Sian Williams and Carol Kirkwood Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Sian Williams and Carol Kirkwood

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. Sian Williams and Carol Kirkwood travel through Essex and head for an auction in the Cotswolds.


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The nation's favourite celebrities...

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-We are special then, are we?

-Oh, that's excellent.

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..paired up with an expert...

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We're a very good team, you and me.

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..and a classic car.

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Their mission? To scour Britain for antiques.

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-No idea what it is.

-Oh, I love it.

-GAVEL BANGS

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-The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction.

-Yes!

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But it's no easy ride.

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THEY GASP

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There's no accounting for taste.

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Who will find a hidden gem?

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Who will take the biggest risks?

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Will anybody follow expert advice?

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-Do you like them?

-No.

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There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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-Are you happy?

-Yes.

-Promise?

-Ecstatic.

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Time to put your pedal to the metal.

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This is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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In today's headlines, it's the battle of the broadcasters

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with TV legends Sian Williams and Carol Kirkwood.

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We go back a long way, don't we? What is it, 15 years?

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Golly. It must be longer.

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Because I joined the BBC, now, what, 18 years ago.

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I went on to Breakfast 17 years ago.

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I was there for 11 years, so, yeah.

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Our celebrity gal pals will be on the front line

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of the antiques trail.

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Armed with £400 each to spend, the forecast is looking great.

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THEY GIGGLE

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In a career spanning over 30 years, Sian is best known as

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a news journalist and, for over a decade,

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was the face everyone wanted to wake up to on BBC Breakfast.

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She's interviewed everyone from movie stars to world leaders.

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-It's not going to rewrite the Budget, Mr Cameron.

-Why not?

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Doesn't he look young!

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She's been at the forefront of breaking news.

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So this antiques malarkey should be a walk in the park.

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I find antiques shops quite intimidating, actually,

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because I don't know what I should be looking for.

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I don't know what I should be paying for the things I quite like

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but I don't know whether they're antiques or not.

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It all seems quite overwhelming.

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In the end, you'll go for something you like.

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There's no point buying something you think's going to sell

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if you don't like it.

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But at least she's in good company.

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Beside her in the passenger seat is fellow broadcasting veteran,

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and everyone's favourite daredevil weather girl, Carol Kirkwood.

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I'm still too scared to look...down!

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She's famous for predicting and battling the elements,

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all the while sporting a smile that could melt an ice cream

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faster than the sun on a hot summer's day.

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What I would really like to look for would be blingy things,

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sparkly things, glamorous things.

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I love chandeliers, like you see in Versailles.

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Hm. How much money does she think she has to spend?

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That said, two such classy girls deserve a classy car.

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A 1989 Jaguar XJS, to be precise.

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This reminds me of that Bridget Jones movie.

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The sun is out, you and me in the countryside in an open-top car.

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All we need is Hugh Grant and Colin Firth.

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Sorry to disappoint, girls, hah!

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Today's expert auctioneers, Charlie Ross and Charlie Hanson,

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are lovable.

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THEY LAUGH

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But not quite rom-com material.

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They are, however, extremely excited about meeting their leading ladies.

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I think a cheery smile, a great warmth, that warmth,

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that warm front is here today, Charlie.

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-The number of times I've woken up to Sian and Carol.

-She's a headliner.

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Easy, tiger!

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Try to keep your minds on the competition here, fellas.

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I don't think I've ever beaten you. Have I ever beaten you?

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-No, you never have.

-Look at me. Have I ever beaten you?

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Charlie, in four years of Road Tripping,

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I have never lost to my elder statesman.

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Who will emerge victorious remains to be seen.

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All that's certain for now is the 1974 Triumph they're driving.

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Today's journey commences

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in the picturesque village of Battlesbridge.

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On this Antiques Road Trip, we're travelling through Essex

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before ending up at an auction in Cirencester in the Cotswolds.

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-Oh, it's Charlie!

-And Charles.

-And Charles.

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BOTH EXPERTS: Hello!

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Hi. That's it, Charlie, just guide them in. Great wheel turn.

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Towards me, Sian. Come to me, Sian.

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SIAN: There is a post in the way.

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Nice to meet you. How are you, OK?

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Now, Carol, I'm going to be practising my Scottish accent.

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-Oh, no!

-I'm going to go with Carol,

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then she can be really cross with me when I try to say,

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-(SCOTTISH ACCENT) Hello, Carol.

-Anyway! So...

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Oh, Charlie Ross, I'm so overwhelmed!

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I knew it wouldn't work.

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Carol, come back again.

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Come on. Let's go shopping. Sian.

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-Well, we'll be the cooler pairing.

-THEY LAUGH

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There's a first time for everything, Charles.

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With £400 burning a hole in both teams' pockets,

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it's full speed ahead.

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Right, Carol. Shopping...

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Do walk past, after you. Up the stairs,

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right to the top of the building.

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Their first shop, Battlesbridge Antiques Centre,

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has a wealth of wares. But what's the game plan?

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This morning, you thought you'd be buying antiques,

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what was it you were thinking you want to buy?

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-Sparkly things, I think.

-Sparkly girl.

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And different things, not your run-of-the-mill.

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I don't want to go home with a big pile of furniture.

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Does rival Sian have such clear ideas about what she wants?

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Modern. I quite like a more modern feel. Art Deco-y.

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Tactics agreed, next on the boys' agenda,

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to woo their leading ladies with some smooth lines.

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Like you, it has great style.

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Thank you!

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It's an oil painting! CAROL LAUGHS

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A wonderful picture.

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One of the nicest oil paintings I've ever seen.

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Aw. You're bonkers, Charlie, come on.

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Lucky we're in an antiques shop, Charlie.

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I think that line's circa 1950.

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But no silver tongue will distract these girls from what they want.

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Rustic farmhouse furniture? Not particularly.

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A bit of Welsh gold?

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SHE SIGHS

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Oh, hell fire! I'd better get moving.

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Come on, Charles, you're going to have to do better than that

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to impress your celebrity.

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Sian, I'm looking at those two ladies over there.

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Aren't they attractive?

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Do you like them?

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-No.

-No?

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Hm. I wonder why!

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I don't think I'm going to be buying a statue of a woman wearing

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stockings and suspenders, if it's all right with you.

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HE MUMBLES Well, yeah, OK... On that note...

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-I'll leave you with that one.

-It's a shame.

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One to remember there, Carlos!

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Upstairs, Carol's after glitz and glamour.

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Oh, look at this, Charlie. Ooh, is it a commode?

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Carol, that is not a commode!

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It's a hall seat with a storage compartment.

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Oops! I feel a right clot now.

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No, no, don't...

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I mean, you could use it as a commode.

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CAROL LAUGHS It is quite commode-ious.

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Let's go, Charlie, come on!

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Nice try, though, Carol.

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Downstairs, could Sian and Charles finally see eye-to-eye?

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-Look at that, isn't that sweet?

-That's lovely.

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-Now, you've hit it on the head here.

-That's lovely, I like these.

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They're really nice, and they are made by

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a very good factory called Shelley.

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Shelly were a really important 1920s factory who evolved

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a certain glazed design which reflects Art Deco.

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-I love it.

-And they're really nice.

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-Would that be a good thing to buy?

-We could even do a deal.

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We could even buy a little sample and put as one lot.

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How would you do that?

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We could buy a jug, buy the posy holder, the vase,

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put the three bits together for one price only.

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-They call it doing a deal in the business.

-Do they?

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What collectors don't like is to see flaking or scratch marks where

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something has rubbed against it.

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-To me, the rim's in good condition.

-Looks all right, doesn't it?

-Yeah.

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It reads, "From Snowdon, Wales." It's meant to be!

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-It's meant to be, it's coming home, via you to an auction.

-How lovely.

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-That is almost now a must-buy.

-That is a must-buy. Yes.

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So, possible pottery for Sian and Charles.

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Perhaps some retro techno for their rivals.

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Ooh. Gosh, look at these computers!

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-I remember them when they were first out.

-You can't!

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No, you're right, I don't!

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-I don't remember them at all!

-That's a mistake.

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Oh, Carol!

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But, finally, they've stumbled across something

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they can both get excited about.

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Look at the books. What do you think of them, Charlie?

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Oh, lovely. I like early books.

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Jackanapes, by Juliana Horatia Ewing,

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illustrations by Randolph Caldecott, famous illustrator.

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Now, they are rather fun.

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-Do you think we ought to have a look at those?

-I think we should.

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"The surgeon cannoned against and rebounded from another officer.

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"A sallow man, not young, with a face worn

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"more by ungentle experiences than by age." Sounds like me!

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CAROL LAUGHS

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Well, I didn't want to say!

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The other thing is, a first edition is quite sexy.

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I would say to you, if you could buy these two books for, say, five quid,

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I think there's no downside.

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You'll make a bit of profit, and you're buying a bit of history.

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-We like that, we like a bit of history.

-Yes, we like that.

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Carol sounds keen.

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But, with no ticket, she needs to talk to dealer Tara.

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Tara, how much flex do you have in these?

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Not as much as you would like me to.

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But, because I'd like you guys to win,

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-my very, very best would be £8.

-For the two?

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-For the two.

-That sounds good to me.

-I mean, frankly...

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-Tara.

-Oh! She's done it!

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A lightning deal from Carol. Who could have forecast that?

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You don't hang about, do you?

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That's a whole £8 spent on those two books, leaving them with £392.

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Meanwhile, Sian has finally found a Shelley vase and posy holder

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that she likes, but there's no ticket price.

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-OK. The two vases, £30 each.

-How much?

-£30 each.

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-Posy dish, £20.

-Aw!

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Really? Sorry, sorry.

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If you wanted the two, £50 for the vase and the posy dish.

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-So these two together would be 50?

-Yes.

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Do you think - is it worth talking to him?

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Do you think he's prepared to budge at all?

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Um...

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No. If you wanted to take both, he could go to 45 for the two.

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I would say the two together, pretty good at £45.

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I'd prefer 40, but that's probably pushing it too far.

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-So, 45 for those two together.

-Yes.

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Vicki...

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We'll shake your hand, and say, going, going...

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-Shake her hand. ..At £45.

-Thank you.

-No worries.

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We're really grateful. I think they're lovely.

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Sian and Charles have splashed their cash

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on a Shelley Art Deco vase and pottery posy holder for £45.

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So, their spending is well underway.

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Which is more than can be said for Carol and Charlie.

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-We've spent a fortune.

-Have you?

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Carol has to buy everything she sees, she's very difficult.

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She is a hopeless liar, hopeless. Honestly.

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Sian's right. Because Carol and Charlie have yet to add

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to their £8 Victorian book purchase.

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I just haven't seen anything yet that I like.

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You will do. Something will grab you.

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I will hear a squeal like there's never been before.

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And I will come running with my cash.

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Oh! But here's something Carol would love. A barometer.

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If only she'd found it first.

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"Rises for fair or dry.

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"Falls for rain or storm."

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Shall we have and ask and see? It's £45. What's is worth?

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I like it.

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If this was...in a London retail store it would be about £95,

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and I've seen them on offer there at 95.

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In an auction room I think it's worth between 30 and 50.

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-But what's it worth to dealer Vicki?

-Hello, Vicki.

-Hello.

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I'm looking at this and thinking, "I don't even know whether it works."

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-OK.

-Can you tell whether it works?

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To be honest, no.

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-Sorry.

-How much shall we pay you for a barometer that might work or not?

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-How much do we have on it?

-45.

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Absolute best would be 35.

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I like it cos it's got a really good look about it and it is Deco.

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-30?

-Erm...

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("Yes", is the word you're looking for.)

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OK, go on, then. Yes.

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All right. Take a chance. We're going to go with it.

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Sian takes a chance, adding the barometer to the Shelley vase

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and posy holder, meaning she has now spent a total of £75.

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Thanks a lot, we've enjoyed it.

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-The car awaits. Bye.

-Bye.

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Carol and Charlie also bid adieu to Battlesbridge and hit the road.

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-And don't spare the horses.

-I won't.

-Whoo-hoo!

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Giving Charlie the perfect opportunity

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to get to know his daredevil celebrity a little better.

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The scariest thing I've ever done was hang gliding,

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and that was for a programme about the weather.

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It was really scary.

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We were going up with the intention of scooping some cloud

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into a jar and measuring the weight of the cloud.

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It was terrifying.

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We were about five miles high in the sky.

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Five miles? Scooping clouds?

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With not much between us and eternity.

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In keeping with her passion for heights,

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Carol and Charlie are off to Stow Maries Aerodrome,

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a place that tells the story of the young men who fearlessly defended

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our country and, for the first time, the skies during World War I.

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Gosh. Half close your eyes and imagine yourself in 1917...

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-Gosh.

-..and I'm just taking you to your plane.

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In 1915, with World War I in full swing in the trenches, the Germans

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brought the war to the skies in the form of giant Zeppelin airships.

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They were originally used on reconnaissance missions

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until January 1915, when they first attacked Britain.

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Sadly, this airborne assault was the first of many

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and Stow Maries opened the following year.

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Carol and Charlie are meeting curator Ivor.

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-Welcome to the museum.

-Thank you.

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We were one of three aerodromes that were set up in 1916

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that were used by 37 Home Defence Squadron, Royal Flying Corps.

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These are some of the aerodromes that were dotted around

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East Anglia at the time

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to defend the northeast and approaches to London from

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the Zeppelin raids that plagued the country.

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Such giant machines

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and bomb attacks had never been seen on British soil,

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terrorising its inhabitants and claiming the lives of over 500 people.

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There was a huge outcry among the people,

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especially in the capital, that they felt they weren't defended.

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To be honest, that was probably the truth at the time.

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Aviation was still in its infancy and was an unknown world.

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In response to these attacks, in tiny planes, our young novice pilots

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took to the skies to take on the mighty Zeppelins.

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Our first B Flight commander here, Claude Ridley, had been to France,

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he'd won the Military Cross and the Distinguished Service Order.

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By the time he came here as B Flight commander.

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he was just six weeks short of his 20th birthday.

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-20!

-These guys were pioneers, it was so dangerous.

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They had nobody to teach them.

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Every time they went up it was the first time somebody had done that.

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Young pilots, sometimes with only hours of flying experience,

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took to the air. Many didn't even make it past training.

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50% of Royal Flying Corps casualties, the whole Corps

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during the First World War, were down to flying accidents and not combat.

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Despite this, missions continued,

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often with recruits learning on the job.

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Sadly for many of these fighter pilot pioneers,

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life expectancy was short.

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There's the thing.

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I can't begin to imagine how an 18-year-old,

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you're going out in one of them

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and knowing that you might not come back.

0:16:410:16:44

Over at the mess, World War I enthusiast Russell is waiting,

0:16:440:16:48

not with a cup of tea

0:16:480:16:50

but something far more useful for keeping warm at 10,000 feet.

0:16:500:16:54

Pick that up and just feel the weight of what these guys

0:16:540:16:57

would have been wearing.

0:16:570:16:59

I've never felt a garment of that weight.

0:16:590:17:02

Gosh, that is heavy.

0:17:020:17:04

They're flying at 10,000 and 12,000 feet

0:17:040:17:06

-and this is the only thing that's going to keep them warm.

-Wow.

0:17:060:17:09

A Sidcot flying suit for you.

0:17:110:17:13

-May I put it on?

-Yes.

0:17:130:17:14

This is going to be fun.

0:17:140:17:16

Come on, Carol, for goodness' sake.

0:17:180:17:21

The Zeppelin's halfway across the Channel by now.

0:17:210:17:23

-Come on.

-How long is this programme?

0:17:230:17:26

This clothing, along with goggles, was all that protected

0:17:270:17:31

the pilots in open cockpits.

0:17:310:17:33

Carol, you look like a polar bear.

0:17:330:17:35

We're a long way from the Arctic Circle,

0:17:350:17:38

but Russell has one more treat in store.

0:17:380:17:40

That's a little bit of history frozen in time.

0:17:420:17:45

Russell, this is one of the planes that would actually have been

0:17:450:17:48

-used during World War I?

-Yes.

0:17:480:17:50

It's an SE5, typical type of aircraft that would have been

0:17:500:17:53

flown from here.

0:17:530:17:54

This is a single seater, so you wouldn't be able to go for a fly,

0:17:540:17:56

but at least you'll be able to experience the cockpit

0:17:560:18:00

and how tight it is actually and the flight controls.

0:18:000:18:04

It's going to be quite tricky.

0:18:040:18:06

OK.

0:18:060:18:07

Like getting on a horse, really.

0:18:090:18:11

Careful, Carol.

0:18:110:18:13

I've got you. That's it.

0:18:130:18:17

You're facing the wrong way, dear.

0:18:170:18:19

There's a mirror there as well.

0:18:190:18:21

That's for doing your make-up.

0:18:220:18:25

As you can see, it's fairly tight in there.

0:18:250:18:28

-Yes.

-Also not a lot of view.

0:18:280:18:30

You've also got to be looking through the sight,

0:18:300:18:32

which is in front of you.

0:18:320:18:34

And above your head is a machine gun.

0:18:340:18:37

The plane might be small, but it could certainly pack a punch.

0:18:370:18:40

What we have here, if you just get a hold of the joystick there,

0:18:400:18:43

we have a button on there.

0:18:430:18:45

If you give that a little push on it.

0:18:450:18:47

And then you'll hopefully get a little bit of a...

0:18:470:18:49

MACHINE GUN FIRES

0:18:490:18:51

Blimey!

0:18:510:18:53

I wasn't expecting that.

0:18:530:18:55

Neither was Charlie.

0:18:550:18:57

Are you all right, boy?

0:18:570:18:58

You can feel the plane shaking as well, can't you?

0:18:580:19:02

Very good.

0:19:020:19:03

You got him, Carol.

0:19:030:19:05

I can't imagine the fear and actually having a target

0:19:070:19:11

that you were aiming at when you fired the rifle.

0:19:110:19:14

And don't forget, there's some coming back the other way.

0:19:140:19:18

And in an aircraft that is basically wood and fabric, there's not much

0:19:180:19:22

in way of protection - the bullets would just go straight through.

0:19:220:19:25

This is making it much more real

0:19:250:19:27

and actually appreciating what the pilots must have felt.

0:19:270:19:31

And a very minor level for me, but for them,

0:19:310:19:34

they were so incredibly brave.

0:19:340:19:36

There's a lot known about the land warfare, but there's not that

0:19:360:19:40

much known about the guys flying and the sacrifices they made.

0:19:400:19:43

So it's so important for us

0:19:430:19:45

and our museum that these memories are kept alive.

0:19:450:19:47

A harrowing account of just how brave our servicemen were

0:19:490:19:52

during the first world war.

0:19:520:19:54

Conquering new technologies

0:19:540:19:56

and the skies to save Britain from the enemy.

0:19:560:19:58

-Oh, look at that.

-Oh!

0:19:580:20:01

What control.

0:20:010:20:03

Oh, no! No!

0:20:030:20:06

Safely back on the ground,

0:20:110:20:12

Sian and Charles are on their way to another shop.

0:20:120:20:16

But I think you're a lady that likes glitz and glamour.

0:20:160:20:18

-Oh, do you think?

-Yes!

0:20:180:20:19

And maybe we ought to buy some jewellery or maybe try

0:20:190:20:22

and find some nice silver.

0:20:220:20:23

They're travelling just under two miles to

0:20:230:20:26

Rettendon in the Borough of Chelmsford.

0:20:260:20:29

Our two broadcasters may be interested to know that

0:20:290:20:32

this area played a vital role in the development of radio

0:20:320:20:36

and the world's first wireless factory was established here in 1898.

0:20:360:20:41

Here we go. Best foot forward.

0:20:410:20:43

With £325 left from their original £400,

0:20:430:20:46

Sian and Charles have plenty to spend on that perfect

0:20:460:20:49

piece of glitz and glamour at FB Antiques.

0:20:490:20:52

-I'm Fred, how are you?

-Very well. Nice to meet you.

0:20:520:20:55

What we're looking for is maybe some jewellery or silver.

0:20:550:20:59

No. Silver I don't have and I don't have jewellery, unfortunately.

0:20:590:21:03

-Well, that's it.

-Thanks, Fred.

0:21:030:21:07

-What do you specialise in?

-Mainly furniture.

-OK.

0:21:070:21:10

Hm, might want to rethink that plan, Charles.

0:21:100:21:13

It's going big, it's going bold, it's going masculine.

0:21:130:21:16

The only problem with big

0:21:190:21:20

and bold is that can be a tad on the pricey side.

0:21:200:21:24

Oh, stop it. £2,500.

0:21:260:21:29

Look at that nice credenza... Oh, that's £5,500.

0:21:300:21:33

Move away from the expensive items. Going twice. It's not sold today.

0:21:340:21:39

In fact, it's not going at all well for Sian and Charles

0:21:390:21:42

and it's about to get worse.

0:21:420:21:45

Breaking news.

0:21:450:21:46

Sorry to disturb you. But it's raining and your car is open.

0:21:480:21:52

It is really raining hard?

0:21:520:21:53

Well, it's raining that the interior is getting wet.

0:21:530:21:55

I'm sorry about that.

0:21:550:21:57

No, no, that's both of our fault. Thank you very much.

0:21:570:22:00

Which raises the age-old question -

0:22:000:22:02

how many celebrities does it take to close the roof on a car?

0:22:020:22:06

Speed control. Roof!

0:22:060:22:08

Have you got the keys? It says roof.

0:22:080:22:11

Mind your hands.

0:22:110:22:13

Come to daddy.

0:22:130:22:14

ENGINE SPLUTTERS

0:22:140:22:16

This happened before.

0:22:160:22:18

Hang on.

0:22:180:22:20

Don't just stand there, Charles.

0:22:200:22:22

Well done. Now press roof.

0:22:250:22:27

well done. It's moving.

0:22:280:22:31

Mind your hat!

0:22:310:22:33

Thank goodness for that. Disaster averted.

0:22:350:22:38

It's back to business.

0:22:380:22:39

What I saw when we came out, I saw this man here.

0:22:410:22:45

Charles has spotted a late 19th century carved Black Forest

0:22:470:22:50

dancing bear clock.

0:22:500:22:52

A pretty collectible, but not to everyone's taste.

0:22:520:22:55

-I love him.

-Why?

0:22:570:22:59

You might say, "Charles, look at the subject, it's not very nice."

0:22:590:23:02

It isn't very nice. And I feel sorry for the bear.

0:23:020:23:05

-Yeah.

-Which is tethered by a chain.

-Yes.

0:23:050:23:08

It's a bit sad.

0:23:080:23:10

-You wouldn't want it, would you?

-No.

0:23:100:23:13

But I'm thinking about what today is so popular

0:23:130:23:16

and although the subject is sad...

0:23:160:23:18

Look at that. And that's the back. That's gorgeous.

0:23:180:23:21

Wow. That's the original movements, dating to around 1880.

0:23:210:23:24

I think he's really good. Do you know what he could make at auction?

0:23:240:23:27

No, no idea.

0:23:270:23:29

It could make £100 if the market isn't with it,

0:23:290:23:32

but all day long it ought to make 250 to £300.

0:23:320:23:37

-Let me find out what the price is. Can I do that?

-Yes.

0:23:370:23:39

With your consent. Look at me.

0:23:390:23:41

-Happy?

-No.

-Back in a sec.

0:23:410:23:45

I don't like it. It makes me sad.

0:23:450:23:48

It makes me sad.

0:23:480:23:49

Didn't you say you'll only buy things you like, Sian?

0:23:490:23:53

What's the price?

0:23:530:23:55

The best I can do on it is 180.

0:23:550:23:57

Oh, an ouch.

0:23:580:24:01

-That sounds like a lot of money.

-Fred, look at the lady.

0:24:010:24:04

-Look at the bear.

-It isn't a lot of money.

0:24:040:24:07

He's got a lovely colour.

0:24:070:24:09

What's the very best?

0:24:090:24:10

160.

0:24:100:24:13

"Let me free!"

0:24:140:24:16

I was hoping to buy it somewhere around 120.

0:24:160:24:19

Look at me.

0:24:210:24:22

-I'll tell you what I'll do...

-Look at me.

0:24:220:24:24

..I'll split it with you, 140.

0:24:240:24:27

-We're going to buy him. Are you happy?

-Yeah. No.

0:24:270:24:29

We're going to gamble, to accumulate, to speculate

0:24:290:24:31

and give this bear freedom.

0:24:310:24:33

This is for you and for the profit.

0:24:330:24:35

Walk him out and I'll shake the man's hand.

0:24:350:24:37

Thank you very much.

0:24:370:24:39

Sian's plan has gone out of the window in favour of profit.

0:24:390:24:43

So Charles hands over the £140, leaving them

0:24:430:24:46

with just £185 left to spend.

0:24:460:24:49

What have you done?

0:24:490:24:51

With clearer skies and the top down again, it's good night from me

0:24:530:24:56

and it's good night from them.

0:24:560:24:58

-Sorry.

-Sorry!

0:24:580:25:00

Uh-oh.

0:25:020:25:03

It's 8am and the weather today is clear and sunny and...

0:25:060:25:10

And we're on the road.

0:25:100:25:13

It's really nice driving this car on a decent road.

0:25:130:25:16

-It's nice and smooth without all the potholes.

-Yeah, it is.

0:25:160:25:19

Carol!

0:25:210:25:23

Wrong one, sorry.

0:25:230:25:24

Sorry about that, chaps.

0:25:260:25:27

Which one's the brake?

0:25:270:25:29

It's that big flat thing under your foot, Carol.

0:25:290:25:32

Hopefully Charles and Charlie are a bit more in control.

0:25:320:25:35

Don't hold your breath, though.

0:25:350:25:37

We had a great day yesterday.

0:25:370:25:39

-How do you find Carol, seriously?

-Absolutely lovely.

0:25:390:25:43

Sian's the same, isn't she?

0:25:430:25:45

They just have a lovely warm presence and...

0:25:450:25:48

-People you want to be with.

-Yeah.

0:25:480:25:51

Aw, how sweet.

0:25:510:25:53

Carol and Charlie are going to have to spend big today,

0:25:530:25:56

as they only spent £8 on a pair of Victorian books yesterday.

0:25:560:26:00

-That sounds good to me.

-I mean, frankly...

0:26:000:26:02

Charles and Sian, however, spent £215 of their £400 budget,

0:26:020:26:06

coming home with a barometer, some Shelley vases and a dancing bear clock.

0:26:060:26:12

-Happy?

-No.

0:26:120:26:14

Don't worry, Sian, you still have shopping ahead of you today.

0:26:140:26:17

-Morning, ladies.

-Good morning.

0:26:170:26:19

-What's our plan today?

-We're going shopping.

0:26:190:26:23

-I'd like to buy something big.

-Would you?

0:26:230:26:24

-Like a wardrobe or a chest of drawers?

-I like your style.

0:26:240:26:27

Do you know what, Charlie, I don't want to do that.

0:26:270:26:30

-What do you want to buy?

-I want to buy bling.

0:26:300:26:32

She wants to buy something feminine.

0:26:320:26:34

A journey awaits.

0:26:340:26:37

Good luck! Have a lovely day.

0:26:370:26:40

This morning both couples are heading to Great Baddow.

0:26:400:26:43

One of England's largest villages with over 13,000 inhabitants.

0:26:430:26:48

Like nearby Chelmsford, it also has a historical media link and was

0:26:480:26:53

home to an important TV and radio research lab that opened in 1936.

0:26:530:26:59

Do you want to have a little sneak round here?

0:26:590:27:01

Yeah, very much so.

0:27:010:27:02

Sian and Charles have £185 left to spend

0:27:020:27:05

and where better than this large antiques emporium?

0:27:050:27:09

Baddow Antiques Centre.

0:27:090:27:10

-Charles?

-Yes.

-Gosh, Sian's quick off the mark.

0:27:100:27:14

-That's quite sweet.

-That is nice.

0:27:140:27:16

That's really nice.

0:27:170:27:19

That's really nice.

0:27:190:27:21

They both like the Chinese bowl.

0:27:240:27:26

Mental note.

0:27:270:27:28

Mental note.

0:27:280:27:30

I quite like this Edwardian feather tray.

0:27:300:27:33

That's good.

0:27:330:27:34

It's a bit weird, isn't it?

0:27:340:27:36

It is.

0:27:360:27:37

That's quite good, you know.

0:27:370:27:39

1920s. It could do quite well.

0:27:390:27:41

I think it's a little bit odd.

0:27:410:27:43

It is a bit quirky, isn't it?

0:27:430:27:44

-It's well done, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:27:440:27:46

Condition's good.

0:27:460:27:47

They're not in any way stained or marked.

0:27:470:27:50

Do you think any butterflies were harmed in that feather tray?

0:27:500:27:52

No.

0:27:520:27:54

-Of course not.

-I'm sure not.

0:27:540:27:56

Get out of here.

0:27:560:27:57

Hm, I think following on from "Beargate,"

0:27:570:28:00

Charles may be telling a little porky.

0:28:000:28:03

The tray is actually made up from hundreds of butterfly wings.

0:28:030:28:07

In the 1920s, peacock butterflies were often raised on farms

0:28:070:28:10

in Europe and used for jewellery and decorative art.

0:28:100:28:14

Out of interest, if we said to you, "What's the best price?"

0:28:140:28:16

what will be the best knockdown as a giver and taker?

0:28:160:28:20

I would have to ring her.

0:28:200:28:22

As Steve needs to make a call,

0:28:220:28:24

Sian asks for a price on the Chinese bowl she likes too.

0:28:240:28:27

I'm really conscious that you have never lost against Charlie Ross.

0:28:270:28:30

-It doesn't matter.

-It matters to me.

0:28:300:28:32

-Charlie and I are great friends.

-Hey, speak of the devil.

0:28:320:28:35

Charlie and Carol are also on the hunt for a deal

0:28:350:28:38

elsewhere at Baddow Antiques.

0:28:380:28:40

Oh, this is an Aladdin's cave, isn't it?

0:28:400:28:43

Look, there's a man.

0:28:430:28:44

That's not Aladdin, though, that's the dealer, Ron. Hi, Ron.

0:28:440:28:47

Shall I walk from front to back?

0:28:470:28:49

You do the same, Carol, and then we'll see what Ron's got for us.

0:28:490:28:53

Left to her own devices, like a magpie,

0:28:550:28:58

Carol gravitates to the sparkly stuff.

0:28:580:29:00

Here's more bling. This is what I've been looking for.

0:29:000:29:03

That's a nice ring, the red one.

0:29:030:29:06

But I know Charlie won't be impressed if I buy that one.

0:29:060:29:10

But Charlie has found something he IS impressed with.

0:29:100:29:13

A Victorian painted cast-iron letterbox.

0:29:130:29:16

And without consulting Carol, he's on the phone negotiating.

0:29:160:29:19

Bad boy, Charlie. I hope she likes it.

0:29:190:29:21

I'm not going to beat around the bush, 25 quid!

0:29:210:29:24

I know I'm a horrible man, Ernie.

0:29:240:29:26

I'm awful. I'm ghastly.

0:29:280:29:30

And if you were here you would have permission to hit me.

0:29:300:29:32

Permission granted, Ernie.

0:29:320:29:34

Oh! Hang on!

0:29:340:29:36

Carol, I don't know what you're going to think of me,

0:29:360:29:38

but I bought a Victorian letterbox.

0:29:380:29:41

It's wonderful. Don't you love it?

0:29:430:29:45

Carol, tell me you love it.

0:29:450:29:47

I love it.

0:29:490:29:51

Phew.

0:29:510:29:52

Now that you're enthused,

0:29:520:29:54

I've seen something up here I want you to have a look at as well.

0:29:540:29:57

-I can't get up.

-Let me help you.

-I wonder if it sparkles.

0:29:570:30:00

Meanwhile, Sian and Charles are waiting for a price on the tray

0:30:030:30:07

and bowl when Charles spots something else.

0:30:070:30:10

Let's just see what else is in this cabinet.

0:30:100:30:12

I've seen something else.

0:30:120:30:14

That's nice.

0:30:140:30:15

Careful, Charles, that's a 19th century Staffordshire cat...

0:30:150:30:19

-Deaf now.

-Oh, you've broken the ear.

0:30:190:30:22

-Have you got any glue at all?

-Oh, no.

0:30:220:30:25

Would she travel with a tube?

0:30:250:30:27

It wasn't me, honestly. It just fell off.

0:30:280:30:30

-Oh, stop it.

-Honestly. No, it wasn't me, I promise you.

0:30:300:30:33

Pull the other one, Charles. Actually, best not.

0:30:330:30:35

You might break something else.

0:30:350:30:37

What shall we do?

0:30:370:30:39

You have to tell him.

0:30:390:30:42

-I'll stick it back on quick.

-No.

0:30:420:30:44

Lucky for Steve, Sian's moral compass is as straight as an arrow.

0:30:440:30:48

The very best she can do is 75.

0:30:480:30:52

In the meantime,

0:30:520:30:54

Charles went into the cabinet to take this small cat out.

0:30:540:30:59

-And he touched the ear of the cat...

-And it's fell off.

0:30:590:31:02

And it sort of came away under his thumb,

0:31:020:31:05

but he thinks that it was loose.

0:31:050:31:07

-It was loose, sir.

-Don't worry.

-What's the best price on the cat?

0:31:080:31:12

Honestly. You hold the ear.

0:31:120:31:14

What's the price on it?

0:31:140:31:17

-£25.

-A tenner.

0:31:170:31:20

Yeah, I think for £10 that's quite good value.

0:31:200:31:22

-Despite the broken ear.

-OK.

0:31:220:31:24

What's he talking about?

0:31:240:31:26

-Do you like cats?

-Um...

-SHE MEOWS

0:31:260:31:29

You do now.

0:31:290:31:31

This is the second item Charles has bought that Sian dislikes.

0:31:310:31:34

But what about the bowl and tray she found?

0:31:340:31:38

-Bowl, 75?

-75 is the very best she can do.

0:31:380:31:41

Have we got a price on the feather tray?

0:31:410:31:43

I can do 40.

0:31:430:31:45

She can't do any less on that.

0:31:450:31:47

We'll go for the tray and the cat and that's 50.

0:31:470:31:49

That's it. Two for 50.

0:31:490:31:50

I'll shake the man's hand as well. That's for you, boss.

0:31:500:31:53

That's £50 all-in for the tray and the cat.

0:31:530:31:55

Leave the tray for the time being?

0:31:550:31:56

It's so pretty and delicate. It really is.

0:31:560:31:59

It's up to you.

0:31:590:32:00

I think it's a real gamble,

0:32:000:32:02

but then...the Road Trip is all about a rollercoaster

0:32:020:32:05

and we'll ride it together.

0:32:050:32:07

-Let's take the risk?

-Really?

0:32:070:32:09

It's true. It's real.

0:32:090:32:11

It's live.

0:32:110:32:13

It's sold.

0:32:130:32:15

We're going to buy it, yeah?

0:32:150:32:17

-Thank you.

-We're going to go for it.

0:32:170:32:19

After much debating, the plate purchase

0:32:190:32:21

brings their spending here to £125.

0:32:210:32:25

And the fiver.

0:32:250:32:27

There we are, there's ten.

0:32:270:32:29

-Not five for the change?

-No.

-Are you sure?

0:32:290:32:32

Yeah. We'll leave it at 70.

0:32:320:32:33

It gives you more of a chance.

0:32:330:32:36

-Oh, bless you. Thank you very much.

-Isn't that nice.

0:32:360:32:38

In other words, get out of here before you break something else.

0:32:380:32:42

-You get two.

-Thank you.

0:32:420:32:44

No, Charles, don't kiss him.

0:32:440:32:46

Carol too has found something that's caught her eye.

0:32:490:32:51

I want to show you this. I'm not sure... I quite like it.

0:32:510:32:55

It's this here.

0:32:550:32:57

It's got a Christmassy feel to it, probably because of the stag

0:32:570:33:00

and the snow and the fir trees. We've got a teapot, a coffee pot and

0:33:000:33:04

then there's more cups and saucers down there, so there's a lot to it.

0:33:040:33:08

It's Crown Devon China. It's quite interesting.

0:33:080:33:11

It's 1960s. Not something I'd want in my house.

0:33:120:33:15

Could we live together? Would you like it in your house?

0:33:150:33:18

-No, we could live together.

-That's fine.

0:33:180:33:20

This isn't a wedding gift list, Charlie.

0:33:200:33:22

Comes down to price.

0:33:220:33:23

Is this a Ron job?

0:33:230:33:25

-Yes.

-Is this you and Ron?

0:33:250:33:26

It's me and Ron...cooking up here.

0:33:260:33:28

Ron!

0:33:280:33:30

If you bought it all, I mean...

0:33:300:33:32

..it would have to be...£225.

0:33:340:33:37

What?! You cannot be serious.

0:33:370:33:40

You sound like John McEnroe.

0:33:400:33:41

That's over half their starting budget.

0:33:410:33:44

What's your best price?

0:33:440:33:45

I'm leaving. Carol, work your magic.

0:33:450:33:49

I was thinking more like 150.

0:33:490:33:51

It can't be done.

0:33:510:33:53

What if we split the difference and go for 160?

0:33:530:33:56

That isn't splitting the difference. I mean...

0:33:560:33:59

I would go as low as 185.

0:34:010:34:03

Thank you.

0:34:030:34:05

Can I consult with...

0:34:050:34:07

You consult with who you like.

0:34:070:34:08

Although it seems Charlie's head

0:34:080:34:11

if full of romantic gestures rather than antiques.

0:34:110:34:13

Serenade my Carol.

0:34:130:34:16

ACCORDION PLAYS

0:34:160:34:19

Oh, look.

0:34:190:34:20

# Ron. #

0:34:220:34:23

Actually, Charlie, since you're here, Ron has agreed to 180.

0:34:250:34:29

No. You said 180. I said 185.

0:34:290:34:31

I would say to you, Carol,

0:34:310:34:33

if you went on bended knee and Ron could possibly do it for 150,

0:34:330:34:38

I would say, "Buy it for 150," cos I think you stand a sporting chance.

0:34:380:34:43

Come on, Carol, work that Scottish charm.

0:34:430:34:45

I can give you hard cash right now. 150, notes.

0:34:450:34:49

Oh, Ron! You legend!

0:34:530:34:56

-Are you happy with that, Ron?

-No.

0:34:560:34:59

It's not something shiny,

0:35:000:35:02

but at £150 Carol must be pleased as Punch

0:35:020:35:04

and Ron's generosity doesn't end there.

0:35:040:35:07

They're a nice couple.

0:35:070:35:08

There's something you might have missed

0:35:080:35:10

and it's a medal for an exhibitor at the Great Exhibition in 1851.

0:35:100:35:16

-You might like to see it.

-Love to see it.

0:35:160:35:18

The Great Exhibition took place in Hyde Park.

0:35:180:35:21

Its aim, to celebrate the works of industry of all nations,

0:35:210:35:24

but also for Britain to showcase to the world its own industrial feats.

0:35:240:35:28

-And the wee leather case as well, that's cute.

-That's the medal.

0:35:300:35:33

I think that's the original leather case.

0:35:330:35:35

Who have we got there?

0:35:350:35:37

-What a handsome devil.

-Looks like you.

0:35:370:35:40

Prince Albert.

0:35:400:35:42

He's got more hair than I have.

0:35:420:35:44

But what about the all-important question?

0:35:440:35:47

I would do it at a very reasonable...

0:35:470:35:49

£20.

0:35:490:35:51

And leave the rest to you.

0:35:510:35:53

Carol, shake Ron by the hand.

0:35:530:35:55

Ron, thank you very much.

0:35:550:35:58

A great price for a great little piece of history,

0:35:580:36:01

which brings their spending in this shop to £195.

0:36:010:36:05

Thank you very much.

0:36:050:36:07

Whilst Carol and Charlie celebrate finally spending some money,

0:36:070:36:11

Sian and Charles are heading for the village of Greensted-juxta-Ongar.

0:36:110:36:16

We're off to visit a very old church.

0:36:160:36:19

-My grandfather was a Presbyterian minister.

-Was he?

0:36:190:36:23

So I spent a lot of my childhood in churches.

0:36:230:36:26

Sian now hosts a Sunday morning religious ethical debate programme.

0:36:260:36:31

And with churches such a strong part of her childhood,

0:36:310:36:34

she should feel at home in St Andrew's.

0:36:340:36:36

The building dates back to the time Christianity was introduced

0:36:360:36:40

to Britain, that's over 1,300 years of history and worship

0:36:400:36:45

as it's still in use today.

0:36:450:36:47

That looks amazing. Shall we go in?

0:36:470:36:49

Charles and Sian are meeting Jackie, a guide at the church.

0:36:500:36:54

It's beautiful.

0:36:540:36:56

-Thank you very much.

-And very old.

0:36:560:36:58

Very old.

0:36:580:36:59

It's been dated to 1060 to 1100,

0:36:590:37:03

so we're the oldest wooden church in the world

0:37:030:37:06

and the oldest wooden building in Europe.

0:37:060:37:08

Even more extraordinary, excavations undertaken in 1960 revealed

0:37:080:37:13

earlier timber structures dating as far back as the 6th and 7th century.

0:37:130:37:18

We could almost be now back in the 11th century,

0:37:180:37:21

walking in as maybe a bride and groom to be

0:37:210:37:24

and there you've got timbers sitting there for 1,000 years.

0:37:240:37:27

-Yes.

-Amazing.

0:37:270:37:30

Let's pretend you're a peasant farmer

0:37:300:37:33

and I'm a land girl.

0:37:330:37:35

Thanks a lot.

0:37:350:37:37

Looks like the wedding's off, Charles.

0:37:370:37:39

Inside the church is a veritable treasure trove of quirky

0:37:430:37:46

historical artefacts and stories.

0:37:460:37:48

Like the lepers' hole, thought to have been

0:37:500:37:53

used by lepers as they weren't allowed into the church itself.

0:37:530:37:57

And a Bible bound in the original wood from the church's walls

0:37:570:38:00

and still used today in sermons.

0:38:000:38:03

Hello, 1060, I'm 2014.

0:38:030:38:06

The church is also famous for its stained glass windows,

0:38:060:38:10

one of which pays homage to St Edmund, the first patron saint

0:38:100:38:15

of England, whose body is believed to have rested here for a night.

0:38:150:38:19

Kind Edmund was king of East Anglia in 855.

0:38:190:38:23

He ruled for 15 years.

0:38:230:38:25

Apparently it was very peaceful during his reign.

0:38:250:38:29

However, the Danes started invading this part of England

0:38:290:38:33

and he was captured.

0:38:330:38:35

Hingwar, the leader of the Danes, said he was to give him half his kingdom

0:38:350:38:42

and half his wealth, and relinquish his faith.

0:38:420:38:45

Edmund agreed to hand over half his kingdom and half his fortune,

0:38:470:38:51

but would not relinquish his faith.

0:38:510:38:54

They took him out of the church and they beat him

0:38:540:38:57

and then they tied him to a tree.

0:38:570:38:59

And when he still would not relinquish his faith

0:38:590:39:02

they shot him with arrows and darts.

0:39:020:39:05

As if that wasn't enough, the Vikings chopped off his head

0:39:050:39:08

and threw it away in a wood.

0:39:080:39:10

It is told that his head was found by a talking wolf, who guarded it

0:39:100:39:15

between its paws until Edmund's friends came along to find him,

0:39:150:39:18

reuniting his head with the rest of his body.

0:39:180:39:22

Poor old Edmund.

0:39:220:39:24

Why was he superseded by George?

0:39:250:39:27

What did George do that Edmund didn't

0:39:270:39:30

to make him patron saint of England?

0:39:300:39:32

Well, George was chosen by the Normans to be our patron saint.

0:39:320:39:37

And the Normans obviously wanted to take over the country and eradicate

0:39:370:39:42

all things Saxon, so they wanted to do away with our way of life.

0:39:420:39:47

Let's campaign to get Edmund back as patron saint of England.

0:39:470:39:52

-Quite right.

-Do you think?

-Definitely.

-It starts here.

0:39:520:39:57

You heard it here first.

0:39:570:40:00

Meanwhile, Charlie and Carol are off

0:40:000:40:02

to the quintessentially charming village of Blackmore, in Essex.

0:40:020:40:06

It's believed that Henry VIII's illegitimate child,

0:40:060:40:10

Henry Fitzroy, was born there.

0:40:100:40:12

And, speaking of royalty...

0:40:120:40:14

-Oh, I love the Queen in particular.

-You've met the Queen?

-Yes, I have.

0:40:140:40:18

-No!

-Charlie, I had the great honour and privilege of giving a talk

0:40:180:40:24

-to the Queen and the Queen has such a brilliant sense of humour.

-Really?

0:40:240:40:28

-The nerves quickly went.

-So when will it be Lady Kirkwood?

0:40:280:40:32

-SHE LAUGHS

-When I marry Sir Someone-or-other!

0:40:320:40:34

LAUGHTER

0:40:340:40:36

Sorry, Charlie, looks like you're out of it, then.

0:40:360:40:39

Carol and Charlie are left with nearly half their original kitty to spend.

0:40:390:40:44

I'm sure they'll sniff out a bargain. Not here, though!

0:40:440:40:47

At Megarrys Antiques and Teashop.

0:40:480:40:50

Open. That's a good sign.

0:40:500:40:52

Hello!

0:40:520:40:54

Our lovable duo split up to cover more ground,

0:40:550:40:58

and for once it seems Carol isn't after bling.

0:40:580:41:01

We had a wee bunny just like that, the Sylvac rabbit there,

0:41:010:41:07

when I was growing up at home.

0:41:070:41:09

Ooh, bling!

0:41:090:41:11

No, spoke too soon.

0:41:110:41:12

But she has found something else that's put a sparkle in her eye.

0:41:120:41:16

It's different, it's small, it would fit into any house. It's attractive.

0:41:160:41:20

Yeah.

0:41:200:41:21

-You like it, don't you?

-I do like it.

0:41:210:41:24

This walnut side table is a reproduction,

0:41:260:41:28

but, at over 100 years old, it's still an antique.

0:41:280:41:31

Can they afford it, though?

0:41:310:41:33

I love that little Louis XV piece.

0:41:330:41:35

-I think there is some movement on that.

-Is there?

0:41:350:41:38

But I'll have to look at my stock book.

0:41:380:41:40

Fingers crossed.

0:41:400:41:42

-I think I've got an answer for you.

-Try me.

-Two?

0:41:420:41:46

-That is bottom-line!

-Yeah, yeah. No, I'm not even wincing.

0:41:490:41:54

Yes, you were, Charlie.

0:41:540:41:55

-I want Carol to win as well!

-Thank you, Judy.

0:41:550:41:59

-We haven't quite got that amount, have we? Nearly.

-Nearly.

0:41:590:42:03

-We are three pounds short.

-Three pounds short?

0:42:030:42:06

Well, I'm not going to quibble about three pounds!

0:42:060:42:09

SHE LAUGHS

0:42:090:42:11

Carol, you've given the game away there. THEY LAUGH

0:42:110:42:14

No, no. You've got to be hard-headed about these things and it's super.

0:42:160:42:20

Astonishingly, Carol has fallen for something other than bling,

0:42:210:42:25

but Charlie is thinking with his head for once.

0:42:250:42:29

Well, clearly, £200 is about what it'll make.

0:42:290:42:32

-And it's lovely.

-So we wouldn't make a profit on it.

0:42:330:42:37

No, I don't think you would.

0:42:370:42:38

That doesn't matter.

0:42:380:42:41

It's such a beautiful piece, and the satisfaction we'll get from...

0:42:410:42:44

-Owning it. Briefly.

-Exactly. Yes.

0:42:440:42:47

Despite having said she wouldn't buy furniture,

0:42:470:42:50

Carol is determined to get the side table.

0:42:500:42:52

The only issue now is the price.

0:42:520:42:55

You know what we've got. We've got £197 in our pocket.

0:42:550:42:58

Can you do anything better than 180, Judy?

0:42:580:43:01

-175, absolute bottom dollar.

-You're dropping! Hold on.

0:43:020:43:07

-Would you like a chair?

-Yes!

0:43:070:43:08

We've been given a cracking price.

0:43:080:43:10

Can you think of any other reason why we shouldn't buy it?

0:43:100:43:13

-No, I think we should buy it.

-Sold.

0:43:130:43:15

-OK.

-That came with such a sigh, Judy.

0:43:150:43:18

The deal is sealed.

0:43:180:43:20

With a shiny side table in tow,

0:43:200:43:23

Charlie hands over the dosh for their final purchase.

0:43:230:43:26

-Come on.

-You are incorrigible.

0:43:260:43:30

And with the shopping now finished,

0:43:300:43:33

Carol and Charlie head to Greensted church,

0:43:330:43:36

where it's time to unveil her wares.

0:43:360:43:38

Three, two, one. This is our table top.

0:43:380:43:41

Look at that!

0:43:410:43:43

Oh, no!

0:43:430:43:44

-The bear's gone!

-Wishful thinking on Sian's part.

0:43:440:43:47

-Sorry about that. Look!

-That's good.

0:43:470:43:51

-May I look?

-Of course you can.

0:43:510:43:52

I have to say I wouldn't give him house room, but I'm sure...

0:43:520:43:56

SIAN LAUGHS

0:43:560:43:57

-Put it there, girl! That's exactly what I said.

-Isn't it funny?

0:43:570:44:01

Charles, well done!

0:44:010:44:03

-I think you bought something absolutely marvellous.

-It's horrible!

0:44:030:44:06

-Charlie, sell it to Carol.

-Or better still, Sian.

0:44:060:44:10

-Black Forest?

-Yeah.

-Late 19th century.

-Yeah.

0:44:100:44:14

-Highly collectable.

-We paid £140.

-I think that's a good thing.

0:44:140:44:18

Because we feel, Carol, it might make between 150 and 250.

0:44:180:44:21

It could make 250 to 350.

0:44:210:44:24

-No, it won't make 250.

-It could roar home.

-No, no.

0:44:240:44:26

Will you?

0:44:260:44:28

No.

0:44:280:44:29

LAUGHTER

0:44:290:44:31

And another of Sian's least favourite pieces,

0:44:310:44:34

now with the ear stuck firmly back on.

0:44:340:44:37

-What you think of the cat?

-I love it. Carol, what's it worth?

0:44:370:44:42

50p.

0:44:420:44:44

LAUGHTER

0:44:440:44:45

That's what I would pay for it.

0:44:450:44:47

Carol, I would not even have paid 50p for it.

0:44:470:44:50

Carol, one question, is the sun shining on us?

0:44:500:44:53

-No, it looks like it's going to rain, actually.

-LAUGHTER

0:44:530:44:57

But what will Sian and Charles think of their rivals' purchases?

0:44:570:45:01

Oooh!

0:45:010:45:03

Wow.

0:45:030:45:04

Oh, I like this.

0:45:040:45:07

-It's Crown Devon, Charlie?

-Exactly. What's the pattern?

0:45:070:45:11

-Leaping Deer, or something like that.

-Stockholm.

0:45:110:45:13

Of course, Stockholm, yeah.

0:45:130:45:15

Nice little stags, fir trees, a bit of snow. A winter scene.

0:45:150:45:19

Well done, that girl.

0:45:190:45:21

She might have just swung it for them, you know?

0:45:210:45:24

I bet you paid more than £150.

0:45:240:45:27

-We paid exactly 150.

-Did you, really? Interesting.

-Very good.

0:45:270:45:31

-Thank you very much.

-Sian, come here. What you think of that?

0:45:310:45:35

Oh, I didn't see that!

0:45:350:45:37

-Is this walnut?

-It's walnut.

0:45:370:45:40

It's late 19th century, a copy of...

0:45:400:45:44

Louis XV style.

0:45:440:45:46

So it's 100 years later than it might have been originally,

0:45:460:45:49

but it's still a genuine antique.

0:45:490:45:51

I'm hoping you paid probably...

0:45:510:45:53

-In my estimation, I really feel...

-Hang on to me, Sian!

0:45:530:45:56

I'm going to be really kind.

0:45:560:45:57

-At auction I think it's worth between £70 and £100.

-Oh, no, no!

0:45:570:46:02

-We paid £150! No, we paid £175!

-You didn't? Oh, no!

0:46:020:46:08

A mixed reaction, but what do they really think(?)

0:46:080:46:12

What was interesting to me

0:46:120:46:14

was seeing Charlie's reaction to the bear that I didn't like.

0:46:140:46:18

-Absolutely right.

-You said to me, "Trust me on this, Sian."

0:46:180:46:22

But I don't think the rest of their items are much good at all,

0:46:220:46:25

to be perfectly honest.

0:46:250:46:27

-The table at 175 is a massive spend.

-That's a good spend.

0:46:270:46:30

And I think it's worth on a really good day £80.

0:46:300:46:33

-Touch and go.

-Yeah, I think it could be really close.

0:46:330:46:36

-Trust me, we'll be OK.

-OK. Come on, then. I do trust you.

0:46:360:46:41

No, I really do.

0:46:410:46:43

Methinks the lady protesteth too much.

0:46:440:46:48

The auction is in the beautiful market town of Cirencester,

0:46:480:46:51

often referred to as the capital of the Cotswolds.

0:46:510:46:53

Are you looking forward to the auction?

0:46:530:46:56

-I don't quite know what to expect.

-No. Me neither.

0:46:560:46:59

All will soon be revealed.

0:46:590:47:02

-We are almost on.

-Let's get in.

-We're almost on.

0:47:020:47:04

Today at Cotswolds Auction House,

0:47:060:47:09

our celebs' wares are for sale

0:47:090:47:11

online, on the phone and in the room.

0:47:110:47:13

Our auctioneer is Elizabeth Poole.

0:47:130:47:16

The bear, yes. He's lovely.

0:47:160:47:18

The fact that he's a dancing bear with a pole is probably less

0:47:180:47:22

saleable than if he hadn't got his dancing pole,

0:47:220:47:24

but it's nice that it's a clock.

0:47:240:47:25

I'm a little wary of the books because of the condition and

0:47:250:47:29

that they're not the sort of thing that's terribly desirable today.

0:47:290:47:33

Carol and her very own force of nature, Charlie Ross,

0:47:330:47:37

have spent £378 of their original £400 on five lots.

0:47:370:47:42

And they still have time for romance.

0:47:420:47:44

-That's one of the nicest oil paintings I've ever seen.

-Aw!

0:47:440:47:47

Sian and Charles could only BEAR to part with £335,

0:47:470:47:52

accumulating six lots.

0:47:520:47:53

-It's sold.

-It's sold.

0:47:530:47:55

To date, Charles is undefeated by Charlie Ross,

0:47:550:47:59

but could this be the day all that changes?

0:47:590:48:01

I've never been to an auction before.

0:48:010:48:03

This is all new territory for me.

0:48:030:48:06

Carol was after all things shiny,

0:48:060:48:08

but ended up falling for a wooden side table.

0:48:080:48:10

It's their most expensive purchase, so fingers crossed.

0:48:100:48:13

100. 110. 120.

0:48:130:48:16

Now we're going!

0:48:160:48:18

130. 140.

0:48:180:48:20

150. 160.

0:48:200:48:22

It's like being at Wimbledon, Carol!

0:48:220:48:25

-170.

-You're in the money.

-180.

-Yes!

0:48:250:48:29

190. 200.

0:48:290:48:31

210. 220.

0:48:310:48:33

-It will fit in a small house.

-230.

0:48:330:48:36

240.

0:48:360:48:37

-# Oh, Carol! #

-Come on, come on!

-250.

0:48:370:48:40

# Don't let me steal your heart away. #

0:48:400:48:43

270.

0:48:430:48:45

At 270 on the phone.

0:48:450:48:47

270 on the phone. Are you done in the room?

0:48:470:48:49

-270 on the phone.

-280!

0:48:490:48:52

At 280.

0:48:520:48:54

At 280.

0:48:540:48:55

290.

0:48:550:48:57

At 290.

0:48:570:48:58

On the phone at 290.

0:48:580:49:00

Last chance, then. Going, going...

0:49:000:49:03

-Going at 290...

-GAVEL BANGS

0:49:030:49:05

CHEERING

0:49:050:49:07

-Well done!

-An amazing result for their first lot.

0:49:070:49:11

Who needs bling when you've got £115 profit?

0:49:110:49:16

It shows they've got the right people here. We're going to have a good day.

0:49:160:49:19

Sian loved her Shelley vase and posy holder, but will the bidders, too?

0:49:190:49:24

-20 to start.

-Come on, let's go.

0:49:240:49:26

£10. It's a bargain at 20.

0:49:260:49:28

-It is a bargain at 20!

-20. Come on.

0:49:280:49:31

-Start me at 20.

-I don't believe it. Surely.

0:49:310:49:35

-Madam!

-Nobody at £20?

0:49:350:49:37

I'm trying hard here, Charles.

0:49:370:49:38

-£20...

-You're doing a great job.

0:49:380:49:42

At 20 with the lady. Any more? Last chance.

0:49:420:49:45

A new bidder at 22.

0:49:450:49:46

At 22 with the lady.

0:49:460:49:48

-22.

-One more! Look at me!

-Last chance.

0:49:480:49:52

Going at 22...

0:49:520:49:54

-Oh, no!

-A disappointing first lot for Sian and Charles.

0:49:540:49:58

Don't mind. Wave them. goodbye.

0:49:580:50:01

I want to go and buy them.

0:50:010:50:04

Can Carol and Charlie make another big win on their Victorian books?

0:50:040:50:09

-Start me at £10.

-Easy.

-Any interest at 10?

0:50:090:50:12

£5. Who'll give me five?

0:50:120:50:15

£5.

0:50:150:50:16

No interest at five.

0:50:160:50:18

-£5.

-Sit down!

-Two Victorian books.

0:50:180:50:21

Five I'm bid. Thank you. Lady's bid at five.

0:50:210:50:24

£5. Any more? Lady's bid at five. Six now.

0:50:240:50:28

At six. Seven.

0:50:280:50:29

At £7 with the lady. Eight, is it?

0:50:290:50:32

Eight with the gentleman.

0:50:320:50:33

£8.

0:50:330:50:35

At £8.

0:50:350:50:36

-All done, then, and selling at eight.

-Exactly what they cost.

0:50:360:50:39

-Oh, well.

-Thanks for coming.

0:50:390:50:41

Well, perhaps not on fire, Charlie,

0:50:410:50:43

but breaking even is still a good result and you're still in the lead.

0:50:430:50:48

This is exciting.

0:50:480:50:49

But with the temperature rising in the room,

0:50:490:50:51

what better time to try out Sian's barometer?

0:50:510:50:54

-Start me at 20.

-Come on, let's go. Come on, let's go!

0:50:540:50:59

Ten, then. £10 for the barometer.

0:50:590:51:01

At ten. Any more?

0:51:010:51:03

-Over there!

-15.

0:51:030:51:05

At 15. At 15. Is there any more?

0:51:050:51:08

Selling at 15...

0:51:080:51:11

SHE LAUGHS

0:51:110:51:12

Another disappointing result,

0:51:120:51:14

but Charles is still looking on the bright side.

0:51:140:51:16

Do you know what, Sian?

0:51:160:51:18

I'd rather get the bad ones out of the way first

0:51:180:51:20

and look forward to the good times.

0:51:200:51:22

Dealer Ron gave Carol

0:51:230:51:24

and Charlie quite a bargain on this bronze medal.

0:51:240:51:27

Can it turn a profit?

0:51:270:51:28

Bit of interest on this. Let's start the bidding at ten. 12. Bid at 12.

0:51:280:51:33

At £12.

0:51:330:51:34

At 12. 15 in the room. At 15.

0:51:340:51:37

At 15. 18.

0:51:370:51:39

-20.

-Yeah, that's it.

-Stop it.

0:51:390:51:41

20. Who's going on? At £20. Is there any more?

0:51:410:51:44

-At £20...

-It's great.

-What do you mean, great? It's a disaster.

0:51:440:51:47

-At 20...

-Very disappointed with that.

0:51:470:51:52

Very disappointed with that.

0:51:520:51:53

Bad luck. They got that for a steal.

0:51:540:51:56

Next up is the Chinese bowl Sian loved.

0:51:560:51:59

Ten I'm bid. At ten. At ten.

0:52:010:52:04

-20th century.

-Is there any more? At 10.

-I don't believe it.

0:52:040:52:07

-It's 20th century.

-At £10.

-It's not.

-It is.

0:52:070:52:09

I'm selling at ten if you're all finished. At £10.

0:52:090:52:12

-Last chance...

-GAVEL BANGS

0:52:120:52:14

Oh!

0:52:160:52:17

-Now, that is a disaster.

-That is.

0:52:170:52:20

Charlie seems to think that the bowl is younger than Charles had

0:52:200:52:23

originally thought and it appears the buyers here today agreed.

0:52:230:52:27

Carol, I feel we are almost going to surrender

0:52:270:52:30

to your lead now, that is just about insurmountable.

0:52:300:52:35

It's not over yet, Charles.

0:52:350:52:37

Without Carol's permission,

0:52:370:52:38

Charlie purchased the so-called Victorian letterbox.

0:52:380:52:41

But will it put a final stamp on their victory?

0:52:410:52:44

£30. No takers at £30? Come on!

0:52:440:52:47

No interest at £30?

0:52:470:52:49

You need a letterbox. I know you need a letterbox.

0:52:490:52:52

Everybody needs a letterbox!

0:52:520:52:55

£20, start me off, then.

0:52:550:52:57

-Any interest at 20?

-It's very heavy.

-With the lady at £20.

0:52:570:53:01

At £20. Must be worth more than this. 22.

0:53:010:53:05

22.

0:53:050:53:06

22 standing. 25.

0:53:060:53:08

-You get the money.

-25.

0:53:080:53:11

Not a lot. At 25.

0:53:110:53:13

-Keep going.

-Come on! It's wiping its face.

0:53:130:53:18

It's cheap at 25...

0:53:180:53:20

Is that a profit?

0:53:210:53:23

Did someone bid? Yeah, they bought it. Well done.

0:53:230:53:27

-Thank you.

-An absolute snip.

0:53:270:53:29

Another surprise result, but they're still in the lead.

0:53:290:53:33

-We're going down, Charlie.

-No, Carol, stick with me.

0:53:330:53:36

Next up, the cat with a glued-on ear.

0:53:370:53:40

Best of luck, guys.

0:53:400:53:41

-Start me at £15.

-This is our make or break.

-Nobody is on the phone.

0:53:410:53:45

Come on.

0:53:450:53:46

Come on, she says!

0:53:460:53:48

-We've got 15!

-Thank you, sir. At 30.

-30. Come on, let's go.

0:53:480:53:51

At 30 here. Come on, it's worth a bit more. 35.

0:53:510:53:54

-Come on, let's go.

-45. 50.

-We're going.

-55. 60.

-Come on!

-At 60.

0:53:540:53:59

One more, madam.

0:53:590:54:00

At 60. Come on, one more.

0:54:000:54:02

At 60. Is there any more? I shall sell at 60.

0:54:020:54:06

All done.

0:54:060:54:08

-Brilliant! £60!

-That's great!

-The journey is on.

0:54:080:54:12

An amazing profit for Sian and Charles. They're back in the game.

0:54:120:54:17

That's really good. Congratulations, Charles. Sian, brilliant.

0:54:170:54:22

That was brilliantly done.

0:54:220:54:25

The tension is rising,

0:54:250:54:26

and at £150, Carol's Stockholm china set was a high-risk purchase.

0:54:260:54:32

Let's hope it pays off.

0:54:320:54:34

Lots and lots of interest. Can I start the bidding at 55, 60?

0:54:340:54:39

-At £60.

-Lots of interest, 60?

-At 60. 65. 70. 75. 80.

0:54:390:54:42

85. 90.

0:54:420:54:44

95. 100. 110. 120.

0:54:440:54:47

At 120.

0:54:470:54:49

More! We need a bit more.

0:54:490:54:51

At 120.

0:54:510:54:52

130. 140. At 140. Any more? Online at 140.

0:54:520:54:56

Are we all done at 140?

0:54:560:55:00

-Well done.

-It could have been a lot worse.

0:55:000:55:03

I thought it would go higher than that, actually.

0:55:030:55:05

The way it was going like this.

0:55:050:55:07

I agree. Another shock result, though.

0:55:070:55:09

And Carol and Charlie's first loss of the day.

0:55:090:55:12

Next, love it or loathe it, the dancing bear.

0:55:140:55:17

Charles is convinced it's a winner.

0:55:170:55:20

It'll need to be to get them back in the competition.

0:55:200:55:22

£50 to start me.

0:55:220:55:24

-Hold my hand, Carol.

-Good luck.

0:55:240:55:27

60.

0:55:270:55:28

65.

0:55:280:55:30

70. 75.

0:55:300:55:31

75. 80. 85.

0:55:310:55:33

90.

0:55:330:55:35

-95.

-Oh, my God.

0:55:350:55:37

100. 110. 120. 130.

0:55:370:55:40

-Keep going, girl.

-140. 150. 160. 170.

0:55:400:55:44

Let's go, girl. Let's party hard. It's on, girl.

0:55:440:55:47

200. 220.

0:55:470:55:49

-Let's go, girl.

-250. 260.

0:55:490:55:51

280. 300.

0:55:510:55:53

-At 300...

-Keep going.

-At 300 bid standing. Any more online?

0:55:530:55:57

-At 300 in the room... All done?

-GAVEL BANGS

0:55:570:56:00

Yes!

0:56:000:56:01

-Well done!

-Thank you very much! Thank you!

-Thank you!

0:56:030:56:08

An amazing victory and what a comeback.

0:56:080:56:10

The competition is really hotting up.

0:56:100:56:13

-Who's winning? I don't know.

-I don't know who's winning.

0:56:130:56:16

We can't work it out any more. It's no good. My mathematics are no good.

0:56:160:56:22

I don't know what's happening.

0:56:220:56:24

It's all too much. The contest is now wide open.

0:56:240:56:27

It's down to Sian and Charles's final lot.

0:56:270:56:30

-£10.

-Come on!

0:56:300:56:33

Please!

0:56:330:56:34

We need this!

0:56:340:56:36

Any interest at 10?

0:56:360:56:37

-Don't bid!

-Beautiful tray.

-Five!

0:56:370:56:41

£5. Nobody wants it.

0:56:410:56:43

Any interest at five?

0:56:430:56:45

Oh, no. We worked so hard.

0:56:450:56:47

They can't hear me because you're making so much noise!

0:56:470:56:50

We're being told off by the auctioneer!

0:56:500:56:52

You tell 'em, Liz!

0:56:520:56:54

Five I'm bid. Thank you.

0:56:540:56:55

At £5. Any more? At £5 with the gentleman.

0:56:550:56:58

Come on, six.

0:56:580:56:59

This is a plea for a little bit more. £6 anywhere?

0:56:590:57:03

Selling, then, at five if I have to. All done.

0:57:030:57:06

Were you bidding, madam?

0:57:070:57:09

-No, right.

-Nice try, Charles.

0:57:090:57:10

In spite of his cajoling, they racked up another big loss.

0:57:100:57:14

And I still think it's really close.

0:57:140:57:16

Of course it's close. Who's won?

0:57:160:57:18

So it's time to find out, and let me tell you, it's a close one today.

0:57:180:57:22

Sean and Charles made a small profit, after auction costs,

0:57:220:57:25

of £2.84, leaving them with £402.84.

0:57:250:57:31

But Carol and Charlie did marginally better, and after costs

0:57:310:57:34

emerged with a profit of £18.06

0:57:340:57:38

and a final tally of £418.06.

0:57:380:57:43

All profits, both great and small, go to Children In Need.

0:57:430:57:46

What's more, for the first time in Antique Road Trip history,

0:57:460:57:50

Charlie Ross has emerged victorious over Charles Hanson.

0:57:500:57:55

-Well done. Congratulations.

-Put your hand there.

-Congratulations.

0:57:550:57:58

-I've beaten you at last.

-Sian, allow me.

0:57:580:58:01

-We've had an absolute ball.

-It was great fun.

0:58:010:58:04

Carol, I haven't said goodbye.

0:58:040:58:06

Get off!

0:58:080:58:09

It looks like victory has gone to Charlie's head!

0:58:090:58:12

-Come on, Charlie.

-All the best.

-Thanks a lot!

-Bye, girls.

0:58:150:58:21

Bye-bye, ladies.

0:58:210:58:22

ALL SAY GOODBYE

0:58:220:58:24

Come on, girls!

0:58:240:58:26

Don't leave us! Don't leave us!

0:58:260:58:28

-Come on, Sian, let's get out of here.

-Hurray!

0:58:280:58:31

THEY LAUGH

0:58:310:58:33

It's been fantastic. I've loved every minute of it.

0:58:330:58:36

-We've laughed so much over the past three days, haven't we?

-Yes.

0:58:360:58:39

It's been brilliant.

0:58:390:58:40

It is the battle of the broadcasters with TV legends Sian Williams and Carol Kirkwood joining the Antiques Road Trip. Helped by experts Charles Hanson and Charlie Ross, they travel through Essex and head for an auction in the Cotswolds. Along the way, Sian visits the oldest wooden church in the world and Carol hears about the heroic lives of World War I pilots, the pioneers of flight.