this haggling lark

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'and they've got their first lot in hand for £28.

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'Which might shine a light.

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'It looks as though Jean Christophe and Margie have finally caught up.'

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-Hello.

-Look at that!

-I don't know you.

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I'm Simon. Pleased to meet you. Are you OK?

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'What might Jean Christophe's strategy be?'

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You know, like going to a food shop, obviously, you can't smell, you can't taste.

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'You can taste the antiques, if you want, Jean Christophe.

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'I don't know if I'd recommend it.

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'Mm, aroma of hat!'

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Would you let me this desk for 400 quid?

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-How much is the piano?

-LAUGHING: How much is a piano?

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He's so excited. We've only got £400 and we're trying to make a profit.

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I've lost control.

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Look! I've lost control! Complete control!

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LAUGHS He's having a good time.

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It's not his field and it's an exciting field.

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'Jean Christophe soon sniffed out something he's really keen on.'

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-How about that horse?

-Oh, crikey!

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-You've got to think, where I come from...

-That!

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-..something like this.

-That is awful.

-I don't think so.

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That is the worst horse in Christendom.

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I know it's not perfect.

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MUSIC: Theme to "Rawhide"

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'It's a 20th-century carousel horse missing one ear

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'that's been liberated from a fairground and fitted on runners.

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'There's no ticket price. To put it mildly, Margie is not keen.'

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It's in terrible condition. It doesn't rock.

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-It's got no age to it at all.

-But the thing is...

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I've never seen anything as horrible in my life.

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That's what people like! If it's too beautiful, people hate it.

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'You've found that, have you, Jean Christophe?

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'Under sufferance, Margie will fetch Simon.'

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Simon, follow me. That horrible horse.

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-It's not horrible.

-It is horrible.

-It's something attractive.

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I bet it's expensive.

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The horse is 200. BOTH GASP

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You see? I told you it's worth something.

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-MARGIE: Move on.

-Why don't we say 40 quid?

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'Steady on, Jean Christophe.'

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75. Oh, that's...

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-My only concern is the missing ear.

-MARGIE: It is a slight problem.

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Shall we call it Vincent Van Gogh? LAUGHS

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SIMON: How about I meet you halfway? Say, 55, and you've got a bargain.

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40. If you accept 40, I'll go for it

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and it's out of your showroom.

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SIMON: Mm...

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-You've got a deal, Jean Christophe.

-You're a good man, because I really believe in it!

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'So, Jean Christophe negotiates an excellent deal on his beloved horse.

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'Despite her professional reservations, Margie will indulge him on this one.

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'What a nice thing.

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'Rosemary and Paul are still downstairs

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'and they've spotted something of their own.'

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-Look! "Lusty's Maidsaver!"

-Oh, I love it!

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-GASPS

-That's a gem.

-I LOVE it!

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'It's a mid 20th-century kitchen branded as the Maidsaver!'

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-It's bang on trend.

-I wonder how much this is.

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'Ticket price is a hefty £225,

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'so they have to agree a deal with Simon - the deal of the century.'

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Simon? Can I ask you a question?

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SIGHS

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'Now Rosemary's got him where she wants him, she's going to try for another reduction.

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'Stand by. Poor boy.'

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50. Ooh!

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I'm afraid that's far too cheap. 55.

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'You're a quick learner. You've really taken to bargaining. You've terrified him.'

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I think if we stretched to 125, you're getting a bargain.

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No, no, no. We can't.

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I've got a price at the top we can only do, seriously.

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I can only do it. OK...70.

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We have got it up at 225, which is a reasonable price.

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Minimum we could go to, that would be 90.

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'Simon's giving you a run for your money.'

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75.

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I think 85, you've got an absolute bargain.

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A real, real bargain at 85. 82 and I'll call it a deal.

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ROSEMARY LAUGHS HEARTILY

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Fantastic!

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Have you any idea how glad I am that Rosemary is on MY side?

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She's a tough cookie!

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'She certainly is. Now Rosemary's trying to get Simon to include a few small kitchen items in the deal

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'to dress the cabinet - which is really finger-licking cunning.'

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Can you throw in just a few little bits?

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SIMON: I'm sure we can, yes.

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You're such a good egg! Thank you SO much!

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-You are a whirlwind.

-I love it! Shall we go upstairs?

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'Ha ha ha. Thought you'd never ask.

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'Paul's clocked something.'

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That is a mid 20th-century office regulator.

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That is the timepiece from which other clocks could be set.

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-Look at that technology!

-Wow!

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-What is that?

-This is an electric regulator.

-It looks electric.

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'It dates from the 1940s and it's marked up at £85.'

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-I like the face.

-It's got a great face.

-It's really lovely.

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'Of course, they'll be looking for a substantial discount from Simon,

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'who'll be lucky if he still has his hat by lunch time.

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Do you recall, upstairs, you've got a...albeit shabby office wall clock?

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It's not going to be 20 quid, is it?

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-£40. £40 will...

-Aargh!

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ROSEMARY: 21?

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PAUL LAUGHS

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Little steps!

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The absolute death would be 35. You've got an absolute bargain.

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-25.

-30 and I'll shake your hand.

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You've got an absolute bargain. Yes. I mean...

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All right. Go on.

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Cheers. I'd better get more money out.

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'You better had, Paul.

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'Simon's given you generous deals, but he's also made lots of sales.

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'The other two are still browsing

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'and it doesn't look as if Margie's having any more luck

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'containing the Mercurial Jean Christophe.'

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La belle epoch?

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Anything Napoleon or Louis XV or...?

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Unfortunately, no, I don't think so.

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Charlemagne?

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-Let's be serious now and give a little bit of concentration.

-Yeah.

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'Margie's steering him towards something befitting of his profession. Stop mincing about.'

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-Look, culinary!

-Wonderful painting.

-A mincer.

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I used to make mince with that.

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-Did you?

-Yeah. Many, many years ago.

-I bet. When you were a lad.

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'It's an old tool for mincing meat. There's no ticket price on it.'

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It falls into a group of antiques called kitchenalia.

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It doesn't go for a lot of money.

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Mind you, if at the auction people connect you with something culinary, it probably would.

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SIMON: The mincer I could do for £5.

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'This could be the start of their job lot of kitchen-centric items.

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'I'm starting to sense a theme developing.

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'Kitchenalia, to use the antiques world term,

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'can be saleable to the right market.

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'It does put Jean Christophe back on familiar ground.

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'He's soon found something else he'd like to add to the lot.'

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-I can see the scale and the mincer together.

-That is a thought. Yeah.

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How much is it? We've got 25 with the weights.

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'It's a set of scales and weights dating from the early 20th century.'

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MARGIE: So, the two together? SIMON: The mincer and the scales?

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What about 18 for the pair?

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'Oh! Now he's doing his Marcel Marceau!

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'But it seems to be working.'

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-15.

-I'm going to step out here.

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MARGIE LAUGHING

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Thank you, my friend. I love you very much.

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'Deal done at £15 for the mincer and scales.'

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Marvellous. Thank you.

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'And the irrepressible Jean Christophe is browsing on.'

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I have great interest to this...

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-Is it Victorian?

-LAUGHTER

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'Lordy!

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'Now, Rosemary and Paul are back on the road.

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'They're driving towards Grange Moor, West Yorkshire,

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'and heading into Rockwood Antiques, which is above a garden centre.

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'Oh!

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'Dealers Karen and Sally are ready to greet them.

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'Hello, Karen and Sally.'

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Wow! Oooh!

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OK. Let's just say hello.

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-How are you doing?

-Hello, hello! How are you?

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'Our competitive pair are getting down to some determined bargain hunting.'

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It's come over all serious, you and I! What happened?

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-I love these big bowls.

-A big dairy crock!

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-I love them.

-They are belting, aren't they?

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With JC and myself, it's all got a bit kitchen-orientated!

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-I'm getting that!

-You're getting the hang of it?

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Kitchen, kitchen, kitchen.

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'And before long, Rosemary's spotted yet another kitchen themed item.

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'This time, on a miniature scale.'

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Oh, look at this!

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GASPS Oh! Look at this oven!

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Sweetheart!

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Oh, look!

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My grandchildren would LOVE this.

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'It's a child's toy stove dating from the 1930s or '40s,

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'complete with miniature pots, pans and utensils.

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'Ticket price is £85. It's awoken the childlike joy in this pair.

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'It's almost as if they've trotted off to the nursery.'

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-Isn't that adorable?

-A wee tinplate range, is that what you call it?

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-Yeah.

-A stove.

0:19:310:19:33

-What do you think they would sell it for?

-I'd need that for half.

0:19:330:19:38

'Getting it for half price might be a challenge,

0:19:380:19:41

'but Rosemary is proving she's no slouch at bargaining.

0:19:410:19:44

'She'll speak to Karen.'

0:19:440:19:46

-Are you able to speak for these people?

-I am, love. Yes.

0:19:460:19:51

OK. It's obviously too expensive for us. We couldn't even do half.

0:19:510:19:56

-£25?

-Can I have a look, see what's on it?

0:19:560:19:59

'Uh-oh.'

0:19:590:20:01

-I'd rather you didn't!

-LAUGHS

0:20:010:20:04

'But Karen's kindly willing to haggle.'

0:20:040:20:07

Could you possibly shift to 30?

0:20:070:20:10

SIGHS

0:20:100:20:12

-I wouldn't hesitate.

-All right. I'll do 30.

0:20:120:20:15

Done. OK. Thank you so much.

0:20:150:20:17

'Wonderful! Wonderful! Deal struck.

0:20:170:20:20

'They've got the darling little stove for £30

0:20:200:20:24

'and a ruckload of children's pots and pans.

0:20:240:20:28

'Now, Jean Christophe and Margie are in the car.'

0:20:290:20:33

That was our first shop. How do you feel?

0:20:330:20:36

I think it was an amazing experience.

0:20:360:20:38

BOTH LAUGH

0:20:380:20:40

'Thanks to you, Jean Christophe.

0:20:400:20:43

'They're motoring off towards the city of Leeds.

0:20:430:20:46

'They're going to spend the afternoon visiting a stately home,

0:20:460:20:50

'Temple Newsam, where Michelin-winning chef Jean Christophe

0:20:500:20:53

'will learn about a menu served here in the 19th century

0:20:530:20:57

'that was amongst the most lavish of its time.

0:20:570:21:00

'They're meeting retired curator James Lomax.'

0:21:000:21:04

-You're James?

-That's right. Come along.

-Thank you.

0:21:040:21:07

'Temple Newsam is a grand Tudor Jacobean pile,

0:21:080:21:12

'one of the most important country houses in the north of England.

0:21:120:21:17

'It sits in 1,500 acres of parkland,

0:21:200:21:23

'which today includes a rare breeds farm.

0:21:230:21:27

'Jean Christophe's keen to visit the farm,

0:21:270:21:29

'which produces high-quality meat, but before that

0:21:290:21:32

'they're going to learn about a very special meal in the house's history,

0:21:320:21:36

'a feast fit for a King.'

0:21:360:21:38

In 1894, there was a visit by a member of the royal family to Leeds.

0:21:380:21:44

The future Queen Mary and George V, the Duke of York,

0:21:440:21:48

came and had a big dinner here for 48 people.

0:21:480:21:53

'The royal couple who were then Duke and Duchess of York,

0:21:530:21:57

'came to Leeds to inaugurate some new academic buildings.'

0:21:570:22:02

They came to open the new medical faculty at the university

0:22:020:22:05

and stayed here for three days - it was like a state visit.

0:22:050:22:08

'In 1894, the house was owned and lived in

0:22:080:22:12

'by Lady Emily Charlotte Meynell Ingram - quite a mouthful.

0:22:120:22:16

'Like many grand houses of the time,

0:22:160:22:18

'Temple Newsam was equipped to host large and lavish parties.

0:22:180:22:23

'The royal guests enjoyed a spectacular meal in their visit.

0:22:230:22:27

'Look at that!'

0:22:270:22:29

You can see the preparations going on.

0:22:290:22:31

They're laying the table, basically.

0:22:310:22:35

You can see the silver plates - the 144 silver plates.

0:22:350:22:40

Then we also have the menu.

0:22:400:22:42

Of course, in French.

0:22:420:22:45

It has to be. Anything really smart has to be in French always.

0:22:450:22:49

'Naturellement.'

0:22:490:22:52

"Consomme royale, poulet roti,

0:22:520:22:55

"escaloppes de saumen ravigot, salade de homard."

0:22:550:22:59

'To you or me, that's royal broth, roast chicken,

0:22:590:23:03

'salmon with sauce and lobster salad. Yummy!'

0:23:030:23:06

-"Poulet decoupe".

-What's that?

0:23:060:23:09

Beheaded chicken!

0:23:090:23:12

It's basically a chicken slice in 24 bits.

0:23:120:23:17

'The menu has put Jean Christophe in mind of a giant of French cookery.'

0:23:170:23:21

This is definitely Escoffier time, Escoffier language.

0:23:210:23:26

'Auguste Escoffier rejuvenated traditional French cooking

0:23:260:23:31

'in the late 1800s and early 1900s, publishing La Guide Culinaire,

0:23:310:23:35

'which remains a bible in professional kitchens to this day.

0:23:350:23:39

'This menu reflects the haute cuisine of the moment.'

0:23:390:23:43

-As a chef...

-These old menus.

-..this is like reading a bible to me.

0:23:430:23:49

-Yes, of course it is.

-This is the frame of cooking today.

0:23:490:23:52

This is where all the sauces, these amazing classic dishes

0:23:520:23:57

have been moved on now to what it is today.

0:23:570:24:00

-In that time, these would be really exceptional.

-Exceptional eating.

0:24:000:24:04

'The chef that cooked this meal wouldn't have had far to go

0:24:050:24:09

'to source the produce that went into it.

0:24:090:24:12

'A farm on the estate provided the house with much of its food.

0:24:120:24:17

'The provenance of our ingredients is just as important today.

0:24:170:24:21

'The farm still exists and Jean Christophe and Margie

0:24:220:24:26

'are going to wander down there to meet farm manager David Bradley.'

0:24:260:24:30

-Good afternoon.

-Welcome to Temple Newsam.

0:24:300:24:32

-How are you?

-Very good. Brought some nice weather with you.

0:24:320:24:36

-We had a lovely time in the house.

-It's lovely, isn't it?

0:24:360:24:40

'Today, it's run by the city as a rare breeds farm,

0:24:400:24:43

'devoted to preserving breeds of farm animals neglected by commercial agriculture.'

0:24:430:24:49

-Do you want to see the cattle?

-I'd love to.

0:24:520:24:56

Most of the breeds became rare after the war years, really.

0:24:570:25:01

Most of the breeds became rare when farming methods got more modern

0:25:010:25:05

and traditional things went by the board.

0:25:050:25:08

That's my favourite one.

0:25:120:25:14

'The farm provides meat to Temple Newsam's on-site cafe.

0:25:170:25:21

'The farm's been successful in its mission

0:25:210:25:24

'to preserve traditional British breeds and farming methods,

0:25:240:25:27

'bringing the gastronomic story of Temple Newsam up to the present day.

0:25:270:25:31

'Jean Christophe is impressed.'

0:25:310:25:33

I think it's important to understand the way of sourcing your product,

0:25:330:25:38

to understand about farms.

0:25:380:25:40

It's down to people like ourselves to produce something that's better than we've had in the past.

0:25:400:25:45

This is fabulous.

0:25:450:25:48

You only need one good chef and one good farmer and you've got it made!

0:25:480:25:52

'Indeed! It's time for Jean Christophe and Margie to hit the road.'

0:25:520:25:57

Bye bye, Billy.

0:25:570:25:59

'With that, it's the end of a hectic first day. Bon nuit, mes amis.

0:25:590:26:05

'But the bargain trail calls and the next morning finds all four back on the road,

0:26:090:26:15

'comparing notes on the trip so far.'

0:26:150:26:18

I have to tell you, I love Paul.

0:26:180:26:20

He is so good to be with. He's so funny.

0:26:200:26:23

-Margie, what does she think about what you bought?

-Oh!

0:26:230:26:26

-Margie LOVE it!

-BOTH LAUGH

0:26:260:26:30

-I don't know whether to believe you or not.

-She gave me a look like...

0:26:300:26:34

"OK. Yeah. You've got a point."

0:26:340:26:37

I think you are completely winding me up.

0:26:370:26:40

'You could be right there, Rosemary.'

0:26:400:26:43

He was like a little boy in a sweet shop. I really lost control.

0:26:430:26:48

What I've got, believe me, will knock your socks off.

0:26:480:26:52

-Well...

-Knock your socks off.

-Wait till you see what I bought yesterday.

0:26:520:26:57

You're going to be shocked.

0:26:570:26:59

'He IS winding you up this morning, Rosemary.

0:26:590:27:03

'So far, Rosemary and Paul have spent £170 exactly on four lots -

0:27:030:27:08

'the two carbide lanterns,

0:27:080:27:10

'the Maidsaver kitchen cabinet, the regulator clock

0:27:100:27:14

'and the toy stove and accoutrements,

0:27:140:27:15

'meaning they have £230 left to spend today.'

0:27:150:27:19

Thank you very much. Take care.

0:27:190:27:22

'Jean Christophe and Margie have been quite abstemious by comparison,

0:27:230:27:28

'spending only £55 on two lots -

0:27:280:27:31

'the scales and mincer, and the carousel horse.

0:27:310:27:35

'They have £345 left to spend.

0:27:350:27:38

'They're all beginning in the West Yorkshire town of Hebden Bridge.

0:27:380:27:43

'Bohemian Hebden Bridge is known for its vibrant cultural scene

0:27:430:27:48

'and array of independent shops.

0:27:480:27:50

'What better place to kick off today's proceedings?'

0:27:500:27:53

Hello! Here are the competitors.

0:27:530:27:56

-How was your journey?

-Damp!

0:27:560:27:59

-I'll see you later.

-See you later.

-Have a good'un.

0:27:590:28:03

'Rosemary and Paul are strolling off to their first shop.

0:28:040:28:08

'They're heading into Hebden Bridge Antiques,

0:28:080:28:11

'where they're meeting dealer Duncan. Hello, Duncan.'

0:28:110:28:14

-Your name is?

-Duncan.

-Hello, Duncan.

0:28:140:28:17

-How do you do? I'm Paul.

-I'm Rosemary.

0:28:170:28:20

Do you know what? JC has been winding me up so much this morning!

0:28:230:28:28

He's been doing my head in. This is real BUSINESS, OK?

0:28:280:28:32

-I mean that. Please help me.

-A grudge match?

0:28:320:28:35

This is a grudge match. Actually, we're at war.

0:28:350:28:38

We're actually at war.

0:28:380:28:40

'The brave Mr Laidlaw is willing to step up to the plate

0:28:420:28:46

'and has soon spotted something that speaks to his own war-like area of expertise, militaria.'

0:28:460:28:51

-I'll show you an easy profit on an interesting thing.

-Hm?

0:28:510:28:55

'It's a pipe with a clay bowl

0:28:550:28:58

'shaped as the head of French military leader Ferdinand Foch,

0:28:580:29:03

'Supreme Commander of the allied armies in World War I.'

0:29:030:29:07

Dated 1918.

0:29:070:29:09

That's commemorating the armistice. That's 13 and a half pounds.

0:29:090:29:15

Buy it for a tenner and it's worth £30 to £50.

0:29:150:29:18

'Duncan will open the cabinet.'

0:29:180:29:20

I do love it because it's so... Feels lovely, though, doesn't it?

0:29:220:29:26

It's history! Like nasty Jean Christophe, it's a thing of the past!

0:29:260:29:32

'They're taking a note of it and browsing on.'

0:29:320:29:35

It's like Aladdin's cave in here. It's fantastic.

0:29:350:29:39

'The military theme continues as Paul's expert eye alights on something else.'

0:29:420:29:48

LAUGHS

0:29:480:29:50

-I've got something.

-What is it?

0:29:500:29:52

-Binoculars.

-Not any old pair of binoculars.

-What are they?

0:29:530:29:58

Not a lot of people know this,

0:29:580:30:00

but...

0:30:000:30:02

those are military...

0:30:020:30:05

Don't look closely at me, it doesn't get any better!

0:30:050:30:08

'Crikey, it's Cary Grant!'

0:30:080:30:10

-These date to the Second World War.

-Do they?

0:30:100:30:13

These were designed for and issued to British paratroops.

0:30:130:30:19

If they don't make 30 to 50, there's been an injustice.

0:30:190:30:23

'Paul's pretty sure he can turn a profit on his two pieces of militaria.

0:30:230:30:29

'Rosemary's still fixated on the Maidsaver kitchen cabinet she bought yesterday

0:30:290:30:34

'and is determined to scare up some kitchen items to dress it.'

0:30:340:30:38

Have you got any little things I can put inside it that I don't pay for?

0:30:380:30:42

PAUL AND DUNCAN LAUGH Just some bits and pieces?

0:30:420:30:46

'Rosemary! That's even embarrassed Paul!

0:30:460:30:50

'Asking for free stuff might be taking hard haggling a little far.

0:30:500:30:55

'But she is going to try to assemble her own parcel of kitchenalia

0:30:550:30:59

'to dress the cabinet, which Duncan might do for a knock-down price.'

0:30:590:31:03

-What bits and pieces are you looking for?

-You know, maybe one of these.

0:31:030:31:07

-Pretty cups and saucers?

-Yes.

0:31:070:31:09

-Spoons you're interested in?

-Yes. They'll have me down as a scavenger.

0:31:090:31:14

'They will.'

0:31:140:31:16

-It's a wine stopper?

-No, a spirit server.

-That would be fantastic!

0:31:160:31:21

Take that.

0:31:230:31:25

I love that.

0:31:250:31:27

Can we put that on my...? PAUL LAUGHS

0:31:270:31:30

Can we? Please?

0:31:300:31:32

I feel like a beast of burden here, chef.

0:31:320:31:35

'Rosemary's positively daft for kitchen items.

0:31:370:31:40

'Is she finally finished?'

0:31:400:31:42

OK, I think we're done.

0:31:420:31:44

Oh, wait!

0:31:440:31:45

-LAUGHING:

-"I think we're done. Oh, wait!"

0:31:450:31:48

'It's a set of four Victorian copper pans.

0:31:480:31:51

'They're thinking of adding them to the mega lot of kitchen cabinet and kitchenalia.'

0:31:510:31:56

Onto your counter.

0:31:560:32:00

'Ticket price for all four pans is a hefty £114.

0:32:000:32:05

'Oh, Duncan?'

0:32:050:32:07

-Would a straight 100 be any good to you?

-That's a bit of slack.

0:32:070:32:11

I should have said, "Will there be a hell of a lot of slack?"

0:32:110:32:15

We're talking about slightly less than half.

0:32:150:32:19

Well, we wouldn't be able to do that.

0:32:190:32:21

70.

0:32:210:32:23

I still, you know, I don't think we'll make the money on it.

0:32:230:32:27

-How about 60?

-You're tempting us.

0:32:270:32:30

'What about Rosemary's mountain of kitchen items?

0:32:300:32:33

'Combined ticket price on that motley assortment is around £30.'

0:32:330:32:39

If I give you a tenner for those?

0:32:390:32:41

-How about 13, unlucky 13?

-SHE SIGHS

0:32:410:32:44

-12?

-OK.

0:32:440:32:46

'What about the two military items Paul's so keen on,

0:32:460:32:51

'the pipe and the binoculars?'

0:32:510:32:53

-We can do that for a tenner. Can't go any lower.

-That is so fair!

0:32:530:32:57

-Really keen on that.

-You're going to say the same about the binoculars.

0:32:570:33:02

Yes. We could do that for a tenner.

0:33:020:33:05

-They could go together quite easily.

-Yes, they look nice.

0:33:050:33:09

'£20 for the two is more than fair.

0:33:090:33:12

'So, Duncan's currently offering a total of £92 for the lot.

0:33:130:33:18

'If they take everything on the table, what could he do for the bulk buy?'

0:33:180:33:23

-75.

-We're going to have to do it.

0:33:230:33:26

We're going to have to do it. PAUL LAUGHS

0:33:260:33:29

I'm not going to do that. Come here.

0:33:290:33:33

'An extraordinary deal from Duncan means that they're all bought up.

0:33:330:33:37

'Duncan's colleague Peter is lying in wait.'

0:33:370:33:40

Rosemary, before you go, I'd like to give you a present

0:33:400:33:43

in exchange for a photo.

0:33:430:33:45

-Fan...

-To help you with your kitchen.

-Oh, that's fantastic!

0:33:450:33:49

Seriously?

0:33:490:33:51

'Thank you, Peter. That plate will be added to the kitchen lot on which they've now spent £147.'

0:33:510:33:57

That's good!

0:33:580:34:01

'The other pair are in the car and Margie's looking forward to rooting out some real antiques today.'

0:34:040:34:11

-Are you going to let me have a look around?

-Yes, of course.

0:34:110:34:14

And maybe buy something a bit special?

0:34:140:34:18

-I'll be your comis.

-You'll be my comis chef!

0:34:180:34:23

'They're heading for a shop just outside Hebden Bridge.'

0:34:230:34:27

# Non, je ne regrette rien... #

0:34:270:34:30

'Yes, yes, yes. Let's be "Edith Pi-affing" you!

0:34:300:34:34

'They're at Caldene Antiques Centre.'

0:34:340:34:36

-What about this?

-Oh!

0:34:390:34:41

BOTH LAUGH

0:34:410:34:43

'They're greeted by dealers Shirley and Paul.'

0:34:430:34:48

So, we're going to have a jolly good look round.

0:34:480:34:51

-And then, if you can help me at some stage?

-Well, I hope so.

-So do I.

0:34:510:34:57

Has he got any smell?

0:34:570:34:59

Look, he's watching me.

0:34:590:35:02

'Margie's keen to see if anything might chime

0:35:020:35:05

'with either her silver specialism

0:35:050:35:07

'or Jean Christophe's cheffy enthusiasms.'

0:35:070:35:10

With him being with us, a bit of culinary...

0:35:100:35:14

-I was thinking about that.

-A bit of silver for the table!

0:35:140:35:18

I want to try and get him on a more serious track.

0:35:180:35:21

'He does seem a bit more reflective today.'

0:35:210:35:25

It's a lot to... There's so many little, little...

0:35:250:35:29

It's a different...different shop.

0:35:290:35:32

But I spot something over there.

0:35:320:35:35

Which, I think it might work.

0:35:350:35:37

Because my mum, my mother used to sew, make a bit of couture.

0:35:370:35:43

-Is it Victorian?

-Yes. 1870.

0:35:430:35:46

'He decides against that chapeau, but they've soon spotted another.'

0:35:460:35:52

What about this firefighter? It's a French one, yeah? Is it French?

0:35:530:35:58

-Chapeau de pompier?

-Oui. I recognise French. Pompier.

0:35:580:36:02

This is at least 100 years old.

0:36:020:36:05

'It is, indeed. It's a 19th-century brass fireman's helmet

0:36:050:36:09

'owned by one Firel Firent,

0:36:090:36:13

'who worked in the town of Decize on the Loire river.'

0:36:130:36:17

'Ticket price is £125.'

0:36:180:36:21

-This is fantastic.

-Yeah, it's interesting.

0:36:210:36:25

-This is fabulous.

-Yeah.

0:36:250:36:27

You can smell leather.

0:36:280:36:30

'Paul's asked the dealer who owns it what it might go for.'

0:36:300:36:33

-If we can get to 70.

-It's a nice job but we only have 60 quid left.

0:36:330:36:39

'That's a fib, Jean Christophe!'

0:36:390:36:42

65, just to ease it?

0:36:420:36:44

-65. OK.

-You're a good man. Thank you.

0:36:440:36:48

'Mon dieu! Another great deal and the helmet's in the bag for £65.

0:36:480:36:54

'Rosemary and Paul, meanwhile, are raring to go,

0:36:570:37:00

'but it looks like something's deflating their ambitions.'

0:37:000:37:04

-If you're going to pop it, pop it big stylee.

-Yeah.

0:37:040:37:07

-Holy Moses!

-Well, let's get it... It's in the boot, obviously.

0:37:070:37:11

-I know we've got one. There we go.

-All right. Here we go.

-Give me that.

0:37:110:37:17

'Time for some patented Laidlaw heroics.'

0:37:170:37:20

MUSIC: Theme to "The A-Team"

0:37:200:37:23

Make sure it's tight enough, Paul, so it won't come off.

0:37:250:37:29

Yes, chef!

0:37:290:37:30

Right!

0:37:330:37:35

'With that crisis averted, they're driving to Halifax, West Yorkshire.

0:37:360:37:40

'They have all their items for auction,

0:37:400:37:43

'so they're going to spend the afternoon

0:37:430:37:45

'at the Duke of Wellington's Regimental Museum.

0:37:450:37:48

'Rosemary is the patron of a Yorkshire charity

0:37:480:37:51

'that trains young forces' veterans for new careers in bakery,

0:37:510:37:55

'so she's keen to learn more about the military history of the area.

0:37:550:38:00

'Militaria-mad Paul's more than happy to come along for the ride.

0:38:000:38:04

'They're meeting military curator John Spencer.'

0:38:040:38:07

Good to see you. Thanks very much for coming.

0:38:070:38:10

Welcome to the Duke of Wellington's Regiment Museum.

0:38:100:38:14

'The museum celebrates the history of the regiment founded in 1702

0:38:160:38:21

'as the Earl of Huntingdon's Regiment,

0:38:210:38:23

'but which came to be named after politician and war hero

0:38:230:38:27

'the first Duke of Wellington.'

0:38:270:38:30

We'll look at some items related to the great Duke himself.

0:38:300:38:33

'Born in 1769, Arthur Wellesly, the Duke of Wellington,

0:38:340:38:39

'was twice British Prime Minister,

0:38:390:38:41

'Commander in Chief of the British Army

0:38:410:38:44

'and famed as the victor at the Battle of Waterloo during the Napoleonic Wars.'

0:38:440:38:50

The Duke of Wellington became Colonel of the regiment in 1793.

0:38:500:38:55

He was Commander of the regiment.

0:38:550:38:57

He took it with him to India and to the Continent to fight the French.

0:38:570:39:01

As he went onwards and upwards through the ranks,

0:39:010:39:04

he remained the Honorary Colonel of the regiment until 1812.

0:39:040:39:08

-Fantastic! It's very much his regiment.

-Very much his regiment.

0:39:080:39:12

When the Duke passed away, Queen Victoria decreed

0:39:120:39:16

that his old regiment, the 33rd,

0:39:160:39:18

should become the Duke of Wellington's Regiment in his honour.

0:39:180:39:21

'The museum holds some of the legendary Duke's own possessions.'

0:39:210:39:26

-Clothes worn by the Duke of Wellington.

-What?

-Yes.

0:39:260:39:29

-Not the Wellington boots?

-Yes! We have a complete set of clothing.

0:39:290:39:33

-You are joking?

-Worn by the Duke of Wellington.

0:39:330:39:36

We have here his frock coat.

0:39:360:39:38

-Look at that!

-Good Lord! And his original hat?

0:39:380:39:41

His original hat with the cockade of the allied troops at Waterloo.

0:39:410:39:47

'On the other side of the room are more items relating to Waterloo.'

0:39:470:39:51

-The campaign bed is the Duke of Wellington's.

-It's his?

0:39:510:39:55

It's allegedly the one he slept in on campaign.

0:39:550:39:58

'The museum doesn't just celebrate the great Duke's achievements.

0:39:580:40:02

'The stories of the brave men who served in the regiment are reflected also.'

0:40:020:40:07

Ensign Howard of the Light Company of the 33rd

0:40:070:40:10

wore that cap at the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815.

0:40:100:40:15

A French musket ball passed within an eighth of an inch of his head.

0:40:150:40:19

He survived to write home to his mother, "Thank God I am safe.

0:40:190:40:23

"I had a very narrow escape that day.

0:40:230:40:25

"I intend bringing the cap to England."

0:40:250:40:28

Which, sure enough, he did. It's ended up in Halifax.

0:40:280:40:31

Yes. A circuitous journey, but the place for it to be.

0:40:310:40:35

'Marvellous. The proud regiment so formed went on to serve

0:40:350:40:40

'in our major conflicts through the 1800s and into the 20th century.'

0:40:400:40:44

Throughout the Second World War, up to the actions of the '90s.

0:40:440:40:48

-The regiment have served in Afghanistan and been seriously injured.

-Exactly.

0:40:480:40:54

'Rosemary, of course, is patron of the Veterans' Artisan Bakery

0:40:540:40:59

'which supports ex servicemen, so the museum has resonated with her.'

0:40:590:41:03

This is really close to my heart because they come back traumatised,

0:41:030:41:09

and they're so brave, these young men, they really are.

0:41:090:41:12

Thank you SO much for showing us.

0:41:120:41:15

'Inspired by all they've learned,

0:41:150:41:18

'it's time for Rosemary and Paul to be hitting the road.

0:41:180:41:23

'Elsewhere, Jean Christophe and Margie are in the car,

0:41:260:41:30

'heading to their last shop.'

0:41:300:41:32

-Time running out. One more shop.

-And we've got 280 quid.

-Yeah.

0:41:320:41:37

'Time is, indeed, of the essence.

0:41:370:41:40

'They're heading back to Hebden Bridge and, in fact,

0:41:400:41:43

'to the very same shop the other pair were in this morning.

0:41:430:41:47

'Duncan and Peter look almost recovered from their earlier customers.'

0:41:470:41:52

Duncan, how are you?

0:41:520:41:54

'They need to focus on finding their last items.'

0:41:580:42:02

-CLOCK CHIMES

-Brilliant!

0:42:050:42:08

You are interested in those?

0:42:090:42:12

'Margie's managed to steer him away from "those things".'

0:42:120:42:16

She's the boss. I forgot.

0:42:160:42:18

'But Jean Christophe's leading her a merry dance.'

0:42:180:42:21

MARGIE LAUGHS Well, I'd rather have that.

0:42:210:42:24

I'd rather have that than those flaming things!

0:42:240:42:27

'Shortly, he's alighted on something upstairs.'

0:42:270:42:31

-This lot in the corner is very, very interesting.

-What is it?

0:42:310:42:36

-Oh, the scales.

-Oh, yes. The scientific scales.

-Fabulous!

0:42:360:42:40

'They're early 20th-century scientific scales

0:42:400:42:44

'and are priced up at £75.'

0:42:440:42:47

-Shall we move that on the side?

-Put it over there.

0:42:470:42:51

-STRAINING:

-Bloody hell! It's heavy.

0:42:510:42:53

'Watch your back, Jean Christophe.'

0:42:530:42:56

I've just spoken to Duncan. He's got 65 on them.

0:42:560:42:59

-He's prepared to knock them right down...

-65 for what?

-..to 25.

0:42:590:43:04

'Once again, Jean Christophe has set his heart on this.'

0:43:040:43:08

-Are you going to shake hands with the gentleman?

-£25.

0:43:080:43:12

-Oh!

-Shake his hand.

-Thank you very much.

0:43:120:43:15

'What a bargain! They're taking the scales for £25. Who wouldn't?

0:43:150:43:20

'Soon, Margie's found something that she thinks might be right up Jean Christophe's street.'

0:43:230:43:28

-Oh, my God!

-Yeah. Opera glasses.

-Qu'est ce que c'est?

0:43:280:43:32

This very kind... They're at 45. 20 quid.

0:43:320:43:36

I'm going to give you a kiss on your hand.

0:43:360:43:39

Well done, because that is fabulous.

0:43:390:43:43

'It's a pair of 19th-century mother-of-pearl opera glasses.

0:43:440:43:47

'Ticket price is £45.'

0:43:470:43:49

You could look up in the box and see who... Ooh! It's not his wife!

0:43:520:43:56

BOTH LAUGH

0:43:560:43:58

'Best see what Peter could do on them.'

0:43:580:44:01

-For you...

-Yeah.

-..as a special one-off price.

0:44:010:44:05

-£20.

-Oh!

-We'll have it!

0:44:050:44:08

-Fabulous. You're a good man. Thank you so much.

-Pleasure.

0:44:080:44:12

'Another nice buy in the bag, and they're nearly finished shopping -

0:44:120:44:16

'bar one more cookery themed item.'

0:44:160:44:19

-Mrs Beeton.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:44:190:44:21

You like Mrs Beeton, don't you?

0:44:210:44:24

-How much is that?

-I'm not sure what the price is on it.

0:44:240:44:28

Let's have a look and see. It's got 35 on it.

0:44:280:44:33

'It's an Edwardian edition of Mrs Beeton's famous book of cooking and household management.'

0:44:350:44:41

£20 we could do that for you.

0:44:410:44:43

I can hear Mrs Beeton, "Ooh, take 15."

0:44:430:44:47

-For a photo for the wall of fame, 15.

-Go on, do it.

0:44:470:44:52

You're a good man. Thank you.

0:44:520:44:54

'With that final deal, everyone's got their lots for auction.

0:44:540:44:59

'Jean Christophe and Margie have caught up with the other two

0:44:590:45:02

'and it's time for the grand unveiling of their buys.

0:45:020:45:06

'Jean Christophe and Margie are up first.'

0:45:070:45:09

That's the first thing.

0:45:090:45:12

-PAUL LAUGHS

-Is that a unicorn?

0:45:120:45:16

Excuse me. Don't touch it!

0:45:160:45:19

I can't believe this! Thank you for your gracious touch(!)

0:45:190:45:23

-He's called Vincent.

-Oh, goodness me!

0:45:230:45:26

Don't touch it. Just calm down.

0:45:270:45:30

All right. It's not the first edition?

0:45:300:45:33

Oh, no!

0:45:330:45:35

-Do you know who this lady is?

-Yes, I do know who this is.

0:45:350:45:39

Better move on. This is a mincer.

0:45:390:45:41

What's this?

0:45:410:45:43

-Don't! This is 100 year old.

-It's a fire engine.

0:45:430:45:47

-'It's a helmet, actually.'

-This is from France.

0:45:470:45:50

-ALL: Ah!

-100 years old.

0:45:500:45:52

-It's from Burgundy. He was a brave man.

-Oh, he's a brave man.

0:45:520:45:56

One of thousands of brave men in the world who fight against the fire.

0:45:560:46:01

And that is value. What do you think of this?

0:46:010:46:04

Look, it's a good thing.

0:46:040:46:06

It ain't unique, but it's a good specimen of a desirable object.

0:46:060:46:10

-Conservatively, it's 50 to 80 on a good day.

-We can go off now!

0:46:100:46:14

Actually, I have to say to you, I think you've done really well.

0:46:140:46:18

-I really think you have done well.

-It must hurt, non?

0:46:180:46:21

'Jean Christophe, that's not very sportsmanlike.

0:46:210:46:24

'Now, it's Rosemary and Paul's turn.'

0:46:240:46:26

-There you go.

-It's an oven.

0:46:270:46:30

Isn't that nice? Oh! The little colander!

0:46:300:46:34

Listen to her! You do make me laugh, actually.

0:46:340:46:37

It's even got little candles in there you can put on.

0:46:370:46:41

-That was £30.

-£30, yes.

0:46:410:46:45

Early 20th-century, Lucas King O' The Road,

0:46:450:46:49

automotive - early automotive.

0:46:490:46:51

And then an LMS railway hand lantern.

0:46:510:46:54

-That's up your street.

-I agree. That's good.

0:46:540:46:58

-It's quite smart, that.

-How much did you pay for that?

0:46:580:47:01

-Both of them, one lot...

-Yeah?

0:47:010:47:04

-£28.

-That's a good buy.

-For both of them.

0:47:040:47:08

-£28 for the both of them.

-I have to give you a point for that.

0:47:080:47:13

'That's more like it. And with a flourish...'

0:47:130:47:17

I remember seeing that. I thought you were going to buy that.

0:47:180:47:21

ROSEMARY: All beautifully done. We've got a whole kitchen.

0:47:210:47:26

One of these pans is incredibly valuable.

0:47:260:47:30

I used to work for a while in a place where everything was copper.

0:47:300:47:35

Believe me...this is not very valuable.

0:47:350:47:38

At all. In fact, you cannot even cook with that.

0:47:380:47:42

'Don't mince your words, Jean Christophe.

0:47:420:47:44

'Anyway, everyone's ready for auction.'

0:47:440:47:47

Well done, Margie. Well done.

0:47:470:47:50

Thank you, darling! Thank you.

0:47:500:47:53

And I'm looking forward to the day.

0:47:530:47:56

'They're frank enough in the flesh. What will they say behind closed doors?'

0:47:590:48:05

The horse is awful! It'll go one of two ways.

0:48:050:48:08

They'll either be lucky and people will be charmed by its eccentricity,

0:48:080:48:12

or they'll laugh at it and it'll bomb.

0:48:120:48:15

Honestly, she was on and on and on in the car.

0:48:150:48:18

She's trying to wind you up and she's done it.

0:48:180:48:22

They could do well on a couple of things,

0:48:220:48:24

then crash with the kitchenette.

0:48:240:48:27

Do you know what? Bring it on. PAUL LAUGHS

0:48:270:48:30

'And so to battle!

0:48:300:48:33

'On this Road Trip, they began in Gomersal, West Yorkshire,

0:48:330:48:37

'and will face the saleroom in Sheffield, South Yorkshire.

0:48:370:48:41

'In its steel-skied industrial past,

0:48:410:48:45

'Sheffield was known as a dirty picture in a golden frame.

0:48:450:48:49

'But today, signs of its civic regeneration abound.

0:48:490:48:53

'Jean Christophe and Rosemary are on their way,

0:48:530:48:57

'and Rosemary's still fixated on her kitchen cabinet.'

0:48:570:49:00

I haven't got a clue how my wonderful kitchen's going to go.

0:49:000:49:04

It is a kitchen in one piece of furniture.

0:49:040:49:08

Well, I think if there's an interest it has to be like a fireman

0:49:080:49:12

or someone who has a wood fireplace.

0:49:120:49:15

-ROSEMARY LAUGHS

-Somebody who need wood!

0:49:150:49:18

-Cheap wood.

-BOTH LAUGH

0:49:180:49:21

'That burning issue aside, how are they feeling in the other car?'

0:49:210:49:26

Paul, shall we bother turning up with these two?

0:49:260:49:29

When these two get cracking, we might as well slip off somewhere.

0:49:290:49:34

Is there a bar? Is there a cafeteria we can retreat to?

0:49:340:49:38

They're both very excitable, aren't they?

0:49:380:49:41

'That's saying something, but it's all part of their charm.

0:49:410:49:45

'Everyone's arrived at the saleroom, Sheffield Auction Gallery,

0:49:450:49:48

'which was established in 1840.'

0:49:480:49:50

How are we all feeling?

0:49:500:49:52

-Absolutely ready for it.

-Very good.

-It's going to be magic!

0:49:520:49:56

-LAUGHTER

-Good luck, Rosemary.

0:49:560:49:59

'Today's auctioneer is Robert Lea.

0:49:590:50:02

'Before he raises the gavel aloft, what does he think of our team's lots?'

0:50:020:50:06

I like your kitchen cabinet. It depends what somebody paid for it.

0:50:070:50:11

The horse is certainly different. One thing against it is it's not useable.

0:50:110:50:16

Very solid. You can fit a whole family on that, never mind a kiddy.

0:50:160:50:21

'On this trip, Jean Christophe and Margie spent £180 on five lots.

0:50:230:50:29

'While Rosemary and Paul splashed out £255

0:50:300:50:34

'and also have five lots in today's sale.

0:50:340:50:37

'With all profits going to Children In Need,

0:50:370:50:39

'it's time for their items to meet the discerning Sheffield crowd.

0:50:390:50:44

'First up is Jean Christophe and Margie's job lot of mincer, scales

0:50:450:50:49

'and an Edwardian edition of Mrs Beeton.'

0:50:490:50:52

£28. 30, I'm looking for...

0:50:520:50:55

-Can I bid?

-No.

0:50:550:50:58

..Fair warning. Hammer's going to drop at £35.

0:50:580:51:01

'That weighs in with a profit, but they will pay auction costs.'

0:51:030:51:08

-It made five quid.

-Charges to come off that.

0:51:080:51:11

'Now it's Rosemary and Paul's lanterns from rail and roads past.'

0:51:120:51:18

30. 32. 35. 38. 40. 42, it needs to be to carry on.

0:51:180:51:23

42. 45. 48, sir?

0:51:230:51:26

I'm out. Anybody else? It's going to sell.

0:51:260:51:28

They're going to sell at £48. Fair warning at 48...

0:51:280:51:32

BANGS GAVEL

0:51:320:51:34

'That's a bright outcome for them.'

0:51:340:51:37

I was expecting a lot more.

0:51:370:51:38

'Jean Christophe and Margie are up now with the carousel horse

0:51:380:51:43

'which divided their opinions.

0:51:430:51:45

'Who'll get bragging rights out of this?'

0:51:450:51:48

£50 for it?

0:51:480:51:51

Let's go down to 20. LAUGHTER

0:51:510:51:54

£10. 12. 15?

0:51:540:51:56

18. 20. 22.

0:51:560:51:59

25. 28. 30. 32.

0:51:590:52:02

35. 38? 35 only.

0:52:020:52:05

All done at £35?

0:52:050:52:08

That's good enough.

0:52:080:52:10

'Mm, you do know you made a £5 loss before costs, Jean Christophe?

0:52:100:52:16

'Now it's Rosemary and Paul's turn,

0:52:160:52:18

'as their regulator clock meets the room.'

0:52:180:52:21

On commission, I start at 30. 32. 35.

0:52:210:52:24

Need 38 elsewhere. Anybody else want to join in?

0:52:240:52:28

Hammer's going to drop, reluctantly, at 35...

0:52:280:52:33

JEAN CHRISTOPHE LAUGHS

0:52:330:52:35

'A small profit, but a profit, indeed.'

0:52:350:52:38

No, we're closing.

0:52:380:52:41

'Let's hope Jean Christophe and Margie can gallop to a profit

0:52:410:52:45

'on the next one, their 19th-century opera glasses.'

0:52:450:52:48

A few commissions on them. Start the bidding at ten, 12, 15, 18, 20.

0:52:480:52:52

22 I'm looking for in the room to carry on. 22 with the lady.

0:52:520:52:57

25. 28. 30. 32?

0:52:570:53:01

30. Lady, central. £30...

0:53:010:53:03

'A small profit, and not quite the pearl they'd been hoping for.'

0:53:060:53:12

I'm very sorry.

0:53:120:53:14

'Of course you are, Rosemary.

0:53:160:53:18

'One more for team Rosemary and Paul,

0:53:180:53:21

'the 1940s toy oven and miniature utensils.

0:53:210:53:24

'Might this give them something to play with?'

0:53:240:53:27

Commissions force me to start the bidding at 18, 20, 22, 25, £28.

0:53:270:53:32

-Worth more than that.

-30. 32 with me.

0:53:320:53:34

35? I'm out. Young lady on the front at £35...

0:53:340:53:38

ROSEMARY: It's beautiful! It's beautiful!

0:53:380:53:41

..Anybody else want to join in? It's going to go at £35...

0:53:410:53:45

'Another small profit for the miniature items.'

0:53:470:53:51

We just need one item.

0:53:510:53:53

'Ha! Careful!'

0:53:530:53:55

'Now, it's Jean Christophe and Margie's French fireman's helmet.

0:53:550:54:00

'Will it save the day?'

0:54:000:54:02

Commissions force me to start it at 22, 25, 28, 30, 32, 35.

0:54:020:54:09

38 I need elsewhere.

0:54:090:54:11

38?

0:54:110:54:12

-I'm going to bid it.

-'That's not allowed.'

0:54:120:54:14

Anybody else for £38?

0:54:140:54:17

No, you can't do that! 40, sir. 42. 45? >

0:54:170:54:22

-42, gentleman standing on my left. Fair warning at £42...

-Oh, la la!

0:54:220:54:26

'Sadly, the bidders aren't as keen on it as Jean Christophe was.

0:54:310:54:35

'Oh, la la, indeed.'

0:54:350:54:37

Jean Christophe, how good was that helmet again?

0:54:370:54:41

'Now it's Rosemary and Paul's much beloved Maidsaver kitchen cabinet

0:54:410:54:46

'and accompanying copper pans and kitchenalia.

0:54:460:54:49

'They've thrown everything but the kitchen sink at it. Will it pay off?

0:54:520:54:56

Few commissions on this. Must start them at 48, 50, 55, 60,

0:54:560:55:03

65, £70.

0:55:030:55:05

75? 80 I'll accept elsewhere...

0:55:050:55:07

No?!

0:55:070:55:08

Seems cheap but it's got to go. £75 for the utility stuff.

0:55:080:55:12

Fair warning at 75...

0:55:120:55:15

No, no, no! Mama mia!

0:55:150:55:17

..80, new bid. 85. 90. Must be 90.

0:55:170:55:22

Hey, sit down. Don't take your clothes off.

0:55:220:55:26

..95 I need elsewhere. All done, are we, at £90?

0:55:260:55:29

Hammer's going to drop. Shout at me if I've missed you.

0:55:290:55:32

Oh, no!

0:55:330:55:35

And you've been doing my head all the time for 90 quid?

0:55:350:55:40

'Hard cheese, you two. It's going to be tough to recover from that.'

0:55:400:55:44

I could have used it for my wood fire!

0:55:440:55:48

'Jean Christophe and Margie are currently in the lead.

0:55:500:55:53

'Their fate hangs in the balance on their last lot,

0:55:530:55:56

'the scientific scales.'

0:55:560:55:58

Commissions force me to start them, ten, 12, 15, 18,

0:55:580:56:04

£20.

0:56:040:56:05

-22 I need. > What did you pay?

-Ssh!

0:56:050:56:08

22 with the lady. Anybody else for 25? It's in the balance...

0:56:080:56:12

-It's neck-and-neck.

-I'll give you my cooking book!

0:56:120:56:16

-I'll do the washing up for one year!

-'No, you jolly well won't!'

0:56:160:56:20

Oh! The pain in my heart!

0:56:200:56:24

'What a pity, a small loss.'

0:56:240:56:27

£22!

0:56:270:56:31

'So, Rosemary and Paul have one last chance

0:56:310:56:35

'to make up the lost ground and claw back the lead.

0:56:350:56:38

'Will their militaria themed lot of binoculars and pipe win the war?'

0:56:380:56:43

Commissions force me to start them at ten, 12, 15, 18,

0:56:430:56:47

20, £22.

0:56:470:56:49

I need to carry on. 22. 25. 28? I'm out.

0:56:490:56:53

-Who's going to win? £28.

-No, no, no, no.

0:56:530:56:57

Needs to be 30 elsewhere. All done? Hammer's going to drop, reluctantly.

0:56:570:57:02

It won't drop. > No! No! No!

0:57:020:57:05

CHEERING

0:57:070:57:09

Thank you, everybody! We love you! Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

0:57:090:57:14

'Paul was right, the militaria did make a profit,

0:57:140:57:17

'but not enough to win the day.

0:57:170:57:19

'The teams did make small profits throughout,

0:57:210:57:24

'but the items that Rosemary and Jean Christophe bought blinded by love rather sank them.

0:57:240:57:30

'Jean Christophe thinks they won. Is he right?

0:57:310:57:35

'Rosemary and Paul started with £400.

0:57:360:57:38

'After paying auction costs, they made a not very toothsome loss

0:57:380:57:43

'of £61.48p

0:57:430:57:45

'and end this Road Trip with £338.52p.

0:57:450:57:49

'While Jean Christophe and Margie also started with £400,

0:57:510:57:55

'after costs, they lost a slightly more palatable £45.52p

0:57:550:58:00

'and so end today with £354.48p.

0:58:000:58:04

'And Jean Christophe seems to have won dishwashing duties from the opposition.'

0:58:050:58:10

Congratulations. Well done.

0:58:100:58:13

I've got a new kitchen porter now! That's good.

0:58:130:58:17

In the car, kitchen porter!

0:58:170:58:19

'I think you'll be hearing about this for some time, Rosemary.'

0:58:190:58:23

Oh, I can't believe this!

0:58:230:58:25

Thank you, my friends.

0:58:250:58:28

Bye, chefs!

0:58:280:58:30

'Goodbye, chefs. You've been sweet.'

0:58:300:58:32

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:370:58:40

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0:58:400:58:43

It's a culinary stand off as Rosemary Shrager and Jean-Christophe Novelli take to the road in a classic Ford Mustang to see who can buy antiques that will cook up profits at auction. With £400 each to spend, experts Margie Cooper and Paul Laidlaw help the chefs sift through the bargains as they road trip through Yorkshire, stopping on the way for Jean-Christophe to discover a menu fit for a king. But will both the chefs' passion for cookery themed items land them in hot water at the auction in Sheffield?


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