Johnnie Walker and 'Whispering' Bob Harris Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Johnnie Walker and 'Whispering' Bob Harris

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. Legendary DJs Johnnie Walker and 'Whispering' Bob Harris are the celebrity guests on the hunt for antique treasure.


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-The nation's favourite celebrities...

-Got some proper bling here.

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..paired up with an expert...

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What? What?

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..and a classic car.

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Put your hands up, girls!

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Their mission - to scour Britain for antiques.

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-CRACKING

-All breakages must be paid for.

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This is a good find, is it not?

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction...

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but it's no easy ride.

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Who will find a hidden gem?

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Who will take the biggest risks?

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Turn my antiques head on.

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Will anybody follow expert advice?

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I think it's horrible!

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There'll be worthy winners....

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This is better than Christmas!

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..and valiant losers.

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Time to put your pedal to the metal,

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this is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Welcome to a rocking good trip in the company of a couple of music icons.

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-I just like being on the road, don't you?

-I do actually.

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It's just the feeling of freedom.

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-It's not the destination so much as the journey.

-Yeah.

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Today's celebrities are Johnnie Walker and Bob Harris,

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esteemed DJs and friends who, between them,

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have been spinning records for almost a century.

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How groovy's that?

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-You know what this reminds me of a lot?

-What?

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When I first joined you on Radio 1, John Peel and I used to go off

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on trips round local junk shops and...

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looking for second-hand records.

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Meeting their heroes has certainly got antiques experts David Harper

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and Phil Serrell giddy with excitement.

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We're seeing these guys today, I mean, they're musical legends.

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-Truly, truly, yeah.

-Had influence on our taste.

-Completely.

-Yeah.

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These two super fans are driving a 1957 Ford Zephyr

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which dates from a time before seat belts were mandatory.

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-Uber cool.

-So cool it's unbelievable.

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Are they really going to be as cool as they seem in real life?

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-This is going to be interesting.

-Cooler.

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He may be right, you know.

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Johnnie was a budding racing driver

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before he began rocking the boat as a pirate DJ.

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'Johnnie Walker!'

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I think it's very important to have a personality.

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People want to hear somebody in the studio playing records

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and reacting to them.

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He eventually came back on dry land to join BBC Radio 1

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but he's been a bit of a rebel his entire career,

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always championing good music over playlists and formats.

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My older brother used to collect all these 78s,

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he'd forbid me from playing them when he was out.

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-He had Singing The Blues by Guy Mitchell.

-Right.

-And I sat on it.

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-Sat on it. Broke into bits.

-It broke!

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Bob played his very first Radio 1 record just over 45 years ago,

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although he soon became much better known as the face

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and voice of the ground-breaking Old Grey Whistle Test.

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Oh, that was terrific.

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His intimate style earning him the nickname Whispering Bob.

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Now that's heavy.

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So, who do you want to work with?

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I'm fascinated with the pirate radio of the 1960s, what about you?

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Well, see, for me, the Old Grey Whistle Test was just, you know.

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I love the pirate thing, you love the Grey Whistle Test.

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-Shall we do that?

-Let's do it.

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As well as their biggest fans, our celebrities will each have £400.

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-How are you?

-Hello.

-Great to meet you. Very good to meet you.

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-What do you think about this?

-This is really nice.

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-I think it's beautiful.

-But that, actually, that's the coolest motor.

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-Given Philip's slim stature...

-Yeah.

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-..you might be more comfortable in that one.

-I need a transit!

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THEY LAUGH

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-So we've got the cool car.

-We've got the cool car.

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Yeah, we'll rock it in here while you two go...

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Johnnie and David grab the MGB GT and Bob and Phil the Zephyr

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and once they've got past the autographs,

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I'm sure there'll be a lot of serious talk about tactics.

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When this comes out you're going to phone up Elton, Robert, you know...

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-And get them watching!

-..Macca.

-They watch anyway.

-Oh, good, excellent.

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Naughty!

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Today's trip starts in Crewkerne, Somerset

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and takes a rock'n'roll ramble around the southwest

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before arriving at an auction in Salisbury, Wiltshire.

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Back in 1700, this delightful town was the birthplace of Joshua Fry,

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the American soldier and adventurer who,

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along with Thomas Jefferson's father,

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was responsible for the first mapping of Virginia.

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Now, rock legends first.

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-It's huge.

-I know.

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How do you feel knowing that you've got to buy some stuff?

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-Does it make you feel a bit, "Oh, what am I going to do?"

-Yeah.

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Good, we're in the same boat, then!

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Just relax. Take it all in.

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John Peel used to have these in the studio, you know,

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-called his show the perfume garden.

-No, did he?

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Always had candles in the studio

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-and a few joss sticks burning for that effect.

-Oh, wow!

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-We're not going to buy any of those, are we?

-We're not, no.

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Hey, man, peace.

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Now enter Bob and Phil.

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We need something that says Bob Harris, don't we?

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Sounds like a plan to me.

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I like old signs.

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I was producing an album by a guy called John Golding in the '70s

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and when it was completed, to thank me, he bought me

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this big ticket sign which I've got outside my, er, my studio.

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-So anything that's kind of like that but vintage.

-I think that's new.

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If you look there...

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-Can you just see that that bit of cast is still in the hole?

-Yes.

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If that's been screwed to something that would've been knocked off.

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-That is absolutely right.

-Well, that's a pity, isn't it?

-It is.

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Meanwhile, the others are busy sorting out strategy.

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-Just have to knock them down a bit.

-Are you experienced with that?

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-Well, the car salesman years could come in handy, you see.

-Of course.

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And then I got the chance to go on the pirate ships.

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The garage manager, he said, "You must decide.

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-"Are you going to be a proper car salesman or a disc jockey?"

-Ooh.

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"I'll give you two weeks to think about it."

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I said, "I don't need two weeks, I'll give you the answer now."

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He said, What's that?" "I'll be a DJ, thanks very much."

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So far, they're not looking at much but that might be about to change.

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Do you know what it is?

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It's a cartridge case which my original assumption

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would be that this is for cassettes.

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No, no, I can tell you now if you were a big country land owner,

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massive estate, shooting hundreds and hundreds of pheasants,

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you would arrive on the day with a case like this

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to put your cartridges in.

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-OK.

-You put your cartridges in there like that.

-Right.

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And then as the day went on, you pull that leather up

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-and it brings the cartridges to the top.

-Wow!

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Now, there's a big but with this, OK?

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-In all these things, condition is imperative.

-Yeah.

-OK?

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This has been repaired along there...

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-it's got new corners on it.

-Yes.

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-And these straps aren't quite as old as me.

-No, quite!

-Right?

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If you look really, really closely at this,

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-look at the stitching there.

-Yeah.

-And look at that stitching there.

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-Completely different.

-Yeah.

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In perfect nick, without any problems or faults,

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-these things are worth 300-500...

-Right.

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-..£400-600.

-Right.

-Massively collectable.

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This has got quite an expensive tag on it anyway at £160.

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Well, we might be able to do a lot, lot better than that.

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-Do you really think so?

-Yeah, I do.

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There's a great thing in this business about upcycling

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and I'm just wondering if we can turn

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an Edwardian leather cartridge case

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into the Bob Harris bespoke cassette holder.

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Cassette holder, that would be good, wouldn't it?

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Let's consult our shopkeeper, Anthony.

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At auction, I think that's going to make 80 to 120,

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which is half the price you've got on it.

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-Mm.

-Is there going to be any room for negotiation?

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I can certainly contact the trader. I can't halve the price

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but that's probably what he paid for it at auction in the first place.

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If you can find out what the very best is, tell him we've got

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-a musical legend here.

-A musical legend, yes.

-A musical legend here.

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Strangely, our other legend has his eye on something similar.

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-Are you into shooting?

-Yeah, I am.

-Are you?

-Yeah.

-That is a good label.

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-"The Right Honourable Lord Raglan."

-Yeah.

-Wow.

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That's the original ticket, isn't it? "Pall Mall, SW1."

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-Yes, it is.

-A lot of money though.

-How much?

-140.

-140.

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Yeah, but you said you were brilliant at negotiating,

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I'm absolutely confident that you will get that,

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harking back to your wheeler dealer days, for a song.

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Get it?

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-What sort of shooting do you do?

-Clays.

-Right.

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-Don't like killing anything.

-No.

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-You any good?

-Yeah, I have my moments.

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-I was on one trap, when the clays go away from you...

-Yeah.

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..and I was borrowing my friend's gun and we were just having a go.

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And I go, "Pull." Blew the first one out.

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"Pull." Second. Third.

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By the fifth and sixth, I hadn't missed yet.

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There's people standing behind me thinking,

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"Who the hell's this geezer?" I got ten out of ten. My God.

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Impressive!

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-What do you know about Lord Raglan, anything?

-I don't know.

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I'd like to know more about him. He must be a local guy.

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Could it be THE Lord Raglan -

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the man who ordered the Charge of the Light Brigade? Time to talk to Tina.

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-I'm slightly drawn to this.

-Right.

-Not in a big way.

-OK.

-Yeah.

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Would you like me to ring the dealer,

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-see if I can get any more information?

-Yeah, why not?

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-And a price, a best trade price.

-A best trade price.

-Yeah, please.

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Meanwhile, we're still a-waiting news

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on the Bob Harris bespoke cassette case.

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Fancy anything else?

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-What I collect is buses.

-Buses?

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-Toy buses.

-Toy buses?

-Yeah, Dinkys...

-And you love those?

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..tin toys. Oh, absolutely. Yeah.

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I've still got some of the buses that I bought as a child.

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-So if we can find some toy buses, that's us.

-Oh, I'm there.

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Ah, wait a minute, wait a minute, wait a minute.

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Do you like those?

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The Routemasters - not very nice,

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but the two in the box at the back there...

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Are they nice, are they?

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The Original Omnibus Company buses, those two are sweet.

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But, I mean, I just like them,

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but I don't think they're of any value particularly.

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I think if they went in an auction,

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they'd probably get less than the ticket price there, to be honest.

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Oh, well. Tina's spoken to the chap who owns the gun case

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and he's come down to £100,

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but Johnnie's keen to exercise his car salesman skills.

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His name's Gordon Smith.

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Gordon.

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How are you?

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I'm kind of drawn to, you know, I love the number nine.

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So I've got 90 sort of in my mind.

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You've gone very quiet there, Gordon.

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Yeah.

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(95. It's 45 quid off.)

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-I do like it, I must say.

-Yeah.

-I do like it.

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We'll go for it, Gordon.

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I think they're GUNNA go for it.

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Now, anyone not on the phone?

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Tina, point us in the direction of a living antiques dealer.

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There's a lady here, her name's Jane, down the bottom.

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Right, Jane, we're coming to get you!

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It's all happening.

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Let's go and get Jane. Hello, Jane. I'm David, nice to meet you.

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-Hello, Jane. I'm Johnnie.

-How do you do?

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-So, Jane, what do you know about Scamp there?

-Not very much at all.

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-I think it's a pastel.

-Yeah.

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-So it's not a print?

-I don't think so.

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-He's quite a little character, isn't he?

-What a great name- Scamp.

-Yeah.

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-How much is he?

-It's gotta be worth a fiver, isn't it?

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The ticket price, however, is eight.

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Seven quid would do it nicely.

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You said a fiver a moment ago, he keeps going up.

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-I'm going up two quid.

-Seven sounds good to me.

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-Unbelievable!

-Yeah.

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-Have we bought it?

-Er, I think we have.

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I think we have.

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So it seems. Jane has something else, too.

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That is something I could put out for you quite reasonably.

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In other words you want to get rid of it. It's been around a long time.

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-No, I've only just brought it in, actually.

-Hmm!

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It's a bit of a lump.

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-Yeah.

-Needs rewiring which would be 100 quid.

-Made out of?

-Brass.

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No label on it yet, you haven't priced it up yet.

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-Date-wise, Johnnie, I'm guessing that's mid-20th century.

-Yeah.

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-So it looks like it's a 17th century piece...

-Yeah.

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..it's a reproduction.

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-Was it a good weight?

-It's very heavy.

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Yeah, sounds like he's introducing a record.

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If you used your fantastic negotiating skills,

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I reckon we'd bag that at a bargain. Over to you.

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Over to me. Starting about 12 quid?

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Er...

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-Say 15.

-15?

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-Could do 15.

-You reckon?

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-You've got to give me secret signals here, mate.

-OK, OK.

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OK, well, I'll have that, thanks. So we'll take that and Scamp.

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-Brilliant! Brilliant!

-OK.

-Johnnie, we're proper dealers...

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You're not supposed to be shaking each other's hands.

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-Jane, thank you.

-Thank you very much, Jane.

-This is more like it.

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Let's fill the MG up!

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After a slowish start, they've got three in the bag for £117.

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-£3 change there.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you, Tina.

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Now, viewers with a keen memory may recall that the ticket price

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on this was £160.

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I have had a chat with him since we spoke earlier

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and he said 120 would be, you know, round about his bottom.

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-It's a round-about bit.

-Yeah, that's...

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Can you do any round-about bit...?

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-Can we meet you halfway?

-At?

-100.

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-100 feels right to me if that's...

-OK, all right. I mean, I...

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Between us, we have that leeway so, yes, I can do that.

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-You happy with that?

-I think we're there, aren't we?

-Yeah, I mean.

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Sorry, I was a bit quick.

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Ha! There's a whole lot of shaking going wrong this morning, you know.

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-The deal is done.

-That's fabulous. I've even got some money for you.

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-Oh, do you?

-Pay the man.

-Yeah.

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-I think we've done well with that.

-I think this is pretty good.

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And out on the long and winding road are rivals Johnnie and David.

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The swinging '60s was definitely true,

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but I missed two thirds of it because I was out on the boat

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-on the North Sea.

-Of course, bobbing about in the ocean!

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Yeah, but we made up for it on our week on shore.

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Clubs like the Bag O' Nails

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and the Cromwellian Club where you'd see the Beatles and Clapton

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and people just used to go there and hang out together.

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It was a really great scene.

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Those two are taking a bit of a break from the shops

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and tootling from Crewkerne to Sparkford.

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Radio 1 DJs, people like Gary Davies and Bruno Brookes,

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-were all having their Porsches and stuff.

-Yeah, yeah.

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So I bought a Citroen 2CV.

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Well, our fans of cool cars should have a fine old time

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at our next destination where they've come to find out more

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about a diminutive British beauty.

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-Good bit of driving there, Johnnie.

-Thank you.

-Hello, Johnnie.

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-How very nice to meet you.

-Nice to meet you.

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Welcome both of you to the Haynes International Motor Museum.

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If you'd like to come with me.

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The Haynes Company made their name

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with their trademark Owners Workshop Manuals

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and opened this fine collection in 1985.

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But that is one of the most beautiful cars ever made.

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Indeed. But they've come to find out how the evolution of the small car

0:14:430:14:48

changed motoring and gave birth to a British icon.

0:14:480:14:51

Our story starts with this quirky classic.

0:14:510:14:54

-I'm sure you probably know what it is.

-Messerschmitt.

0:14:540:14:57

It is a Messerschmitt. It's a Kabineroller 200,

0:14:570:15:00

a KR 200 and just in case you were going to ask, it's got...

0:15:000:15:05

No parts from this car have come from a Messerschmitt plane.

0:15:050:15:09

-Cos the canopy looks like...

-It does.

0:15:090:15:11

It does, it's the same Messerschmitt, it's the same company

0:15:110:15:14

that during the Second World War made all the fighter planes.

0:15:140:15:17

Based on an invalid carriage,

0:15:170:15:19

the keenly priced Kabineroller was an immediate hit,

0:15:190:15:23

thanks in part to world events.

0:15:230:15:25

Is this a result of the Suez fuel crisis, 1956?

0:15:250:15:29

Yes, oil and then petrol, of course, was in very short supply

0:15:290:15:33

-and we were looking at rationing again.

-Right.

0:15:330:15:36

You know, relatively soon after the Second World War

0:15:360:15:39

and so onto the market from the Continent,

0:15:390:15:42

from countries like Germany and Italy came these very small cars

0:15:420:15:46

which were essentially driven with motorcycle engines

0:15:460:15:50

and because of that a lot of them didn't have a reverse gear

0:15:500:15:54

but also you didn't need car tax to drive it,

0:15:540:15:57

-you didn't need a car licence.

-So I guess in a way

0:15:570:15:59

that is the forerunner of the Smart car we know today.

0:15:590:16:02

-Yeah.

-It is.

-And, of course, there's one just there.

-Right.

0:16:020:16:05

-Mr Walker, would you like to try it?

-Please do.

0:16:050:16:08

Now, this is before health and safety

0:16:080:16:09

so if I can just keep my hand over that rather than...

0:16:090:16:12

-Just kick him in.

-I'd never drive one on the road.

0:16:120:16:15

Can we squeeze David in too?

0:16:150:16:17

-Ooh, hello. Are you all right?

-Don't worry, it's fine.

0:16:170:16:21

-Right...

-It's supposed to do that.

0:16:210:16:23

-It's even got more room than our little MGB GT.

-Yes.

0:16:230:16:26

-You've got enough air for about 30 seconds.

-OK.

0:16:260:16:29

But the windows are open anyway so there you are,

0:16:290:16:31

this is the full micro car, the bubble car experience.

0:16:310:16:34

The British Motor Corporation soon decided that they too

0:16:370:16:41

could make a little 'un.

0:16:410:16:43

One that was capable of carrying four adults and their luggage

0:16:440:16:47

and in 1959 their top designer came up with a Mini.

0:16:470:16:51

Alec Issigonis, he was given a very tight brief.

0:16:510:16:55

He had to produce a car that could fit in a box no longer

0:16:550:16:59

than 10ft, no wider than four and no taller than four.

0:16:590:17:03

The biggest thing that he did was turn the engine sideways.

0:17:030:17:06

-Yes, transverse.

-Yes.

-Why?

-Which had never, ever been done before.

0:17:060:17:10

-To save space.

-So everything about this car is designed to save space.

0:17:100:17:15

-And a very revolutionary constant velocity joint.

-Yes.

0:17:150:17:19

Oh, that was...! Are you called Malcolm?

0:17:190:17:22

I thought we were just going to talk about music!

0:17:220:17:24

Thanks to its enormous influence on car design,

0:17:240:17:27

Alec Issigonis's Austin Power-ed classic

0:17:270:17:30

has been voted second only to the Model T.

0:17:300:17:33

This car when it first came on the road was actually called

0:17:330:17:36

wizardry on wheels because everything in it was so clever.

0:17:360:17:40

Now, Johnnie, do you remember the day the Mini was released?

0:17:400:17:43

I do, I remember all the newspaper headlines.

0:17:430:17:45

It was a really big thing because it was such a revolutionary car

0:17:450:17:49

that nobody had ever made a car that was that small.

0:17:490:17:52

I mean, we've seen bubble cars,

0:17:520:17:53

hardly you can't really call it a car,

0:17:530:17:55

you know, you need a wheel at each corner.

0:17:550:17:58

Yes, and unlike its continental forerunners,

0:17:580:18:00

the Mini, with its nimble handling,

0:18:000:18:02

would dominate motorsport in the '60s.

0:18:020:18:05

-I mean, you could drive them really fast, couldn't you?

-Yes, you could.

0:18:050:18:08

-Look at Paddy Hopkirk, Monte Carlo rally.

-Absolutely. Several wins.

0:18:080:18:12

Sporting chic, bags of swinging endorsement

0:18:130:18:17

and even a starring role in a movie - it's no wonder the humble Mini

0:18:170:18:21

became a style icon

0:18:210:18:23

as well as one of the bestselling British cars in history.

0:18:230:18:26

So, if I was to say that I had the keys to a 1965 Mini Deluxe outside.

0:18:260:18:33

-Thank you very much, Matt.

-You're very welcome.

0:18:330:18:35

It's a lovely present, we really do appreciate it.

0:18:350:18:38

-Thanks a lot, mate.

-I hope the trustees aren't watching.

0:18:380:18:41

Johnnie, go for it. Yeah, great seeing you, Matt.

0:18:420:18:44

-We'll see you again sometime.

-Yeah, cheers, Matt.

0:18:440:18:46

-Do bring the car back.

-Yeah, bye!

0:18:460:18:48

Shall we have it?

0:18:480:18:50

-Let's leave the MG. Yeah, happy?

-Yeah.

-Good.

0:18:500:18:52

-Yeah, bye!

-Bye!

0:18:520:18:54

-DAVID LAUGHS

-We've got a little Mini.

0:18:540:18:56

I hope they're joking.

0:18:560:18:58

Meanwhile Bob and Phil are on their own journey through the past.

0:19:000:19:04

My dad had a Zephyr

0:19:040:19:05

and the thing I loved, I remember at the time, about this car

0:19:050:19:10

was the Americanisation of it that little bit.

0:19:100:19:13

You know, with the fins, you've got a bit of chrome on it,

0:19:130:19:16

the style, the two-tone.

0:19:160:19:18

-Yeah, Whitewall tyres.

-Yeah, beautiful car.

0:19:180:19:21

These two are making their own sweet way to their next shop.

0:19:230:19:27

The Dorset village of Yetminster was home to

0:19:270:19:30

Benjamin Jesty in the 18th century, a local farmer who

0:19:300:19:33

administered the world's first recorded smallpox vaccination.

0:19:330:19:38

-Hello, there.

-Hi, Philip.

0:19:380:19:40

We've got Whispering Bob Harris and Miserable Phil Serrell.

0:19:400:19:43

On the Dorset leg of their world tour, complete with bus.

0:19:440:19:49

-I like the sign up there.

-I love the sign up there.

-Nice.

0:19:490:19:52

-Could you carry that off?

-I don't think so, do you?

0:19:520:19:57

-They are always too small.

-They are, aren't they?

0:19:570:20:00

Suits you, sir.

0:20:000:20:01

-Ah!

-Also promising.

0:20:010:20:03

What do you think about this?

0:20:030:20:04

Yeah, clarinet, could you play that?

0:20:040:20:06

-No, no, I couldn't.

-Are you sure? I couldn't either.

0:20:060:20:09

-I wouldn't even know how to put it together.

-That might make two of us.

0:20:090:20:12

The greatest exponent of this for me was Acker Bilk.

0:20:120:20:15

-Stranger On The Shore.

-Yeah.

0:20:150:20:17

Ah, yes, the clarinet classic.

0:20:170:20:19

It's interesting because you can get really good versions of these

0:20:190:20:22

that are quite old, but this is plastic and it's made in China.

0:20:220:20:26

Oh, is it? Oh, it's still quite... It's substantial, isn't it?

0:20:260:20:29

I wouldn't rule this out at all.

0:20:290:20:31

-I like the musical theme for you.

-Yeah.

0:20:310:20:33

Well, it's £30.

0:20:330:20:35

It'll be almost embarrassing to try and get some discount on that,

0:20:360:20:39

won't it? We'll give it a go.

0:20:390:20:41

You could always threaten to play it, Phil.

0:20:410:20:43

I've just noticed, Phil, this rather lovely picnic set.

0:20:430:20:48

-We could have that in the Zephyr.

-We could have that in the Zephyr!

0:20:480:20:51

-It's the same colour scheme.

-It is, isn't it?

0:20:510:20:53

What, every colour scheme?!

0:20:530:20:55

The first thing to do with these is check

0:20:550:20:58

that the old Thermos is still...

0:20:580:21:00

-Oh, look at those. That's all there, look.

-Yeah.

0:21:000:21:03

Oh, yeah. It looks as if it's hardly ever been used.

0:21:030:21:07

Joking apart, we've got the Zephyr.

0:21:070:21:09

You know, there are people who collect classic cars

0:21:090:21:12

and this is a great thing to put in the boot

0:21:120:21:13

-if you're going out for your day in your classic car...

-Absolutely.

0:21:130:21:16

You know, take your tartan rug with you and picnic set.

0:21:160:21:19

That's good.

0:21:190:21:21

-Look, Sirram.

-Yeah.

-Sirram.

0:21:210:21:24

-Yeah.

-You're pretty much sure

0:21:240:21:26

this would be the original cup and saucers for it, which is nice.

0:21:260:21:28

Will it be both items?

0:21:280:21:30

However much I like the clarinet,

0:21:300:21:32

to me, this has got a much greater potential.

0:21:320:21:35

-Shall I leave the clarinet there?

-I think so, yeah.

0:21:350:21:38

So this is now a number one possibility.

0:21:380:21:41

It's getting there, isn't it, yeah.

0:21:410:21:43

Somehow I think those two will be doing quite

0:21:430:21:45

a bit of business in here.

0:21:450:21:47

-Actually, I must say, it rather suits you, yeah.

-Toulouse Serrell?

0:21:470:21:50

Please don't encourage him, Bob.

0:21:500:21:53

This is rather nice, look.

0:21:530:21:54

Oh, look.

0:21:540:21:57

-This is a fly-fishing box with flies.

-I think that's lovely.

0:21:570:22:01

Oh, it's beautiful, isn't it?

0:22:010:22:02

When would you say this was manufactured?

0:22:020:22:06

I would think that's probably 1920s.

0:22:060:22:09

It's that great British field sports age.

0:22:090:22:11

It's got a second little compartment here as well.

0:22:120:22:16

"Crawford McFall. April."

0:22:160:22:19

This is telling you the flies.

0:22:190:22:21

These are all the names of the flies. So you've got a Dark Olive,

0:22:210:22:24

a Gold Nibbled Hare's Ear. How does that grab you?

0:22:240:22:26

You know, I really would love to get this.

0:22:260:22:29

-I would as well.

-I think this has got potential.

0:22:290:22:31

How much is it? 140 quid. Whoa!

0:22:310:22:34

That is quite expensive, isn't it, £140.

0:22:340:22:36

That is casting your bread upon the water, that is, isn't it?

0:22:360:22:38

We're going to Salisbury for the auction, that is

0:22:380:22:41

a good sort of fishing area. I would kind of hope that it would work.

0:22:410:22:45

If we could perhaps just try and put a group of things together.

0:22:450:22:51

-So we've got this.

-Yeah.

0:22:510:22:52

We've got the picnic hamper.

0:22:520:22:54

We could perhaps find something else.

0:22:540:22:56

What though?

0:22:560:22:58

Something old? Something grey?

0:22:580:22:59

We've already said no to the whistle.

0:22:590:23:02

-I think it's probably from the '60s.

-I would say.

0:23:020:23:04

Not only can you drink from these cups, you can actually play them.

0:23:040:23:09

Well, sort of.

0:23:090:23:10

You've got six cups, sugar bowl and milk jug.

0:23:100:23:15

I think they are rather attractive. I don't know what it is about them.

0:23:150:23:19

And the price... £40.

0:23:190:23:21

That's, erm...

0:23:210:23:23

I could imagine somebody at an auction

0:23:230:23:25

really taking a fancy to these.

0:23:250:23:27

Portmeirion Pottery wasn't made in the famous

0:23:270:23:30

Welsh tourist village, but it was sold there.

0:23:300:23:33

The important thing is damage.

0:23:330:23:35

And if you just run your fingers,

0:23:350:23:37

very often, you know, fingers will feel damage before eyes see them.

0:23:370:23:41

-I don't think there's any damage to these at all.

-That's a good tip.

0:23:410:23:45

Does that mean we might be talking to Mark soon?

0:23:450:23:48

-We've got a £40 coffee set, we've got a £34 picnic set...

-Yep.

0:23:480:23:53

..and we've got a £140 fly box.

0:23:530:23:56

In my eyes we've got to try and buy them

0:23:560:23:59

for somewhere between, well, £80-100 if we can.

0:23:590:24:01

That is the cold light of day.

0:24:010:24:03

Whether he will or not, I don't know.

0:24:030:24:05

-What, all of them together, you mean?

-Yes.

-Blimey.

0:24:050:24:08

Gird your loins.

0:24:080:24:09

It would be lovely to buy them for somewhere between £80-90.

0:24:090:24:12

If we bought them for 90, we've got to sell them for about 110-115

0:24:120:24:17

-just to get our money back.

-Yeah.

0:24:170:24:20

I've got 210 on sale.

0:24:200:24:22

I can't really go that low, I'm afraid.

0:24:220:24:25

I couldn't see us going much over 100 quid for them, in truth.

0:24:250:24:28

-I'll do 110.

-OK.

-Yeah.

-Yeah, all right, then.

0:24:280:24:32

-All right?

-Yeah. You've got a deal. Good one, Mark.

0:24:320:24:36

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:24:360:24:39

So that's £55 for the fly-fishing box, 30 for the Portmeirion

0:24:390:24:43

and £25 for the picnic set. Not bad.

0:24:430:24:46

And now approaching fast at the end of side one...

0:24:470:24:51

Does it feel safe, Bob, with me driving?

0:24:510:24:54

-I do, Johnnie, yeah.

-Are you sure?

-Yeah, completely.

0:24:540:24:58

-Why, are you going to scare me any minute?

-I might just try.

0:24:580:25:01

THEY LAUGH

0:25:010:25:03

Night-night.

0:25:030:25:04

Next day, we're in Devon, down by the seaside, how lovely.

0:25:070:25:11

Look at that, Phil, the English Riviera, eh?

0:25:110:25:14

I know that Torquay is just seen as that

0:25:140:25:17

-but it is something else really as well.

-What is it?

0:25:170:25:19

-Basil!

-Of course it is!

0:25:190:25:21

Later, they'll be making for that Wiltshire auction.

0:25:210:25:24

But first, they're about to meet up in Torquay.

0:25:240:25:26

So, Philip, when I first saw him, I thought,

0:25:270:25:30

"There's a bit of an Elton John going on there."

0:25:300:25:33

-So now I call him Rocket Man.

-Yes!

0:25:330:25:35

You are right, though. Put a piano in front of Phil.

0:25:360:25:40

He could turn up and do gigs, couldn't he?

0:25:400:25:42

Nobody would know the difference.

0:25:420:25:44

Until he opened his mouth, presumably, Bob.

0:25:440:25:47

Fortunately he knows a bit about antiques though

0:25:470:25:49

and together the two of them have spent £210 on a fly-fishing case,

0:25:490:25:54

a picnic set, a leather cartridge case and coffee set.

0:25:540:25:58

Not only can you drink from these cups, you can actually play them.

0:25:580:26:03

Leaving them with just under £200 still to spend.

0:26:030:26:06

While Johnnie and David have parted with £117 for a chandelier,

0:26:070:26:12

a portrait of Scamp and a leather gun case...

0:26:120:26:16

-Are you any good?

-Yeah, I have my moments.

0:26:160:26:18

..meaning they have almost £300 at their disposal.

0:26:180:26:22

Right, are you off in yours and we're off in ours?

0:26:220:26:24

Yes, we seem to have wrong partners.

0:26:240:26:27

Bob, I'm going to deliver you over here.

0:26:270:26:29

Just over this way, Johnnie. There you are.

0:26:290:26:32

I'm driving today.

0:26:320:26:34

-I'm driving, right.

-I like being chauffeur driven.

0:26:340:26:37

-Well, well.

-We're off, we're off.

0:26:370:26:40

Whoa!

0:26:400:26:42

After that getaway, Johnnie and David are following the coast road.

0:26:420:26:46

Johnny, you're going to have to forgive me for quite possibly

0:26:460:26:49

a stupid question, but is your name really Johnnie Walker?

0:26:490:26:53

No, it's not. When I joined my first radio station, run by Americans,

0:26:530:26:57

they brought a lot of jingles from their station in America

0:26:570:27:01

and they said, "We want you to be called Johnnie Walker because

0:27:010:27:04

"we've got a lot of jingles."

0:27:040:27:05

I had a great one that goes

0:27:050:27:07

# Johnnie Walker... #

0:27:070:27:09

-So that was that, really.

-Dare I ask what your real name is?

0:27:090:27:12

-Peter Dingley.

-Peter Dingley's got a great cool ring to it.

0:27:120:27:15

-Really?!

-Yeah.

0:27:150:27:17

Whoever they are, they're heading for the delightful resort of Paignton.

0:27:170:27:21

-There we go.

-After you.

0:27:210:27:23

-Thank you.

-Not that they've got time for a dip.

0:27:230:27:26

-Hello, Pete.

-Hello, Johnnie.

-How are you?

0:27:260:27:29

-Nice to meet you. Very well, thank you. Peter.

-David.

0:27:290:27:32

Really good to meet you.

0:27:320:27:33

What have you got, then? Anything fantastic?

0:27:330:27:36

We've got a treasure trove for you here.

0:27:360:27:38

It's got to be cheap, mind.

0:27:380:27:40

Well, I'm sure a bit of the old charm would help with that, Johnnie.

0:27:400:27:43

-We want something special.

-Something unusual.

0:27:430:27:46

Where is your special, unusual stuff, Peter?

0:27:460:27:49

Well, if you don't ask.

0:27:490:27:51

What's your connection with cameras then?

0:27:510:27:54

I've just always loved photography.

0:27:540:27:56

You know, collected cameras over the years. Kodak Jr.

0:27:570:28:01

What's nice about that is we've got the original case with that one.

0:28:010:28:04

Oh, the little leather pouch?

0:28:040:28:06

Were you out and about in the '60s taking pictures of all the celebs?

0:28:060:28:10

Yeah, and I had a Nikkormat, which was like the poor man's Nikon.

0:28:100:28:13

I used to take photographs at gigs

0:28:130:28:15

and had a few photographs published in New Musical Express.

0:28:150:28:19

Tell me, how would that do in a auction, do you think?

0:28:190:28:22

Not well.

0:28:220:28:23

Because that brand, great brand, but they were the prolific makers.

0:28:230:28:28

This was the camera for everybody.

0:28:280:28:30

It is probably under £3, I'd guess, Peter.

0:28:300:28:33

In which universe?!

0:28:350:28:37

I'm not sure that went down well.

0:28:370:28:40

I could do that for £15.

0:28:400:28:42

7.50 would be quite good, wouldn't it?

0:28:420:28:45

It's so easy to make Peter laugh, isn't it?

0:28:450:28:48

Yes, exactly. Just hammer his prices, he loves it.

0:28:480:28:51

Or I'll cry, let's be honest.

0:28:510:28:54

-What did we get to?

-7.50. That's over double what you offered.

0:28:540:28:57

-He's offered over double what I offered.

-We've doubled our offer.

0:28:570:29:00

-I can't believe we did that.

-No, neither can Peter.

0:29:000:29:03

-We're getting close to being ejected here.

-You are, yeah.

0:29:030:29:06

-Do you think?

-Yeah.

0:29:060:29:08

I tell you what might be interesting,

0:29:080:29:11

you get closer to Peter.

0:29:110:29:12

-Johnnie's offer was 7.50.

-I can't do it.

0:29:140:29:17

What could you do?

0:29:170:29:19

Because you're such a legend...

0:29:200:29:23

Yeah.

0:29:240:29:26

I suppose I could do it for 12.50.

0:29:260:29:28

All right, then, 12 quid.

0:29:280:29:31

12.50!

0:29:320:29:34

-That's it.

-You got to give him his 50p.

0:29:340:29:37

I'm sure I can find 50p.

0:29:370:29:39

Shall we do that. Peter, I'm so sorry about Johnnie Walker.

0:29:390:29:43

I think Peter's given them a very good deal there.

0:29:450:29:47

Quick, pay the man before he changes his mind.

0:29:470:29:50

Johnnie Walker, quickly!

0:29:500:29:53

Jump in. I'll throw you the camera.

0:29:540:29:56

Meanwhile, with Whispering Bob and the Rocket Man,

0:30:020:30:05

the grilling goes on.

0:30:050:30:07

Where does Whispering Bob come from?

0:30:070:30:10

It was coined by a journalist, on Melody Maker,

0:30:100:30:13

when I first started doing the Old Grey Whistle Test.

0:30:130:30:15

-Are you proud of it?

-I am. It's distinctive, you know?

0:30:150:30:18

-There are millions of Bobs in the world.

-There is only

0:30:180:30:20

-one Whispering Bob.

-There are not many Whispering Bobs.

0:30:200:30:22

Only one Whispering Bob.

0:30:220:30:24

Those two are journeying towards Dartington

0:30:240:30:27

where, in the 1920s, an American heiress began a revolution

0:30:270:30:31

in both farming and education.

0:30:310:30:33

Philip, Bob,

0:30:350:30:36

-welcome to Dartington.

-And you are Celia.

-I am Celia.

0:30:360:30:40

-Celia, this is very special.

-It's very beautiful, isn't it?

0:30:400:30:43

This is the medieval courtyard, 15th century.

0:30:430:30:46

But completely transformed by Dorothy Elmhirst.

0:30:460:30:48

Would you be kind enough to show us around?

0:30:480:30:51

-I'd love to.

-OK.

0:30:510:30:54

Dorothy Whitney was fabulously wealthy and determined to

0:30:550:30:59

spend her fortune on furthering the progressive causes she believed in.

0:30:590:31:03

She met her second husband, Leonard, the farmer son

0:31:030:31:07

of an English parson in 1919.

0:31:070:31:10

Together they established a centre for their ideas

0:31:100:31:13

and moved to the Devon countryside.

0:31:130:31:15

He realised there were different ways that you could do agriculture.

0:31:150:31:19

There was something lacking in the British education system.

0:31:190:31:22

She knew that the things needed to move on from Victoriana,

0:31:220:31:26

if you like.

0:31:260:31:27

So they then discover they had an opportunity together to make

0:31:270:31:31

something very special and they came here to do it.

0:31:310:31:34

What condition was the estate in when they got here?

0:31:340:31:36

It was completely ruined. There was one farmer living here.

0:31:360:31:41

The courtyard was a farmyard and they restored the building

0:31:410:31:46

and added to it.

0:31:460:31:48

If you want to come with me, I'll show you some of it.

0:31:480:31:50

Oh, yes, we really would.

0:31:500:31:52

The couple spent millions over the next few years,

0:31:520:31:55

providing a huge boost to the local economy.

0:31:550:31:58

They set up farming and forestry products

0:31:580:32:00

and in 1926 established a co-educational boarding school.

0:32:000:32:04

What would it have been like

0:32:040:32:06

building this up from the ground, really?

0:32:060:32:09

It was a busy and building community

0:32:090:32:13

of so many different kinds of people and interests.

0:32:130:32:15

That is what they fostered.

0:32:150:32:17

They started a new school because they knew that schooling

0:32:170:32:20

methods that existed didn't work for all children.

0:32:200:32:23

They just got on with it and

0:32:230:32:25

started a school that transformed the way that we are all taught now.

0:32:250:32:30

With no prefects, uniforms or punishment,

0:32:300:32:33

the Dartington School was extremely advanced.

0:32:330:32:36

The children here spent less time in the classroom

0:32:360:32:39

and learnt instead whilst working on the estate.

0:32:390:32:42

That belief that you could teach people of the future,

0:32:420:32:46

that you could welcome the writers of the welfare state here to

0:32:460:32:51

write the Labour Party manifesto in 1945, that you could mix

0:32:510:32:56

work on the land with art.

0:32:560:32:58

And all of those things melded together.

0:32:580:33:01

The arts were at the core of the Dartington experiment.

0:33:010:33:05

Many outstanding figures were attracted to the hall.

0:33:050:33:08

That influx was given greater impetus during the '30s and '40s.

0:33:080:33:12

Some of the most famous artists of the time came

0:33:120:33:16

and inhabited rooms around the courtyard and did their work.

0:33:160:33:20

In particular it attracted artists from Europe who are being

0:33:200:33:24

persecuted prior to the Second World War.

0:33:240:33:28

These were people who were dancers, painters, sculptors

0:33:280:33:32

and they were welcomed in here by the Elmhirsts,

0:33:320:33:34

but also by the local community.

0:33:340:33:37

They brought with them a whole new way of being

0:33:370:33:41

and that legacy lasts today.

0:33:410:33:44

Nowadays, Dartington is famous for its international summer school -

0:33:440:33:47

a unique music event -

0:33:470:33:50

as well as hosting several other educational programmes.

0:33:500:33:53

They had a big vision,

0:33:530:33:55

but I think they would have been surprised and largely impressed

0:33:550:33:59

to see that, 40-odd years later,

0:33:590:34:01

it was still doing so many of the things that they had started,

0:34:010:34:05

still experimenting and still trying to be relevant,

0:34:050:34:08

still trying to do things differently.

0:34:080:34:11

The Elmhirsts' vision has become a charitable trust,

0:34:110:34:15

specialising in the arts, sustainable agriculture and social justice.

0:34:150:34:19

I think towards the end of their lives, they could also see

0:34:190:34:22

that they had created something which might not be able to continue

0:34:220:34:27

because it needed too much money.

0:34:270:34:29

It needed too much of the money that Dorothy brought with her,

0:34:290:34:33

which was now running out.

0:34:330:34:35

That has been the constant challenge ever since,

0:34:350:34:37

to maintain the legacy but to find a way to do it

0:34:370:34:40

that will work for today and for future generations.

0:34:400:34:45

Now, this is the sort of place a pirate might warm to.

0:34:500:34:54

Johnnie and David have returned the route towards Torbay

0:34:540:34:58

and the harbour town of Brixham, famed for fishing,

0:34:580:35:01

smuggling and also an annual pirate festival.

0:35:010:35:04

Probably very few of them as authentic as our Johnnie.

0:35:040:35:08

David, I've got to say,

0:35:080:35:10

I'm not feeling hugely confident in what we've got.

0:35:100:35:14

I'm hoping this final shop,

0:35:140:35:16

we're going to find something really special.

0:35:160:35:18

You want to go for the killer object.

0:35:180:35:21

Blimey, pirates lacking confidence, surely not.

0:35:210:35:27

-I love this.

-I love that.

0:35:270:35:29

-It's very trendy.

-Hello, John.

-Hello, there.

0:35:290:35:32

-How are you?

-I'm all right, fine. How are you?

0:35:320:35:35

-Very well indeed.

-David Harper.

-Hello, David.

0:35:350:35:38

I'm liking the pirate scarf there.

0:35:380:35:41

It's a nautical look.

0:35:410:35:42

Yes, the captain has plenty of cargo in here.

0:35:420:35:46

Johnnie, did you use telescopes on Radio Caroline?

0:35:460:35:49

-No, we didn't.

-Looking for girls on shore.

0:35:490:35:52

No, they used to come out for us, we didn't need a telescope.

0:35:520:35:57

Hey, let's have a closer peek on the poop deck, eh?

0:35:570:36:00

This is off the camera from when she was broken up.

0:36:000:36:03

-So these are the real thing?

-These are the real thing.

0:36:030:36:06

They've taken out the original glass that was in them

0:36:060:36:09

and now made them into good quality mirrors.

0:36:090:36:11

-How many portholes were taken off?

-God knows.

0:36:130:36:16

-I like the fact it is all about recycling.

-Yeah.

0:36:160:36:19

-That is very eco-friendly.

-Yes, people like that.

-Yes, it's good.

0:36:190:36:22

What worries me is the fact that we don't know how many

0:36:220:36:25

are on the market. How long have you been selling them for?

0:36:250:36:28

About two years.

0:36:280:36:30

-Does it open up as well? Is that what you're going to do?

-Yeah.

0:36:300:36:33

Could a bit of ocean liner be the killer buy they're after?

0:36:330:36:37

The ticket price however is £195.

0:36:370:36:40

What is the trade in these?

0:36:400:36:43

-The very best, seriously, 120.

-Wow.

0:36:430:36:47

What is the best, John?

0:36:480:36:50

-It's going to break my heart, this.

-We'll be gentle with you.

-£90.

0:36:500:36:54

-OK.

-Right.

-Very best.

0:36:540:36:56

Now, it's been a long time since we heard from their rivals.

0:36:580:37:02

If you could have played in any band,

0:37:020:37:04

which band would you have played in?

0:37:040:37:06

-Oh, wow. Probably Led Zeppelin.

-Really?

-What would you have done?

0:37:060:37:10

Guitar, drums?

0:37:100:37:11

Yeah, I would have replaced Jimmy Page.

0:37:110:37:14

-I would have been much better than him.

-I have heard that.

0:37:140:37:17

Personally I'm more of a triangle or tambourine man myself.

0:37:170:37:20

-J Arthur Rank on gong.

-Absolutely right.

0:37:200:37:24

Those two are breezing the Zephyr towards the coast

0:37:240:37:27

for a last look-see around the antique shops of Paignton.

0:37:270:37:30

-Good afternoon.

-Good afternoon.

-You must be Richard.

-I am.

0:37:300:37:34

-I'm Bob.

-Hello, Bob. Nice to meet you.

-Good to meet you.

0:37:340:37:37

-This is Philip.

-Philip. How are you?

-Hello, Philip.

-Good to see you.

0:37:370:37:41

-And you.

-This looks as new as a pin here. The shop, I mean.

0:37:410:37:44

Yeah, thankfully not the contents.

0:37:440:37:46

-What's the cheapest thing in the shop?

-Cheapest thing in the shop?

0:37:460:37:49

-Probably me.

-Really?

-Ha-ha!

-I'm not sure that would be practical.

0:37:490:37:54

Anyway, Phil's spotted something a bit smaller.

0:37:540:37:57

That's interesting, Bob, look.

0:37:570:37:59

Hasn't travelled far either.

0:37:590:38:01

My mum had something very similar to this actually.

0:38:010:38:05

-Everybody's mum had something similar.

-Yeah.

-That is Torquay ware.

0:38:050:38:10

OK? So this is a mid-20th century equivalent of a stick of rock!

0:38:100:38:14

-This is rather attractive.

-I think this is really, really undervalued.

0:38:140:38:19

I like the motto - may you live as long as you want,

0:38:190:38:22

and never want as long as you live.

0:38:220:38:24

-That'll do, won't it?

-Or, as another famous Bob once sang,

0:38:240:38:29

# May you stay forever young. #

0:38:290:38:31

Meanwhile, back in Brixham...

0:38:310:38:34

-What about an original gunpowder barrel?

-Really?

0:38:340:38:38

It's got the broad arrow on it.

0:38:380:38:41

-Oh, he's got the military stamp on there, look.

-MoD stamp.

0:38:410:38:45

It's probably going to be about 1850.

0:38:450:38:48

So, what would you do with that now? The natural thing to do...

0:38:480:38:51

You could put a glass top on it.

0:38:510:38:54

-Make it into a coffee table.

-Yeah.

0:38:540:38:57

-I'm a massive fan of Hornblower books.

-Yeah.

0:38:570:39:00

I love all the stories about old, tall-masted sailing ships.

0:39:000:39:03

And look at the name. What is this?

0:39:030:39:06

The Fighting Temeraire Antique Shop, isn't it?

0:39:060:39:08

-Temeraire means brave and foolhardy. There he is.

-Yeah.

0:39:080:39:13

-The ticket price is £160.

-What sort of trade is that, John?

0:39:130:39:17

£75.

0:39:170:39:18

I like that.

0:39:180:39:20

I really like that.

0:39:200:39:21

-Yeah.

-19th century gunpowder barrel. It's got a lot going for it.

0:39:210:39:25

-Yeah. That talks to me.

-Time for John to make a tactical withdrawal,

0:39:250:39:30

while they make up their minds.

0:39:300:39:32

What I love about it is I think it's very rare.

0:39:320:39:34

It would be a talking point and it'd be something special.

0:39:340:39:38

-I agree.

-And what about the rag? Obviously, it is what it is.

0:39:380:39:41

Some people might think it's a bit scruffy.

0:39:410:39:44

If it was me and I bought that, I'd remove the rag, polish it and glass

0:39:440:39:47

top it, but I think into auction, it gives it authenticity, doesn't it?

0:39:470:39:51

Yeah.

0:39:510:39:52

I mean, when you look at those, they might be real from a ship,

0:39:520:39:56

-but it just says repro really, doesn't it?

-It does.

0:39:560:39:59

-So, do we want to try and knock him down?

-A bit.

-Yeah.

-Just a bit.

-Yeah.

0:39:590:40:02

Batten down the hatches, eh?

0:40:020:40:04

-It's kind of between the porthole mirror and the barrel.

-Right.

0:40:040:40:08

-If I offered you £60 for the gun barrel...

-I've got to get 70 for it.

0:40:080:40:13

-Have you?

-Yeah.

0:40:130:40:14

-Do you like compromise?

-65, you're going to say?

-Yeah.

-No, I can't.

0:40:140:40:18

This is where we walk out, pretend we're going to leave it.

0:40:180:40:21

Well, you've just given that one away.

0:40:210:40:23

-You might as well try it now, chaps.

-Shall we give it a go?

0:40:230:40:26

Come on, come on.

0:40:260:40:27

See if he shouts us back.

0:40:270:40:29

Come back!

0:40:290:40:30

-It worked.

-It worked!

0:40:300:40:32

-I think he's going to compromise.

-Let's do it. 65.

-65.

0:40:320:40:36

-There you are. Proper job.

-Thank you, John.

-Nice work, everyone.

0:40:360:40:41

-Now, is that it?

-Hey, have you noticed these?

-Aye-aye.

0:40:410:40:45

Warming pans, Johnnie. They used to sell well. 19th century.

0:40:450:40:48

People used to hang them on the walls.

0:40:480:40:51

They don't hang them on the walls any more.

0:40:510:40:53

You fill them full of coals and stick them in your bed.

0:40:530:40:56

Exactly right, but not really needed these days, eh?

0:40:560:41:00

I'm fed up with the sight of these. I really am.

0:41:000:41:03

You can have these for a pound.

0:41:030:41:05

-Really?

-Take them away. Yeah, I'm fed up with them.

0:41:050:41:07

And all the dogs keep peeing on them.

0:41:070:41:09

Now, that's what you call patination.

0:41:090:41:12

-I'm going to give you £2 for it.

-£2. Good man!

0:41:120:41:15

-Let's take these and we'll come back for the barrel.

-You have one.

0:41:150:41:18

-I'll have two.

-I'm sure someone will find a good home for those.

0:41:180:41:22

# Standing on the corner of... #

0:41:220:41:24

THEY LAUGH

0:41:240:41:26

Meanwhile in Paignton, the Torquay ware is back on the shelf

0:41:260:41:30

and there's a wall clock under consideration.

0:41:300:41:33

-I'm big on my clocks.

-How much is that one?

-35.

0:41:330:41:36

-And there's presumably a deal to be done on that?

-Yeah.

0:41:360:41:39

-Is that a working clock, though?

-It's a bit of a project, really.

0:41:390:41:43

Now, there's an euphemism, if I ever heard one!

0:41:430:41:46

This would require a certain amount of DIY skill and practical skill.

0:41:460:41:49

I have no practical skills whatsoever.

0:41:490:41:52

To me, this is already very daunting.

0:41:520:41:55

There's an expression in our business - if the only thing you have to

0:41:550:41:57

apologise for is the price... Well, with this, you have to start making hundreds of apologies.

0:41:570:42:02

So in my eyes, at auction, this is like £20 to 40, which means

0:42:020:42:05

we've got to try and buy it, if you'll let us, around the £15 mark.

0:42:050:42:09

One for Richard to ponder,

0:42:090:42:10

while Bob turns on and tunes in.

0:42:100:42:13

-What have you got there, Bob?

-Well...

0:42:130:42:16

-FEEDBACK AND STATIC

-Oh, there we go.

0:42:160:42:19

Now, we couldn't come into this shop and see a Marconi radio,

0:42:190:42:23

could we, Phil, and not discuss it and not consider it?

0:42:230:42:25

-Can I just stop you for one minute?

-Yeah, go on.

-There's the microphone.

-OK.

0:42:250:42:29

I want you to give me the intro to the Bob Harris Show.

0:42:290:42:31

-All right, let me just turn on.

-OK.

-I'll count you down.

0:42:310:42:34

-Three, two, one...

-This is Bob Harris Country on BBC Radio 2.

0:42:340:42:38

Ha-ha!

0:42:380:42:41

-What a great moment that was!

-This is the kind of radio that my mum used to have in the '50s.

0:42:410:42:45

Bakelite case, isn't it?

0:42:450:42:47

Yeah, and it was my mum who was very responsible for me getting

0:42:470:42:53

into radio because it was listening to Listen With Mother with her...

0:42:530:42:57

Sounds like it belongs in the Bob Harris Collection.

0:42:570:43:00

-That's the first thing I see.

-Oh, I see.

0:43:000:43:02

-It's got three bits missing from it, look.

-Yes, it has.

0:43:020:43:06

The next thing the auctioneer is probably going to say is,

0:43:060:43:10

this is electrical, it's not been PAT tested,

0:43:100:43:12

-so you've got to cut the wire off.

-Right.

0:43:120:43:14

When they cut the wire off, they don't cut it off down here to put

0:43:140:43:17

a plug on, they cut it off right at the back there, so it can't be used.

0:43:170:43:20

-So it disables it.

-It disables it and you've then got to get it rewired.

0:43:200:43:23

But that's just me being miserable.

0:43:230:43:26

He's got a reputation to maintain, you know?

0:43:260:43:28

It could make 20 to £30. Ever so easily.

0:43:280:43:32

The price on it here is 65.

0:43:320:43:34

Richard?

0:43:340:43:36

-It's lovely, isn't it?

-I love it and I want him to buy it.

0:43:360:43:39

-With the best will in the world, what could you do that for?

-35, Phil.

0:43:390:43:43

-And that's the absolute finish?

-That would be it, yeah.

0:43:430:43:46

If he offered you £30, would that buy that?

0:43:460:43:48

I think as it's for Whispering Bob Harris

0:43:480:43:50

-and Philip Serrell, I think I could do it for 30 quid.

-OK.

0:43:500:43:54

-One last question, before we go any further...

-Yeah.

-The clock...

-Yeah.

0:43:540:43:57

-What's the very best you could do that for?

-20 quid.

0:43:570:44:00

So, 50 for the two.

0:44:000:44:02

-Well, I'm going to go yes, in that case.

-That's great by me.

0:44:020:44:05

I think you've got yourself a deal.

0:44:050:44:07

Well, neither of them may work, but they do look nice.

0:44:070:44:10

Whispering Bob, you can become Smiling Bob,

0:44:100:44:12

cos that's the job done.

0:44:120:44:13

Well done, mate. Well done.

0:44:130:44:15

Yes, the shops are now shut. Time to share.

0:44:150:44:18

-Interesting collection.

-It's quite a variety of things, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:44:180:44:22

-What's this?

-These are the fisherman's flies.

0:44:220:44:26

It's by a London maker, Ogden Smith.

0:44:260:44:29

-That looks a bit charity shop, doesn't it?

-Well, you're bang on.

0:44:290:44:32

It's charity shop 15 years ago.

0:44:320:44:35

-It's now cool and funky retro shop on Kensington

-High Street. Really?

0:44:350:44:38

This is what I thought. This was my theory, David.

0:44:380:44:40

-Now, that makes it a bit more interesting.

-Does it?

0:44:400:44:43

But I think if Bob tried to take that home,

0:44:430:44:45

Trudy wouldn't let him in the house.

0:44:450:44:47

-THEY LAUGH

-Now, I thought one of us

0:44:470:44:49

-was either going to buy a record player or a radio.

-Or a radio.

0:44:490:44:52

-It had to be. Well, this was just there and it's a Marconi.

-Right.

0:44:520:44:58

It's really rather lovely and...

0:44:580:45:00

Does it have a fluorescent tuning tube?

0:45:000:45:02

You get little lights that light up...

0:45:020:45:05

I'm not sure our experts are on quite same wavelength.

0:45:050:45:08

I love the old radios.

0:45:080:45:09

You had to switch them on and wait for it to warm up.

0:45:090:45:12

It needs a bit of a conditioning.

0:45:120:45:13

-I'd give you a couple of quid for it.

-Reconditioning, yeah. So...

0:45:130:45:18

-Oh, sorry... We haven't finished yet.

-Have you finished?

-Johnnie and David's turn.

0:45:180:45:22

-There you go.

-Oh, wow!

0:45:220:45:23

It's not as packed a table as yours.

0:45:230:45:25

Can I just ask what drew you to the dog?

0:45:250:45:28

-This is Scamp.

-OK.

0:45:290:45:32

Scamp is going to become very famous and he's going to make a few quid.

0:45:320:45:37

-Moving slightly away from Scamp... We've both bought sort of...

-Yeah.

0:45:370:45:42

It's fascinating. We know this once belonged to Lord Raglan.

0:45:420:45:45

Well, we now know that this came from Lord Raglan as well.

0:45:450:45:49

-It never did!

-It did now!

-LAUGHTER

0:45:490:45:51

-Yeah, but does it have an R stamped on it?

-It will have!

0:45:510:45:55

Give me a felt tip. Give me a felt tip.

0:45:550:45:58

Now, what do you think of this beautiful barrel?

0:45:580:46:01

Is that gunpowder plot?

0:46:010:46:02

-Gunpowder plot, yeah. Came from a ship in Plymouth.

-Yeah.

0:46:020:46:05

We have reason to believe it was Nelson's, from HMS Victory.

0:46:050:46:09

It was from the pub, the Nelson!

0:46:090:46:12

That's where it was from!

0:46:120:46:13

-Well, good luck, Johnnie.

-Good luck, Bob.

0:46:130:46:16

-We'll see you there.

-OK.

0:46:160:46:17

But what did they really think?

0:46:170:46:19

-Philip's very rude about Scamp. I think it's jealousy.

-Of course.

0:46:190:46:23

I tell you what I really do like of theirs, I like the barrel.

0:46:230:46:26

-Everything else has cost them nothing.

-Yeah.

0:46:260:46:28

Whereas we've got jeopardy all the way down the line.

0:46:280:46:30

I like their picnic set. I think that's very sweet and charming.

0:46:300:46:33

Yeah, it's not going to make much money though.

0:46:330:46:36

I loved it, really. It's been fantastic, Phil.

0:46:360:46:38

-I'm going to go now.

-BOB LAUGHS

0:46:380:46:41

After a whistle-stop tour of the south west,

0:46:410:46:44

our DJs are now in Wiltshire and heading for the auction

0:46:440:46:47

in Salisbury.

0:46:470:46:49

-How are you feeling about all this?

-Little bit nervous.

0:46:490:46:52

Funnily enough, so am I.

0:46:520:46:54

I'm slightly apprehensive.

0:46:540:46:55

Cos when we started this thing, we both said to each other -

0:46:550:46:58

-ah, we don't care if we win, but I want to win!

-Yeah.

0:46:580:47:03

Let's rock!

0:47:030:47:05

Salisbury, on the confluence of five rivers, is an ancient city,

0:47:050:47:10

also - hold tight - an old stomping ground

0:47:100:47:13

of Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich.

0:47:130:47:15

Now then, the two coolest dudes in Britain... Are you nervous?

0:47:160:47:20

-We're going to do well. Confidence.

-Shall we go and see?

0:47:200:47:23

-We're going to do well.

-Lead the way.

-Lead the way.

0:47:230:47:26

Has anything caught the eye of Netherhampton Saleroom

0:47:260:47:29

auctioneer Richard Petty?

0:47:290:47:31

The wall clock, we're quite excited about that.

0:47:310:47:33

Probably the most valuable piece we've got here today.

0:47:330:47:37

Hopefully, we'll see £100 for it.

0:47:370:47:38

Be very disappointed if we make any less than 80 for it.

0:47:380:47:41

The pastel and pen picture of Scamp the dog.

0:47:410:47:44

All I can say is I hope we've got somebody in here today who

0:47:440:47:46

has a little dog that looks similar to that.

0:47:460:47:48

Other than that, I don't know.

0:47:480:47:50

Marconi wireless is actually my favourite piece of all of them,

0:47:500:47:53

would hope to make somewhere between 50 and £70 on it.

0:47:530:47:56

If I was having a present from today's sale,

0:47:560:47:59

that's one I would like.

0:47:590:48:01

Bob and Phil spent £260 on six auction lots.

0:48:010:48:04

While Johnnie and David acquired the same number for £196.50.

0:48:040:48:10

But with the bidding about to commence, there's been a complaint.

0:48:100:48:15

-All the items we've got in the auction should be as is.

-Yeah.

0:48:150:48:18

-As you bought it.

-Yeah, yeah.

-That's how it is in the auction.

0:48:180:48:21

-Of course, yeah.

-But look at that - personally signed by music legend Bob Harris.

-What?!

0:48:210:48:26

-We never said that about you, did we?

-I'll sign all of my lots.

-You were going to sign everything.

-No.

0:48:260:48:31

We're talking about adding value.

0:48:310:48:33

Oh, Lordy! First up, that somewhat controversial wireless.

0:48:330:48:37

-I think we should make an official complaint.

-Shall we do that?

0:48:370:48:41

-Shall we start writing it now?

-Yeah.

0:48:410:48:42

I'll get Bob to sign it for you!

0:48:420:48:45

I'm going to start my bidding at £20.

0:48:450:48:47

He's never mentioned it.

0:48:470:48:50

..30. 35. 40.

0:48:500:48:52

45. 50.

0:48:520:48:54

-55. 60.

-You're going well!

0:48:540:48:56

At 65, I'm out.

0:48:560:48:57

65. 65. 70.

0:48:570:49:00

75? 75.

0:49:000:49:02

80. 85. 90. 95.

0:49:020:49:07

100? 105.

0:49:070:49:09

105. You won't find any more of them.

0:49:090:49:12

You might start now!

0:49:120:49:14

At £105.

0:49:140:49:17

-Well done, well done.

-Even though you cheated.

-High five!

0:49:170:49:21

A great start. Now for Johnnie's leg-of-mutton gun case.

0:49:220:49:27

Shall we start with a tenner?

0:49:270:49:28

-I'll sign it on the back!

-He'll sign it!

0:49:280:49:31

-LAUGHTER

-I'll sign all my lots!

0:49:310:49:33

LAUGHTER DROWNS SPEECH

0:49:330:49:36

I've got a couple of bids in, will you sign those as well?

0:49:360:49:40

Right, anyway, 10 I've got.

0:49:410:49:43

-15.

-20.

-Get it going!

0:49:430:49:44

25. 30. 35. I've got 40.

0:49:440:49:48

45. 45 in the corner. 45. And 50. 55.

0:49:480:49:53

60. 60. Your turn.

0:49:530:49:56

Go on!

0:49:560:49:58

I've GOT 60! You work here!

0:49:580:50:00

-LAUGHTER

-62!

0:50:000:50:01

62?!

0:50:010:50:03

At 62. 62. 65.

0:50:030:50:05

65. Anybody else. At 65.

0:50:070:50:09

At £65...

0:50:090:50:13

Yours, sir.

0:50:130:50:14

Well, you can't always get what you want. How about this?

0:50:140:50:18

Ideal for a trip in a Zephyr, what?

0:50:180:50:20

-I'm starting the bidding at £15.

-No, that is very pretty.

0:50:200:50:23

15, 15, 15, 15. 20.

0:50:230:50:26

25. 30. 35.

0:50:260:50:29

40. 45. 50. 55.

0:50:290:50:33

55. With me, with me, 55. Anybody else want to join in?

0:50:330:50:37

-55. Your last chance on this lot.

-Unbelievable!

0:50:370:50:41

-£55.

-Very good.

-Well done! Well done!

0:50:410:50:46

Those two are our current chart toppers.

0:50:460:50:49

Can Johnnie and David's little camera close the gap?

0:50:490:50:53

40? 30? 10? Thank you.

0:50:530:50:55

-Oh!

-£10, £10, £10, £10.

0:50:550:50:58

£10. £12. 15. 18. 20. 22.

0:50:580:51:03

Come on! Come on!

0:51:030:51:04

-22.

-22.

0:51:040:51:06

Lovely case. Keep going!

0:51:060:51:09

Last chance. At £22. Being sold at £22.

0:51:090:51:13

-We nearly doubled our money.

-Almost.

0:51:130:51:15

That is all right! That is all right!

0:51:150:51:18

It most certainly is. Now it's Bob's bits of Portmeirion.

0:51:180:51:23

Right, 50? 60?

0:51:230:51:25

40? 30? £20. Portmeirion coffee set 20.

0:51:250:51:30

Tenner? 5. £6. £8. £12. 15. 18. 20.

0:51:300:51:36

£20. On my right, £20. 22.

0:51:360:51:38

25.

0:51:380:51:40

28. £30. 32.

0:51:400:51:43

35.

0:51:430:51:45

35. On my right, 35. Anybody else? At £35.

0:51:450:51:51

It's a cheeky little fiver! It's a cheeky little fiver.

0:51:510:51:55

Still upbeat, and why not?

0:51:550:51:57

Next it's the turn of Johnnie's chandelier.

0:51:570:52:01

Who's got £50? 50?

0:52:010:52:03

40? 30?

0:52:030:52:05

Feel free to join in somewhere.

0:52:050:52:07

It's going to go for three quid!

0:52:070:52:09

A lot of people are looking at their feet! Shush!

0:52:090:52:12

£10, £10, £10...

0:52:120:52:13

£10, £10, £10. Don't go shy on this one, boys and girls.

0:52:130:52:17

At £10. Anybody else? 10?

0:52:170:52:19

Oh, no! No!

0:52:190:52:21

Sorry, did I say that out loud?

0:52:210:52:25

A £10 note!

0:52:250:52:27

Not the worst loss ever, but it doesn't help their cause.

0:52:270:52:31

-That's all down to you, son!

-Is it?

-Yeah, that was your call.

0:52:310:52:34

-See how it turns?

-Yeah. But it's true!

-It is true.

0:52:340:52:38

-ALL TALK AT ONCE

-Coming apart at the seams.

0:52:380:52:41

Crumbling before our eyes.

0:52:410:52:43

I'm surprised Bob hasn't signed his cartridge or cassette case.

0:52:430:52:47

Start the bidding at £20. At £20.

0:52:470:52:50

-£20, £20...

-Somebody over there, look.

0:52:500:52:52

25. 28. I've got 30. 32. 35.

0:52:520:52:56

40.

0:52:560:52:57

£40. £40. 45. 50.

0:52:570:53:01

55.

0:53:010:53:03

60. 65. 70.

0:53:030:53:06

-75. 80.

-Well!

-I know, yeah.

-85.

0:53:060:53:10

90.

0:53:100:53:12

-Keep going, keep going.

-90. 95.

0:53:120:53:15

100.

0:53:150:53:17

100. Another one?

0:53:170:53:19

100. 105.

0:53:190:53:21

-105 in the corner. 105.

-You're going to get a fiver more!

0:53:210:53:25

At £105.

0:53:250:53:28

Almost wiped its face, but it's a small loss after auction costs.

0:53:310:53:35

Can they catch a fat profit with this little item, though?

0:53:350:53:39

50? 60? 40? 30?

0:53:390:53:41

£30 I have.

0:53:410:53:42

£30, £30, £30...

0:53:420:53:45

32. 35.

0:53:450:53:46

38. 40. 42.

0:53:460:53:49

45.

0:53:490:53:51

45. On my right, 45.

0:53:510:53:53

Anyone else want to join in? At 45.

0:53:530:53:57

Being sold this time at £45...

0:53:570:54:01

-ALL EXCLAIM

-Oh, isn't that a shame(?)

0:54:010:54:03

Oh, what a shame, guys, you lost a bit of money there.

0:54:030:54:06

I think this is all about to kick off.

0:54:060:54:08

I didn't know I was competitive until right now.

0:54:080:54:13

You wait till Scamp! You wait!

0:54:130:54:15

Yeah, not yet, though, because next up is their pirate pick,

0:54:150:54:19

the powder barrel.

0:54:190:54:20

It's a kind of blank canvas, though, isn't it?

0:54:200:54:23

-Because you can do stuff with it.

-That's what we thought.

0:54:230:54:25

-You could fill it full of gunpowder.

-You could.

0:54:250:54:28

Johnnie, we might have to!

0:54:280:54:30

Start the bidding at £25? At 25?

0:54:300:54:33

At 25. 25 I have. 25. 30.

0:54:330:54:35

35.

0:54:350:54:38

35. Anybody else want to join in?

0:54:380:54:40

35. 40.

0:54:400:54:42

45. 50.

0:54:420:54:44

-55.

-Come on!

-55.

0:54:440:54:47

Anybody else? 55. Your last chance on this lot.

0:54:470:54:50

-Go on!

-Sold this time, then, at £55.

0:54:500:54:54

-He should have given it a bit longer!

-What, four weeks?

0:54:540:54:59

Yes, he definitely tried his best.

0:54:590:55:01

It's time for Bob and Phil's final lot,

0:55:010:55:04

the project.

0:55:040:55:05

Start the bidding at £25.

0:55:070:55:09

25 I have. 25, 25, 25...

0:55:090:55:11

25, 25, 25 with me.

0:55:110:55:13

30. 35. 40.

0:55:130:55:15

-All over the price, eh?

-You're doing well, here.

-Yeah.

0:55:150:55:19

50. 60. 65.

0:55:190:55:21

65 with me. With me, 65.

0:55:210:55:24

-Strong bid, isn't it?

-65. Your last chance on this lot.

0:55:240:55:27

Being sold, going at £65.

0:55:270:55:31

-Well done, well done.

-What do you think?

-Time flies!

0:55:310:55:34

That's just about assured victory for those two, I'd say.

0:55:350:55:39

The figures don't look good, Johnnie. They just don't look good.

0:55:390:55:42

-Bob, what comes next? What comes next?

-Well, it's Scamp.

-Exactly!

0:55:420:55:46

Everything is on Scamp now.

0:55:460:55:48

He looks pretty cool under fire, doesn't he?

0:55:480:55:51

I'm going to take it up the front, cos it's so beautiful.

0:55:510:55:54

Huh! A celebrity endorsement!

0:55:540:55:57

I'm bringing this up the front!

0:55:570:55:58

Worth a try.

0:55:580:56:00

Who will start me at £30?

0:56:000:56:01

20? Who's got 10? 5. 6.

0:56:010:56:03

-Go on!

-All over the place! 10.

0:56:030:56:05

12. 15. 18.

0:56:050:56:08

£20.

0:56:080:56:09

-Come on, Scamp!

-22. 25.

-Yes!

0:56:090:56:12

28. £30. 32.

0:56:120:56:15

-35.

-Go on!

-38.

-I can't believe this!

-£40.

0:56:150:56:19

42. 42.

0:56:190:56:22

Including delivery. At 42. Anybody else? Being sold this time at £42.

0:56:220:56:28

-Well done!

-Well!

0:56:280:56:31

Scamp and Johnnie did good!

0:56:310:56:34

-I've got a sale next Thursday, do you want a job?

-Yes!

0:56:340:56:37

Finally, their bargain warming pans.

0:56:370:56:40

You could always keep your discs in them. Well, maybe not.

0:56:400:56:43

Right, who will start me? Who's got £20.

0:56:430:56:46

10? 5?

0:56:460:56:47

-Is this each?

-LAUGHTER

0:56:470:56:50

You'll be lucky! Who's got 3?

0:56:500:56:53

Thank you! £3 I have.

0:56:530:56:55

-That's profit, well done!

-We're pound up.

0:56:550:56:57

4. 5. 6.

0:56:570:57:00

-8.

-10. You're on a roll. You're on a roll.

-Come on!

0:57:000:57:04

£12, £12, £12...

0:57:040:57:06

14.

0:57:060:57:07

14. A bit of history you're buying here.

0:57:070:57:10

-14. 14. 14. Anybody else?

-Go on!

0:57:100:57:13

That's good, they've done well for us.

0:57:130:57:16

At £14.

0:57:160:57:18

Seven times...

0:57:180:57:20

-There's your profit, £14.

-£14. Marvellous.

0:57:200:57:23

Nice to end on a positive note.

0:57:230:57:25

-Shall we go outside and work out the numbers?

-Yeah, let's.

0:57:250:57:28

-That's a good idea.

-Come on, then.

0:57:280:57:30

Johnnie and David started out with £400

0:57:300:57:33

and made, after paying auction costs, a loss of £29.94.

0:57:330:57:38

Bob and Phil also began with £40,

0:57:380:57:41

but after auction costs they made a profit of £76.20.

0:57:410:57:45

So they are today's winners by over £100.

0:57:450:57:50

All profits go to Children In Need.

0:57:500:57:52

-It was an unfair fight.

-LAUGHTER

0:57:520:57:55

-We should do it all again.

-We have the moral victory.

-We did.

0:57:550:57:58

-And we had Scamp! No-one else had a Scamp.

-Yeah.

0:57:580:58:02

-We've got to go, Bob.

-We should, yeah.

0:58:020:58:05

-Thank you very much.

-See you, Bob.

0:58:050:58:07

See you, guys.

0:58:070:58:08

Go for it, Johnnie, put your foot down.

0:58:100:58:13

Now, there must be a second-hand record shop around here somewhere.

0:58:130:58:16

The moment they got in touch

0:58:160:58:18

and said, "Do you fancy doing the Antiques Road Trip?

0:58:180:58:21

"Bob Harris is doing it." I said, "OK, I'll do it."

0:58:210:58:24

It was exactly the same with me.

0:58:240:58:26

They said, "You'll be with Johnnie Walker." "Oh, yes!"

0:58:260:58:29

LAUGHTER

0:58:290:58:30

Legendary DJs Johnnie Walker and 'Whispering' Bob Harris are the celebrity guests on the hunt for antique treasure. They travel around Devon, Somerset and Dorset, before heading to a decisive auction in Salisbury.