John Simpson and Martha Kearney Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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John Simpson and Martha Kearney

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. Journalists John Simpson and Martha Kearney kick off the series, travelling through Hampshire towards Itchen Stoke near Winchester.


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Transcript


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-The nation's favourite celebrities...

-We've got some proper bling 'ere!

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..paired up with an expert...

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..and a classic car.

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BOTH SHOUT AT ONCE

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Their mission, to scour Britain for antiques.

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All breakages must be paid for.

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This is a good find, is it not?

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction. But it's no easy ride.

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Who will find a hidden gem? Who will take the biggest risks?

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Got my antiques head on.

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Will anybody follow expert advice?

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I think it's horrible!

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-There will be worthy winners...

-This is better than Christmas!

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..and valiant losers.

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Time to put your pedal to the metal.

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This is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Breaking news - today's road trip

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features two heavyweights of British broadcasting,

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fearless journalists Martha Kearney and John Simpson.

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Are you terrified, Martha, to be with me?

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I'd be more terrified if I were doing the driving.

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We haven't stalled yet.

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Famous last words, John?

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-Oh, you found the indicator!

-I found the indicator.

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-No need for hand signals.

-No...

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-ENGINE REVS

-Reverse...

-Reverse.

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-OK, that was good.

-MARTHA CHUCKLES

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TIM CHUCKLES

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Oh, dear, their dashing 1961 Ford Zephyr was manufactured before

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seatbelts were mandatory, which is why our celebs aren't wearing any.

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And with two veterans of front-line reporting hitting the road,

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there's no room for small talk.

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What were you doing in Kabul?

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The first time I went I presented a Woman's Hour from there,

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which is very...

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-Really?

-Yeah, yeah.

-God, that's really good stuff.

-Yeah.

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-Where do you stay when you're there?

-I stay in the...

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What's it called,

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the big hotel, the one that's always getting attacked?

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-Oh, yes. Is it Serena?

-Serena.

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John and Martha are old friends from the BBC newsroom.

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I followed in your footsteps and put on a burka, but I always

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wondered how you got away with it, because you are quite a tall man.

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-Yes, I was.

-You in a burka must have been quite a sight.

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I was the tallest woman in Afghanistan. With the biggest feet.

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Speaking of which, multi-award-winning journalist

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John Simpson really will go to any lengths to get a story.

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He's been at the forefront of breaking news

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throughout his career, spanning the last five decades.

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Well, this is it.

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We're walking into Kabul city.

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Fearlessly confronting the world's most terrifying dictators.

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It's amazing the company you keep on trips like this.

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And reporting from the depths of war zones as events unfold.

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EXPLOSIONS

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He's in good company today,

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for Martha herself is no stranger to danger.

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I'll be reporting from Afghanistan.

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She was nominated for a Bafta for her work

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reporting on the Troubles in Northern Ireland.

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The guns are out and blast bombs are being used

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in places like here in Carrickfergus.

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Known for her fearless approach

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whilst asking probing questions.

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In essence, aren't you losing the propaganda war?

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I don't think we're losing it, but I think we've got to go out and fight it. Of course we have.

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Huh! Today, she's well-known for the incredibly popular

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World At One on Radio Four.

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Your programme is one of my absolute favourites.

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When I'm not travelling, I'm home mostly,

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so I can listen to whatever I want to listen to.

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Oh, well, that's lovely to hear.

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Armed with £400 each,

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how will this pair cope battling it out on the antiquing trail?

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Do you want to beat the bejesus out of me?

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-Well, you know, journalists are very competitive.

-We are a bit, aren't we?

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But in a way you have to have that competitive spirit.

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You have to want to be the first with the story...

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-You do in our business.

-Yes.

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Two such intellectual titans deserve only the most cerebral of experts.

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Auctioneers Natasha Raskin...

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We have got some erudite guests.

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..and, um, Phil Serrell.

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-What did you just say?

-Erudite.

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Astute, clever, intelligent...

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Come on, Phil, keep up!

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Yeah, keep up, Phil.

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They're powering along in a 1965 MG Midget.

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These are tiptop BBC journalists we're dealing with here.

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I'm in awe of people like that, seriously, because they are...

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-Risk-takers.

-Yeah, you know.

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You think of all the different things they've had to report on.

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-Martha for the peace process in Ireland...

-Your driving...

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SHE LAUGHS

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Watch out!

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SHE LAUGHS

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On this Road Trip we're travelling through Jane Austen country,

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otherwise known as Hampshire,

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ending up at an auction in the village of Itchen Stoke.

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Today's journey begins in Hartley Wintney.

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That's a cool car. I want to drive that car.

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I'm going to go and let Martha out. I'm going to get my partner.

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-Hello!

-Hello!

-Hi, John!

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I feel as though I've been in a can of beans or something.

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-Very nice to meet you.

-You, too.

-I'm looking forward to this.

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-How are you? This is exciting!

-Very.

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-Any tips?

-Well, the only tip I've got is to try and beat these two.

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He usually does!

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It looks like we've decided who is working with whom.

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Yeah, we naturally migrated towards the opposite sex.

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Boy, girl, boy, girl, yeah.

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-It's got to be done.

-We need to sort these cars out.

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-Yes. I quite like the one you're leaning on.

-Do you?

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I think that's quite cool. What do you reckon?

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Well, this was the first car I ever owned.

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I wanted an MGB but I couldn't afford it.

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-Are you going to be able to fit into it, John?

-I'm not sure I can.

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This could be good!

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-Only because you're so tall, that's all I'm saying.

-How nice you are!

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-NATASHA:

-Oh, no...

-I'm going to...

-It's happening!

-Aaagh!

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-Yay!

-Oh, man!

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ENGINE STARTS

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-Hey!

-REVVING

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You never lose it!

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MARTHA LAUGHS

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He's off! He's off!

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-He's dumped you!

-Yeah.

-That's not a very good start, is it?

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He's back!

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No, he's off again.

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-Shall we just sneak off? Let's steal the march.

-It's Brands Hatch!

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-Yes, let's steal a march on them.

-Don't leave me alone!

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If John ever comes back, our celebs are sharing the shop floor

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this morning in White Lion Antiques Centre.

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So, Martha, what's floats the Martha boat?

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I've got very wide-ranging tastes, actually.

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-I love Arts and Crafts furniture.

-Right.

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I've got a few things by the mouse man...

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-Yeah? Robert Thompson of Kilburn.

-Yeah. I love those.

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I quite like kitschy '50s things.

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So what we want is something vintagey kitschy

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that's Art Nouveau with a mouse on it.

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Exactly! That'll sum it up pretty well.

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Good luck with that, Phil!

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I wonder if John has such a clear game plan.

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Are you looking for anything in particular or are we just

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going to amble along and see what strikes us?

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That sounds terribly kind of purposeless, doesn't it, but it's

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my way of approaching everything, really - just see what there is.

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-Without purpose.

-Without any purpose whatever.

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So, with two very distinct approaches in play,

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let the shopping commence.

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Nice tache!

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How are you on boxes and trunks, Martha?

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-Yes, I do like trunks very much.

-Do you?

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Shall we have a look at that one over there?

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-Oh, and I like this, actually.

-Do you?

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What I love is the idea that somebody has stored things in this.

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And look at this beautiful, beautiful wood.

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The thing with trunks and boxes is, you get two types of trunks

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and boxes - dome-top trunks

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and you get flat-top trunks, and by and large a flat-top trunk is

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always worth more than a dome-top trunk,

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because you can't put anything on top of a dome top trunk.

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Oh, so this could be a coffee table or something as well as a...

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I can see that as a coffee table, a TV table...

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-Is it all the same piece?

-You're good, aren't you?

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-If you open that up...

-Because this seems much older.

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Well, what do you think that would make at auction?

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HE KNOCKS

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I would think about... 60, 70 quid?

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I think you're on the money.

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Its ticket price is £125, though.

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-So it's at least half, we need to get it down to.

-Yeah.

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It's the kind of thing I would buy for myself...

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Martha, if you would buy this for yourself, then I think...

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Let's just...leave that there.

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Let's go and have a quick look around and we'll come back.

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I like this girl, she speed-shops.

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Well, this is going swimmingly so far. How are their rivals getting on?

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I mean, this is my kind of stuff.

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This is a Candara carving.

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-So a Shia deity.

-Yes.

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And it's from Afghanistan.

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It may be, but it's also way out of budget.

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Natasha?

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I did clock something over here.

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And forgive me if I'm wrong,

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but I have a sort of vision in my mind...

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-What, this?

-I thought isn't that a very 1970s - a diplomat's item?

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-Did you encounter a lot of diplomats?

-I did!

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And this makes me think of diplomats maybe on their beautiful dresser

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they would have had this filled with ice, and a decanter by the side...

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-It's actually quite nice.

-It is quite nice, yeah.

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If my wife came back from a sale

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with that I'd be full of congratulations,

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instead of the usual, "Where did you get that tosh from?"

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I'd say that's a pretty big thumbs up.

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The ticket price is £55.

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-Nice and thick.

-They are nice and thick, yeah. They look good.

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-I quite like the set.

-I think you're absolutely right

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and I trust your instinct on this, if we can get them down

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to the kind of level that, you know, where we can sell them.

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Now, what's Martha up to?

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Load of cobblers?

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Straight from the serious business of shopping, eh?

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Perhaps dealer Jerry can help.

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What about that?

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-A blowtorch!

-It's a VINTAGE blowtorch!

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It's a blowtorch, Martha, it's a blowtorch.

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What does it say there? Primus or something?

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So presumably this is from the same maker as the Primus stove.

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-Yeah.

-And you pump it up...

-And then it blows up!

-Yeah.

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It's priced at £38.

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I think these are very fashionable.

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These kinds of things are coming into their own now.

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Worryingly, I'm not going to argue with you.

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It's the sort of thing that I would buy, but you've got to buy that.

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-It's only 15 quid. You want to bring that with you?

-Yes.

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Martha knows exactly what she likes.

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As does our Natasha.

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I don't know how you feel about jewellery, but I absolutely

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love this micro mosaic brooch - the bar brooch style.

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Really intricate, isn't it? Really lovely.

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And trying to theme it with your career,

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-it's got a sort of Moorish appeal to it.

-It has, yes, you're right!

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I know nothing about these whatsoever.

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I mean, who...who makes it? Where does it come from?

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Well, they tend to have been tourist items made in Italy.

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-Made for the tourist trade.

-Made for the tourists.

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And the Brits going over to Italy and coming back with

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-wee trinkets. Look how wearable that is today.

-Yes!

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That would jazz up this outfit instantly. Even yours, even yours.

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I think it would be good on both of us at three quid.

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-Yeah? Good on anyone.

-Three quid.

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-You think I'm a bit of a dreamer.

-Let's get that.

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Ticket price is just £6.

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This is the first test of John's haggling skills.

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Stand by.

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There's a sort of '70s glass set of six glasses and an ice bucket,

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and then there's a little brooch, very small brooch. Nothing.

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-You could throw that in and not even notice.

-Yes.

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Hm, smoothly done, John!

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The two items have a combined ticket price of £61.

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What would be great for us would be half price.

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30 for the two?

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Can't do 30.

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I could take a chance at 40, to help you out.

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Well, I would have said 34.

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36?

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-Well, let's say 35.

-35 sounds great. Thanks, John. Nice to meet you.

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John is no stranger to haggling, it seems, so that's two items

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in the bag - 30 for the drinks set and £5 for the brooch.

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Now, what has Martha unearthed?

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Goodness knows!

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-What have you found?

-It's this old...chair.

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It's a little bit...

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rickety, but there's something about the wood that I rather like.

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-You can feel that somebody has sat in that chair over time.

-Yes.

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Well, very often if you have a look at the back of these things

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it tells you more than the front.

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-And if you look there...

-It's been mended.

-That's been broken.

-Right.

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-And that bit of wood has been let in there.

-Mm.

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But this thing just wants a polish and some love, really.

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So, that's now three items of interest for Martha -

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the chair, the trunk and the blowtorch.

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Their combined ticket price is £338. Time for some serious negotiation.

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Is there any possibility

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we can buy the thing somewhere between £100 and £140?

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-What, all of them?

-Yeah.

-I could probably deal at 180.

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Hm... That's quite hard for us, isn't it?

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No, because we'd lose on that.

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I'd really like to buy three things here if we possibly could.

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It would be nice, wouldn't it?

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-I don't want you to buy things from here and not earn a profit.

-OK.

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-So, let's do the deal...

-Yay!

-..and let's get it done.

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-Thank you so much.

-You've been really kind to us, thank you.

-OK.

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-That's really nice. Thank you so much.

-Thank you so much.

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I'm delighted. We won't use the blowtorch on you now.

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-No!

-That was our secret weapon.

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Fantastic! Thank you so much. Pay the man, Martha, pay the man.

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Well, thankfully, Martha's charming smile

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and Jerry's generosity were enough to secure the blowtorch for £20,

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the trunk for 50 and the saddle chair for £70.

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Their rivals, though, have once again hit the open road.

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Is there one moment in your career

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that really sticks out as a particularly proud scene?

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There's one, which I've never really told anybody about.

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After Nelson Mandela got let out of jail in 1990,

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I started to get to know him a bit

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and he was very friendly and very, very nice.

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And then he was, of course, in 1994, he was elected president.

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And we were allowed onto the platform,

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-right beside him.

-Wow.

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And...

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Oh! I mean... I'm...

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It's a wonderful memory of a wonderful man.

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He looked at me...

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-and gave me a big wink and a thumbs up.

-Oh, wow!

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And I just thought, "Oh, life holds nothing better than this."

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That's quite a story.

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John and Natasha are on their way to Keogh Barracks in Ash Vale.

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John's no stranger to being a civilian on the battlefield

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and he's here to learn about some very different non-combatants,

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who played a decisive role in winning the war.

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OK, shall we?

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Let's do it.

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Today, they're meeting with Captain Pete Starling.

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Well, Natasha, John, welcome to the Army Medical Services Museum.

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Preparing for war involves a huge amount of planning.

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Incredibly, it was only after General Haig suffered toothache

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at the start of the First World War,

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that any provision was made for our soldiers' teeth.

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Prior to this, huge numbers of soldiers were withdrawn from battle

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due to teeth issues, so this wasn't a problem

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they could afford to ignore any more.

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There were thousands of soldiers suffering from toothache,

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broken dentures and were ineffective as infantrymen.

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And this happened right throughout the war.

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In the early days of the war, almost all dental treatment

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for British soldiers was carried out by civilian practitioners.

0:16:530:16:57

By 1918, there were 850 dental officers in the Army.

0:16:570:17:01

By the outbreak of the Second World War,

0:17:010:17:03

the Army Dental Corps had been established.

0:17:030:17:06

So 1939, then, the Army mobilises again, but there have been

0:17:060:17:10

great developments in the Army Dental Corps.

0:17:100:17:13

We had this organisation called The Field Ambulance.

0:17:130:17:15

This was the unit that treated the casualties,

0:17:150:17:18

as they came back from the front line.

0:17:180:17:20

Being at the heart of the action

0:17:200:17:21

left them vulnerable to attack and capture.

0:17:210:17:24

Like their Medical Corps counterparts,

0:17:240:17:26

a substantial number ended up as prisoners of war,

0:17:260:17:29

because they remained with the sick and wounded.

0:17:290:17:31

One such military dentist was Captain Julian Green.

0:17:310:17:35

One of those captured in northwest Europe

0:17:360:17:38

was this dental officer, Julius Green.

0:17:380:17:41

And he was captured at St Valery,

0:17:410:17:44

with 152nd Field Ambulance.

0:17:440:17:47

And, throughout the war, he remained in captivity.

0:17:470:17:50

As well as surviving the perils of the prisoner of war camps,

0:17:500:17:54

Green played a vital role in the war after a meeting

0:17:540:17:57

with a British commando that would change his life forever.

0:17:570:18:01

Now, in one camp he was in, he was taken to see a commando,

0:18:010:18:05

who was very seriously ill.

0:18:050:18:07

And this chap was working for the intelligence services.

0:18:070:18:10

And what he was doing, or what he had been doing,

0:18:100:18:13

is he had been sending letters back to his parents with code in them.

0:18:130:18:17

Green was asked to take over from the commando and become a spy.

0:18:180:18:23

He was taught a secret code to communicate with MI9,

0:18:230:18:26

who were responsible for aiding Allied resistance fighters

0:18:260:18:30

in occupied territories.

0:18:300:18:32

The code was hidden within letters to his parents.

0:18:320:18:35

The letters were then intercepted by the British intelligence service.

0:18:350:18:39

We've got here on the table a translation of how you interpret

0:18:390:18:43

the code here, which is quite difficult to understand,

0:18:430:18:46

because it's all to do with so many words in one line

0:18:460:18:50

and then you take the second word or the third word.

0:18:500:18:54

The code consisted of a grid system,

0:18:540:18:56

where individual letters or words could be picked out of

0:18:560:18:59

specific sentences to make up phrases.

0:18:590:19:02

Oh, wow. It's amazing. And quite interesting that you say that.

0:19:020:19:05

-It's... Yeah.

-It says "decoding the letters is quite simple".

0:19:050:19:07

-LAUGHTER

-And that's what happens.

0:19:070:19:09

But then, tellingly, "Once you know how".

0:19:090:19:11

-"Once you know how", yeah.

-LAUGHTER

0:19:110:19:13

Green proved to be the ideal candidate to spy on people.

0:19:130:19:16

As a dentist, he was asked to treat German officers,

0:19:160:19:19

as well as other prisoners.

0:19:190:19:20

And, as he wasn't a fighting soldier and had an affable bedside manner,

0:19:200:19:25

people spoke surprisingly openly to him.

0:19:250:19:28

The smaller one is a letter from the intelligence services.

0:19:280:19:32

-Oh.

-It's to his father,

0:19:320:19:35

telling him to ignore certain phrases in the letter.

0:19:350:19:38

that he won't understand anyway, but please don't question them.

0:19:380:19:41

Yes, yes.

0:19:410:19:42

So "please pay no attention to the reference

0:19:420:19:45

"to letters from Lorder and Philippa Outram

0:19:450:19:49

"and do not mention them in letters to your son."

0:19:490:19:51

It's quite a lot of pressure on his family. Saying here,

0:19:510:19:54

"You will no doubt appreciate the necessity for maintaining

0:19:540:19:57

-"absolute secrecy in this matter."

-Yeah.

-Yes.

0:19:570:19:59

You can just imagine how he would have felt.

0:19:590:20:01

He would have been shaking reading that letter,

0:20:010:20:03

thinking people were watching him.

0:20:030:20:05

-Yes.

-But, more importantly, what happened if his son was...

0:20:050:20:07

-you know, caught.

-Mm!

-Yeah.

-What would happen?

0:20:070:20:10

Incredibly, after all Green had been through,

0:20:100:20:13

he survived and returned home at the end of the war.

0:20:130:20:17

And, amazingly, went on to play yet another pivotal role

0:20:170:20:20

much closer to home.

0:20:200:20:21

I have a little bit of a secret to tell you.

0:20:210:20:23

-This is the man that my father used to call Uncle Julie.

-Oh, God!

0:20:230:20:27

There's no blood relation, but he was the best man

0:20:270:20:30

at my father's wedding and my father was the best man at his wedding

0:20:300:20:34

and Julius' son Alan was also a dentist in Glasgow.

0:20:340:20:38

-Completely bizarre!

-You've kept very quiet about that.

-An amazing story!

0:20:380:20:42

I didn't think it could be true, to be honest with you. It's just...

0:20:420:20:45

It's too bizarre, but my dad tells a nice story of, every morning,

0:20:450:20:48

Uncle Julie used to come down and do militarily inspection

0:20:480:20:51

-before they went to school!

-LAUGHTER

0:20:510:20:54

So, he must have been through

0:20:540:20:56

-so much in these prisoner of war camps...

-Yes.

-Yes.

0:20:560:20:58

..and remained a really light-hearted gentleman,

0:20:580:21:01

-which is an amazing story in itself.

-Lovely!

0:21:010:21:04

What an incredible man, whose bravery will have saved countless lives,

0:21:040:21:08

both on the battlefield and at home.

0:21:080:21:10

Back with Martha and Phil,

0:21:120:21:14

who are driving just under a mile down the road from their first shop.

0:21:140:21:19

Out of all the people you've met and talked to and interviewed,

0:21:190:21:22

were there any that you really felt nervous about beforehand?

0:21:220:21:25

When I was a junior reporter, I was sent to interview Margaret Thatcher.

0:21:250:21:29

-Yeah.

-She was visiting a craft fair.

-Yeah.

0:21:290:21:32

And my editor said, "Go there, ask a few questions about the craft...

0:21:320:21:36

"and then ask her about the teachers' strike," so I went, "OK!"

0:21:360:21:40

She was very nice to me at first and explained to me

0:21:400:21:42

-why she liked the Dartford Crystal or whatever it was.

-Yeah.

0:21:420:21:45

And then, I said, "And what do you think about the teachers' strike?"

0:21:450:21:48

And she GLARED at me with those bright eyes

0:21:480:21:52

and turned on her heel and walked off!

0:21:520:21:54

And I remember, I felt absolutely, you know, awful that I'd, er...

0:21:540:21:59

I felt I'd done something very wrong.

0:21:590:22:02

Something tells me Martha's going to have no problem

0:22:020:22:05

keeping Phil in check today.

0:22:050:22:07

HE SHIVERS

0:22:090:22:11

-Let's go.

-Oh, this is rather pretty, isn't it?

-It's lovely, isn't it?

0:22:110:22:15

Looks promising, doesn't it?

0:22:150:22:17

Talking about the shop?

0:22:170:22:18

Hopefully so, as they still have £260 left to spend.

0:22:180:22:22

-And how much is that?

-20 quid.

0:22:240:22:27

We can leave that there a bit longer, I think.

0:22:270:22:29

What about this vicious-looking fellow?

0:22:290:22:32

I can't imagine having him around the house.

0:22:320:22:34

-Well, that's 950 quid.

-SHE GASPS

0:22:340:22:36

I'm not sure there's anything in here for us.

0:22:360:22:38

-£950 for a stuffed fish?!

-Yeah.

0:22:380:22:42

So far, it's not looking good.

0:22:420:22:45

Now, I'm a keen cook, so I like these.

0:22:450:22:48

These are for kind of making little sauces and things.

0:22:480:22:51

I think they're probably French and you can pick them up, really,

0:22:510:22:54

for next to nothing in the markets.

0:22:540:22:56

-Have you done any of the celebrity cooking programmes?

-I have.

0:22:560:23:00

-How did you get on?

-I did Great British Bake Off.

-And?

0:23:000:23:04

-Won it.

-Ooh-hoo-hoo!

-Ooh!

-So what sort of cake have we got tomorrow?

0:23:040:23:07

-Ha-ha!

-Presumably, you've rattled something up for you?

-Yeah!

0:23:070:23:10

It's back in the car!

0:23:100:23:11

There are many lovely objects on offer here,

0:23:110:23:14

but there's nothing that tickles their fancy.

0:23:140:23:18

Ooh, lordy, where's Phil off to now?

0:23:180:23:20

The butcher's?

0:23:210:23:22

OK, the baker's.

0:23:240:23:25

HE SIGHS

0:23:250:23:27

And now the pub!

0:23:290:23:30

-Yeah.

-Really, Phil!

0:23:300:23:32

-I wasn't after a quick pint...

-SHE LAUGHS

0:23:320:23:35

-You say that!

-Well, yeah. I just sneaked off.

-He said he wasn't after

0:23:350:23:38

-a quick pint, but do we believe him? I dunno!

-Sort of moderately quick.

0:23:380:23:42

He does look a bit rosy-cheeked, the old rogue!

0:23:440:23:48

They picked up some great items earlier,

0:23:490:23:51

so rest up, chaps, there'll be more shopping tomorrow.

0:23:510:23:54

And nighty-night!

0:23:550:23:57

It's a new day and today's headliners are bright-eyed, bushy-tailed

0:24:010:24:04

and all set for reporting for duty.

0:24:040:24:07

-So how are you enjoying the shopping?

-Well, very...very much.

0:24:070:24:10

I mean, the thing is, I never go shopping for that kind of stuff,

0:24:100:24:14

so it's a bit of a mystery to me. I imagine you're more used to that?

0:24:140:24:18

I do like, um, poking about in old junk shops and antique shops,

0:24:180:24:23

but I've really enjoyed doing it with Phil.

0:24:230:24:26

I mean, he tells it like it is.

0:24:260:24:27

I go over and say, "Oh, these lovely saucepans!"

0:24:270:24:30

He said, "20 quid in France, don't bother!"

0:24:300:24:32

-Oh, good!

-So he's very direct.

-Yes.

-Doesn't try and nurture my feelings.

0:24:320:24:37

Yeah, that's our Phil!

0:24:370:24:39

With Natasha, she spots things that are just

0:24:390:24:42

sort of hidden by other things that I'd never even noticed.

0:24:420:24:46

Our celebs aren't the only ones enamoured with their pairings.

0:24:460:24:50

What I think is interesting about these two,

0:24:500:24:52

of all the people we've worked with and the rest of it,

0:24:520:24:55

-they've put themselves on the edge, haven't they?

-On the line, yeah.

0:24:550:24:58

-Martha in Ireland...

-Yeah.

-..John across the world.

0:24:580:25:00

But, yeah, they really...

0:25:000:25:02

-They know no fear.

-You know...

-Until they met you(!)

0:25:020:25:04

You know, being shot at, and all that sort of stuff,

0:25:040:25:08

-it just pales into insignificance...

-When you get into the saleroom!

0:25:080:25:12

-..to a mahogany chest of drawers.

-Ha-ha!

-Doesn't it?

0:25:120:25:15

Speaking of which, yesterday, Martha and Phil made a great team.

0:25:150:25:19

She showed a keen eye for antiques, knowing exactly the style she wanted.

0:25:200:25:24

I think these are very fashionable.

0:25:240:25:27

They spent £140 on three items in their first shop -

0:25:270:25:31

a brass blowtorch, a pine trunk and a Victorian saddle-seat chair.

0:25:310:25:36

John was mostly interested

0:25:360:25:38

in historical artefacts from his travels.

0:25:380:25:41

-I mean, this is...

-OK.

-..my kind of stuff.

0:25:410:25:43

He let Natasha take the lead on his two purchases, spending just

0:25:430:25:47

£35 on an Italian micro mosaic bar brooch and a 1970s hi-ball drink set.

0:25:470:25:53

-Good morning!

-Look at that!

0:25:530:25:55

MARTHA: I'll try not to crash into your car!

0:25:550:25:57

Ooh, I've stalled. Well, that's a good way of stopping, isn't it?

0:25:570:26:00

-You go and get...

-It's the only way to stop!

0:26:000:26:02

-MARTHA LAUGHS

-The only way to stop!

0:26:020:26:03

-Good morning, John.

-Good morning!

-How are you, my love?

-I'm very well.

0:26:030:26:06

-How are you?

-Lovely to see you.

-Isn't this gorgeous?

0:26:060:26:09

-This is exciting!

-Very!

-Yes!

0:26:090:26:11

-We're going to win!

-Let's go tease these two.

-Yeah.

0:26:110:26:14

-Good morning, sir.

-Hello, how are you?

0:26:140:26:16

-Very nice to see you.

-Hi, Tash, how are you?

0:26:160:26:17

-Are you well?

-I'm very well indeed.

-Good!

-Can I just say,

0:26:170:26:20

don't get too close to the enemy.

0:26:200:26:22

-The enemy?

-We're not the enemy. Look at us! We're all friends here.

0:26:220:26:25

This... This is a war zone.

0:26:250:26:27

Psych 'em out. Well, we...we've got the most amazing "objet", haven't we?

0:26:270:26:32

-Oh, yeah, stunning!

-Objet?! Oh, my goodness!

0:26:320:26:35

-We've just got a couple of objects.

-LAUGHTER

0:26:350:26:37

-'A bit more competitive this morning, I see.'

-Absolutely.

0:26:370:26:41

Back on the road, heading to Wickham,

0:26:410:26:43

and John is telling Natasha about his own fallout with a prime minister.

0:26:430:26:47

It was my very, very first day as a reporter.

0:26:470:26:52

My boss said, er, "There's a lot of stuff in the paper,

0:26:520:26:55

"Harold Wilson's going to call a general election" - it was 1970 -

0:26:550:26:58

"Why don't you go down to Euston station...?

0:26:580:27:01

"He's going to travel to his constituency. ..and just ask him?"

0:27:010:27:05

He comes down the platform, smiling at everybody,

0:27:050:27:07

everybody's smiling back,

0:27:070:27:08

so I stepped forward with my trusty microphone

0:27:080:27:11

and said, "Excuse me, Prime Minister,

0:27:110:27:12

"but, you know, I've heard of rumours that you might be going to

0:27:120:27:15

"call an election - is there any truth in it?"

0:27:150:27:18

I got as far as saying, "Excuse me, Prime..."

0:27:180:27:22

when he...went berserk, punched me in the stomach...

0:27:220:27:26

SHE GASPS AND LAUGHS

0:27:260:27:27

..and tried to wrestle the microphone out of my hand.

0:27:270:27:30

Hopefully, there'll be no such conflict at Warwick Lane antiques.

0:27:300:27:35

The money's burning a hole in my pocket!

0:27:380:27:40

Yes, me too, let's go spend it.

0:27:400:27:42

They've still got £365 left, so where to first?

0:27:450:27:50

-Shall we separate and, er...?

-Keen for a separation this early?

0:27:500:27:54

-Oh, no, no, it's....

-THEY LAUGH

0:27:540:27:56

-I'm up for that, OK, you go one way, I'll go the other...

-OK.

0:27:560:27:59

..and see what we come up with.

0:27:590:28:00

Natasha took the lead on day one,

0:28:000:28:02

but it looks like John's keen to branch out by himself today.

0:28:020:28:07

Lordy, what's he gone and found?

0:28:090:28:11

SIREN WAILS

0:28:110:28:14

IT WINDS DOWN

0:28:200:28:23

How about that?

0:28:260:28:27

I've started my own air raid.

0:28:300:28:32

-This is great!

-Isn't it?

0:28:340:28:36

Absolutely lovely. No home should be without one.

0:28:360:28:38

SHOPKEEPER LAUGHS

0:28:380:28:40

I'm not sure about that, but John certainly seems right at home.

0:28:400:28:44

It's kind of my... natural habitat, this, you know,

0:28:440:28:49

stuff from the Second World War, shell cases...

0:28:490:28:53

Actually, to be really honest, I don't have this kind of stuff

0:28:530:28:56

at home very much, but, um, it's the sort of thing I'm interested in.

0:28:560:29:01

Natasha's back to see how he's getting on.

0:29:010:29:05

-Mm-hm.

-There's a thing there, which is just up my street -

0:29:050:29:09

a letter to the German people from the British occupying forces...

0:29:090:29:14

-Mm-hm.

-..about how bad the war was

0:29:140:29:16

and how good the Brits are going to be to them

0:29:160:29:18

and how the Germans ought to be quiet from now on,

0:29:180:29:20

-handed out to, you know, hundreds of thousands of locals.

-Wow!

0:29:200:29:24

-That's just my cup of tea. I love documents...

-Yeah!

-..that are real.

0:29:240:29:29

John has found a British propaganda pamphlet -

0:29:290:29:32

translated into English from a German one -

0:29:320:29:35

that would've been airdropped during World War II.

0:29:350:29:38

Ticket price - £35.

0:29:380:29:40

I can't believe anybody else in the world would be interested in it,

0:29:400:29:44

-but, er...

-Oh, no, I think you might be wrong.

0:29:440:29:46

I have another letter to show you, if you want to have a look.

0:29:460:29:48

I think you'll find it interesting.

0:29:480:29:50

It sort of mixes wartime with decadent living?

0:29:500:29:53

-Quite interesting. Shall we have a look.

-That sounds like my life!

0:29:530:29:57

Nothing decadent about the letter's price tag, though, as it's just £12.

0:29:570:30:02

-It's such an unassuming little brown envelope, isn't it?

-It is, isn't it?

0:30:020:30:06

-And it's been sent to this hotel in a Yorkshire address.

-Yes.

0:30:060:30:09

-And the first telling sign of...

-From France? From Reims, yes.

-..excitement is "Lanson".

0:30:090:30:15

House of Lanson Champagne has been around since 1760.

0:30:150:30:19

It's one of Champagne's oldest houses

0:30:190:30:21

and has been the official supplier of the British court since 1900.

0:30:210:30:26

So a little touch of class and fizz.

0:30:260:30:28

"For the first time since many years..." Nice French English.

0:30:280:30:32

"..we find again the opportunity of writing to England

0:30:320:30:35

"and telling you how thankful we are to your armies

0:30:350:30:38

"for their magnificent efforts." Isn't that lovely?

0:30:380:30:42

And now, he's saying, "Despite the numerous and terrible bombardments

0:30:420:30:45

"of your towns, you and the members of your house are safe and well...

0:30:450:30:49

"Wines are in good condition. Stocks pretty fair.

0:30:490:30:52

"Vintages 1941, '42, will be very good."

0:30:520:30:55

The letter was written on Boxing Day, 1944, to a hotel in Yorkshire,

0:30:550:30:59

encouraging them to start buying Lanson Champagne again,

0:30:590:31:02

in preparation of the liberation.

0:31:020:31:04

-So, I thought to myself, as soon as you showed me that letter...

-Mm-hm?

0:31:040:31:07

..maybe we could put them together?

0:31:070:31:09

I think World War II ephemera, surely!

0:31:090:31:12

The two letters are owned by different dealers.

0:31:120:31:14

First up, it's Julia.

0:31:140:31:16

-Isn't this lovely?

-It's gorgeous, isn't it?

0:31:160:31:19

-It's just such a fascinating letter.

-Sort of a moment of history.

0:31:190:31:22

-Yeah.

-France just opening up again.

-Yeah.

0:31:220:31:25

-Did you have a figure in mind?

-We had £12 on it. I can...

0:31:250:31:28

-You wouldn't take eight, would you?

-Nine.

0:31:280:31:31

-Can we afford nine?

-NATASHA LAUGHS

0:31:330:31:36

-I'd be lying if I said no!

-OK.

-LAUGHTER

0:31:360:31:39

-I would be lying. What do you reckon?

-Yeah.

0:31:390:31:41

-I'd be happy with that.

-Well, thank you.

0:31:410:31:43

-Thank you. Thank you.

-That's all right.

-I'm really happy with that.

0:31:430:31:46

-I'm really pleased.

-It's a delight.

-Thank you so much.

0:31:460:31:49

So, that's one letter signed, sealed and delivered.

0:31:490:31:53

And one more to go.

0:31:530:31:56

Gil, I'm really interested in that little document there.

0:31:560:31:59

I love documents, I love this kind of thing.

0:31:590:32:02

Always, whenever I've been in the places where air forces have

0:32:020:32:05

dropped the leaflets, I'm always out there,

0:32:050:32:08

if I can be, you know, chasing around, picking them up.

0:32:080:32:11

Strong pitch, John, but how low is Gil willing to go?

0:32:110:32:15

I'll do it for 22.

0:32:150:32:18

I suppose, I ought to say, would you take 21?

0:32:180:32:22

I'll take 20.

0:32:220:32:24

-You're a great gentleman...

-Oh, really?

-..and I love you for it.

0:32:240:32:27

Good man, Gil! And, with that, their shopping here is complete.

0:32:270:32:31

Isn't it?

0:32:310:32:33

I have to say, I'm very sad to be walking away from the siren.

0:32:330:32:37

-You'd be amazed how many people have looked at that.

-I bet!

0:32:370:32:40

And it's only been in about four days.

0:32:400:32:43

I could do a very good price on that.

0:32:430:32:45

OK, so what was your full price? Ticket price is 290?

0:32:450:32:48

I could knock nearly a third off that price.

0:32:480:32:51

OK, so we're talking...?

0:32:510:32:53

-I'd knock £80 off for you.

-OK, so we're still over 200.

0:32:530:32:58

-And there's no scope for sort of £150?

-Oh...

0:32:580:33:01

I would do two for you, because I like John.

0:33:010:33:04

-LAUGHTER

-And I'll throw that letter in.

0:33:040:33:07

-Oh!

-Oh, so that's all in?

0:33:070:33:09

OK...

0:33:090:33:10

And that was originally 20?

0:33:100:33:12

-So he's...

-We could be saying 180?

-So essentially asking 180.

-Mm-hm!

0:33:120:33:16

-It's a gamble! It's a big gamble!

-It is a gamble.

0:33:160:33:20

Surely not for the man who's regularly in warzones?!

0:33:200:33:23

-Are you going to try it?

-Go on.

-I think you've got a sale!

-OK.

0:33:240:33:28

-Yeah!

-Brilliant, thank you.

0:33:280:33:29

-That's so kind!

-Brilliant.

-Thank you very much!

-Thank you.

0:33:290:33:31

John really has come into his own this morning

0:33:310:33:34

and found three items of historic interest for £209.

0:33:340:33:39

Meanwhile, Martha and Phil are back on the road again

0:33:410:33:43

and heading to Lyndhurst.

0:33:430:33:45

So you're an apiarist, aren't you?

0:33:450:33:47

That's a beekeeper to you and me!

0:33:470:33:49

Yeah, I was, I was given, um,

0:33:490:33:52

a beehive as a wedding present about 15 years ago

0:33:520:33:56

-and I built up to seven hives over the years...

-Really?

0:33:560:34:00

..and I, you know, I love bees!

0:34:000:34:02

I've got many, many bee-related items in my house!

0:34:020:34:06

-Old beehives, old skeps...

-Have you?

-..tablecloths!

0:34:060:34:10

Nature lover Martha is in for a treat,

0:34:100:34:13

as they're visiting a jewel in the crown of the south-west.

0:34:130:34:17

Covering more than 90,000 acres, the New Forest is

0:34:180:34:22

Britain's smallest national park and famed for its iconic ponies.

0:34:220:34:27

Ruthlessly cleared of its local population,

0:34:270:34:29

to create a playground for royalty, it is still governed by a unique set

0:34:290:34:34

of ancient laws handed down over the last 1,000 years.

0:34:340:34:38

To tell them more is Jonathan Gerrelli.

0:34:380:34:41

-Hi there.

-Hello!

-How are you doing?

0:34:410:34:43

What a fantastic day to be in the New Forest, isn't it?

0:34:430:34:46

-Welcome to the forest. Yes, it's lovely.

-And the ponies as well!

0:34:460:34:49

Yes, we have ponies here. They're here grazing away quite happily,

0:34:490:34:52

catching a bit of breeze and keeping the flies off.

0:34:520:34:54

Now, it's called the New Forest, but obviously, it's not at all new?

0:34:540:34:58

No, "Nova Foresta", um, but of course, it's not very new,

0:34:580:35:01

as you say, um... It was designated, created, became

0:35:010:35:05

a royal hunting forest made by William the Conqueror in about 1079.

0:35:050:35:09

With his royal capital in nearby Winchester,

0:35:110:35:14

the king made a controversial land grab,

0:35:140:35:17

declaring 150 square miles of land as his own personal hunting ground.

0:35:170:35:22

What happened to the people who were living here

0:35:220:35:25

when William the Conqueror decided that this was going to be

0:35:250:35:28

his very own playground, a hunting forest?

0:35:280:35:30

When he came here, there were already people living,

0:35:300:35:32

working, farming, keeping animals on the forest.

0:35:320:35:36

These once-peaceful lands became scenes of carnage and destruction

0:35:360:35:41

as the King systematically cleared villages

0:35:410:35:43

and burnt down churches to make way for his new royal hunting ground.

0:35:430:35:48

All he was interested in was protecting his deer

0:35:480:35:51

and protecting the habitat that the deer lived in.

0:35:510:35:54

Strict laws were enforced

0:35:540:35:56

and illegal poaching was punishable by mutilation or death.

0:35:560:36:00

After much discontent, it was eventually recognised that the

0:36:010:36:05

forest folk must be allowed some use of the land in order to survive.

0:36:050:36:10

So he created a number of very Draconian forest laws to help

0:36:120:36:15

control those people, manage this area.

0:36:150:36:18

A system of rights were established, which remain in place today,

0:36:180:36:23

allowing commoners to graze their animals on the land

0:36:230:36:25

but under strict supervision.

0:36:250:36:28

Whilst the majority of the New Forest is still referred to as Crown land,

0:36:280:36:32

it has not been used to hunt deer since 1997.

0:36:320:36:35

To carry out, and make sure those rules and regulations were

0:36:350:36:38

adhered to, he created the Verderers and the Verderers' Court.

0:36:380:36:42

They employed Agisters to go out and do the work on the ground.

0:36:420:36:45

And, because I'm a top-notch journalist,

0:36:450:36:47

I can see that you yourself are an Agister.

0:36:470:36:49

What does that involve?

0:36:490:36:50

Well, an Agister... If you look up the word "agist" in the dictionary

0:36:500:36:54

it means to take in animals for payment.

0:36:540:36:57

All these animals are owned by individuals.

0:36:570:36:59

We refer to them as commoners,

0:36:590:37:01

but they pay a fee to put these animals out here.

0:37:010:37:03

The Agisters collect that fee on behalf of the Verderers.

0:37:030:37:06

It helps pay the running costs of the Verderers' Court, pays my wages,

0:37:060:37:09

so I'm always very keen to make sure we get all that money in.

0:37:090:37:12

It all sounds still quite medieval.

0:37:120:37:15

It very much is, yeah.

0:37:150:37:17

Yes, it is very much a medieval system,

0:37:170:37:20

but it is very much relevant today and still in practice today.

0:37:200:37:23

It is these ancient rules that protect the forest

0:37:230:37:27

and manage the livestock, including the world-famous ponies,

0:37:270:37:31

whose ancestors have been roaming free here since the last ice age.

0:37:310:37:35

So how do you keep track of how many ponies there are here?

0:37:350:37:39

Well, all the ponies have owners, as we've said.

0:37:390:37:42

They all carry their individual owner's mark.

0:37:420:37:45

Every autumn we conduct what we in the forest refer to as drifts,

0:37:450:37:49

round-ups, if you like.

0:37:490:37:51

During drifts, the ponies are rounded up

0:37:510:37:53

and checked over for any health problems.

0:37:530:37:56

This annual event is governed by the laws of the forest,

0:37:560:37:59

all of which are upheld in the Verderers' Court.

0:37:590:38:03

-Right, come on into the hall.

-This is a very nice space, isn't it?

0:38:050:38:09

Looks pretty ancient.

0:38:090:38:11

You've got quite a few antlers on the walls here.

0:38:110:38:14

You don't have any spare ones, do you?

0:38:140:38:17

-She's good, honestly.

-Yes, very good.

0:38:170:38:19

Not on me at the moment, but I might be able to track some down.

0:38:190:38:22

Has Phil met his soul mate in Martha?

0:38:220:38:24

True to his word, John has managed to hunt down some antlers...

0:38:260:38:30

..so they're off to see a man about a deer head.

0:38:320:38:35

Just 30 minutes down the road near Sway, they're meeting Martin.

0:38:350:38:40

-Hi, there.

-Hello, how are you?

-How are you doing?

-All right.

0:38:400:38:43

-I'm afraid we've been calling you "Antler Man".

-You are, yes.

0:38:430:38:48

-This is Phil.

-Nice to meet you.

-Hi, there. I'm Martha. This is Phil.

0:38:480:38:52

-How are you?

-Good to see you.

0:38:520:38:54

-So you sell these things?

-Yes, yes.

0:38:540:38:57

They're cool, aren't they?

0:38:570:38:59

It's all deer by-products. Natural.

0:38:590:39:02

Obviously some of the deer have been culled

0:39:020:39:04

humanely as part of population management.

0:39:040:39:08

Unfortunately, the big one was hit by a car and we had to put her down.

0:39:080:39:12

Yeah, obviously a lovely set so we kept the head, basically.

0:39:120:39:16

We'd probably be more interested in the antlers, rather...

0:39:160:39:18

I think more interested in the antlers.

0:39:180:39:21

The skins are very pretty but, yeah, these are big antlers, aren't they?

0:39:210:39:24

Yeah, these are two fallow deer.

0:39:240:39:25

One big one and a medium-sized one and some little roe deer.

0:39:250:39:28

And how much do you sell these for?

0:39:280:39:31

The roe deer go for £10 each,

0:39:310:39:33

the medium for 30 and the big one for 60.

0:39:330:39:38

-60.

-What do you think?

0:39:380:39:40

There's choice at least.

0:39:400:39:43

This is clearly the most impressive one, isn't it?

0:39:430:39:47

I don't know what that would make at auction.

0:39:470:39:49

-Would that make £40-£60?

-I'd have thought.

-Would it make more?

0:39:490:39:54

I would say so, yes. I don't know.

0:39:540:39:57

-I should think you should get £100 for it or so at auction.

-Really?

0:39:570:40:00

-Yes, I would say so, yes.

-What about if we gave you 60 quid for those?

0:40:000:40:04

Say 65, yes? Is that a deal?

0:40:040:40:07

-I think so, don't you?

-I think that's a deal.

-Super.

0:40:070:40:09

-Thank you very much.

-Antler Man, put it there.

0:40:090:40:12

Thank you very much. Very good.

0:40:120:40:15

It may not be everyone's cup of tea,

0:40:150:40:17

but Martha and Phil are leaving with three of the four deer heads.

0:40:170:40:21

Back with John and Natasha,

0:40:220:40:24

and they're making their way to Winchester, England's ancient capital

0:40:240:40:27

and the former seat of King Alfred the Great.

0:40:270:40:30

I reckon we'll find it here.

0:40:300:40:32

John's got just over £150 left to spend in the Jay's Nest.

0:40:320:40:36

That, John, is bang on trend.

0:40:360:40:39

Even the colour of the upholstery, which is so ghastly,

0:40:390:40:43

is bang on trend, because it's Scandinavian, it's simple.

0:40:430:40:47

The chair?

0:40:470:40:49

No, I think it's horrible!

0:40:490:40:52

-Is that a fiver, yes?

-All you do is persuade me of two things.

0:40:520:40:54

One, I shouldn't be involved in furniture in any way.

0:40:540:40:57

And, two, I'm not really suited to the modern world any more.

0:40:570:41:01

Fear not, John, there's plenty more in here.

0:41:010:41:04

So we found this lovely wood block.

0:41:090:41:11

The Japanese are right into their wood block prints, aren't they?

0:41:110:41:14

-Mmm.

-I've been collecting.

0:41:140:41:16

We have about 50 at home

0:41:160:41:17

and I keep bringing them down but the best ones are at home.

0:41:170:41:21

-And this is one of your husband's ones?

-My husband's, yes.

0:41:210:41:23

It's another object of historic interest to John.

0:41:230:41:27

An early 19th-century Japanese wood block print

0:41:270:41:29

depicting a new year's ritual.

0:41:290:41:32

Got that lovely lacquered furniture

0:41:320:41:33

-presenting that lovely motif in the background.

-Mmm.

0:41:330:41:36

We've got these gorgeous girls.

0:41:360:41:38

We've got all these nice motifs,

0:41:380:41:40

so it all must have an auspicious meaning, doesn't it?

0:41:400:41:43

Mmm, a new year's meaning, I think, yes.

0:41:430:41:45

We know who the artist is, which is so important.

0:41:450:41:48

Its ticket price is £75, but will Jocelyn be tempted to take an offer?

0:41:480:41:53

-It's £50.

-I mean, that is a good price.

0:41:530:41:55

-Is there any scope for a wee bit of haggling?

-No, not on that.

0:41:550:41:58

I've given you the bottom straight away

0:41:580:42:00

because I know he had about 75 on him.

0:42:000:42:03

-Yeah, what do you think, John?

-Well, I love it.

0:42:030:42:07

It's the period before anybody had, kind of, quotes, discovered Japan.

0:42:070:42:12

It was a closed society

0:42:120:42:14

and would remain that way for another 50 years or something.

0:42:140:42:19

-Everything about it is beautiful. Jocelyn, 50 quid?

-50 quid.

0:42:190:42:22

-50 quid, OK.

-My husband will be delighted.

-Let's do it.

0:42:220:42:25

Thank you so much.

0:42:250:42:27

So that's their final item in the bag.

0:42:270:42:30

I'm really, really chuffed.

0:42:300:42:32

-Am I allowed a kiss?

-Yes.

0:42:320:42:34

What a smooth operator, John!

0:42:340:42:37

Thank you so much. Take care.

0:42:370:42:39

Back with Martha and Phil, on their way to Southampton,

0:42:400:42:43

the departure port for the Titanic.

0:42:430:42:46

They are visiting Cobwebs Antiques and meeting dealer, Peter.

0:42:460:42:49

The Ship Shop.

0:42:490:42:51

Do I have a sinking feeling or what?

0:42:510:42:54

-Hello.

-Hello there.

-Hi.

0:42:540:42:57

-Nice to meet you.

-I'm Peter.

-I'm Martha.

0:42:570:42:59

-I love all this marine stuff. It's terribly romantic.

-It is.

0:43:030:43:07

I went on an ocean liner when I was a little girl

0:43:070:43:10

and, ever since then, I really enjoy these things.

0:43:100:43:14

Martha still has £195 left to spend.

0:43:140:43:18

But what has she spotted?

0:43:200:43:22

Would this be called like a bulk-head light?

0:43:220:43:26

-Yeah, it's a ship's navigation lamp.

-Why do you like that, Martha?

0:43:260:43:29

I like these heavy industrial-feeling things.

0:43:290:43:35

I don't know, there's something very strong and interesting about it.

0:43:350:43:40

Martha is once again quick to find something of her own personal taste.

0:43:400:43:44

-So how old is that?

-Probably 1950s, 1960s.

0:43:440:43:49

-Peter, what's the ticket price on that?

-£45.

0:43:490:43:52

SHE INHALES DEEPLY

0:43:520:43:53

She's good, isn't she? She's absolutely on the money.

0:43:530:43:56

She knows very quickly.

0:43:560:43:58

She's also quick to spy another item of interest.

0:43:580:44:01

This I rather like. What period would that be from?

0:44:010:44:04

That's Edwardian. It's a desk lamp.

0:44:040:44:07

I had that on my own desk actually for a while.

0:44:070:44:09

My own taste, I prefer this one,

0:44:090:44:11

but I don't know which you think would do better at auction.

0:44:110:44:14

Well, like everything else, it's down to price, isn't it?

0:44:140:44:17

That one would be 35 and the other one would be 70.

0:44:170:44:21

If we offered you 50 quid for that one, you'd tell us to go away,

0:44:210:44:24

-would you?

-Very politely, yes.

0:44:240:44:26

-And what would you tell us to go away on this one?

-30 quid.

0:44:260:44:30

-For me, that's ticked the number one box.

-Yeah.

0:44:300:44:34

The number two box is I think that's a better buy.

0:44:340:44:37

-Lovely, OK, I'm going to go for that.

-OK.

0:44:370:44:39

-Is that a deal, 30 quid?

-Yes.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:44:390:44:42

Swift business, eh?

0:44:440:44:47

So, with her final purchase sorted,

0:44:470:44:49

time now to hotfoot it over and join John and Natasha for the big reveal.

0:44:490:44:53

-NATASHA:

-What have we got here?

-Golly!

0:44:540:44:56

-MARTHA:

-This is a ship's navigation lantern

0:44:560:44:59

and this is a vintage blowtorch.

0:44:590:45:01

Oh!

0:45:010:45:02

-Yes.

-For waking your husband up in the morning?

0:45:020:45:05

-Yes, exactly!

-NATASHA:

-Toast.

0:45:050:45:06

-MARTHA:

-Attacking the opposition.

0:45:060:45:08

-And then that's an old desk chair.

-Oh, yes.

0:45:080:45:10

Which is surprisingly comfortable,

0:45:100:45:12

and I thought that was almost like an old newspaper man's chair.

0:45:120:45:15

Yes, it is a bit, isn't it? Yeah, lovely.

0:45:150:45:17

And then, of course, the piece de resistance...

0:45:170:45:20

-Yes.

-..the biggest one

0:45:200:45:23

-was actually killed in a road accident.

-Oh.

0:45:230:45:26

They took the horns from it, and it's just magnificent, isn't it?

0:45:260:45:29

Yeah.

0:45:290:45:30

John, what's your sort of reaction to this stuff? It's quite different to ours.

0:45:300:45:33

-Really impressive, and I think...

-Mm.

0:45:330:45:35

..and I'm pretty certain they're going to win.

0:45:350:45:37

We went the kooky way, didn't we?

0:45:370:45:39

-NATASHA:

-Yes, you do the honours.

-There we go.

0:45:390:45:41

-LAUGHTER MARTHA:

-God, this is quite a range.

0:45:410:45:43

This is the propaganda leaflet that the British dropped over Germany

0:45:430:45:49

to say, "We're going to win the war."

0:45:490:45:51

-NATASHA:

-It's accompanied by this really interesting letter.

0:45:510:45:54

-Oh, this was sent in 1944...

-MARTHA:

-Oh, yes.

0:45:540:45:57

..to say, "Thanks to your wonderful armies,

0:45:570:46:01

"France is now liberated and we should let you know

0:46:010:46:05

-"that the latest..."

-NATASHA:

-Vintage.

0:46:050:46:07

"Vintage of champagne is really good, so any time you want it..."

0:46:070:46:10

-Oh.

-"..yours sincerely, Monsieur Lanson."

0:46:100:46:13

-How much was that?

-£29 all in for the two letters.

0:46:130:46:15

That is cheap.

0:46:150:46:16

I'm intrigued to know about your woodcut,

0:46:160:46:18

cos they can make a lot of money.

0:46:180:46:20

It's a beautiful little thing, about 1810, 1820.

0:46:200:46:25

Wow.

0:46:250:46:26

But then, our piece de...

0:46:260:46:28

-Can I just tell you?

-Can I do it?

0:46:280:46:30

-I love that. How much was it?

-NATASHA:

-It was 180...

0:46:300:46:33

-I'll give you 190.

-190? Deal!

0:46:330:46:35

-I'll give you 190.

-You love it.

0:46:350:46:36

I do, I think it's absolutely...

0:46:360:46:37

John thought it would be a good way to call his son to dinner.

0:46:370:46:40

-LAUGHTER

-It's the absolute business, I love it.

0:46:400:46:42

Do you know what we should do?

0:46:420:46:43

-NATASHA:

-What should we do? OK.

-Oh, yes.

0:46:430:46:45

-Let's go and...

-Yeah.

0:46:450:46:46

-..fill these somewhere.

-Shall we have a toast?

0:46:460:46:48

-Let's have a wee toast.

-MARTHA:

-OK. To the auction.

0:46:480:46:51

-NATASHA:

-To the auction, best of luck to you both.

0:46:510:46:53

-MARTHA:

-May the best team win.

-NATASHA:

-Yes! Thank you!

0:46:530:46:56

Hang on, chaps, before you start celebrating,

0:46:560:46:58

what do you think of each other's items?

0:46:580:47:00

-I love the range of the things they've got.

-Oh, yeah.

0:47:000:47:03

Especially the air-raid siren, hilarious!

0:47:030:47:05

Well, who could not of thought, "I want to own that"?

0:47:050:47:07

I could write a novel in that chair, I think it's absolutely gorgeous.

0:47:070:47:11

I'm not sure I would swap anything...

0:47:110:47:12

I like what we've picked, I do like what we've picked.

0:47:120:47:15

That'll do me.

0:47:150:47:16

-SHE LAUGHS

-Come on.

0:47:160:47:17

How very cordial!

0:47:190:47:20

Will the competitive juices

0:47:200:47:22

start flowing

0:47:220:47:23

en route to the auction

0:47:230:47:25

in Itchen Stoke?

0:47:250:47:26

-I don't think I'm going to beat you at the auction...

-Well...

0:47:260:47:29

..I think you're going to win.

0:47:290:47:30

I think those stags' heads are absolute winners...

0:47:300:47:34

I do think you probably had the most beautiful thing

0:47:340:47:36

-out of all our objects and that's the...

-Japanese...

0:47:360:47:39

Japanese woodcut. I, you know... I would like that.

0:47:390:47:41

That's something I can imagine at home.

0:47:410:47:44

Today we're visiting Andrew Smith & Son Auction Rooms,

0:47:440:47:47

where our celebs' wares are going for sale online, on the phone

0:47:470:47:52

and in the room.

0:47:520:47:53

Our guy with the gavel is Andrew Smith.

0:47:530:47:55

GAVEL BANGS

0:47:560:47:58

The deer antlers are quite magnificent.

0:47:580:48:00

Some people find them a bit gruesome,

0:48:000:48:02

but the actual antlers themselves are good quality items

0:48:020:48:07

and really of much interest to interior design people these days.

0:48:070:48:11

So, they should do well.

0:48:110:48:12

I think my favourite item must be the air-raid saxon.

0:48:120:48:16

It's a fun item and it's of local interest as well,

0:48:160:48:19

being a Hamble item.

0:48:190:48:20

-PHIL:

-How are you?

-I'm very well.

0:48:200:48:22

-Good to see you, Martha.

-Thank you.

0:48:220:48:24

-Door-opening service.

-Hello, my darling, how are you?

0:48:240:48:27

-It's all go, I'm very well. Mwah! How are you?

-Yeah, fine.

0:48:270:48:31

-Are you nervous?

-Uh... I think I am.

0:48:310:48:33

Despite having NO game plan, John did unearth items he loved.

0:48:330:48:38

He spent a total of £294 on five lots.

0:48:380:48:42

Martha, however, knew exactly what she wanted

0:48:430:48:45

and bought five lots that reflected her own personal style.

0:48:450:48:49

She spent £235.

0:48:490:48:51

-MARTHA:

-Good luck.

-NATASHA:

-Front-row seats.

0:48:510:48:53

Yes, good luck to you, yes.

0:48:530:48:54

Good luck indeed.

0:48:540:48:56

The first item is the brooch that Natasha found

0:48:560:48:58

and John fell in love with.

0:48:580:49:00

£20?

0:49:000:49:02

A tenner? £10, surely?

0:49:020:49:03

£10 I have, thank you.

0:49:030:49:05

At 12. At £10.

0:49:050:49:06

15. 17 we have now. 20.

0:49:060:49:08

At £20? Anyone else coming in?

0:49:080:49:11

-At £20, going the last time...

-GAVEL BANGS

0:49:110:49:14

-NATASHA:

-Yes!

-Oh, well, that wasn't bad.

0:49:140:49:16

-MARTHA:

-Good, well done. That is fantastic. That's very good.

0:49:160:49:18

-That's very, very good.

-MARTHA:

-That's you...

0:49:180:49:20

-quadrupled your investment.

-Yes.

0:49:200:49:22

-NATASHA:

-Yeah!

0:49:220:49:23

Cracking start.

0:49:230:49:25

Up next is Martha's blowtorch.

0:49:270:49:30

£20.

0:49:310:49:32

£20. A tenner?

0:49:320:49:34

-PHIL:

-Start the car, Martha, start the car.

0:49:340:49:36

£10, well done, sir.

0:49:360:49:38

15, yes?

0:49:380:49:39

-PHIL:

-That's good money, he's worked hard, hasn't he?

0:49:390:49:42

17. 17, is there any more?

0:49:420:49:44

All done at £17,

0:49:440:49:45

the very last time...

0:49:450:49:47

-MARTHA:

-At least somebody paid money for it,

0:49:470:49:49

I'm quite relieved about that.

0:49:490:49:50

-NATASHA:

-He did well for you there.

0:49:500:49:52

That's the spirit, Martha! Only a small loss.

0:49:520:49:55

Let's hope John's 1970s drinks set, a la diplomat, fares better.

0:49:550:50:01

I'm going to start the bidding at £25, is there seven in the room?

0:50:010:50:05

-Nearly there.

-At £25 and selling...

0:50:050:50:07

It does seem cheap, doesn't it? 27.

0:50:070:50:09

30, 32.

0:50:090:50:11

-PHIL:

-These people are blind!

-ANDREW:

-Is there five? At £32.

0:50:110:50:14

Come on.

0:50:140:50:15

All done at £32 then?

0:50:150:50:17

Last time at £32...

0:50:170:50:19

-Aw, there's no profit in that.

-Can I suggest?

0:50:210:50:22

-Can I suggest that on the way home you get a lottery ticket?

-No!

0:50:220:50:25

NATASHA LAUGHS

0:50:250:50:27

It's a profit!

0:50:270:50:28

-You're on a winner.

-They've got a bargain, though, they've got a bargain!

0:50:280:50:31

-NATASHA:

-You have!

0:50:310:50:32

-Martha, you're on my side!

-Oh, sorry, sorry.

0:50:320:50:35

Easy, Phil.

0:50:360:50:37

Will Lady Luck be shining down on Martha's bit of maritime nostalgia?

0:50:370:50:41

-I'm going to start the bidding at £50.

-Oh, yeah!

-50?

0:50:410:50:45

At £50 and selling. Is there five?

0:50:450:50:48

At £50. 55.

0:50:480:50:50

-Hey! There you go.

-60. And five.

-(Come on, come on!)

0:50:500:50:53

At £70, any more?

0:50:530:50:55

Last time then at £70...

0:50:550:50:57

-NATASHA:

-Oh, Martha!

-What a girl!

0:50:580:51:01

-MARTHA:

-Yes! Brilliant. Very pleased.

0:51:010:51:03

-Fantastic.

-Yeah, very pleased about that.

0:51:030:51:05

With good reason. Martha's more than doubled her money there. Good job.

0:51:050:51:10

I can see Martha developing a new career here.

0:51:100:51:12

LAUGHTER

0:51:120:51:13

Look out, Phil, the next lot is John's Japanese wood block print,

0:51:130:51:16

which he adored!

0:51:160:51:18

£40?

0:51:180:51:20

£40? 20 then?

0:51:200:51:21

-£20?

-What's happening?

0:51:210:51:22

-£20.

-Why...

0:51:220:51:24

-£20? £10 then to get it going?

-Oh!

0:51:240:51:26

-John!

-£10 we have, thank you. Eye for a bargain there, sir.

0:51:260:51:28

At £10, is there a 12?

0:51:280:51:30

At £10, and we will sell, make no mistake, at £10... 12.

0:51:300:51:34

-NATASHA:

-Oh!

-15. Suddenly we have an auction!

0:51:340:51:37

-NATASHA LAUGHS

-20.

-It's all go.

0:51:370:51:39

22.

0:51:390:51:40

-At £20, any more?

-It's beautiful, it's beautiful!

0:51:400:51:42

-At 20...

-HE LAUGHS

0:51:420:51:44

Eye of the beholder! At £20, any more?

0:51:440:51:46

All done at £20... Last time?

0:51:460:51:49

I think that was very unlucky, I think that was really unlucky.

0:51:500:51:54

-NATASHA:

-Uch, do you know what?

-Oh, well.

0:51:540:51:56

We put our name to something beautiful and with age to it...

0:51:560:52:00

I can't believe that people can't recognise quality

0:52:000:52:04

when they see it, no matter what...

0:52:040:52:06

-You know, it's...

-MARTHA:

-Yeah.

0:52:060:52:08

-But I mean, I suppose you see this all the time?

-It does happen.

0:52:080:52:11

Bad luck, John, somebody really did get that for a steal.

0:52:110:52:15

Next up, Martha and Phil went slightly off-piste

0:52:150:52:18

and came back with some antlers.

0:52:180:52:20

I'm going to start the bidding at £50,

0:52:200:52:22

is there five in the room?

0:52:220:52:24

At £50 and selling, is there five?

0:52:240:52:26

55, 60 and five?

0:52:260:52:29

70. And five. 80.

0:52:290:52:32

And five? 90.

0:52:330:52:35

-Yes.

-Yeah, you are doing... I knew it!

0:52:350:52:36

MARTHA AND NATASHA LAUGH

0:52:360:52:38

And £85. Still a good buy at £85. Are you sure?

0:52:380:52:40

At £85, and selling...

0:52:400:52:42

If you're all done? At £85, very last time...

0:52:420:52:46

-We're in profit.

-NATASHA:

-You still made a profit!

0:52:470:52:49

-MARTHA:

-I'm very pleased with that.

0:52:490:52:51

-NATASHA:

-That is two pretty healthy profits.

0:52:510:52:53

John, do you think you appeared with the wrong experts?

0:52:530:52:55

No, my dear, no, no, no, never!

0:52:550:52:57

Can I just get this in? Can I just get this in?

0:52:570:52:59

You don't think they were a little DEAR?

0:52:590:53:02

-NATASHA:

-Oh!

-MARTHA:

-Ooh!

0:53:020:53:03

He's on fire today. Good result, though.

0:53:030:53:06

John and Natasha loved their World War II letters,

0:53:060:53:10

fingers crossed the buyers do too.

0:53:100:53:13

Interesting lot.

0:53:130:53:14

Start me at £50.

0:53:140:53:16

£50? £50? 20 if you like.

0:53:160:53:19

-MARTHA:

-Who's bidding? Someone's got to bid.

0:53:190:53:21

£20? A tenner? £12, well done, thank you, and 15?

0:53:210:53:23

At £12 and selling, any more? At £12.

0:53:230:53:27

-At £12. 15 on the net.

-Oh!

0:53:270:53:30

-17. At £15 on the net...

-No, that was a no.

0:53:300:53:33

..is there 17? At £15 then.

0:53:330:53:36

The last time at £15...

0:53:360:53:39

Someone online has got a wee bit of history there...

0:53:410:53:43

-MARTHA:

-Yeah.

-NATASHA:

-..for nothing. For nothing!

0:53:430:53:46

Do you know, I...

0:53:460:53:47

They were two incredible finds of John's...

0:53:470:53:50

But there's still time for a comeback.

0:53:500:53:52

Next on the agenda is Martha's pine trunk.

0:53:520:53:55

I'm going to start the bidding off at £60,

0:53:550:53:59

-is there five in the room?

-Are you in profit?

0:53:590:54:01

-Come on!

-At £60 and selling, 65 at the back there.

0:54:010:54:04

-There we are.

-Yeah.

-70 and five.

0:54:040:54:06

80 and five.

0:54:060:54:08

At £80, commission bid, is there a five?

0:54:080:54:10

-At £80, any more?

-Martha, you are the cat that got the cream!

0:54:100:54:14

Look at that face!

0:54:140:54:16

£80, last time...

0:54:160:54:17

-Well done, yeah, yeah, yeah.

-NATASHA:

-Yes!

0:54:190:54:21

-Well done you, well done you, well done you!

-Love it!

0:54:210:54:23

-MARTHA:

-That's great, isn't it?

0:54:230:54:24

Martha's on a roll today!

0:54:240:54:27

But auctions can be won or lost on just one item.

0:54:280:54:31

Next it's her Victorian saddle seat chair.

0:54:310:54:33

I'm going to start the bidding at £20, is there two in the room?

0:54:330:54:39

-Yes, of course there is.

-At 22...

0:54:390:54:40

-Yeah.

-..25, 27, 30, 32.

0:54:400:54:44

-What? Who leaves £30 on commission for that?

-Here we go.

0:54:440:54:47

32 in the room, is there a five? 35, 37... 40, 42, 45, 47, 50...

0:54:470:54:52

Are you sure? 50.

0:54:520:54:55

-Yeah!

-And five.

0:54:550:54:56

At £55 and selling then, if you're all done?

0:54:560:55:00

-ANDREW:

-And it's 007 again.

-007! Bond!

0:55:000:55:04

-MARTHA:

-Oh, we love you... We love you, Mr Bond!

0:55:040:55:06

-NATASHA:

-He stole your blowtorch and he stole your seat, how dare he?!

0:55:060:55:09

I thought it was BLOFELD, not blowtorch, isn't it?

0:55:090:55:12

LAUGHTER

0:55:120:55:13

That small loss for Martha is good news for John.

0:55:130:55:17

It's the final lot of the competition, John's big gamble,

0:55:170:55:20

his World War II air-raid siren.

0:55:200:55:23

He could be up for a big loss, but equally, a big win

0:55:230:55:27

to put him back in the running.

0:55:270:55:28

No bidding from you now, Phil.

0:55:280:55:31

-Can I give it a whirl?

-You can give it a whirl.

0:55:310:55:33

Can I...

0:55:330:55:34

But I have to say this is...

0:55:340:55:36

This is only a practice, don't evacuate the room.

0:55:360:55:39

-NATASHA:

-Here he goes!

0:55:390:55:40

SIREN WHIRS AND BLARES

0:55:400:55:44

How good is that? I think a round of applause...

0:55:450:55:48

-The sound of the Blitz.

-NATASHA LAUGHS

0:55:480:55:51

Yes!

0:55:510:55:52

Well done! Well done.

0:55:540:55:57

Air-raid siren as ably demonstrated there...

0:55:570:55:59

-NATASHA LAUGHS

-We have a commission bid.

0:55:590:56:02

NATASHA GASPS

0:56:020:56:03

I'm going to start the bidding at £50, is there a five in the room?

0:56:030:56:06

-NATASHA LAUGHS

-At £50, 55, 60...

-Ah!

0:56:060:56:09

..60 and five. 70 and five. 80 and five.

0:56:090:56:13

-Commission bid's out.

-It's got a long way to go,

0:56:130:56:15

-it's got a long way to go, John.

-£80, £85... And 90? 90, and five.

0:56:150:56:19

-MARTHA:

-Ooh!

-100.

-We have three figures!

0:56:190:56:22

-And ten.

-Yes!

0:56:220:56:24

-120.

-Yes!

0:56:240:56:25

Ooh, this is tense, come on, John!

0:56:250:56:27

That's £110, is there 120? At £110, in the room then, and selling...

0:56:270:56:32

At £110...

0:56:320:56:34

-I love that.

-John!

0:56:370:56:38

-I'd have bought that.

-You did so well!

0:56:380:56:40

I really thought that that was going to go higher,

0:56:410:56:44

but at least you bought something you loved, John.

0:56:440:56:46

We probably need to go and do the sums, don't we, to see who's won?

0:56:460:56:49

-Um, yeah, it might take...

-I don't think we need to worry too much about...

0:56:490:56:52

-I'll get the abacus, you get the calculator...

-Come on, let's...

0:56:520:56:55

-MARTHA:

-I'll take my shoes off, count on my toes.

0:56:550:56:57

Let's go and have a look.

0:56:570:56:58

No need for that, chaps, that's my job.

0:56:580:57:00

Both couples started this trip with £400 each.

0:57:000:57:04

John and Natasha made a loss of £132.46,

0:57:040:57:08

leaving them after auction costs with £267.54.

0:57:080:57:13

Doesn't sound too bad if you say it quickly.

0:57:130:57:16

Martha and Phil, however, are the victors of this road trip,

0:57:160:57:19

making a profit - ha-hah! -

0:57:190:57:21

after costs, of £16.74,

0:57:210:57:24

leaving them with a grand total of £416.74.

0:57:240:57:28

All profits, of course, go to Children In Need.

0:57:280:57:31

-NATASHA:

-That was great.

-It was fantastic fun, wasn't it?

0:57:310:57:33

Well, it was real fun.

0:57:330:57:35

And, actually, I have to say, without being smarmy I hope,

0:57:350:57:37

that the most fun was being with you three.

0:57:370:57:40

-NATASHA AND MARTHA:

-Aw!

-That's really kind.

0:57:400:57:41

-MARTHA:

-We did have a laugh, didn't we?

0:57:410:57:43

Let's face it, I just lost money on the rest,

0:57:430:57:45

so there's bound to be more fun...

0:57:450:57:47

-John...

-Great pleasure.

0:57:470:57:48

-You are a gentleman, sir, gentleman.

-Great pleasure.

0:57:480:57:50

Thank you, Martha, it's been a pleasure.

0:57:500:57:52

-MARTHA:

-An absolute laugh.

0:57:520:57:53

-NATASHA:

-And thank you for your great company!

0:57:530:57:55

-Can I have a kiss?

-Of course you can. Mwah!

0:57:550:57:57

-John, thank you so much, that was wonderful.

-I'll not be left out.

0:57:570:57:59

-NATASHA:

-We're good at losing money together.

0:57:590:58:01

-MARTHA:

-Aren't we a bunch of luvvies?

0:58:010:58:03

-MARTHA:

-Cos it's not like this in the newsroom, is it?

0:58:030:58:05

-No!

-NATASHA:

-"Darling, darling!"

0:58:050:58:07

-MARTHA:

-Don't tell them!

-Who's driving?

0:58:070:58:08

No, when I see you next I shall blank you and walk straight past.

0:58:080:58:11

Yeah.

0:58:110:58:12

Really enjoyed it, I mean,

0:58:140:58:15

it's been such a wonderful contrast with the day job.

0:58:150:58:19

In three days' time,

0:58:200:58:22

I'll be in Libya covering the civil war there

0:58:220:58:26

and I'll look back on this with real nostalgia, actually.

0:58:260:58:30

I'm sure you will. Safe travels to the pair of you.

0:58:300:58:35

Award-winning journalists John Simpson and Martha Kearney kick off the series in style.

While John finds war-related items that remind him of his years on the front line, Martha scours the New Forest to find some objects for auction.

Their trip takes them through Hampshire towards a decisive auction in Itchen Stoke, near Winchester.