Angela Rippon and Gloria Hunniford Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Angela Rippon and Gloria Hunniford

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. Gloria Hunniford and Angela Rippon battle it out in Kent and Sussex with the help of experts Paul Laidlaw and David Harper.


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The nation's favourite celebrities...

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We are special then, are we?

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Oh, that's excellent.

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..paired up with an expert...

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We're a very good team, you and me.

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..and a classic car.

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Their mission - to scour Britain for antiques.

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I've no idea what it is.

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Ooh, go on, have a stroke.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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Yes!

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-But it's no easy ride.

-THEY GASP

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There's no accounting for taste!

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Who will find a hidden gem?

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Who will take the biggest risks?

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Will anybody follow expert advice?

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-D'you like them?

-No.

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There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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-Are you happy? Promise?

-Yes, ecstatic.

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Time to put your pedal to the metal,

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this is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Today we're taking a magical mystery tour

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with two of our finest TV journalists

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and one silver Beetle.

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Well, every time I see a Morris Minor, I just think...

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-No, this is a Herbie!

-Is this a Herbie?

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-This is a Herbie, darling. This is a Volkswagen Beetle!

-Oh, right!

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Yes! This is Herbie with a haircut, cos we've got...

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The bottom line is, I do not like gears.

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See, I see no point in a geared car.

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No, you see, I love gears, cos I think you've got

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much more control over the car than you have with an automatic.

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But you're a control freak, Angela, you like it! THEY LAUGH

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Yes, our strong female leads - and friends -

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are Gloria Hunniford and Angela Rippon.

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Thank you!

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We're like Thelma and Louise in this, aren't we?

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We are. We might never come back off this programme.

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They started out reading the news in the '70s

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and have gone on to have long and venerable careers in television,

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trying their hand at everything from antiques to ballroom dancing.

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CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

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-BRUCE FORSYTH:

-Thank you, Darren and Gloria.

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Yes, Angela can certainly cut a rug too

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and she used to present Top Gear.

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It was when we joined the EEC, the common market,

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that the rumpus really started.

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Gloria, I'm slightly worried the way you keep

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putting your feet to the floor...

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I know, I know, I keep doing that instinctively, don't I?

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But these days, Angela and Gloria

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are regularly to be found writing wrongs on Rip-Off Britain.

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Today's experts - dealer David Harper and auctioneer Paul Laidlaw -

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have mixed feelings about working with consumer champions.

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We've got two icons, haven't we, today?

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-Mind you, I can't help but feel we're being infiltrated.

-Why?

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Well, this thing that they do - Rip-Off Britain.

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-"The sordid underbelly of the antiques world..."

-Yeah!

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"We picked up on this pair of likely lads."

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"Look at the way they negotiate!"

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Celebrities and experts have £400 each,

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and they're driving through the Sussex countryside

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in a 1970s Volkswagen and a 1960s MG Midget,

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or at least that's the plan. Standby!

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-It's losing all power.

-Has it gone?

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ENGINE RATTLES AND SPLUTTERS

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Ah, it's died!

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Get out and get under then, chaps.

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You'll want somebody obviously at the helm, as it were.

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Crikey, our jalopies usually last a bit longer than this!

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Give it a whirl.

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-HE REVS ENGINE

-Oh, it's a steam engine?!

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Ha-ha, now, quickly!

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Go, baby! Yeah, you can do it, come on!

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DAVID LAUGHS It's got nothing!

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Oh, hang on! Rescue could be at hand.

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-Having trouble, boys?

-DAVID: Yes.

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GLORIA: Aren't you lucky?

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-I am very good. I bet you're glad to see us.

-Lovely to see you.

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-You too.

-You've no idea, life-saver!

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-David, hello!

-Really lovely to see you.

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What d'you reckon, do we give them a lift?

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-GLORIA: They're good-looking boys.

-Are they?

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DAVID: Really? GLORIA: Very well turned out.

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DAVID: Never been told that before!

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Gloria, I think we've scored, darling. Get in the back!

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So, the celebrities get them out of there.

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Our trip starts out at Lewis, in the South Downs,

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and then heads north and east towards Kent,

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before making for the capital and an auction at Chiswick.

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GLORIA: I would say this is rather cosy in the back, wouldn't you?

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DAVID: We're getting very cosy here, aren't we?

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-GLORIA: Yeah, I know!

-Well, don't get too cosy! Not with my expert!

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THEY LAUGH DAVID: Are we together, Angela?

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I think we are, yes.

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GLORIA: Ah! Well, I guess we're together then?

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-Yeah.

-Well, you know, I like big, handsome men.

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And you ended up with me, unfortunately!

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GLORIA LAUGHS

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Lewis, the county town of East Sussex,

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sits within Britain's newest national park.

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Ah, now, there's an encouraging sign.

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This is where we're going?

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Angela and David are the first to squeeze from the Beetle into a shop.

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-Hello!

-Morning.

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-Hi, I'm Angela.

-Michelle.

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-Hello, Michelle.

-Hello, Michelle. David, nice to see you.

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-Hi, David.

-Hi, there.

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-This looks very exciting, can we dive in?

-Yeah.

-All right.

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-Where do we start?

-We'll shout you when we want a deal doing.

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Now, this is normally where our celebrity and experts

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set about doing a little bonding.

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Well, I love beautiful Georgian furniture

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cos it's so beautifully made.

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-Oh, yes!

-When did you last see a drawer

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that had tongue and groove on the doors?

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You know what? This is my kind of woman, this is perfect!

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THEY LAUGH

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Going well, but then with a CV like Angela's,

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she's almost an expert herself.

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-That's a cake stand.

-Yeah, I know.

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-It's heavily carved.

-Yeah.

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It's probably Indian, from the days of the Raj.

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-Oh, don't be silly, it's modern.

-Yeah! Is it?

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-Of course it is.

-No, don't think so. Let's have a look.

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-I don't think that's terribly old.

-Let's see.

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-I bet you that's not very old.

-Let's have a look.

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No, I think you're actually probably quite right.

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OK, delete that! THEY LAUGH

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I think we already know who's in charge here, don't we?

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-Please can I handle that?

-Which...thing?

-This one.

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-Isn't that lovely? Look at that.

-Oh, my gosh.

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-Look at that.

-Isn't that delicious?

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How much is this? Ah, £215?!

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-You know, actually, that's not that bad.

-That's not bad.

-No.

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It's not bad. Is it actually a Liberty piece?

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-Turn it over on the other side.

-It is, it's a Liberty & Co.

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-There may have been a pair.

-Definitely would have been a pair.

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It wouldn't have been one on its own.

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Is it marked Tudric on the base?

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-Tudric, there it is.

-There you go. OK, let me have a look at the number.

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So, Tudric is a design purely made for Liberty.

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Save your breath, David, Angela already knows.

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-I would guess that's First World War-ish.

-That's lovely, isn't it?

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1915, the latter end of the Art Nouveau,

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but look at the shapes, oh!

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There's no profit to be had, however, nice though it is.

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I would have that in my home.

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I wouldn't just have it on display, I would handle that and...

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-Tactile, isn't it?

-It's a touchy piece.

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-Oh!

-Yeah, have a stroke.

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-Oh, go on, have a stroke.

-Ooh, I say! Missus!

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THEY LAUGH

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-I'm just going to hold on to it.

-That's like a teddy bear.

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This is all very well, you two, but what are you actually going to buy?

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You see, this is very cool and trendy now, look at that nest of tables.

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-Very G Plan that, isn't it?

-Very G Plan...

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Ten or 15 years ago it would have been put into a skip, now it's...

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Oh, it is G Plan! There we are, it's vintage G Plan.

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-Goodness me.

-Look at that.

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It's bang on trend - 1970s.

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G Plan sticker's still on the bottom.

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-But what's nice about this, Angela, it's well-made.

-It is.

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Unlike modern furniture today,

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-it was made to last for a very long time.

-It's nice.

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The distinctive, but affordable designs of the range,

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were first produced in the '50s by the Gomme company of High Wycombe

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and cleverly branded as G Plan.

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-Where we selling?

-London?

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-London?

-Yes.

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So we've got to bear that in mind, haven't we?

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Sounds like Chiswick might have that little nest coming its way.

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What about Gloria and Paul, bit more room in the Beetle now?

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When I was very young, my mum, you know, she would haggle on everything.

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She would say, "Is that the best you can do?

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"Could you not take a bit off for that?"

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And I used to be so embarrassed I had to walk away.

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But now, of course, you know, ever since I became an adult,

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I've always haggled, but then my children are embarrassed,

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and so it sort of goes on.

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Those two could make a formidable team, you know.

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-Gypsy caravan on the right-hand side.

-It is!

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-Hello. Hi, how are you?

-Hello there, how are you doing?

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No, we're just loving the caravans, gorgeous.

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It looks like you live in an idyll there!

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-Well, today we do!

-How long will you stay in this spot?

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Well, we've been here probably four days,

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we're off tomorrow because we worked for a theatre company last year

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pulling their set with the horses.

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Oh, yeah.

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And they are doing two shows on Romney Marsh.

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How long will it take you to get from here to Romney Marsh?

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-To get to that part of Kent would be a week, wouldn't it?

-WOMAN:

-Yeah.

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-A week?

-Yeah.

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What a wonderful way though to amble along the road at your own leisure.

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It's lovely when you can stop in a spot like this.

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Fantastic.

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While Gloria and Paul are enjoying a chance encounter,

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their rivals are having their first difference of opinion. Stand-by.

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-Oh, it's a jolly nice ginger jar that, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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Actually, I like that.

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-Maybe a bit traditional.

-Oh, I don't know.

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-I love Poole, but for me, that's just too traditional.

-Really?

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For me, it is.

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I think he's got a point, Angela.

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I like it.

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It's beautifully made, there's not a mark on it.

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-It's really good quality and I think...

-OK.

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-Can I pop it with the G Plan thingies?

-Yeah, do.

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Cos I think that's rather nice there.

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-Like that.

-OK, put them aside.

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-So what have we got so far? We've got 75 and 35.

-OK.

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Angela gets her way, of course.

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What else is there then?

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-Oh, look at that for the bathroom!

-Absolutely.

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-There is a market for that.

-Really?!

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-Yeah.

-Needs a bit of a clean.

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Does a bit, it's held a lot of wet, damp towels in its time.

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-It's a towel rail.

-Yeah, I know.

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I mean, that would come off, wouldn't it?

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-But look at its shape, Angela.

-I know.

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-Look at that shape. Is that nice?

-It's very 1950s, isn't it?

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It is, isn't it?

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-You're right, I think this is second generation Art Deco.

-It is.

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Because Deco comes to an end

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at the beginning of the Second World War really,

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kicks off again after the war when they're reinventing the style.

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Shall we put that with the table and the pot?

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-Well, I think we're going in the right direction.

-What is it, 18 quid?

-Yeah.

-£18.

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Am I allowed to clean that up beforehand?

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I think we could sneak it, give it a bath.

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I'd like to clean that up cos that could be quite nice.

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OK, put that aside as well, then.

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-We're going very 20th century, aren't we?

-We are, aren't we?

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That's right. It's all of at least 14 years old!

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Now for a chat with Michelle.

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-So, we've got the nest of G Plan tables.

-Right.

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And we've got the Poole Pottery ginger jar, right?

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What is your best price on that and that?

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The normal trade price would be 65 on the tables

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and 33 on the ginger jar.

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Oh, I'm not interested in that, I had a much lower price than that in mind.

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That would be the normal trade price.

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-I'm not interested in normal trade!

-We're not normal.

-No, you're not, are you?!

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-Oh, no!

-No! No...

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-Not even going to think about that.

-What are you thinking?

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-Ooh, now, be careful here.

-50 and 25.

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Yeah, that's OK.

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75... You gave in too easily!

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Yes, it sounds like you could have pitched a little lower, Angela.

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-I think we've got a chance, I do.

-So we're going to go 50 for that...

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-50 for that.

-25 for that or should...20 for that?

-I can't do 20.

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-You can't do 20? All right, 25 then.

-Yeah, that's fine.

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All right, 75 for the two.

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OK, so I think, basically, you've done a deal.

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But what about this?

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OK, now, Michelle, you're really, really going to have to help us out on this.

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What's your best price on that?

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-How much is on it?

-It's 18.

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-I could probably do 15.

-Oh, Michelle!

-How about a tenner?

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-That's what I thought you were going to say.

-Yeah, tenner for that.

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She means business. Good luck, Michelle.

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-Let's do 12.

-No, tenner.

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And then that makes it a nice round 85 for the three things.

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-OK. OK.

-Have we done it?

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Angela has, ha!

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Three items for £85.

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So, what's it like trying to keep up with the indomitable Angela Rippon?

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She knows exactly what she wants, goes for it, and he gets it.

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There is no mucking about.

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Impressive stuff. Time for the other two to get started...

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..on the edge of the Ashdown Forest at Nutley.

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-Morning.

-Hello.

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-How are you? Gloria.

-Welcome.

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-Lovely to see you.

-How are you?

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-Welcome.

-Yeah, very good.

-Likewise.

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That's terrific, so you've got all sorts of little niches

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-and shops and...

-Lots of different people.

-Yeah, lovely.

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And where's yours, Maureen, what do you specialise in?

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I just have a mix of everything.

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That is EXACTLY what they'd like to hear, I'm sure, Maureen.

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Paul is his usual thorough self, of course,

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and Gloria knows a thing or two about antiques.

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Am I right in saying that this is a majolica?

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-Indeed, we could go with that.

-What do you think?

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It wants to be English and it wants to be 1860s or 1880s,

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but more importantly, it wants to be nicer than that and fine.

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I mean, this is loosely decorative. Yeah, so it's...

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Is it like cabbage leaves?

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I don't know, but the glazes aren't particularly finely applied.

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-This isn't the majolica we were looking for, sadly.

-Yeah.

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That's what he's here for, keep looking.

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A pair of lampposts, perhaps?

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-So they're just reproduction ones, are they?

-Yes, and...

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Also, the ticket says, what? PAUL LAUGHS

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-495!

-495 each!

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We haven't got the money anyway!

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Foiled again!

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Can Paul come up with anything better though?

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This is...a money box.

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You could tell me that,

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but it's the distinctive little stamped brass plaque

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that caused me to ask to see it.

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And it says in this instance,

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-"From the decking of the Mauretania..."

-Whoa!

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"..the Old Lady of the Atlantic."

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Now, what happened is, early 20th century

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when these great battleships and liners were being broken up,

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the teak from the decks was turned into little collectables.

0:13:150:13:20

My problem is, one - they're never that valuable.

0:13:200:13:23

And I must admit, I would like us to spend some money here,

0:13:230:13:27

show some oomph.

0:13:270:13:29

Two - it's not in the best of condition, is it?

0:13:290:13:34

-No.

-It's a tad tired.

0:13:340:13:35

The ticket price is £14,

0:13:350:13:37

but Paul's also spotted a Wemyss pot.

0:13:370:13:41

Wemyss Ware, founded in Scotland in the late 19th century...

0:13:410:13:46

The colours are lovely, aren't they?

0:13:460:13:48

Well, d'you know, the patterns that we recognise first and foremost,

0:13:480:13:51

and I'm sure you'll have seen them,

0:13:510:13:53

-are the pigs with the big cabbage roses on?

-Of course.

0:13:530:13:56

Yes, by Karl Nekola, that's what we recognise as Wemyss.

0:13:560:14:00

-Identified with the Queen Mum?

-Famously collected by.

0:14:000:14:02

-Right.

-Yeah.

0:14:020:14:03

Now, there's nothing like the royal warrant or its equivalent...

0:14:030:14:06

-Yes.

-..to bring you an audience.

0:14:060:14:08

I thought you came with that? PAUL LAUGHS

0:14:080:14:10

There may be a warrant out for me...

0:14:100:14:12

I thought that halo was above your head!

0:14:120:14:14

Let me just have a look at it.

0:14:140:14:15

Now, do you see any cracks or chips which would be fatal?

0:14:150:14:18

Without my glasses? No.

0:14:180:14:20

Tell you what, give it a little tap because if there is no resonance...

0:14:200:14:24

-If it's got a crack, you'll get a real resonance.

-Mm-hm.

0:14:240:14:26

-Do you like that?

-I do.

0:14:260:14:28

-It's pretty.

-There may be a problem...

0:14:280:14:30

What?

0:14:300:14:32

-What is in?

-I guess you would put...

0:14:320:14:35

Well, you're either going to have a very warm cup of tea or coffee

0:14:350:14:38

in your hand, or you might use it to store pencil and pens,

0:14:380:14:41

things like that, but that would be an awful waste, wouldn't it?

0:14:410:14:44

-There's a possibility that that's only...

-Jam?

0:14:440:14:47

Ah, that's where we're going,

0:14:470:14:49

-but what would it need if it were for jam?

-A lid.

0:14:490:14:51

I suspect it may have had a cover,

0:14:510:14:54

possibly even with a little aperture for your preserve spoon.

0:14:540:14:57

-Right, what price is on that one?

-It is priced up at £65.

0:14:570:15:00

65, yeah.

0:15:000:15:01

I wonder what Maureen makes of the lid question?

0:15:010:15:05

Well, it hasn't got any damage round there though, has it?

0:15:050:15:07

We get that, but many a thing lived in a china cabinet

0:15:070:15:10

and never got put to its...

0:15:100:15:11

-True.

-So, do you think, Maureen, if it had had a lid on it,

0:15:110:15:14

-there would be a bit of damage here?

-I think there might have been, yes.

0:15:140:15:18

-Is there a margin in there that you could erode to our benefit?

-May I?

0:15:180:15:23

Of course.

0:15:230:15:24

-How is 50?

-Still a bit too high, isn't it?

0:15:240:15:27

For our purposes, I don't think it's a trade purchase.

0:15:270:15:31

-Right, I think we can go for 40.

-Could we settle on 35?

0:15:310:15:35

Bite the bullet.

0:15:350:15:37

-Let's stick at 40 at the moment.

-She's a hard woman.

0:15:370:15:41

Oh, she's good, she's good, she's good!

0:15:410:15:43

D'oh! We've met our match!

0:15:430:15:45

At the risk of walking out empty-handed...

0:15:450:15:47

We're thinking 35, we are hoping that maybe you'll meet us there?

0:15:490:15:52

-Could we do 13 each?

-I'll give you three quid.

-I'm tempted not...

0:15:520:15:56

Yeah, why would we quibble over a few pounds? We're not that hard!

0:15:560:15:58

-Have we just done a deal?

-We've done a deal.

0:15:580:16:01

-We've broken our duck!

-£38!

0:16:010:16:04

-OK?

-I financed it.

-Thank you very much, Maureen,

0:16:040:16:06

thank you for meeting us in the middle there.

0:16:060:16:08

You're not getting your two quid back.

0:16:080:16:10

Hell, yes, I'm getting my £2 back! I would wrestle for £2.

0:16:100:16:13

Well, we have to!

0:16:130:16:14

Phew, that was a titanic struggle! Now, where are Angela and David?

0:16:140:16:20

Taking a well-earned rest from all of that it seems...

0:16:200:16:23

just outside Lewis, in the tranquil village of Rodmell,

0:16:230:16:28

where Angela's come to see the country home

0:16:280:16:30

of novelist Virginia Woolf.

0:16:300:16:32

Monk's House, now owned by the National Trust,

0:16:320:16:35

is preserved exactly as it was

0:16:350:16:36

when Virginia wrote many of her great works here,

0:16:360:16:39

taking inspiration from the Sussex countryside and the South Downs.

0:16:390:16:43

Look at that!

0:16:430:16:45

-Hi!

-I'm Angela.

0:16:450:16:46

-Hi, I'm Vicky, nice to meet you.

-Hello, Vicky.

0:16:460:16:48

-Hi, Vicky, I'm David. Nice to see you.

-Ah, this is heaven!

-Isn't it?

0:16:480:16:51

Look at it, it's so stunning!

0:16:510:16:53

Virginia's sister and fellow Bloomsbury Group member,

0:16:540:16:58

the artist Vanessa Bell, acquired a house nearby in 1916,

0:16:580:17:02

followed a few years later by the writer and her husband, Leonard.

0:17:020:17:06

Oh, lovely beams, look.

0:17:060:17:08

The sitting room is furnished with many items by Bell

0:17:090:17:11

and her partner Duncan Grant.

0:17:110:17:13

In London, she was very much part of the Bloomsbury set, wasn't she?

0:17:130:17:17

-Yes, yeah.

-With lots of very famous friends.

-Mm-hm.

0:17:170:17:20

Did they come here and if so, who used to come into this room?

0:17:200:17:23

The whole Bloomsbury Group kind of almost relocated,

0:17:230:17:26

so, you know, round this table you would have had

0:17:260:17:28

the likes of EM Forster, TS Eliot, Lytton Strachey, Vita Sackville-West...

0:17:280:17:32

-Oh, gosh.

-I mean, it is...

-They're big names, aren't they?

-Big names.

0:17:320:17:35

-Incredibly creative people.

-They sat in these chairs?

-Mm, they would have, yeah,

0:17:350:17:38

there are photographs of the likes of TS Eliot and EM Forster.

0:17:380:17:41

The energy that must have been in this room with those names...

0:17:410:17:44

-Wouldn't you love to have been a fly on the wall and listened to the conversations?

-Ah, yes!

-Exactly.

0:17:440:17:49

Sometimes, don't you just wish you could go back...?

0:17:490:17:51

-If these beams could talk!

-Yes!

0:17:510:17:53

But a writer's life is by necessity a mostly solitary one

0:17:530:17:56

and for Virginia Woolf, that meant many hours spent in this annexe,

0:17:560:18:00

which served as both writing room and bedroom.

0:18:000:18:03

Oh, what a pretty little room. Where would she have written in here?

0:18:060:18:09

-The chair that you see in the corner...

-This one?

0:18:090:18:12

She would have put a board across the arms of that.

0:18:120:18:14

-She would have written on her lap.

-My gosh.

-So, yeah...

0:18:140:18:16

-By hand, of course?

-By hand.

-No typewriter?

0:18:160:18:19

-She did have a typewriter, yeah...

-But not here?

0:18:190:18:21

Well, she was quite keen to write things by hand.

0:18:210:18:23

She'd also recite a lot of what she'd written,

0:18:230:18:25

make sure the rhythm was right and she'd do that in the bath.

0:18:250:18:28

What are those books with the bindings on the back?

0:18:280:18:30

Yeah, so these, it's a complete collection

0:18:300:18:32

-of Arden Shakespeare...she was given in the 1930s as a gift...

-Ah!

0:18:320:18:36

And Virginia suffered frequently with issues of mental health

0:18:360:18:40

and also, you know, migraines, bad headaches,

0:18:400:18:43

and when she went through a period like that, she would find cathartic,

0:18:430:18:46

repetitive tasks to undertake,

0:18:460:18:49

and one of them was covering books.

0:18:490:18:51

We've got Antony and Cleopatra, Henry V...

0:18:510:18:54

-And what are they actually covered in?

-It is actually marbled paper.

0:18:540:18:58

We don't know whether it was something she produced herself

0:18:580:19:01

or something she purchased, but she was really keen on marbled paper.

0:19:010:19:04

And you can see there, she's also just put hand labels

0:19:040:19:07

on there as well and hand written on them.

0:19:070:19:09

So it's the only manuscript we have of hers in the house.

0:19:090:19:11

There's a reminder of one of Virginia's most famous novels

0:19:120:19:15

in the fireplace with tiles painted by her sister.

0:19:150:19:18

To The Lighthouse, published in 1927,

0:19:180:19:21

was soon followed by the more accessible Orlando -

0:19:210:19:25

much of that book written in Virginia's garden hideaway.

0:19:250:19:29

-Well, she had a lovely walk to work every day, didn't she?

-She did, yeah.

0:19:300:19:33

-Not a bad commute!

-Sun shining like today, you can't moan, can you?

-Ah!

0:19:330:19:36

Leonard had a saying for it, didn't he?

0:19:360:19:38

He would basically say that she had

0:19:380:19:40

the regularity of a stockbroker on a commute to work

0:19:400:19:42

and it was a very regular lifestyle that she led,

0:19:420:19:45

so she'd be down here every morning, 10am on the dot,

0:19:450:19:48

and then she would go back in for lunch.

0:19:480:19:50

Then she'd go on a walk, you know, through the Downs,

0:19:500:19:52

get some more inspiration, come back, work on her writings.

0:19:520:19:55

-So these are her glasses?

-They are her glasses, yeah.

0:19:550:19:57

-Her pencil?

-I'm not sure about the pencil, I can't, you know...

0:19:570:20:01

Yeah, I don't know the history of the pencil,

0:20:010:20:03

but the desk was definitely hers, not that she actually used

0:20:030:20:06

a desk to write, it just used to be somewhere to store papers.

0:20:060:20:10

No, that was done in this chair with a view of her husband's

0:20:100:20:14

beautiful garden outside.

0:20:140:20:16

But it wasn't all hard work for the troubled writer,

0:20:160:20:18

because the Woolfs and their Bloomsbury Group friends

0:20:180:20:22

were very fond of a game of bowls.

0:20:220:20:24

And at Monk's House, you can get on the green yourself.

0:20:240:20:27

There's the jack... Well, we have to put the jack out first, don't we?

0:20:270:20:30

OK.

0:20:300:20:31

-Ooh!

-Oh, that's close.

0:20:330:20:35

ALL: Oh! ALL LAUGH

0:20:370:20:40

Come on, baby.

0:20:400:20:41

-Rubbish!

-Yeah!

-Oh!

0:20:430:20:45

Nothing like a couple of vigorous ends after crafting another

0:20:450:20:48

modernist masterpiece.

0:20:480:20:50

Oh, I can't believe it, she's knocked you further forward!

0:20:500:20:52

-I'm even closer!

-Right, come on. ANGELA LAUGHS

0:20:520:20:55

-Three, four...

-No.

-..five, six...

-No!

0:20:550:20:58

-I'm closer!

-DAVID LAUGHS

0:20:580:21:00

Oh, I do like a happy ending.

0:21:000:21:02

-Girl power, eh?

-That's it, girl power.

0:21:020:21:04

You are in the right place for girl power.

0:21:040:21:06

Yeah, that's true, that's true.

0:21:060:21:07

It's today's theme, all right. Night-night, then.

0:21:070:21:10

See you soon.

0:21:100:21:12

Another day, another motor.

0:21:130:21:16

It's probably better that I drive today

0:21:170:21:19

-because you don't have a great track record with old cars, do you?

-Oh-ho!

0:21:190:21:23

How very dare you, Harper!

0:21:230:21:25

Well, I mean, yesterday... MG, you driving,

0:21:250:21:27

doesn't get a mile before the car gives up the ghost!

0:21:270:21:31

-PAUL LAUGHS

-It wasn't only the Midget that barely got off the grid

0:21:310:21:35

yesterday though,

0:21:350:21:36

because Gloria and Paul managed just one pot for £38.

0:21:360:21:40

D'oh! We've met our match.

0:21:400:21:42

Leaving Gloria feeling more than a tad frustrated.

0:21:420:21:45

-ANGELA:

-Where are your negotiating skills?

0:21:450:21:48

-GLORIA: Well, we didn't have anything to negotiate.

-But you got to sharpen them up.

0:21:480:21:52

It's all very well, if you've got something that you're haggling over.

0:21:520:21:55

Angela and David, however, are practically in the home straight,

0:21:550:21:59

after acquiring a nest of tables, a Poole Pottery jar

0:21:590:22:01

and a towel rail for £85...

0:22:010:22:04

Give it a bit of a clean and that could be quite nice.

0:22:050:22:07

..leaving them with just over £300 to spend today.

0:22:070:22:11

David and I were very lucky

0:22:110:22:12

because we went into a shop that was an absolute Aladdin's cave.

0:22:120:22:15

It was chock-a-block.

0:22:150:22:17

I was thinking about it overnight. I thought,

0:22:170:22:19

-"At least if we don't spend anything, we haven't lost anything."

-Exactly!

0:22:190:22:22

Don't worry, Gloria, you'll be fine.

0:22:220:22:24

We're in the same first shop.

0:22:250:22:27

It could be handbags at dawn, can you imagine?

0:22:270:22:29

We've got Gloria and Angela, who have been friends for about 30 years,

0:22:290:22:33

-fighting to get in the door first.

-Consummate professionals...

0:22:330:22:37

THEY SNARL AND GRUNT

0:22:370:22:40

Later, they'll be heading into London for an auction in Chiswick,

0:22:400:22:43

but our next stop is the Kent village of Otford.

0:22:430:22:46

Back in 776,

0:22:510:22:53

there was a battle fought around here between King Offa's Mercians

0:22:530:22:57

and the Jutes of Kent,

0:22:570:22:59

but as you can, things have calmed down quite a bit since then.

0:22:590:23:02

-A rather comfortable bench.

-It's very nice here.

0:23:020:23:05

Leafy place, very nice indeed.

0:23:050:23:07

What do you reckon?

0:23:070:23:08

-Where are they?

-A-ha!

0:23:080:23:10

-They've got a new car today.

-They have.

0:23:100:23:12

Well, the Healey has already gone further than the Midget, at least.

0:23:120:23:15

What time do you call this, then? A lie in, was it?

0:23:160:23:19

We've got work to do, have we not?

0:23:190:23:21

We've got two shops to go to today, haven't we?

0:23:210:23:23

Two shops and two things.

0:23:230:23:25

A man who boasts like that - there's something wrong.

0:23:250:23:29

-Shall we stop?

-Let's do it.

-Let's shop.

0:23:290:23:30

GLORIA: We're going to the same shop, aren't we?

0:23:300:23:32

DAVID: Lead the way, madam.

0:23:320:23:34

Gloria's been to Otford before,

0:23:340:23:35

but she seems content to let Angela and David lead the way.

0:23:350:23:39

-Are we sharing this shop, then?

-I think we are, aren't we?

0:23:390:23:42

Is it first one in bags the bargains?

0:23:420:23:44

GLORIA: Tell you what, there's another one down here.

0:23:450:23:48

Ah, I see. Something up her sleeve, eh? Cunning.

0:23:480:23:51

-David Harper.

-Wendy.

0:23:510:23:52

Hello, I'm Angela.

0:23:520:23:54

-Good morning, Grace.

-Hello, Grace.

0:23:540:23:56

Good morning, Grace.

0:23:560:23:57

-Angie.

-And another name I don't have to remember!

0:23:570:24:00

Angie? Oh, this makes my life much easier.

0:24:000:24:02

Hello, nice to see you.

0:24:020:24:04

So an awful lot of names and an awful lot of antiques too.

0:24:040:24:07

All to yourselves, though, since Gloria craftily swerved elsewhere.

0:24:080:24:12

This is rather interesting, cos this actually is a charity shop.

0:24:120:24:16

-Right.

-It's a charity shop that stocks a lot of antiques.

0:24:160:24:18

Good morning. Lynn? The manager, I can see from your badge.

0:24:180:24:21

-I'm Gloria and this is Paul, who's our expert.

-Hi, Paul.

0:24:210:24:24

-I was just saying - I love the idea this is a charity shop.

-Yes, it is.

0:24:240:24:28

We rely heavily on donations.

0:24:280:24:30

We do buy things from auctions,

0:24:300:24:32

but we have to buy very, very cheaply,

0:24:320:24:35

obviously to generate as much profit as we can.

0:24:350:24:39

Interesting.

0:24:390:24:40

I wonder what Gloria and Paul can do to swell the charity's coffers.

0:24:400:24:44

-May we have a look in the cabinet?

-Of course.

0:24:440:24:46

There's a lovely little stick pin here.

0:24:460:24:48

We actually reduced it

0:24:480:24:49

because we didn't seem to have a lot of interest in it at 45,

0:24:490:24:52

because it doesn't appear to be hallmarked,

0:24:520:24:55

-yet it seems as though...

-And it's got its original box.

0:24:550:24:58

That's what I like about it.

0:24:580:25:00

-Oh, lovely.

-Charles Packer, Regent Street retailer of London.

0:25:000:25:05

A little gentleman's stick pin.

0:25:050:25:07

Now, albeit unmarked,

0:25:070:25:10

I'd be surprised if that wasn't,

0:25:100:25:13

in fairness the terminal only, not the pin,

0:25:130:25:17

high-carat gold.

0:25:170:25:19

Legally, if it's unassayed, un-hallmarked,

0:25:190:25:22

we can't describe it as gold,

0:25:220:25:24

but the convention at auction is to describe it

0:25:240:25:28

-as "precious yellow metal."

-Could that be a little sapphire?

0:25:280:25:31

It could be. I think it's got a touch of the aquamarine,

0:25:310:25:34

rather than the sapphire, I believe.

0:25:340:25:36

And the price is £25.

0:25:360:25:38

-I adore. What do you think?

-I love it.

0:25:380:25:40

And the truth of the matter is,

0:25:400:25:42

under no circumstances would I haggle in a charity shop.

0:25:420:25:45

Not in a charity shop.

0:25:450:25:46

Keep it in your hand or put it back in the case?

0:25:460:25:48

I don't think we're going to risk snaffling our pin.

0:25:480:25:52

Well played, you two. Any news from the other shop, though?

0:25:520:25:55

-Lordy, what's she seen now?

-Ha!

0:25:550:25:57

Ah!

0:25:570:25:59

-They are definitely period.

-They are period, yes!

-They are Art Deco.

0:25:590:26:04

-They're very Busby Berkeley.

-Aren't they? Yes, exactly.

0:26:040:26:08

-And we have a pair.

-Yes.

0:26:080:26:10

They're about 1930, 1935.

0:26:100:26:13

They're not in very good condition, though, that's the trouble.

0:26:130:26:15

-They're not.

-She's missing the fan! Look, it's there.

0:26:150:26:18

There's a lump on the top where there should be one of those.

0:26:180:26:21

I know, but be forgiving, Angela.

0:26:210:26:23

Proving a bit of a hard sell, eh, David?

0:26:230:26:25

-They're not doing it for me.

-You put them about 15 feet away, squint,

0:26:250:26:30

and you're thinking, "Wow, there's a pair of beauties over there."

0:26:300:26:33

The closer you get to them, it all goes terribly wrong.

0:26:330:26:37

But I'm thinking, online,

0:26:370:26:38

these are the kind of things that people fall for.

0:26:380:26:41

Why should we foist them on someone?

0:26:410:26:44

WHISPERING: Because that's what we do. That's our job.

0:26:440:26:47

Oh, dear. It's not a consumer show, Angela.

0:26:470:26:50

Would you like to put them in a dark corner somewhere

0:26:500:26:52

while I think about it?

0:26:520:26:54

-I think I know what that means.

-Ha.

0:26:540:26:56

That's him told, then.

0:26:560:26:58

Meanwhile, Paul and Gloria have got something else in mind.

0:26:580:27:01

Does that do anything for you?

0:27:010:27:02

Hmm, erm, quite like it.

0:27:020:27:06

-It's this whole cupcake thing.

-Yes, yes.

0:27:060:27:09

-Ladies sitting down to tea.

-Yes.

0:27:090:27:11

You've got a typical folding three-stage affair, yeah?

0:27:110:27:14

And would these be hand painted?

0:27:140:27:16

This is why I'm drawn to it.

0:27:160:27:18

It is lacquered in this rather subtle tone,

0:27:180:27:21

but look at the decoration here.

0:27:210:27:23

Got these little finches,

0:27:230:27:24

character marks, the artist has actually signed it.

0:27:240:27:27

-Beautiful.

-It's going to date to 1920, 1930 in Japan.

0:27:270:27:31

That, purely in terms of decoration,

0:27:310:27:34

is an extremely uncommon object.

0:27:340:27:37

-Very good.

-£25!

0:27:370:27:41

Whoa!

0:27:410:27:43

It's lovely.

0:27:430:27:44

-Look at that!

-Actually, I would serve you tea on that, Paul.

-Yep.

0:27:440:27:48

-Is that an invitation?

-A few fairy cakes on that, absolutely, yes.

0:27:480:27:51

Will I hide it just in case Angela and David come in?

0:27:510:27:54

I never even thought of that. Absolutely, do.

0:27:540:27:57

That's got David Harper written all over it, by the way.

0:27:570:27:59

-Definitely.

-Normally, Paul,

0:27:590:28:01

but right now he's considering a much more youthful item.

0:28:010:28:05

-It's a wine rack, isn't it?

-It's a wine rack/table.

0:28:050:28:08

It's got no great age...

0:28:080:28:10

-No age at all!

-No, I know.

0:28:100:28:11

-I've got shoes older than that!

-All right, it was made yesterday.

0:28:110:28:14

-If you're interested in that, that's actually mine.

-Is it?

-Oh, is it?

0:28:140:28:17

-Ah.

-When did you make it?

0:28:170:28:19

Cheeky! Let's get it out of the window, shall we?

0:28:210:28:24

First of all, Angela, do you like it?

0:28:240:28:27

Um, in a conservatory, it would look good.

0:28:270:28:30

-It needs a good clean.

-Yep.

0:28:300:28:31

-You could varnish the top, couldn't you?

-You know what?

0:28:310:28:33

I think our next stop has got to be to a supermarket.

0:28:330:28:36

I've got to get the rubber gloves and the cleaning stuff

0:28:360:28:39

-and get at this.

-Thanks to Angela,

0:28:390:28:41

we're going to have the cleanest antiques ever this time.

0:28:410:28:43

What's the best you can do on it?

0:28:430:28:45

35.

0:28:450:28:47

35.

0:28:470:28:48

30 quid?

0:28:480:28:50

-I'd be happy at 30.

-I'd be happy at 30.

0:28:500:28:52

I'd be delighted at 30.

0:28:520:28:54

Do you think Angie will be at 30?

0:28:540:28:55

-Angie's going to absolutely snap our hands off.

-Snap it up?

0:28:550:28:58

She's going to have such a good day, she's going to lock up and go home.

0:28:580:29:01

-Is she?

-Yeah.

0:29:010:29:02

Yeah, 30.

0:29:030:29:05

Yay!

0:29:050:29:07

They're having a very nice time - quite the double act, in fact.

0:29:070:29:10

-Thank you very much.

-Thanks very much indeed, Angie. Great pleasure.

0:29:100:29:13

Thank you, nice to see you.

0:29:130:29:15

Down the street, Gloria could be about to turn over a new leaf.

0:29:150:29:18

You may think I'm mad,

0:29:180:29:21

but I love this lectern.

0:29:210:29:22

I think I'm a bit bonded to a lectern anyway,

0:29:230:29:25

because we do so many talks from a lectern,

0:29:250:29:28

but I think... I mean, that's got a Bible on it at the moment,

0:29:280:29:31

but there's a recipe book here.

0:29:310:29:33

Imagine, you could use it in your kitchen

0:29:330:29:34

if you had a big enough kitchen.

0:29:340:29:36

-I'd love the kitchen big enough for this!

-I know.

-Quite, Paul.

0:29:360:29:39

Look at the base of it, look.

0:29:390:29:40

-Strange structure. It's almost like a rocket.

-Yeah.

0:29:400:29:43

It's a Victorian piece,

0:29:430:29:44

it's in a blondish oak.

0:29:440:29:46

If it were desperately dark, I'd maybe have an issue with that.

0:29:460:29:50

It's actually on a sale price here - was 125.

0:29:500:29:53

-Fair.

-It's now 70, which is a real good sale reduction.

0:29:530:29:57

-Tempting me now!

-How do you think we would do with that at auction?

0:29:570:30:00

Um, do you know?

0:30:000:30:03

I could estimate that north of £80.

0:30:030:30:05

It's going to be the only one in auction.

0:30:050:30:07

It's in fantastic condition.

0:30:070:30:09

-It's all right, isn't it?

-So can we have it?

0:30:090:30:12

I think we must have it!

0:30:120:30:13

So with no haggling required, those three items will cost £120.

0:30:130:30:17

-Isn't that great?

-It feels good.

0:30:190:30:21

Suddenly, Gloria and Paul have almost all they need

0:30:210:30:25

for the auction.

0:30:250:30:26

Meanwhile, the others are enjoying life back on the road.

0:30:290:30:32

David's quite a classic car enthusiast

0:30:320:30:34

and Angela, of course, was on that motoring programme.

0:30:340:30:37

What's it called again?

0:30:370:30:38

"TOP GEAR" THEME

0:30:380:30:40

I literally drove everything from Harley Davidson motorbikes

0:30:400:30:44

to an articulated lorry and everything and anything

0:30:440:30:47

you can imagine in between, including 1910 vintage cars.

0:30:470:30:50

Have they had you on Top Gear?

0:30:500:30:52

No, I don't think they will because I don't think Mr Clarkson

0:30:520:30:55

-likes admitting that I was actually the first presenter!

-Really?

0:30:550:30:59

Those two are taking the relatively short road from Otford

0:30:590:31:02

to the village of Brasted.

0:31:020:31:04

-How about that, then, David?

-It's ideal.

0:31:040:31:07

And an even shorter walk.

0:31:070:31:09

-Hello, I'm Angela.

-How do you do? I'm Hugh.

0:31:100:31:12

-Hello, Hugh.

-Hello, Hugh, David Harper.

0:31:120:31:14

My gosh, this is a real antiques shop.

0:31:140:31:16

Yes, there are several fine things to be found in here.

0:31:180:31:21

Everywhere you look! Look at that mirror.

0:31:210:31:25

Almost all of it is older

0:31:250:31:26

and perhaps better quality than they've purchased so far.

0:31:260:31:29

-That is a fab, fab table.

-It is, yep.

0:31:290:31:33

They have money to spend as well, close to £300.

0:31:330:31:36

-What do you think of its shape and design.

-It's Arts and Crafts.

0:31:360:31:39

Definitely.

0:31:390:31:40

It's light, it's pewter.

0:31:400:31:42

I love the shape.

0:31:420:31:43

-Isn't it interesting?

-It's a good shape. What do you think?

0:31:430:31:46

It's an interesting piece.

0:31:460:31:48

How heavy is it? Can I have a feel?

0:31:480:31:49

Yeah. It's off-centre in the middle.

0:31:490:31:52

Oh, it is very wonky-wonky.

0:31:520:31:54

Very winky-wonky, but maybe it's supposed to be,

0:31:540:31:56

because how would you...

0:31:560:31:57

Because it is Arts and Crafts...

0:31:570:31:59

-Hand-done.

-..it's totally hand-done.

-How much do you think at auction?

0:31:590:32:02

50-90 at auction.

0:32:020:32:03

-They want 88 for it.

-88, OK.

0:32:030:32:05

Meanwhile, back in Otford,

0:32:080:32:09

Gloria and Paul are shopping around.

0:32:090:32:12

Where do you want to start?

0:32:120:32:14

You know, I am very systematic.

0:32:140:32:16

Obsessively, compulsively so. I'm going to start at the door

0:32:160:32:19

-and we're going to have a wee mooch.

-Right!

0:32:190:32:21

Familiar territory,

0:32:210:32:22

but apart from the table the others grabbed earlier,

0:32:220:32:24

it should all be in order.

0:32:240:32:26

Paul, I found something to keep you in check.

0:32:260:32:29

I might just keep this by my side.

0:32:300:32:32

They seem a bit more relaxed

0:32:320:32:34

now that they've got a few things in the old bag.

0:32:340:32:36

I actually was awake last night through the night,

0:32:360:32:38

thinking this'll be the first time in this programme

0:32:380:32:41

when I'll go to auction and we've only got one small item,

0:32:410:32:44

but today I feel happy, cos we've found something we like.

0:32:440:32:48

Which is good.

0:32:480:32:49

Even better is that Gloria's now doing more of the finding.

0:32:490:32:53

I must say, Wendy, I absolutely love this sewing box.

0:32:530:32:57

-Look at it - it's in beautiful condition.

-Lovely condition, yes.

0:32:570:32:59

Just imagine all the threads and everything in there.

0:32:590:33:02

Paul, what do you think of this? I've fallen in love with this sowing box.

0:33:020:33:05

I walked past this previously.

0:33:050:33:07

It's very me, I adore it.

0:33:070:33:09

I shouldn't say that before we start!

0:33:090:33:11

Have you seen the condition of it? Look.

0:33:110:33:14

It's not sat in front of a window.

0:33:140:33:15

The colour is strong,

0:33:150:33:17

-the figure's all there.

-The ticket price is 245.

0:33:170:33:20

I'll be absolutely honest with you upfront,

0:33:200:33:22

we haven't got that much money left to play with.

0:33:220:33:25

I think I know what she will accept for it,

0:33:250:33:27

-if you'd like me to tell you?

-Oh, tenterhooks!

0:33:270:33:30

She will take 180.

0:33:300:33:33

Now, see if I had my positive auctioneer's hat on,

0:33:340:33:38

I'd say that's worth 250.

0:33:380:33:40

-At 250, we would make a little profit on that.

-We would.

0:33:410:33:45

Could we take chance, do you think?

0:33:450:33:47

Looking at your face, I think you're up for a bit of a punt, are you not?

0:33:480:33:53

You know you've got a sale here, don't you?

0:33:530:33:55

Do me one last favour.

0:33:550:33:57

Go and ask and say, "They really want it, but it's 170."

0:33:580:34:02

That's not a big ask, another tenner.

0:34:020:34:04

I should say no, but I'll try.

0:34:060:34:09

Imagine if it came down to the last tenner

0:34:090:34:12

and we won it over that. You'd go,

0:34:120:34:14

"Whoa!"

0:34:140:34:16

-OK...

-Wendy, she's come back.

0:34:160:34:19

Are you smiling, Wendy, widely?

0:34:190:34:21

Half smiling.

0:34:210:34:22

-Half smiling?

-How about 175?

-A fiver, isn't it?

0:34:220:34:25

How about we shake Wendy's hand?

0:34:250:34:28

Magic!

0:34:280:34:29

-Thank you.

-You're a smoother talker, Wendy.

0:34:290:34:32

Come here, you. Come here a minute.

0:34:320:34:34

-I've got to give you a kiss for that one.

-But you discovered it, Gloria.

0:34:340:34:37

Anyway, now Angela's finally found a bit of quality.

0:34:370:34:41

Watch out.

0:34:410:34:42

What do you think...

0:34:420:34:44

-of this?

-Oh, my gosh.

0:34:440:34:46

-It's a little Mappin & Webb...

-Oh!

0:34:460:34:49

It's marked on the bottom, silver.

0:34:490:34:52

-..champagne flute.

-Oh, my gosh.

0:34:520:34:56

I like that.

0:34:560:34:58

Can I have a look at the hallmarks,

0:34:580:34:59

let me find the hallmarks on this thing.

0:34:590:35:02

Here we are, up here. Look at how crisp they are!

0:35:020:35:05

-We've got a mark for Sheffield.

-Yeah.

0:35:050:35:08

The lion passant and then the T for 1934.

0:35:080:35:12

-1934.

-So that is kind of mid-period Art Deco, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:35:120:35:16

One solid-silver champagne glass.

0:35:160:35:20

-It's not a glass, what do you call it?

-A flute!

0:35:200:35:23

Is it a flute, I don't know!

0:35:230:35:24

I don't know, it's for drinking champagne.

0:35:250:35:27

It's for drinking champagne.

0:35:270:35:29

-My tipple, darling.

-It's a coupe, actually.

0:35:290:35:32

The ticket price is £85, but they can certainly afford it.

0:35:320:35:35

We could make a bit of money on it or we might lose heavily on it.

0:35:350:35:39

But you know what? I think it's one of those things that is so beautiful

0:35:390:35:43

that if we were to put it in auction,

0:35:430:35:44

whoever bought it would be buying something so beautiful

0:35:440:35:47

and passing it on to someone else as a gift,

0:35:470:35:50

how nice to think that we made that possible for them.

0:35:500:35:53

Aw, you're too nice.

0:35:530:35:55

-Now, Hugh.

-Yes.

0:35:550:35:56

Everybody, surely, must own a Mappin & Webb solid silver champagne coupe.

0:35:560:36:00

I don't think they do. I think they're reasonably rare.

0:36:000:36:03

They're very common, aren't they, Angela?

0:36:030:36:05

All over the place, darling.

0:36:050:36:06

-Yes.

-What kind of money can we do that for?

0:36:060:36:08

73.

0:36:090:36:11

No!

0:36:110:36:12

-Can we make it a nice...? I like noughts.

-So do I.

0:36:120:36:16

-What are you thinking, 60?

-At the most.

0:36:160:36:19

-Could you do 60?

-No, but I tell you what...

-That was a quick answer!

0:36:200:36:23

That's right, but I tell you what, we'll do 70 for you.

0:36:230:36:26

70. Do you pay £70 for a solid-silver Mappin & Webb champagne coupe?

0:36:260:36:31

-I think yes.

-It's very you, Angela Rippon.

0:36:320:36:35

I think we're going to have to have it, aren't we?

0:36:350:36:38

-Can we take it that it's sold?

-It is!

0:36:380:36:39

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:36:390:36:42

Cheers, everyone.

0:36:420:36:43

There's 80.

0:36:430:36:45

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:36:450:36:46

-That means there's £10 coming back to me.

-Yes!

-Sorry, sorry!

0:36:480:36:52

Thank you. A bit of a pause there, I didn't like it.

0:36:520:36:55

So their shopping's now complete.

0:36:550:36:58

But what about their rivals,

0:36:580:37:00

storming towards the ramparts of Leeds Castle?

0:37:000:37:03

Is this our lucky day, or what?

0:37:040:37:07

Oh, my goodness, talk about a feel-good factor.

0:37:070:37:10

-There's the castle.

-What a prospect.

0:37:100:37:13

The shopping's done too, and they're ready to explore.

0:37:130:37:16

The stonework on the castle looks really clean, doesn't it?

0:37:160:37:19

-Joyous, isn't it?

-Beautiful.

-Could be a movie set.

0:37:190:37:22

There's a been castle on this site, definitely in Kent,

0:37:220:37:25

despite its somewhat confusing name, for over 900 years.

0:37:250:37:29

Thank you very much.

0:37:290:37:30

Gloria's come to learn more about the kings and queens

0:37:300:37:34

who spent time here.

0:37:340:37:35

-Hello.

-Hello, there.

-Are you Tori?

0:37:350:37:38

-I am Tori.

-The castle looks magnificent on this gorgeous day.

0:37:380:37:42

Beautiful, really beautiful.

0:37:420:37:44

Once described as the loveliest castle in the world,

0:37:440:37:47

Leeds has been associated with the monarchy

0:37:470:37:49

since the medieval Queen Eleanor of Castile.

0:37:490:37:53

Here we are in the beautiful courtyard.

0:37:530:37:55

-Beautiful.

-I suppose you're wondering why it's called Leeds Castle.

0:37:550:37:59

-Absolutely.

-Well, it's named after the little village of Leeds,

0:37:590:38:02

which is just here on the outskirts of the castle,

0:38:020:38:05

and not after the Leeds in Yorkshire.

0:38:050:38:07

It was built in about 1119 by a Norman soldier

0:38:070:38:11

and then passed in the 12th century into royal ownership.

0:38:110:38:15

How many kings would have lived here over the years?

0:38:150:38:18

Gosh, I would have to use quite a lot of fingers to count that up.

0:38:180:38:21

It's easier if I say how many queens there were -

0:38:210:38:24

six queens that we know resided here or visited here

0:38:240:38:28

during 300 years of occupation from about the 1270s,

0:38:280:38:32

and that takes us right up to Henry VIII.

0:38:320:38:35

In the early 16th century,

0:38:350:38:37

King Henry transformed the Norman stronghold

0:38:370:38:40

into a Tudor palace for the use of his first wife,

0:38:400:38:43

Catherine of Aragon.

0:38:430:38:45

On one visit in 1520,

0:38:450:38:47

5,000 people stayed here

0:38:470:38:48

en route to the famous Field of the Cloth of Gold

0:38:480:38:52

for a meeting with the French king in Calais.

0:38:520:38:55

The Maiden's Tower was built to house the queen's maids of honour

0:38:550:38:59

and one of those was Henry's next wife, Anne Boleyn.

0:38:590:39:03

There's no doubt about the history the place has seen,

0:39:030:39:06

but appearances can be a bit deceptive.

0:39:060:39:09

It says this particular fireplace was installed in Henry VIII's time.

0:39:090:39:13

You're right, it does contain Catherine of Aragon's motifs

0:39:130:39:17

here, the dragon motif and her coat of arms, and over here we have a

0:39:170:39:23

tiny little castle motif, which is very sweet, and Tudor rose.

0:39:230:39:27

So although it may not have been in this location,

0:39:270:39:30

this room looks very medieval, but in fact it dates to 1927...

0:39:300:39:34

-No?

-..when Lady Bailey came in

0:39:340:39:36

and did a wholesale renovation of the place.

0:39:360:39:39

Lady Bailey was an American heiress who bought the castle in 1925

0:39:410:39:45

and set about creating her own version of history.

0:39:450:39:48

HE CHUCKLES

0:39:480:39:49

A sort of medieval meets Art Deco,

0:39:490:39:51

adding several 20th-century comforts including up-to-date plumbing.

0:39:510:39:55

-That's amazing, isn't it?

-No planning consent, I suspect!

0:39:560:39:59

-No.

-Well, no, not such strict rules...

0:39:590:40:02

All these beams would be from late 1920s?

0:40:020:40:05

They are, and they're carved by Venetian craftsman

0:40:050:40:07

and they're hollow, so you can run cabling through them,

0:40:070:40:10

so it's all very, very practical.

0:40:100:40:12

The last queen of the castle even installed

0:40:130:40:16

a dance floor in Henry VIII's banqueting hall,

0:40:160:40:18

as well as preserving the treasures of previous rulers.

0:40:180:40:22

Over here we have a couple of objects relating to

0:40:220:40:24

two of Henry VIII's wives.

0:40:240:40:26

We have here a missal said to belong to Catherine of Aragon.

0:40:260:40:30

Now, what exactly is a missal?

0:40:300:40:31

A missal is a book that records all the liturgical texts

0:40:310:40:35

and sermons for the religious year.

0:40:350:40:38

It's got this leather-panelled binding,

0:40:380:40:41

and you can see the stamped portraits of the saints there.

0:40:410:40:44

Then if you have a look on the inside, you can see...

0:40:440:40:48

it's got a very beautiful,

0:40:480:40:49

albeit rather damaged, frontispiece there.

0:40:490:40:52

-This book dates to 1527.

-Beautifully done.

0:40:520:40:56

It is, it's very crisp.

0:40:560:40:57

Apart from the edges, the actual text is very crisp.

0:40:570:41:00

And the colour, look at the red, the colour's actually

0:41:000:41:03

-very vibrant, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Rubricated text.

-Yes, that's it!

0:41:030:41:07

-You know the words.

-And the box?

0:41:070:41:09

Well, this box is Anne Boleyn's missal box,

0:41:090:41:11

and of course she was the second wife of Henry VIII.

0:41:110:41:15

Slightly less fortunate, I think, than his first wife.

0:41:150:41:18

We have here this beautiful little box. It was designed

0:41:180:41:21

for carrying a very small version of the missal that we've just seen.

0:41:210:41:24

-A VERY small version.

-Very small.

0:41:240:41:27

And it includes these hooks here that you can see, which would be

0:41:270:41:31

used to tie ribbon so that you would carry it around on your waist.

0:41:310:41:35

It's a wooden construction and has been upholstered in brown velvet.

0:41:350:41:39

It has these iron bindings, which at some later point have been gilded.

0:41:390:41:44

So originally it would have been a lot plainer than you see today.

0:41:440:41:47

We could have done with that box to take to our auction, couldn't we?

0:41:470:41:51

Yes, I think it's not for sale.

0:41:510:41:54

The thing is, they do do B&B here, so you can check in.

0:41:540:41:57

THEY LAUGH

0:41:570:41:59

-Thank you so much.

-It's a pleasure to have you here,

0:41:590:42:02

-and good luck with the auction.

-Thanks.

0:42:020:42:04

Now, I'm not sure many of their purchases would get

0:42:040:42:07

house room in a castle, but let's have a butcher's anyway.

0:42:070:42:10

-Shall we go for it?

-Let's go for it.

0:42:100:42:12

-As long as I don't break anything that's on it.

-Da-da!

0:42:120:42:15

Well, I see there's a towel rail, rather different.

0:42:150:42:19

-Very nice ginger jar.

-Portmeirion?

-No, it's Poole Pottery.

0:42:190:42:24

Table, which will take... Is it 10 or 12 bottles of wine underneath?

0:42:240:42:30

-And classic... Why are you laughing?

-What are you laughing at?!

0:42:300:42:34

-And classic G Plan furniture.

-What are you laughing at?!

0:42:350:42:38

-I'm not mad on that.

-Tell me what you paid for this?

0:42:380:42:43

- 50. - You were robbed.

0:42:430:42:45

50 pence?!

0:42:450:42:47

-50 Great British pounds.

-How much did you...?

0:42:470:42:49

HIS VOICE GOES HOARSE

0:42:490:42:51

Sorry, was that German he was speaking?

0:42:510:42:53

That's the piece.

0:42:530:42:55

It is the piece, this is our favourite piece, isn't it?

0:42:550:42:58

GLORIA: This is beautiful, I love that.

0:42:580:43:00

That is Mappin & Webb, 1934, solid-silver champagne coupe.

0:43:000:43:05

That's a champagne coupe? The decadence of it!

0:43:050:43:09

- I thought it was Holy Communion! - With champagne?

0:43:090:43:13

But that's our favourite piece, I think we agree.

0:43:130:43:16

-In fairness, it's not got a lot of competition.

-Oh, thanks(!)

0:43:160:43:21

Well, come on, then, shall we be as impressed?

0:43:230:43:26

Yeah, follow that, you two, I'm sure Angela and David won't hold back.

0:43:260:43:30

Got a Victorian lady's sewing table.

0:43:300:43:34

We looked at that in one of the shops, and I said...

0:43:340:43:36

-We did.

-..what a very pretty piece of furniture,

0:43:360:43:38

but it'll never sell for that at auction.

0:43:380:43:40

What did we say? We thought it might sell for about £50.

0:43:400:43:43

Oh, look, they've been to a cafe and had a cup of coffee

0:43:430:43:46

and forgot to take the mug back.

0:43:460:43:48

It just shows how little you know about Scottish pottery.

0:43:480:43:51

-David Harper knows.

-I actually don't, is it Wemyss?

-Wemyss Ware.

0:43:510:43:55

The cat makers? Give me a Wemyss cat any day!

0:43:550:43:59

The cake stand is very trendy...

0:43:590:44:02

Actually, it's got beautiful hand-painting on it.

0:44:020:44:04

-Character marks...

-Yeah, Japanese.

0:44:040:44:07

-I think that's got something going on there.

-Potential.

0:44:070:44:10

And the converted birdbath or something?

0:44:100:44:13

It's a bird house, not a birdbath.

0:44:130:44:16

I'd hang peanut things off the side of that

0:44:160:44:20

and put it out in the garden. It would look lovely in my garden.

0:44:200:44:23

-Oh, how little you know, Miss Rippon.

-Is it a pulpit?

0:44:230:44:26

-Lectern.

-You've stood at many of those.

0:44:260:44:30

-I've stood at many in my life, none quite like that.

-OK, interesting.

0:44:300:44:35

-So what's in the little box?

-This is rather sweet.

0:44:350:44:37

-A little Victorian stick pin.

-Oh, that's pretty.

0:44:370:44:41

High-carat wishbone-form terminal,

0:44:410:44:43

set with an aquamarine-coloured stone in what...

0:44:430:44:46

"Made by Charles Packer and Co, Regent Street."

0:44:460:44:49

Run through some figures then, so, 40 on the table.

0:44:490:44:52

George IV sewing table...175.

0:44:520:44:55

HE SPLUTTERS

0:44:550:44:58

-We've nailed this one.

-50 quid! 50 quid!

0:44:590:45:04

The auction's going to be a riot. It's going to be out of this world.

0:45:040:45:08

-It's going to be brill.

-You can't call this.

0:45:080:45:11

We hardly need to inquire what they really thought after that lot.

0:45:110:45:15

Seriously, the two tables, many an auctioneer would just reject them.

0:45:150:45:19

"We don't do that, there's a charity shop nearby that does!"

0:45:190:45:23

I think they were laughing at ours

0:45:230:45:25

because everything we've got is very saleable.

0:45:250:45:27

And that's the line I'm sticking to.

0:45:270:45:29

-Nothing you'd swap, is there?

-No. Would you?

0:45:290:45:32

Never in a million years!

0:45:320:45:34

-I think we'll do all right, I really do.

-Exciting.

-You've chosen well.

0:45:340:45:39

And so have you. Good team!

0:45:390:45:41

What a team!

0:45:410:45:43

Nothing left to chance, though.

0:45:430:45:45

Let's see if this is going to work, I hope it is.

0:45:450:45:48

-Look, that muck's coming off there.

-Ah-ha.

0:45:480:45:51

-Look at you, you're a domestic goddess, you really are.

-I know.

0:45:510:45:55

-What shall I do, the towel rail?

-You have a go at that.

0:45:550:45:58

A few minutes of preparation make all the difference to a sale.

0:45:580:46:02

Going to lend us a hand, darling? No.

0:46:020:46:06

Oh, look, it's coming up terrific.

0:46:060:46:08

We could go on one of those shows where you go into people's homes,

0:46:080:46:11

couldn't we?

0:46:110:46:12

We've got all the kit, haven't we? We could top-to-toe a house.

0:46:120:46:16

There's a show - Clean The Nation With Angela Rippon.

0:46:160:46:19

ANGELA LAUGHS

0:46:190:46:20

A must see.

0:46:200:46:22

After starting out in Sussex,

0:46:220:46:24

at Lewes, our celebrities

0:46:240:46:25

and experts have motored into London

0:46:250:46:27

for an auction in Chiswick.

0:46:270:46:28

Well, Gloria, you and I have worked together for many years,

0:46:280:46:32

but I think this time I'm going to get the better of you.

0:46:320:46:34

I haven't forgiven you yet for calling

0:46:340:46:37

my lovely lectern a bird table. THEY LAUGH

0:46:370:46:39

I think they might be taking this a bit too seriously.

0:46:390:46:42

And there are the boys. Hi!

0:46:420:46:45

-How are you doing, Gloria?

-Are you not even mobile today?

0:46:450:46:50

-Lovely to see you. Are we raring to go?

-I think we are.

0:46:500:46:53

I think we are, I'm feeling quite confident.

0:46:530:46:56

We're going to win, so there we go.

0:46:560:46:59

They have an auction every week here, a very big range too,

0:46:590:47:03

so hopefully almost all our purchases will fit right in.

0:47:030:47:07

I wonder what auctioneer Matt Caddick rates most highly.

0:47:070:47:11

Pretty keen on the William IV work table, it's a good, old-fashioned

0:47:110:47:13

antique and a very clean example, so that should do OK.

0:47:130:47:16

The Poole Pottery - this is a pretty boring pattern, in my opinion.

0:47:160:47:19

Transfer decorated. Even to achieve the estimate, it might struggle.

0:47:190:47:23

I think it's going to be a fight between the Poole Pottery

0:47:230:47:26

and the cake stand as to what's going to make the least money.

0:47:260:47:29

Practically and decoratively they're just both a bit lacklustre.

0:47:290:47:32

Angela and David bought five auction lots for a total of just £185,

0:47:320:47:36

while Gloria and Paul spent £333 on their five lots.

0:47:360:47:42

-Now, enter the gladiators.

-Ooh, I say, posh seats as well.

0:47:420:47:46

-Could you not have got us a better seat, Angela?

-I don't think so, dear.

0:47:460:47:49

-We needed your influence, Gloria.

-Too posh for us, I think!

0:47:490:47:53

Yeah, you're lucky they let you in.

0:47:540:47:57

And they're lucky they let their nest of tables in.

0:47:570:48:00

I'm going to admit to you now, I LOVE the nest of tables,

0:48:000:48:03

and if I was allowed to bid I would buy them.

0:48:030:48:05

Hang on, I'm confused - what tactic is Gloria playing?

0:48:060:48:09

I'm not allowed to buy today, otherwise I would buy them.

0:48:090:48:13

She's got her competitive face on.

0:48:130:48:16

-And is there £50 to start me?

-Got to be.

-Nest of tables at £50, start me.

0:48:160:48:21

-Go on.

-£40. Shall we start at 20 and see where we go?

0:48:210:48:24

-They're starting at 20!

-20...

0:48:240:48:28

-Go on.

-Blood from a stone, at £20 I'm bid.

0:48:280:48:31

Oh, miraculous!

0:48:310:48:34

For £20 only, a maiden bid, down in the dumps at £20,

0:48:340:48:38

I can't ask any more times.

0:48:380:48:40

-Give it another five minutes!

-All done?

0:48:400:48:43

-It's a bargain.

-So much for that plan.

0:48:430:48:45

-Obviously in London they have no style.

-Exactly.

0:48:460:48:49

It's just the wrong room.

0:48:490:48:51

I think someone paid £20 too much for them, frankly!

0:48:510:48:54

Next it's Gloria and Paul's wee Scottish pot.

0:48:540:48:58

We paid 38 quid for it and they've only put it down at 15 to 20!

0:48:580:49:02

Well, some would call that a come-hither estimate,

0:49:020:49:04

a come-buy-me estimate.

0:49:040:49:05

A come-hither estimate?

0:49:050:49:07

Start me at £10, £10 for the Wemyss?

0:49:070:49:10

I'll let you catch me up, start me.

0:49:100:49:12

£10 I'm bid, we're off at 10, and 12 I'll take.

0:49:120:49:15

You do know that the Queen Mum collects this pottery?

0:49:150:49:18

She's not here today, though.

0:49:180:49:19

LAUGHTER

0:49:190:49:20

12, you've done enough, £12 I'm bid.

0:49:200:49:23

At £12... 14, 16, 18...

0:49:230:49:27

-Oh, that's got it away.

-At £20...

0:49:270:49:29

Injecting a bit of class has done the job,

0:49:290:49:32

£20 on the back wall then...

0:49:320:49:34

We finished? 20...

0:49:340:49:36

-It's worth more than that, come on.

-£20.

0:49:360:49:39

Well, you just doubled the value, I can't believe it.

0:49:390:49:43

Chiswick seemed less than impressed, I'd say.

0:49:430:49:46

I just think £20 for a tooth mug is over the top.

0:49:460:49:49

- Well, it is. - A very nice tooth mug though.

0:49:490:49:51

It depends on your teeth, you see.

0:49:510:49:53

Your teeth would have looked good in that mug.

0:49:530:49:55

Now for Angela's jar.

0:49:560:49:59

For ginger, or anything you fancy, really.

0:49:590:50:02

Moderately estimated, start me at £20 for it.

0:50:020:50:05

The Poole Pottery, £20 for it.

0:50:050:50:07

I think it was collected by the King of Siam.

0:50:070:50:09

King of Siam collected this, there you go.

0:50:090:50:12

£10 for it, give me £10, start me at 10.

0:50:120:50:15

You're going to make me really work - £5 for it.

0:50:150:50:18

Oh, gosh.

0:50:180:50:20

-£5, start me.

-Go on.

-I'm going to go up in ones now. £5, and 6 I'll take.

0:50:200:50:26

£5 only.

0:50:260:50:28

ANGELA GASPS

0:50:280:50:29

That's a serious bargain.

0:50:290:50:31

We're going to sell it, all done, for five.

0:50:310:50:33

Oh, I am so sorry about that.

0:50:330:50:36

- Are you? - Oh, I really am(!)

0:50:360:50:38

The auctioneer had that one right.

0:50:400:50:42

-Now up comes the absolutely delicious lectern.

-Bird table.

-Bird...

0:50:440:50:48

Sorry, I did get that wrong.

0:50:480:50:50

-I'm going to strangle both of you on the spot.

-I think she means it.

0:50:500:50:54

-Well, at least this thing's antique.

-£50 to start me.

-PLEASE, somebody.

0:50:540:50:58

£40 for it?

0:50:580:51:01

It's going in the wrong direction, Gloria.

0:51:010:51:03

-It is, I'm very disappointed.

-Start me at £10.

0:51:030:51:07

Now you're being really mean.

0:51:070:51:09

-Now I'm bid... You've got a tenner.

-That's good wood.

0:51:090:51:13

Cheaper than lumpwood for your fire at £10. Start me at 12 now.

0:51:130:51:17

-At £12 I'm bid.

-ANGELA:

-£12, there we are.

0:51:170:51:20

Saying no, unbelievably.

0:51:200:51:23

At £12... In the room then at £12, I can't believe it.

0:51:230:51:26

We'll sell it at £12, shall we? £12.

0:51:260:51:29

- No! - Excellent news.

0:51:290:51:31

We was robbed.

0:51:310:51:33

Not quite free speech for some lucky lecturer - huh! - but close.

0:51:330:51:37

When I arrived here today I loved you.

0:51:370:51:39

Now I'm beginning to think you're really mean at heart.

0:51:390:51:42

-You're getting to the real me, Gloria, yeah.

-Oh.

0:51:420:51:45

Next, this little treasure from Angela

0:51:450:51:47

and David's bathroom collection.

0:51:470:51:49

£10, start me. For the towel rail at £10.

0:51:490:51:53

Ten, thank you.

0:51:530:51:55

-14? 16, 18...

-GLORIA: 16! ANGELA:

-Excuse me? Yes?

0:51:550:52:00

At £20, in the red chair at 20, is there any more now?

0:52:000:52:03

Double bubble.

0:52:030:52:05

If you knew how much time... She's been at it!

0:52:050:52:08

If you knew how long I spent cleaning that

0:52:080:52:11

so that it looks absolutely beautiful, you would know

0:52:110:52:14

it's worth every penny of whatever you're prepared to pay for it.

0:52:140:52:18

£100.

0:52:180:52:19

So just to clarify, the patina's gone from the Deco period...

0:52:190:52:23

-£22 is bid.

-Oh, that's more like it.

-24...

0:52:230:52:27

-In the red chair at 24.

-That's good.

-If only it was left original.

0:52:270:52:34

Are we done and out, then? 24, it's stylish enough and goes.

0:52:340:52:37

Oh, well done, fabulous. First profit, yeah.

0:52:370:52:41

Yes, dreams come true,

0:52:410:52:43

but then, Angela and David did only spend half their cash.

0:52:430:52:47

Now for Gloria and Paul's precious yellow metal pin.

0:52:470:52:49

Start me at £20 for it. £20 for it.

0:52:510:52:53

£10 for it. 10 I'm bid,

0:52:550:52:59

12, 14, 16...18, 20...

0:52:590:53:02

£20, the lady's bid at 20.

0:53:020:53:05

We're going to sell it. All done for 20, 22? 24...

0:53:050:53:11

Shake of the head. £24 then, still in the stripes.

0:53:110:53:14

We're going to sell it... £24.

0:53:140:53:17

-One below.

-A Regent Street pin for a very good price.

0:53:170:53:21

Who'd like a shiny wine table of dubious vintage?

0:53:220:53:27

What part of ANTIQUES Road Trip did you fail to get

0:53:270:53:30

when you bought this?

0:53:300:53:31

-Future.

-You've got some stiff competition, I'm bid already at £10.

0:53:310:53:35

There you go, £10.

0:53:350:53:37

12 I'll take. For this wine table, then, at £10.

0:53:370:53:41

-ANGELA:

-It's very nice. I cleaned it. I cleaned it!

0:53:410:53:45

LOUD: Cleaned it!

0:53:450:53:46

For £10... No-one drinks any more, it's a sad age, I know, it's crazy.

0:53:460:53:50

Are they all teetotallers?

0:53:500:53:52

-They drink it too fast, there's no need to store it. £10...

-Oh, go on.

0:53:520:53:55

No-one else going to come in? We've got to sell it. £10.

0:53:550:53:59

After she put all that hard work in too(!)

0:53:590:54:03

Will Gloria and Paul's cake stand fare any better?

0:54:030:54:06

Edwardian, folding cake stand, Japanese lacquer decoration...

0:54:060:54:09

He's not liking it. Telling the truth.

0:54:090:54:11

-Start me at...

-It's actually signed.

0:54:110:54:13

-It's Japanese decorated.

-Signed by the birds?

0:54:130:54:15

-I could clean it for you.

-Hang on.

0:54:150:54:17

- Oh, no, here we go. - No, excuse me.

0:54:170:54:19

It is signed, specially signed.

0:54:190:54:21

Got Japanese decoration on and it does fold flat.

0:54:210:54:24

Yeah, that's the way it goes. See?

0:54:240:54:26

It's beautiful.

0:54:260:54:27

I did mean to bring cakes for you all to eat and I forgot. I'm so sorry.

0:54:270:54:30

Oh, that would have been lovely.

0:54:300:54:32

So, the much-talked-about signed cake stand.

0:54:320:54:34

Start me £30 for it.

0:54:340:54:36

£30 for it. Vintage tea parties are all the rage. £20 for it.

0:54:360:54:40

-£30.

-What?

0:54:400:54:41

On the internet? Good heavens above.

0:54:410:54:43

Two I'll take.

0:54:430:54:44

-They've made a profit.

-On the internet?

0:54:440:54:48

A maiden bid from the World wide Web.

0:54:480:54:50

-At £30.

-Yes.

-All done and out. 30.

0:54:500:54:53

-Profit.

-Well done. Profit.

0:54:530:54:55

Another profit. Good work, team.

0:54:550:54:57

Time for Angela's champagne moment.

0:54:570:55:00

-It is.

-This is our big, big spend.

0:55:000:55:02

It's our big spend and whoever gets it...

0:55:020:55:04

it'll bring real pleasure to their lives, I think.

0:55:050:55:08

-That will make me happy.

-It will. It'll make me happy.

-Yeah.

0:55:080:55:11

-It may not make a profit but it'll make us happy.

-Yeah.

0:55:110:55:13

We'll be happy because you're happy.

0:55:130:55:15

-If only she meant it.

-What's it worth? Is it worth £30?

0:55:150:55:18

Of course it is.

0:55:180:55:20

£30 I'm bid.

0:55:200:55:21

It's worth at least £30.

0:55:210:55:22

At £30. 32 I'll take.

0:55:220:55:24

-32.

-You're off.

0:55:240:55:26

35. 38...

0:55:260:55:27

There, you see?

0:55:270:55:29

- ..40. 2. - Excuse me.

0:55:290:55:31

£42. 45.

0:55:310:55:32

-Go on.

-Yes.

0:55:320:55:34

- £45 in the doorway. - It's worth a bit more.

0:55:340:55:36

-Go on!

-Are we done, then? For £45.

-Think of the pleasure.

0:55:360:55:39

Worth more than that!

0:55:390:55:40

All out at £45. All done. And it sells.

0:55:400:55:42

All that silver?!

0:55:420:55:43

-48.

-48 online. That's more like it.

0:55:430:55:45

-Shaking your head?

-No, don't shake your head.

-At £48.

0:55:450:55:48

The internet's come in at £48. We're done.

0:55:480:55:51

Angela's still slightly ahead though with just one big lot to go -

0:55:510:55:55

Gloria's greatest gamble.

0:55:550:55:57

The sewing table will decide it.

0:55:570:55:59

What's your bet, then?

0:55:590:56:00

Thank the Lord we didn't spend a whole

0:56:000:56:02

load of money on Victorian brown furniture.

0:56:020:56:04

Oh, wait a minute...

0:56:040:56:06

It's the sort of thing which,

0:56:060:56:08

perhaps at a different auction with a different group of people...

0:56:080:56:12

-Yeah, about 15 years ago.

-..50 years ago...

-Yeah.

0:56:120:56:14

-..would've done REALLY, really well.

-They are so mean.

0:56:140:56:17

They're not the price they used to be.

0:56:170:56:18

A bid at £90 to help me on the book.

0:56:180:56:20

They've got 90 quid.

0:56:200:56:21

One, two, three bids. And I'll take 100 in the room now.

0:56:210:56:24

£90 here with me.

0:56:240:56:25

-90.

-Oh...

0:56:250:56:27

On the book at £90.

0:56:270:56:28

Is that it? It's such a shame, isn't it? At £90.

0:56:280:56:31

-They don't make old money at 90.

-It's beautiful.

0:56:310:56:33

Going to sell at 90. All done.

0:56:330:56:35

-90.

-Too soon!

0:56:350:56:36

-Oh...

-£90.

0:56:360:56:39

Oh, it always was a tad optimistic.

0:56:390:56:41

-Ready? One, two, three.

-BOTH: Told you so.

0:56:410:56:44

Oh, and they're supposed to be friends!

0:56:460:56:48

Just think of the fun they'd have had

0:56:480:56:49

if they'd actually made some money.

0:56:490:56:51

Now, Gloria and Paul began with £400

0:56:510:56:53

and after paying auction costs,

0:56:530:56:55

made a loss of £188.68,

0:56:550:56:58

leaving them with...

0:56:580:56:59

Whilst Angela and David, who also started out with £400, made,

0:57:020:57:06

after paying auction costs, a slightly smaller loss of £97.26.

0:57:060:57:12

So they are today's winners with...

0:57:120:57:14

-Well...

-Well, into the sunshine.

-..that was... That was hot.

0:57:160:57:21

-It was hot but it was GREAT!

-It was great.

-I loved it.

0:57:210:57:24

It was good fun, wasn't it?

0:57:240:57:25

It was great fun. I really have enjoyed it.

0:57:250:57:27

- And I love Paul. - Aw!

0:57:270:57:28

-Do you?

-I do.

-How much do you think you'd get for him, then?

0:57:280:57:31

I seriously thought of putting him up for auction.

0:57:310:57:34

-Why not?

-Cos the make-up girl was at him all the time.

-Was she?

-She was.

0:57:340:57:37

Well, I tell you what,

0:57:370:57:38

I don't know how we can have so much fun by losing so much money.

0:57:380:57:41

- So deal us the figures, then. - OK, here we go.

0:57:410:57:43

-We've done incredibly well...

-Yes.

-..by losing.

0:57:430:57:46

The B team, over here, have lost almost £200.

0:57:460:57:49

- Well done. - Hey!

0:57:490:57:51

Seriously. Seriously, well done.

0:57:510:57:53

-Well done.

-And we have actually won by losing almost £100!

0:57:530:57:59

THEY CHEER GLORIA: Very good.

0:57:590:58:00

-It's been the most wonderful journey. Angela...

-Oh, we've had fun.

0:58:000:58:03

..thank you.

0:58:030:58:04

-Thank you so much.

-Very good.

0:58:040:58:06

Lovely working with you.

0:58:060:58:07

-Really.

-I'm going to recommend you two to everybody.

0:58:070:58:10

Really? You can't hire us out, you know.

0:58:100:58:13

-You never know.

-But what are you going to recommend them for?

0:58:130:58:16

I'm going to have a new programme called Who Was The Best Loser?.

0:58:160:58:20

We'd be good at that. We're going to celebrate now.

0:58:200:58:23

-Bye.

-Bye.

0:58:230:58:24

-GLORIA: I've got an idea, actually.

-What's that?

0:58:240:58:26

Why don't we just do the programme again and again, until we win.

0:58:260:58:30

-Until we make money.

-Now, there's a thought.

0:58:300:58:32

You'd be welcome back any time.

0:58:320:58:35

A battle of legendary presenters plays out around Kent and Sussex as Gloria Hunniford and Angela Rippon join the road trip. Along the way they stage a rescue mission to help stranded experts Paul Laidlaw and David Harper. Gloria hears the story behind a local landmark and Angela steps into the world of Virginia Woolf.