Hardeep Singh Kholi and Helen Lederer Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Hardeep Singh Kholi and Helen Lederer

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. Comedian Hardeep Singh Kholi and much-loved comedy actress Helen Lederer join the road trip.


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-The nation's favourite celebrities...

-Some proper bling, here.

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..paired up with an expert...

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What? What?

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..and a classic car.

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-Pick your legs up!

-Hello, girls!

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Their mission - to scour Britain for antiques.

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All breakages must be paid for.

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This is a good find, is it not?

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no easy ride.

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Who will find a hidden gem? Who will take the biggest risks?

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Got to have my antiques head on.

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Will anybody follow expert advice?

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I think it's horrible!

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There will be worthy winners...

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This is better than Christmas!

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..and valiant losers.

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Time to put your pedal to the metal.

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This is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Today's road trip has all the ingredients

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of a right old carry-on,

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as comedy icons Helen Lederer and Hardeep Singh Kohli

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hit the antiques trail.

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I've got my motor running. We are heading on the highway.

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-Yes.

-We are searching for adventure and whatever comes our way.

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-BOTH:

-# Born to be wild... #

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Cor! They are in a cheery mood.

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We haven't seen each other since we shared a couch on breakfast telly.

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Yeah, sharing the couch was good.

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I thought we rocked it.

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Nice.

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These old friends from the comedy circuit

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will be competing against each other, armed with £400 each.

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-Are you excited about today?

-Yeah, yeah.

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But I know you're going to be quite competitive. I just know it.

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-Look, the only winner...

-Yeah.

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The only winner ought to be me.

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Well, someone is confident.

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I was telling a friend I was coming to work with you and they said,

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"Oh, I've always liked her. What's she like?"

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-"What's she like?"

-I found an honest moment

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and I'll tell you what I said -

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I said, "She's as mad as a box of frogs.

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"But without the box."

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-Do you know what I mean?

-That's quite an interesting analogy.

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-I'm going to think on that.

-It's a complement.

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If you say so.

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Wordsmith Hardeep Singh Kohli

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is a comedian, broadcaster and journalist.

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He can be seriously serious.

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I think we've lost that sense of accountability,

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of knowing our politicians.

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But also seriously funny.

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Oh, yes, did I mention he cooks?

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What are you going to do for us?

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Well, I thought a braised oxtail curry.

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It's kind of combines you as a chef, doesn't it?

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It's kind of Scottish-Indian.

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And quite fatty.

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A finalist on Celebrity MasterChef,

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he has recently opened a restaurant in Edinburgh.

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Heating up the passenger seat next to him is comedy royalty.

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Hello!

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Actress, writer and performer,

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the "Absolutely Fabulous" Helen Lederer.

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After breaking into the scene

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at the iconic Comedy Store in the 1980s,

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Helen became a regular face on cult comedy sketch show Naked Video.

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So, I'm going to see my shrink. He's very trendy.

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He's just moved in above the greengrocers.

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Well, he's just starting out in mental health.

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But he has got a lot of practical experience.

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I'm told he used to be a patient, so...

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She's also starred in some of Britain's best-loved comedies,

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such as Bottom, Ab Fab, and more recently branched out

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into children's entertainment on Old Jack's Boat.

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We'll race you there.

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Very well. But let me warn you, you will lose.

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I'm very fast on my bike.

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-Oh, yeah.

-Busy, busy!

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Yeah, here she goes, yeah. With the speed of light.

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Today, thankfully, Helen's ditched the bike

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in favour of the Triumph Herald 1967.

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My dad had one of those.

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You've got funny bones. Do people know that expression?

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Right there, Hardeep.

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-No - I...

-CAR THUDS

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You see, this is what happens, which is fine. It's fine.

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-That's not my fault.

-No. It's just making its presence felt.

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-It's the sort of car you would go courting in, isn't it?

-Yes.

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Are we on the right side of the road?

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-Yeah.

-OK.

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HELEN LAUGHS

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Thankfully, help is at hand

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in the form of auctioneers Catherine Southon and Mark Stacey,

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who are enjoying life in a left-hand drive 1974 Saab Sonett.

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-Do you feel like we are on a hot date?

-Do you think so?

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-Do you feel like I'm your chick?

-You're a hot chick.

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Easy, now...

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Are we excited about meeting some new travel companions, then?

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Of course, I remember Helen Lederer from the '80s.

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Well, yeah - you go back as far. Even further, don't you?

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Oh, whatever!

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I'm with lovely Hardeep Singh Kohli.

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We are going to have such fun today. He is going to make me laugh.

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He is indeed.

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I think Helen and I will have fun as well, actually.

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I think...I think she might be quite wacky.

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You guys will get on, then!

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On today's trip, we are doing a good old tour of old London town,

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ending up at an auction

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in Stansted Mountfitchet in Essex.

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But we begin in South Woodford, east London.

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-Oh.

-Colourful, how colourful.

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-How are you?

-I'm very well. Let me help you.

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Yeah, we lost the roof on the way, sorry.

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-You're looking very smart.

-You really are.

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Difficult to get out. Well, I thought I'd best dress up.

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-How are you, sir?

-You look fabulous.

-Thank you very much.

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-Very nice to meet you.

-Nice to meet you, too.

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-HELEN:

-Nice to meet you.

-Lovely to meet you.

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We've decided we're going to go boy-girl, if that's all right.

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If he is for it, I'm for it.

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Shall we nip in? We've got to go shopping.

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-Left-hand drive, is that all right?

-It's beautiful, isn't it?

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We can't hang around, I'm afraid. We've got shopping to do.

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Remember, buy high, sell low.

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I've watched you a lot on television,

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-I've never had you down as a delusionalist.

-Oh!

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I'm Scottish. It's in our DNA.

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-HELEN:

-Enjoy, but not too much.

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Bye!

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-Are you loving this car?

-This is James Bond, isn't it?

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Oh, yes. Every boy... It's got corduroy seats!

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You've got moleskin on. That could be...

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It's low down, that's for sure.

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It's not designed for a turban-wearing man, is it?

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No, no, it's really not, actually.

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Not the most elegant of entries.

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But, without further ado, they are off.

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Do you have anything in mind?

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Do you have any ideas of the sort of thing you would like to buy?

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Really, I'm in love with Deco.

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I'm in love with... the in-between the wars period.

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I'm also quite obsessed with drinks paraphernalia now,

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since...we opened the restaurant.

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I think this is going to be great.

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Catherine and Hardeep's first shop

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is the eclectic Victoria Antiques - looks nice.

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-Oh...

-Come. Enter the world of antiques with me.

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Oh, yeah. Enter the Galleria.

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Hello!

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They are meeting with dealer Michael.

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So, Hardeep, what will you focus on first?

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-Can I have a look at that?

-He's off already.

-Sorry.

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The clock? Deco clock?

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Can you tell me about these paintings, out of interest?

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-They're prints.

-Prints?

-Yeah.

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-Oh, fine, forget that.

-Forget that.

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And what's this?

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And that's an indenture dated... about 1870.

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Perhaps not as focused as Catherine had hoped.

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-Can read that? I don't have my glasses.

-I will need my glasses.

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-Those at auction are £20 - £30...

-Ah, these are interesting...

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He's not even listening. I don't know why I'm bothering.

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Catherine, how much? I think we might get 20 quid for these.

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I think Catherine might have her work cut out here.

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Cocktail-y things, you've got... Ooh, and a coffee things, as well.

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-Tshh-tshh, tshh-tshh.

-You've got the moves.

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It's like Tom Cruise in Cocktail, watching you do that.

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This is plate, though. This is quite fun, though,

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because this is actually a sugar shaker,

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so it's for putting your sugar on your strawberries and whatever,

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but in the form of a cocktail shaker,

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because I suppose that was all the rage in the '30s.

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And it's by Mappin & Webb.

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-Ooh!

-Ooh! Good name.

-Interesting.

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BUT it's just plate.

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And nobody wants plate,

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but then they might want plate if it's a bit of fun.

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How much is it anyway, out of interest?

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-£18.

-This is exactly what Hardeep said he wanted.

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Could Catherine have found an object that could hold his attention for more than two ticks?

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There's nice wee glasses here.

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Nope, spoke too soon. He's off again.

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You're not interested in that, are you?

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No, I can't buy something I don't aesthetically engage with.

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OK.

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Yet, strangely, I bought this overcoat,

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so make sense of that, viewers.

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-I'm with you.

-Is there much point in me actually having a look,

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-cos you're not going to take any notice, are you?

-Yes, I am!

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Maybe try the sugar shaker again, eh?

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-I think that was good.

-I like it.

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I'm fulfilling your needs. You said Deco, you wanted cocktails...

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In the words of Karen Carpenter, we've only just begun.

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In the words of Catherine Southon, focus, Hardeep.

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I do like this though.

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It's a bit of fun and people will be drawn into that.

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I couldn't give you 18 quid for it though.

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I will take this if we can agree a price.

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15.

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-I heard 13 in my own internal dialogue.

-I see.

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-That's unlucky for some.

-14?

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-Shall we agree on 14?

-14.

-14.

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Brilliant. Nice one, sir. Thank you.

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-You do like it?

-Don't you think?

-No, I love it!

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Well, I listen to what you say.

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Well, Catherine managed to keep Hardeep focused.

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So, for just £14 that's one item in the old bag. Phew.

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-Shake my sugar.

-# Shaking your sugar. #

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Helen and Mark, meanwhile, take a route further into London

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to Finsbury Park, where they're bonding over a biscuit.

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Oh, go on, then.

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It's the last one. Last one.

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Mm.

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They do pick you up, don't they, a good Bourbon?

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-Are you good at negotiating?

-You see, I don't think I am.

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I think what we should do, we've got a good cop, bad cop.

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-OK, cool, yeah.

-You can be the people-pleasing cop.

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-I'm the people pleaser.

-And I can be the not-people-pleasing cop.

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OK, and I praise the person's clothes and things like that.

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-Absolutely.

-I say, "Gosh, I love your shoes."

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-I wonder if we're going to get jewellery.

-I don't know.

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I don't know what the shops are going to be like. Would you like to find a piece of jewellery?

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-You know the magpie element of life?

-Yes.

-Anything that glitters.

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-Ah.

-I like glitter.

-Good to know.

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They're visiting Regent Antiques,

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a veritable treasure trove of all things old.

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-Can I just say something?

-You can.

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I think we should ask about that because it's in vogue.

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There's so much in here. I mean, look at it all.

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Good sidestep there, Mark.

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-I have spotted something here, Helen.

-Yeah.

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-Walking sticks.

-Yeah.

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Perhaps not the height of fashion but very collectable.

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The nice thing with walking sticks is you have such a nice variety

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-of handles. They can be very simple, just rustic carved handles.

-Yeah.

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-Are they collector's items?

-Very much so. Look at this one.

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There are several to choose from.

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Very nice qualities. Nice decoration to the head.

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You've got the feathering.

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Yes, Helen seems to be a willing student.

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-See, that's...

-It hasn't got any silver on it.

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-Well, that's not necessarily a bad thing.

-But it looks like a totem.

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-Well, this is what I would call Colonial.

-Yeah.

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Should I go and find out the price of those three items?

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Yes, and everything comes in threes.

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-Excuse me a second. Keep browsing.

-And you don't want the cake trays?

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-No, I don't want the cake trays.

-Oh, so strict.

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SULKILY: Oh.

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So, whilst Mark struts his stuff, Helen's left to her own devices.

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Look out.

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I'm interested in the bling, I suppose. It's a shiny, pretty thing.

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I could see it in, like, a Soho house, you know,

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like trendy, just on a shelf and then somebody just goes up and goes,

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"Hey, anyone fancy a tune? An Italian folk tune?"

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And then they'd just play it on this.

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But I think Mark might be agin it.

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Nice.

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Helen's certainly got her own ideas.

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Luckily, Mark's back with some sage advice.

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-Helen, I'm trying to advise you.

-OK.

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All that glitters isn't necessarily gold.

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Well, I'm quite superficial.

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-You don't say.

-SHE LAUGHS

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Ouch!

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Mark's also discounted the two silver-topped walking sticks

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as they're over £200 each, but the tribal one is still in play.

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-Have you found something?

-Well, the thing is,

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I think this is a really beautiful thing.

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This, you can't escape the 1920s, '30s, the jazz era.

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You've got these wonderful birthday cake designs Chrysler Building,

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and even around here you've got this, what we call, engine turning.

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-OK.

-Now you mentioned this other box as well,

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which is more of a lady's box.

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Gosh, this is heavy, isn't it?

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You said "lady's". I thought that was quite plain, quite gentlemanly.

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-What, with that sort of decoration there?

-Well, yeah.

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Now, Helen, which one do you prefer?

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Well, I think...

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there's more to this in that it's stylish,

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although, as you say, that's heavier.

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-Oh, so heavy.

-You've got some potential purchases here.

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-All right, don't overact it.

-SHE GIGGLES

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Spot the actress. Perhaps time to call in dealer Tino.

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Tino, I'm wavering between the two boxes.

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-Well, they're both Art Deco.

-They're both Art Deco?

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This one's 1933 and I think that one's 1938.

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And so what kind of price were you thinking of?

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-Well, this one is going to be 170.

-Oh, my Gordon Bennett.

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And that one is going to be probably 300.

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300?! You see, I was right to go for this one, was I not?

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I have to say that both those prices are very reasonable

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-for a retail price.

-Look at my face.

-TINO LAUGHS

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She's not happy. BUT they are both silver.

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I think we can rule this one out cos I think that's...

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And it's the wrong year.

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-It's SO not in the fashion.

-It's not working for me.

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And I think, Helen,

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-you were quite interested in that piano accordion, weren't you?

-I was.

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-I was drawn to it.

-It's interesting, isn't it?

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-Very decorative.

-Decorative.

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The accordion has a ticket price of £250

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and Mark still has his eye on the tribal walking stick.

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How can we meet? How can we even meet in the middle?

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Well, how about 200 for both?

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-200 for the...?

-The box and the accordion.

-And the stick.

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-All right, and the stick.

-There's a lot of unknowns.

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We'd have to go down to 150 for three.

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-Well...

-Tops. Or bottoms.

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I can go to 180. I can't go to 150.

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What about 160?

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165 and that's it. That's it, honestly.

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-What do you think?

-I'm closing my eyes till somebody says something.

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-WHISPERS:

-I think you've got to say yes.

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So I'm now opening my eyes and I'm saying deal.

0:15:040:15:08

-Done.

-Tino, you're a gentleman.

0:15:080:15:10

-Thank you, Tino.

-Your walking stick.

0:15:100:15:13

-Thank you.

-Wonderful.

0:15:130:15:15

Wonderful indeed. Helen's not as bad at haggling as she thought.

0:15:150:15:18

So that's £70 for the Art Deco cigarette box,

0:15:190:15:22

25 for the walking stick

0:15:220:15:24

and 70 again for the accordion, totalling £165 for the three items.

0:15:240:15:28

-This pair make quite a team.

-Thank you very much, Tino.

0:15:280:15:32

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:15:320:15:33

Back with Hardeep and Catherine as they head to Tottenham now

0:15:350:15:39

in the borough of Haringey.

0:15:390:15:41

You're a director, you're a chef, you work on the radio,

0:15:420:15:47

you work on the TV. Is there no end to your talents?

0:15:470:15:50

There's no beginning to my talents, in the words of Mrs Merton.

0:15:500:15:53

During the First World War,

0:15:570:15:59

this particular area had a high concentration

0:15:590:16:01

of conscientious objectors,

0:16:010:16:03

people who refused to be conscripted for military service

0:16:030:16:07

on moral grounds.

0:16:070:16:09

This almost taboo topic should appeal to politically minded Hardeep,

0:16:090:16:14

so they've come to Bruce Castle Museum to find out more.

0:16:140:16:18

They're meeting with curator Ben Copsey.

0:16:180:16:21

-Catherine. Hello, nice to meet you.

-Hi.

-Hi. Hardeep. How are you?

0:16:210:16:24

At the start of the First World War,

0:16:240:16:26

a wave of patriotic fervour swept the UK and men rushed to sign up.

0:16:260:16:32

The casualty rate, however, was much higher than expected

0:16:320:16:35

and it became necessary to introduce conscription in 1916,

0:16:350:16:39

which deemed all men between 18 and 41 to be a soldier.

0:16:390:16:44

It was a criminal offence to refuse to serve,

0:16:440:16:47

and those who faced formal tribunals became known

0:16:470:16:51

as conscientious objectors.

0:16:510:16:54

These men were not just socially ostracised

0:16:540:16:57

but some were also imprisoned for several years.

0:16:570:17:01

So, why were they refusing?

0:17:010:17:03

Was it mainly on moral grounds or religious grounds or a mixture?

0:17:030:17:07

-Class grounds.

-Oh, it was all three, really.

0:17:070:17:10

For a lot of men, whether they were religious or political

0:17:100:17:13

or socialist, Communist, anarchist,

0:17:130:17:16

whether they were artists or for any number of reasons,

0:17:160:17:20

thought that war, and all the death and killing that went along with it, was unacceptable.

0:17:200:17:24

We studied this at school in Glasgow

0:17:240:17:26

and a lot of these conscientious objectors were simply...

0:17:260:17:29

Their moral position wasn't understood

0:17:290:17:32

and they were just described as cowards,

0:17:320:17:34

and it's almost a little bit like the witch-hunts, in a sense.

0:17:340:17:37

Absolutely. They faced a huge amount of discrimination.

0:17:370:17:40

Not just discrimination but essentially criminalisation

0:17:400:17:45

because of their pacifism.

0:17:450:17:47

We have these images in 1914 of hundreds of thousands of men

0:17:470:17:51

all over the world wanting to join the Army,

0:17:510:17:53

and instead we have these 18,000 British people who said, "No."

0:17:530:17:57

It put them in a minority position,

0:17:570:17:59

a really, very difficult one to hold up to.

0:17:590:18:03

Of the estimated 20,000 conscientious objectors in the UK

0:18:030:18:08

it was not all bad.

0:18:080:18:10

Thousands were in the Home Office Scheme

0:18:100:18:12

and in the Non-Combat Corps, but not all were so lucky.

0:18:120:18:17

Several thousand conscientious objectors were court-martialled

0:18:170:18:20

and imprisoned for lengthy periods.

0:18:200:18:22

Here, they endured both physical and mental hardship.

0:18:220:18:26

One of these men was Charles Walker.

0:18:260:18:29

Charles Walker was one of a set of CO brothers who lived in Hornsey.

0:18:290:18:34

And they were some of the first conscientious objectors

0:18:340:18:37

from the area to be arrested for refusing to turn up to barracks.

0:18:370:18:41

Just the brutality here.

0:18:410:18:43

It says, "Dear Annie, This morning we were taken on parade

0:18:430:18:47

"and as we could not of course obey military orders

0:18:470:18:50

"we were pushed, punched, and hit on the hand and legs with a cane."

0:18:500:18:55

At least 100 conscientious objectors are known to have died

0:18:550:18:59

as a result of their brutal treatment in prison.

0:18:590:19:02

In spite of such hardship, they still found ways to continue to rebel.

0:19:020:19:07

This is interesting. There is an allusion here to hunger strikes.

0:19:070:19:13

Was that common amongst conscientious objectors?

0:19:130:19:16

It did become quite common, yeah.

0:19:160:19:18

It started off quite sporadically where some men would refuse

0:19:180:19:22

to eat, just as the suffragettes had done in the decade before.

0:19:220:19:27

And it became quite a widespread tactic but, unfortunately,

0:19:270:19:31

the British Government had practised how to deal with hunger striking

0:19:310:19:34

on the suffragettes, and used exactly the same tactics.

0:19:340:19:37

-They used the same...?

-Tubes down the throat.

-Force-feeding.

0:19:370:19:40

As well as the physical hardship they endured in prison,

0:19:410:19:44

they were forbidden from speaking to each other,

0:19:440:19:47

which was a particularly cruel form of punishment.

0:19:470:19:50

In a Winchester prison, however, the inmates found

0:19:520:19:55

an ingenious way to continue communicating.

0:19:550:19:58

That is probably the best piece of conscientious objector material.

0:19:580:20:04

It's 1916 or 1917 and it's a prison newspaper.

0:20:040:20:09

It's actually made by conscientious objectors in prison.

0:20:090:20:13

So it's all written on the only things that conscientious

0:20:130:20:16

objectors had available to them in prison, which is toilet paper.

0:20:160:20:19

My word!

0:20:190:20:21

-That's incredible!

-So it's very, very delicate.

0:20:210:20:25

It's written with tiny stubs of pencils and with home-made ink,

0:20:250:20:30

all made out of Bible covers.

0:20:300:20:32

You put a bit of water on your Bible cover and push out the dye.

0:20:320:20:36

Or with a pen. It's called the Winchester Whisperer.

0:20:360:20:40

Prisoners would hide the newspaper on their bodies

0:20:400:20:43

and pass it round to other inmates.

0:20:430:20:45

Just looking at that sketch there,

0:20:450:20:47

there is a kind of dynamism, a movement in it.

0:20:470:20:50

There's real penmanship just with the simplest of tools.

0:20:500:20:55

The most vivid of images. It's quite incredible, isn't it?

0:20:550:21:00

Let me ask you a question.

0:21:000:21:01

Was life in prison any more taxing than life in the front line?

0:21:010:21:06

I think that's very difficult to answer.

0:21:060:21:09

Conscientious objectors were supposed to go through

0:21:090:21:12

what was called the principle of equal sacrifice,

0:21:120:21:15

where they had to suffer just as much as a soldier on the front line.

0:21:150:21:18

The issue of course is, there's no bullets flying around

0:21:180:21:22

and no shelling and no gas in prison.

0:21:220:21:25

Some of these men had sentences of ten years hard labour.

0:21:250:21:30

So facing ten years in complete silence is what ended up

0:21:300:21:34

with things like this newspaper.

0:21:340:21:36

Many remained imprisoned even after the war.

0:21:380:21:41

The last conscientious objectors were released in 1920,

0:21:410:21:45

two years after the war was over.

0:21:450:21:47

Shunned by society, imprisoned in inhumane conditions,

0:21:480:21:53

all for refusing to kill

0:21:530:21:55

or help others kill during the First World War.

0:21:550:21:57

Back with Helen and Mark...

0:22:050:22:07

Helen, I can't be in the car with you without asking

0:22:070:22:12

about one of the best-loved comedy programmes, Ab Fab.

0:22:120:22:15

I knew you were going to say Ab Fab even before you said it.

0:22:150:22:18

It was such a good role for you

0:22:180:22:20

and the characters you played before.

0:22:200:22:22

Yes, it was just a fun character to play.

0:22:220:22:26

A lot of people quote that line, "Chairs, some lovely chairs."

0:22:260:22:31

I go out and about and people suddenly go... How amazing!

0:22:310:22:35

That that is known, has been known to people, and cheered them up.

0:22:350:22:40

They're travelling to Stoke Newington.

0:22:400:22:44

It's only been a morning together but they're already best buddies.

0:22:440:22:49

Carol...

0:22:490:22:50

Who's Carol?

0:22:500:22:52

Yes, because my name is Carol, that's handy!

0:22:520:22:55

A bit awkward, that! Best distract Helen with The Cobbled Yard shop.

0:22:550:23:01

Looky, looky!

0:23:010:23:03

Helen, this is such a contrast to the last shop we were in.

0:23:030:23:07

A lot of furniture.

0:23:070:23:09

All of this, it's much more, how can you say...

0:23:090:23:13

Retro?

0:23:130:23:14

Retro.

0:23:140:23:15

A little bit more cutting edge, a little bit sort of hip-hop.

0:23:150:23:19

-It's like things have been chosen.

-Hip-hop, modern.

0:23:190:23:22

Needless to say, Mark is feeling right at home(!)

0:23:220:23:25

You could imagine some grungy teenagers coming in here

0:23:280:23:31

wanting something for their bedroom.

0:23:310:23:33

-OK, a pander.

-It's a radio.

0:23:330:23:36

-Are we allowed to buy these chairs?

-No, we're not.

0:23:380:23:41

-You haven't even given me a chance.

-Move on!

0:23:410:23:43

-But these chairs are...

-Move on, Helen!

0:23:430:23:45

He's so bossy with her!

0:23:450:23:47

-Oh, idea, idea. Mark, Mark, hello!

-Yes?

0:23:490:23:53

If we're looking at strange, funky,

0:23:530:23:55

-you know, like, those posters of the weeping child...

-Yes.

0:23:550:23:59

..that used to be in Woolworths?

0:23:590:24:01

You're sighing and he's looking away. I'm getting the impression...

0:24:010:24:04

But that is kind of so off kilter.

0:24:040:24:08

You see, I was so impressed with you in the last shop.

0:24:080:24:11

I thought, "Helen's grasped this."

0:24:110:24:13

Moving swiftly on, please.

0:24:130:24:15

Ta-da!

0:24:150:24:17

Red and wood, it's that kind of school thing. No?

0:24:190:24:24

You're not happy with the chairs? You don't like the chairs?

0:24:240:24:28

He doesn't like the chairs. OK.

0:24:280:24:31

Obviously not a fan of lovely chairs, then, Mark.

0:24:310:24:35

I'm sure there's something in here.

0:24:410:24:43

-It is a lovely, eclectic mix, isn't it?

-Yes, I love it.

0:24:430:24:46

-Is that a drum?

-No, I think it's a heater.

-OK.

0:24:460:24:50

SHE CHUCKLES

0:24:500:24:52

Gosh, it's tough going today.

0:24:520:24:55

What's she found now?

0:24:550:24:57

Well, it's a tin box.

0:24:570:24:59

"Tattis Potato Crisps, please replace lid.

0:24:590:25:02

"This is the property of..."

0:25:020:25:05

-Oh.

-But I've never heard of Tattis Crisps, have you?

-No.

0:25:050:25:10

-There's nothing in it.

-That's a shame.

0:25:100:25:13

I could do with a bag of crisps right now.

0:25:130:25:16

-If one had that as a kind of lot.

-I think it's great fun.

0:25:160:25:19

Finally! Phew!

0:25:190:25:21

It's not a make of crisps, I think. Do you recognise it?

0:25:240:25:26

Never heard of it.

0:25:260:25:27

You see, it's had a bit of wear and things on it

0:25:270:25:30

so one would hope it was 1950s.

0:25:300:25:33

Time to call on dealer Carol, methinks.

0:25:340:25:39

40s, I would say.

0:25:390:25:41

-But you're the expert.

-Do you think it is?

0:25:410:25:43

Because it's got a great look to it, hasn't it?

0:25:430:25:46

I can see that in somebody's kitchen. Oh, yes.

0:25:460:25:50

Its ticket price is £20 but can Helen work her charm again?

0:25:510:25:56

-So basically, it's 10 or nothing.

-Naughty.

0:25:560:25:59

Helen seems to be bad cop.

0:25:590:26:02

But has it worked?

0:26:030:26:04

Do you know, I've had it for a few weeks

0:26:040:26:07

-so, OK, you've got a deal.

-Yes!

0:26:070:26:09

-Carol, we love you.

-Oh, Carol. Thank you.

0:26:090:26:13

It's the right decision.

0:26:130:26:14

Well, you would say that.

0:26:140:26:16

Apparently tough love does work and for a mere £10,

0:26:160:26:20

Helen is now the proud owner of a 1940s crisp box.

0:26:200:26:24

They'll be ready for a snack themselves as it's curtains down now

0:26:240:26:27

on our first day's buying and night-night.

0:26:270:26:30

A new day has dawned and our celebs are raring to go.

0:26:330:26:37

Hardeep, tell me, how was your day?

0:26:370:26:40

Did you get anything really amazing, like strange?

0:26:400:26:44

No, do you know what was quite nice about my day yesterday?

0:26:440:26:47

-I sort of got something close to what I was hoping to get.

-Oh.

0:26:470:26:51

Yet unusual at the same time.

0:26:510:26:54

We have had a laugh, I tell you what.

0:26:540:26:56

We have had a laugh and we're quite strict with each other,

0:26:560:27:00

which we quite like.

0:27:000:27:02

Is he actively guiding you and encouraging you?

0:27:020:27:05

Because I feel I'm not making the most of Catherine.

0:27:050:27:07

But how does Catherine feel?

0:27:070:27:10

-He's only buying things he likes and that's it.

-Really?

-Yes.

0:27:100:27:14

-How do you put your input in?

-He doesn't care about me!

0:27:140:27:20

Oh, well, he's not all bad then!

0:27:200:27:22

Mark! Such a charmer!

0:27:220:27:24

Yesterday Helen and Mark worked well together

0:27:240:27:27

with Helen discovering a new-found skill.

0:27:270:27:29

-I became quite bad.

-Really?

0:27:290:27:31

-Quite sort of ruthless.

-Did you end up being a bit hard-core?

0:27:310:27:35

I wouldn't want to mess with you,

0:27:350:27:37

I wouldn't want to lock horns with you.

0:27:370:27:39

No. But it was only playing, I was only playing with the person.

0:27:390:27:43

It worked, though.

0:27:440:27:46

As Helen and Mark spent £175 yesterday...

0:27:460:27:50

Looky, looky!

0:27:500:27:52

On four items.

0:27:520:27:53

We should ask about that because it's in vogue.

0:27:530:27:58

An Art Deco silver cigarette box, a tribal walking stick,

0:27:580:28:02

a 1930s Italian piano accordion and a 1940s crisp box called Tattis.

0:28:020:28:09

They also competed in the ultimate face-off.

0:28:090:28:11

Helen won!

0:28:130:28:15

Hardeep and Catherine had a less successful day.

0:28:150:28:18

Oh, these are really interesting.

0:28:180:28:20

He's not listening, I don't know why I'm bothering!

0:28:200:28:22

They spent just £14 on one item that Hardeep loved,

0:28:220:28:25

a novelty 1920s silver-plated sugar shaker.

0:28:250:28:28

Our couples are meeting up this morning

0:28:280:28:30

in central London near Regent's Park.

0:28:300:28:33

-Oh, hello!

-Tally Ho!

0:28:340:28:38

-My lovely friends!

-How are you? Very well.

0:28:380:28:44

-How are you?

-Good, good, good. Allow me.

0:28:440:28:47

-Are you stuck?

-No, I can't get it open, I'm afraid. Mind the car.

0:28:490:28:54

I can just have a conversation like this.

0:28:540:28:56

You could do, you could sit there elegantly.

0:28:560:29:00

Yes, I'm trying to look sophisticated.

0:29:000:29:03

There's a thing you do with this. Push down there, you see.

0:29:030:29:06

You automatically want to pull it up, don't you?

0:29:060:29:08

Well, darling, you want to pull it up, down,

0:29:080:29:10

-any which way you can to get the young lady rescued.

-Thank you.

0:29:100:29:13

How are you? I've missed you so much.

0:29:130:29:15

We've got a lovely visit to go to and you need to shop

0:29:150:29:18

because you haven't bought very much, have you?

0:29:180:29:20

You've bought four items?

0:29:200:29:21

-I think you'll find... You've got how many items?!

-Four.

0:29:210:29:23

Well, I didn't tell him because I didn't want to upset him.

0:29:230:29:26

-Uh-oh!

-Let's leave them to it.

0:29:260:29:29

-You've only got one thing left to buy?

-Yes.

0:29:290:29:32

Pick up some humility. Spend your money on humility.

0:29:320:29:35

We might buy a couple of items, you never know.

0:29:350:29:37

-Ignore him.

-Let's go.

0:29:370:29:39

Hardeep and Catherine are travelling to the uber trendy area

0:29:390:29:43

of Marylebone. Bordering Oxford Street,

0:29:430:29:45

it's been at the height of fashion since the 17th century

0:29:450:29:48

and is a shopping Mecca which hopefully bodes well.

0:29:480:29:53

-So, I'm excited about this.

-There's a lot to cover here.

0:29:530:29:57

I'm more casually dressed today.

0:29:570:29:59

Hardeep and Catherine are heading into Alfie's Antiques Market

0:29:590:30:03

where they're visiting Beth's shop this morning.

0:30:030:30:06

That looks familiar.

0:30:060:30:08

Oh, my God, this is exactly the one we bought yesterday.

0:30:080:30:10

Mappin and Webb?

0:30:100:30:11

-Yes.

-Definitely silver plated?

-Yes. How much is it?

-Well, we paid 14.

0:30:110:30:16

-I'm not even joking.

-What?

-95 quid.

0:30:180:30:21

-What did I say to you?

-You're so good!

0:30:210:30:25

Catherine's prowess proven again. They still have £386 left to spend.

0:30:250:30:31

-I love that purple glass.

-It's Whitefriars.

-What's Whitefriars?

0:30:310:30:36

-Is Whitefriars good?

-Yeah. Oh, it's a ginger jar.

0:30:360:30:40

What's nice about it is, it can be used as a vase,

0:30:400:30:43

which it originally was used for.

0:30:430:30:48

-So that potentially could be two separate pieces?

-Absolutely.

0:30:480:30:51

Have you looked this up?

0:30:510:30:52

I know its Whitefriars by the base, it's got a little ring round it

0:30:520:30:55

but it's also controlled bubbles.

0:30:550:30:57

Whitefriars is thought to be one of the most successful

0:30:570:31:01

and long-running glasshouses in the UK

0:31:010:31:03

although I'm not convinced this is the genuine artefact.

0:31:030:31:07

It could be in the style of.

0:31:070:31:10

-Shall I tell you what's interesting?

-Right.

-It's a beautiful colour.

0:31:100:31:12

It's got a smoky quality to it.

0:31:120:31:14

Its ticket price is £135 but there are more pieces to look at.

0:31:140:31:19

I like the bowl.

0:31:190:31:21

-The bowl is the same sort of thing.

-I think the bowl is beautiful.

0:31:210:31:23

How much is the bowl?

0:31:230:31:25

A lovely shape. Unusual shape as well.

0:31:250:31:28

I love the shape of that, I really like the base of it.

0:31:280:31:30

They're very traditional Whitefriars colours

0:31:300:31:33

and all the really right vibrant yellows, the oranges, the turquoise.

0:31:330:31:38

The bowl is priced at £89 but which one will Hardeep go for?

0:31:380:31:43

-Is it too much to get two?

-Could a deal be done?

0:31:440:31:47

-120 for the two.

-Gosh!

0:31:470:31:48

-Could I kiss you? Would that be out of the question?

-Hold on!

0:31:480:31:51

-120 for the two is pretty good.

-Yes.

0:31:510:31:53

-Is there no way we could do 110 on these?

-115.

0:31:530:31:57

-Only because it's you and you smiled earlier.

-110?

0:31:570:32:01

-115.

-110?

0:32:010:32:03

-115.

-OK, 115.

-It's going to go up if you carry on doing that.

0:32:030:32:08

So, for £115, Hardeep now adds what he hopes

0:32:080:32:12

is two pieces of Whitefriars glass to his collection.

0:32:120:32:16

I don't really care what anyone spends on them.

0:32:160:32:18

I just think it's such a beautiful thing.

0:32:180:32:21

You're a wee smasher!

0:32:220:32:24

Is there anything else for him in here?

0:32:240:32:27

It is rather quirky but it is a good name.

0:32:270:32:29

-It's a WMF set. It's a strawberry set.

-Oh, is it?

0:32:290:32:33

What's nice is all the pieces are there.

0:32:330:32:35

You've got the tray, it's beautifully marked

0:32:350:32:37

and you've got the gilding.

0:32:370:32:39

-And the strawberries on it.

-This is lovely.

0:32:390:32:41

I just think the idea of strawberries and cream

0:32:410:32:43

in June in kind of... rural south-east England...

0:32:430:32:49

I think that's beautiful.

0:32:490:32:51

It's silver plated and silver gilt. Ticket price, £135.

0:32:510:32:56

WMF is a great name. It's one that people know. Art Nouveau.

0:32:560:33:00

-It's beautifully gilded inside. What's the best on that?

-85.

0:33:000:33:04

I'll do 80 because you've bought the other things.

0:33:040:33:07

-Your call, honey.

-I think, yes, yes, yes, thrice yes.

0:33:090:33:13

Hardeep has found another item that he loves,

0:33:130:33:16

making his total spend in this market £195.

0:33:160:33:20

Helen and Mark are in the affluent area of Hampstead

0:33:220:33:26

where there are reportedly more millionaires

0:33:260:33:29

within its boundaries than anywhere else in the UK.

0:33:290:33:32

Once a small village on the outskirts of London,

0:33:320:33:34

the area is also rich in culture.

0:33:340:33:37

Helen and Mark are here to learn about the tragic story

0:33:370:33:40

of one of England's greatest poets, John Keats.

0:33:400:33:43

They're at Keats House to meet with curator Vicky Carroll.

0:33:430:33:48

-Hello. How nice to meet you.

-Welcome to Keats House.

0:33:480:33:51

Thank you, I'm Mark.

0:33:510:33:52

-Nice to meet you.

-Shall we go in?

0:33:520:33:54

As well as writing her own comedy, Helen has a couple of books

0:33:540:33:57

under her belt so can understand the plight of the writer.

0:33:570:34:01

Keats' short life was one of great sorrow.

0:34:020:34:06

He and his siblings were orphaned at a young age when they lost

0:34:060:34:09

their father in a riding accident, and later their mother to TB.

0:34:090:34:13

His parents weren't wealthy,

0:34:150:34:17

but they wanted their children to have the best education.

0:34:170:34:20

Whilst Keats had always loved writing,

0:34:220:34:25

this wasn't actually his original career path.

0:34:250:34:28

Poetry was something he was interested in

0:34:280:34:30

from an early age, while he was at school.

0:34:300:34:32

He was initially destined to become a doctor.

0:34:320:34:35

He was an apprentice to an apothecary for five years.

0:34:350:34:38

He studied surgery at Guy's Hospital as well.

0:34:380:34:41

That was his intended career.

0:34:410:34:43

-A really clever man...

-Yeah.

-..but then totally creative.

0:34:430:34:46

Yeah, absolutely.

0:34:460:34:48

He passed his exams first time, which was very unusual at the time.

0:34:480:34:51

-Wow, very unusual.

-So he was a good student.

0:34:510:34:53

When Keats was studying to become a doctor, was he writing then as well?

0:34:530:34:58

Yes, he did start writing whilst he was studying

0:34:580:35:01

and he actually got a poem published in a magazine called The Examiner.

0:35:010:35:05

Keats loved living in Hampstead because it was a hotbed of artists,

0:35:080:35:12

musicians and actors.

0:35:120:35:14

He loved mixing with creative types.

0:35:140:35:17

He passed his final exams in 1816 but shocked his friends

0:35:180:35:22

by deciding he wanted to devote his life to poetry.

0:35:220:35:26

Crazy man. Crazy, crazy decision.

0:35:260:35:29

I mean, did he do well?

0:35:290:35:32

Did he get paid for his poetry while he was living here?

0:35:320:35:35

He never made an awful lot of money from being a poet.

0:35:350:35:38

His first work was really not particularly well noticed

0:35:380:35:42

outside of his circle of friends.

0:35:420:35:44

His second work was actually reviewed very badly by the press.

0:35:440:35:48

In spite of these knock backs, Keats persisted with his poetry.

0:35:480:35:52

Sadly, tragedy struck again

0:35:520:35:54

when his younger brother Tom passed away from TB aged just 17.

0:35:540:35:59

At the time, John lived nearby.

0:35:590:36:01

But to escape such painful memories, Keats moved into this house where

0:36:010:36:05

he went on to write some of his most famed works.

0:36:050:36:09

-Is that Keats in this very room?

-It is.

0:36:090:36:11

So that is Keats seated in this very room, studying

0:36:110:36:14

-and preparing probably to write one of his poems.

-Oh, wonderful.

0:36:140:36:19

-And some of his best poetry was written here?

-Absolutely.

0:36:190:36:22

He famously wrote Ode to a Nightingale here

0:36:220:36:25

in this house, seated under a plum tree in the garden, we're told.

0:36:250:36:30

He also wrote Ode on a Grecian Urn.

0:36:300:36:31

More happy love! More happy, happy love!

0:36:330:36:37

For ever warm And still to be enjoy'd

0:36:370:36:40

For ever panting And for ever young.

0:36:400:36:44

This is the house where Keats was happiest during his life.

0:36:440:36:47

One of the main reasons for that is it's where he fell in love.

0:36:470:36:51

-BOTH: Oh!

-A certain Fanny Brawne actually lived

0:36:510:36:54

in the house next door and they met and a romance

0:36:540:36:57

between them blossomed.

0:36:570:36:58

Oh, how wonderful.

0:36:580:36:59

-But how convenient to have Fanny next door.

-Exactly.

-Wonderful.

0:36:590:37:02

Keats had first met Fanny when he was nursing Tom.

0:37:050:37:09

A relationship later blossomed.

0:37:090:37:12

So I am now looking at a very pretty ring which I want.

0:37:120:37:16

Who did it belong to?

0:37:160:37:18

That actually belonged to Fanny Brawne,

0:37:180:37:21

who was the love of Keats' life.

0:37:210:37:23

Keats gave that to Fanny for their secret engagements.

0:37:230:37:27

Wow. That has got to be a love letter, hasn't it?

0:37:270:37:30

I would have thought so.

0:37:300:37:32

Keats wrote this letter to Fanny when he was too sick to leave

0:37:320:37:36

the house and too sick to actually meet with her.

0:37:360:37:39

Sadly Keats had also fallen ill with TB,

0:37:410:37:45

the disease which had claimed the lives

0:37:450:37:47

of both his mother and brother.

0:37:470:37:49

You mentioned it was secret. Why was it secret?

0:37:490:37:52

Well, unfortunately Keats and Fanny didn't really have the resources

0:37:520:37:56

that they needed to get married.

0:37:560:37:58

Also because he was starting to become very ill.

0:37:580:38:00

Unable to provide Fanny with a stable future,

0:38:020:38:05

their relationship remained clandestine, but Keats

0:38:050:38:09

and Fanny couldn't resist getting secretly engaged.

0:38:090:38:12

-Oh!

-Beautiful. It's so romantic, isn't it?

0:38:130:38:16

I fear the worst. What happened next, Vicky?

0:38:160:38:18

Well, unfortunately Keats' health continued to decline

0:38:180:38:22

and his friends decided what would be best for him

0:38:220:38:25

would be to travel somewhere with a warmer climate.

0:38:250:38:28

Keats went to Rome with his friend, the artist Joseph Severn.

0:38:280:38:32

-Very sad, isn't it?

-It is, isn't it?

0:38:320:38:34

Sadly, he never saw Fanny again as he passed away

0:38:340:38:37

on the 23rd of February 1821, aged just 25.

0:38:370:38:41

-Oh!

-I know. I feel quite sad, don't you?

-Yes.

0:38:430:38:47

It's really quite sad.

0:38:470:38:49

During his short life, Keats wrote about 145 poems

0:38:490:38:54

but sadly died thinking himself unsuccessful.

0:38:540:38:57

In later years his work was rediscovered

0:39:000:39:03

by Pre-Raphaelite artists

0:39:030:39:05

who produced a number of paintings inspired by Keats' poetry.

0:39:050:39:08

He is now thought of as a key figure in the Romantic movement

0:39:080:39:12

and one of Britain's most famous poets.

0:39:120:39:15

-It is so glorious.

-So we need, what, one or two more things?

0:39:160:39:21

Hardeep and Catherine are still in Marylebone

0:39:210:39:23

at Andrew Nebbett Antiques.

0:39:230:39:26

-I feel something special coming on.

-Do you? In here?

-Shall we?

0:39:260:39:30

-Shall we?

-Let's go.

0:39:300:39:32

Hardeep has just under £200 left to spend.

0:39:320:39:36

Oh, look at that!

0:39:360:39:37

Let's hope there's something here to catch his eye.

0:39:370:39:40

-I would have that in my home. Would you?

-Yeah. 750 quid.

-How much?!

0:39:430:39:47

You can have it in yours, mate. I'll just come and visit.

0:39:470:39:50

HE MOUTHS

0:39:500:39:51

It's nice but perhaps

0:39:510:39:53

look for something more in keeping with your budget, eh?

0:39:530:39:56

-I know you told me it is incomplete.

-Oh, the case.

0:39:580:40:01

-It is very much incomplete.

-It is a vellum case from the '30s.

0:40:010:40:05

-This is perfect.

-That is quite a large size, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:40:050:40:08

That could have been a tissue.

0:40:080:40:10

-No, no, no. It wouldn't have been a tissue.

-A sandwich.

0:40:100:40:13

-There would have been another thing here.

-Very funny, Hardeep.

0:40:130:40:17

This is clearly for ladies.

0:40:170:40:18

A little vanity case, a travelling bag.

0:40:180:40:20

You say that but we've got no proof.

0:40:200:40:22

It is a ladies' one, absolutely.

0:40:220:40:24

-Look at this.

-There is nothing in there I wouldn't use.

0:40:240:40:27

Nothing in there I wouldn't use.

0:40:270:40:28

-You wouldn't use those hairbrushes, for a start.

-I would.

0:40:280:40:31

Catherine's demonstrating admirable patience today.

0:40:310:40:35

What I love about the deco era, the 1930s,

0:40:350:40:39

is how everyone used to personalise things.

0:40:390:40:41

They used to buy really special good-quality things, like this,

0:40:420:40:45

and then personalise it.

0:40:450:40:48

-Things like this would be treasured.

-They would, wouldn't they?

0:40:480:40:51

-They really would.

-Things lasted much longer then.

-They really would.

0:40:510:40:54

Hm. It's ticket price is £95.

0:40:540:40:57

We just have this engine-turned enamel on the top.

0:40:570:41:01

I like enamel that's been turned by an engine.

0:41:010:41:04

It makes me feel part of the industrial age.

0:41:040:41:06

Nothing I say is taken seriously.

0:41:060:41:09

I'm going to speak to someone who has intelligence.

0:41:090:41:12

Oh, cue dealer Tiffany.

0:41:120:41:16

We very much like this box but clearly it has...

0:41:160:41:19

It's not in A1-perfect nick.

0:41:190:41:20

And also I feel it's cluttering up the shop

0:41:200:41:24

and we are prepared to do you a favour and take it away.

0:41:240:41:27

Can we make you an offer? 50 quid.

0:41:270:41:32

I think we could go to 80.

0:41:320:41:34

Shall we just be very candid? 65 is probably...

0:41:340:41:37

We can't really go much higher than 65 because

0:41:370:41:40

-we'll lose money, won't we?

-Probably.

0:41:400:41:42

To go any lower, Tiffany needs to check with owner Andy.

0:41:420:41:47

Thank you, Andy. Thanks. Bye-bye.

0:41:470:41:50

£60.

0:41:530:41:54

Oh, that's fantastic. Well done!

0:41:540:41:59

-Oh, come here and shake my hand, Tiffany.

-Tiffany, thank you.

0:41:590:42:03

-Bless you.

-Thank you, Andy. I'm glad you've got it.

0:42:030:42:06

Gosh, I wish he was here.

0:42:060:42:09

Helen and Mark have also made their way to Marylebone

0:42:090:42:11

and Alfies Antiques Market with their remaining £225.

0:42:110:42:16

The lizard brooch.

0:42:160:42:17

It's quite fun, isn't it? It looks, sort of, '20s style to me.

0:42:170:42:21

This sort of glitzy jewellery now is quite popular, I think.

0:42:210:42:25

It's got that good look.

0:42:250:42:27

It's bling but it's made in the shape of a lizard

0:42:270:42:30

and people are constantly needing lapel wear.

0:42:300:42:33

Yeah, nobody likes an empty lapel.

0:42:330:42:38

It looks lovely on you, actually, I have to say.

0:42:380:42:40

-On a jacket like mine.

-It's got a nice feel about it.

0:42:400:42:44

I like the fact you've got these three big stones in the middle here.

0:42:440:42:47

-It really is blingy, isn't it?

-I think for a piece...

0:42:470:42:51

-And you did want bling.

-The dealer does not want to be on camera

0:42:510:42:54

but informs Mark that the lowest she's willing to

0:42:540:42:56

take down the brooch is £25.

0:42:560:42:58

I don't think you're going to lose very much.

0:42:580:43:01

I personally don't think it is going to make that much,

0:43:010:43:04

but you don't know.

0:43:040:43:06

But Helen's inner magpie can't resist something glittery.

0:43:060:43:09

So that is one item down.

0:43:090:43:10

Mark is also keen to show Helen something else he's uncovered.

0:43:100:43:14

The thing I wanted to show you needs no introduction at all

0:43:140:43:18

to anybody who knows pottery.

0:43:180:43:20

-It's a vase.

-It's a planter.

0:43:200:43:22

Oh, a planter.

0:43:220:43:25

-But I'll accept vase.

-OK, good.

0:43:250:43:27

But this is by the Moorcroft factory.

0:43:270:43:29

Moorcroft has been running for over 100 years.

0:43:290:43:32

In 1928 they were appointed as potter to Queen Mary.

0:43:320:43:36

This is very typically Moorcroft.

0:43:360:43:39

It's two blind decoration with...

0:43:390:43:40

I don't know what flowers are those, hibiscus?

0:43:400:43:42

-Circa what?

-This is a difficult one.

0:43:420:43:46

I think this is probably circa anywhere between 1920 and 1950.

0:43:460:43:51

-It is hand done and it has got the symbol on the bottom.

-Yes, yes.

0:43:510:43:55

-So that is quite marketable.

-It is quite big and

0:43:550:43:57

-marketable and it's Moorcroft and everybody knows Moorcroft.

-Yes.

0:43:570:44:01

Perhaps not everybody, Mark.

0:44:010:44:04

It's ticket price is a whopping £220

0:44:040:44:06

-but can Mark convince Helen it's worth a punt?

-You don't...

0:44:060:44:11

I don't like it at all.

0:44:110:44:12

It does absolutely nothing for me aesthetically.

0:44:120:44:15

But I am interested in making a profit.

0:44:150:44:17

You know when I said be honest? I wasn't quite meaning that honest.

0:44:170:44:21

-Oh, sorry.

-I would say, "What is the very best price on that?"

0:44:210:44:27

-And see where we stand.

-I would concur with that view.

0:44:270:44:31

So, Chris, what would be the very best price,

0:44:310:44:34

-bearing in mind we've got to put this into auction.

-No problem.

0:44:340:44:37

A good profit in that. £100.

0:44:370:44:40

Looking at the auctioneer, they would probably

0:44:400:44:42

estimate it at £80-£120.

0:44:420:44:44

So we are in the middle of the estimate.

0:44:440:44:47

I couldn't go above 80 for that.

0:44:470:44:49

Because that's what your beginning

0:44:490:44:51

-market was on the auction suggestion.

-Ah.

0:44:510:44:55

So I couldn't do more.

0:44:550:44:58

You've convinced me but I'm not the one selling it to you, you know?

0:44:580:45:01

There is just no way of knowing.

0:45:020:45:04

Done. I like this gentleman.

0:45:120:45:14

-Well done. £80.

-We got the Moorcroft for £80.

0:45:150:45:18

We got the Moorcroft.

0:45:180:45:19

That's an incredible discount from Chris.

0:45:190:45:23

For £105, then, that's Helen's final two items in the bag.

0:45:230:45:28

With their shopping complete, our couples reunite

0:45:280:45:31

on the roof to unveil their wares.

0:45:310:45:33

-Are you ready for this?

-Yes.

-We are going to reveal our items.

0:45:330:45:36

Helen, grab the end, lift it off.

0:45:360:45:38

Ta-da!

0:45:380:45:39

Oh, my goodness! You bought loads.

0:45:390:45:41

Oh, that's not what I thought you would buy!

0:45:410:45:44

-Helen loved this.

-That is beautiful, though.

-It's wonderful.

0:45:450:45:47

It's by Francesco's. It is all beaded.

0:45:470:45:49

I love this, sort of, marbled look on the side.

0:45:490:45:53

We have a lovely Art Deco solid silver cigarette box down there.

0:45:530:45:55

-Nice.

-That is nice.

0:45:550:45:57

This lovely tin which Helen loves.

0:45:570:45:59

-That is the sort of thing I would have bought, Helen.

-Lovely colours.

0:45:590:46:03

I love this walking cane and Helen absolutely wanted

0:46:030:46:07

a piece of bling, so we couldn't go

0:46:070:46:10

without buying a piece of bling, could we, Helen?

0:46:100:46:12

That is a lapel lizard, I call it.

0:46:120:46:15

It just curls around the lapel.

0:46:150:46:18

-It's wonderful.

-Would you like to look at what we bought?

0:46:180:46:20

-We'd love to.

-Absolutely.

-We're dying to see them.

0:46:200:46:24

-Oh, wow!

-Oh, nice!

0:46:240:46:28

-Oh, gosh.

-Pretty.

-We've gone for Whitefriars.

0:46:280:46:31

You've never, ever seen a piece of Whitefriars like that.

0:46:310:46:34

No, I haven't.

0:46:340:46:35

Maybe because it's not Whitefriars.

0:46:350:46:37

But this is quite interesting.

0:46:370:46:40

-I love it.

-So pretty.

0:46:400:46:41

-We paid £14 for it.

-Oh, it was cheap. That is a money-spinner.

0:46:410:46:45

You're going to make a lot of money on that.

0:46:450:46:47

What about your little travelling set?

0:46:470:46:50

This was... If you excuse the pun, a vanity purchase, wasn't it?

0:46:500:46:53

-You paid what, £20-30?

-Huh! Mark!

0:46:530:46:56

-We paid 60.

-Oh!

0:46:560:46:58

I think we should leave it there.

0:46:580:47:00

-OK.

-Oh, listen, well done.

0:47:000:47:02

Yeah, probably for the best.

0:47:020:47:05

Helen's been unusually quiet. But is our favourite bad cop

0:47:050:47:09

-about to reappear?

-The shambolic thing with the bits missing,

0:47:090:47:11

the suitcase...

0:47:110:47:13

I think that seems a lot of money to me because I don't

0:47:130:47:15

-think that's enamel. I didn't look at it.

-Who'd want that?

0:47:150:47:17

I loved that tin.

0:47:170:47:19

I would have bought that for £10. You don't like it.

0:47:190:47:21

Who's going to give more than £10 for that?

0:47:210:47:24

No, I think that could do, sort of, 20.

0:47:240:47:25

It won't make a huge amount but it will do £20 or £30.

0:47:250:47:29

People like those sorts of tins.

0:47:290:47:31

The ginger jar is... I have to say, I've never seen,

0:47:310:47:34

but they did pay quite a lot of money for them.

0:47:340:47:37

Altogether it looked pretty except for the silly old suitcase.

0:47:370:47:41

The auction is taking place in the village of Stansted Mountfitchet,

0:47:430:47:47

in Essex, just a few miles from Stansted Airport.

0:47:470:47:50

How are our celebrities feeling?

0:47:500:47:53

Have you ever been to an auction before?

0:47:530:47:55

-I don't think I have.

-Don't twitch.

-Don't twitch!

0:47:570:47:59

-Don't wave at anyone across the room.

-OK.

0:47:590:48:02

-And don't say, "5,000!"

-Oh, right, as a, sort of, nervous tic.

-Yeah.

0:48:020:48:06

-We have got such a mixed bag between us.

-Very, very cornucopic.

0:48:090:48:12

-Yes, and eclectic.

-Yes.

0:48:120:48:15

But more the word you said.

0:48:150:48:18

Yes, today at Sworders Fine Art Auctioneers, are lots

0:48:190:48:23

are for sale online, on the phone and in the room.

0:48:230:48:26

And our auctioneer is John Black.

0:48:260:48:29

Thank you very much.

0:48:300:48:32

The WMF strawberry set, good lot, well plated and well chosen.

0:48:320:48:36

The cigarette box, my favourite of the lots that were brought in.

0:48:360:48:39

I think that could do quite well. Up to £100 if we're lucky

0:48:390:48:43

but a good 1933 hallmarked... A good, sort of, deco lot.

0:48:430:48:47

High praise.

0:48:470:48:49

-ALL: Hello.

-Here we are.

0:48:490:48:52

-Let me help you out.

-Thank you, thank you.

0:48:520:48:56

-Are you ready?

-I'm ready, I'm ready, I'm ready.

0:48:560:48:58

Helen and Mark formed their own comedy double act,

0:48:580:49:02

spending £280 on six items.

0:49:020:49:05

Hardeep and Catherine were also funny to watch,

0:49:050:49:08

but for entirely different reasons,

0:49:080:49:10

and forking out £269 on five lots.

0:49:100:49:14

Can Hardeep's heartfelt items prevail? Or will it be Helen

0:49:140:49:19

and Mark's teamwork that proves to be the winner today?

0:49:190:49:22

-First up is Helen's crisp box.

-I am excited now.

0:49:240:49:27

I've got a really good feeling about this.

0:49:270:49:30

Who'd like to start me at £30? 20.

0:49:300:49:33

Any bids now at £20? I am looking around the room. 20 there.

0:49:330:49:37

-He has bid at £20. On my right.

-Well done.

-We've doubled our money.

0:49:370:49:40

At £20. That is the only bid. I'm going to sell. Make no mistake.

0:49:420:49:47

-We doubled our money.

-We doubled our money.

-You did well.

0:49:470:49:50

-Doubled our money. We got £20 for it.

-They certainly did.

0:49:500:49:53

That's a great result and a great start to the auction.

0:49:530:49:57

Next it's another of Helen's items.

0:49:570:49:59

Her Moorcroft planter.

0:49:590:50:01

Oh, no. Here we go! Please, please!

0:50:010:50:05

We'll start the bidding here at £30.

0:50:050:50:07

-Oh, no!

-No, you're fine.

-Very low.

0:50:070:50:10

40 is bid on the net. 50, madam? At £50.

0:50:100:50:15

60 on the net if you wish now? At £50 the lady has bid in the room.

0:50:150:50:20

Are we all done? At £50. Make no mistake at 50.

0:50:200:50:24

-Thank you very much.

-I think that's quite cheap.

0:50:240:50:27

It does seem a bit cheap to me.

0:50:270:50:30

It went too quickly.

0:50:300:50:32

Someone's got a bargain there today.

0:50:320:50:34

Let's hope Hardeep's possible Whitefriars glass bowl

0:50:340:50:37

will do better.

0:50:370:50:40

-Here we go. Good luck.

-Good luck, you two. Yes, indeed.

0:50:400:50:43

We can start the bidding here at £25.

0:50:430:50:47

28 to bid if you wish now. At £25.

0:50:470:50:50

28 anywhere now? 28. 30. At £30.

0:50:500:50:54

Any advance in the room or on the net?

0:50:540:50:56

-Gosh, no!

-Still with us now on commission. £30 only.

0:50:580:51:02

-All done?

-That is terrible.

0:51:020:51:06

There is no justice.

0:51:060:51:09

I think we know it's not Whitefriars.

0:51:090:51:11

I think we know it's not, no.

0:51:110:51:13

Maybe it's not Whitefriars. Oh, well. Things can only get better.

0:51:130:51:16

Something else nice and shiny

0:51:190:51:20

that Helen really liked was her Art Deco silver cigarette box.

0:51:200:51:24

You could use it as a jewellery casket on your bedside table.

0:51:240:51:28

A casket!

0:51:280:51:29

£50 is bid. Straight in 60, 70, 80. Here we go, here we go.

0:51:290:51:33

It's turning around.

0:51:330:51:34

Any advance in the room?

0:51:340:51:36

-100 on the internet.

-We've got 100!

0:51:360:51:38

110. 120?

0:51:400:51:43

-120.

-BOTH: 120!

-That's amazing!

0:51:430:51:45

All done? 130.

0:51:450:51:48

ALL: Yes! 130.

0:51:480:51:50

Internet bid now for £140.

0:51:500:51:53

-Wow!

-That's a really good...

0:51:530:51:55

Make no mistake at 140.

0:51:550:51:57

-Well done.

-Well done.

0:51:570:52:01

-That's brilliant.

-You did really well.

-You doubled your money there.

0:52:010:52:05

Finally a decent profit and well-deserved for this lovely item.

0:52:050:52:10

Time for Hardeep's 1930s vanity case,

0:52:120:52:15

or sandwich holder, if you will.

0:52:150:52:17

-£20. Tempt you. Anyone for it?

-20?!

0:52:170:52:20

Any bids now. I'm looking around the room. 20, thank you, sir.

0:52:200:52:24

Our saviour.

0:52:240:52:26

At £20 only. All done and we'll sell.

0:52:260:52:29

Oh, for heaven's sake.

0:52:290:52:30

The only bid. Thank you very much.

0:52:300:52:33

He looked quite sad when he said that, though.

0:52:330:52:35

-I think he was sad.

-It was the only bid in a sad voice.

0:52:350:52:38

I think he recognised it was something a bit special

0:52:380:52:40

and I think it hurt him.

0:52:400:52:42

At least Hardeep loved it.

0:52:420:52:43

Now, surely someone will surely be

0:52:460:52:48

in the mood for strawberries and cream.

0:52:480:52:50

-This is us.

-Here we go.

-Is this it?

0:52:500:52:52

Oh, that's lovely!

0:52:520:52:54

30 is bid. Thank you. At £30.

0:52:540:52:56

35, 40, 45. The lady has bid in the room at £45.

0:52:560:53:00

-Here we go, here we go.

-Come on!

0:53:000:53:03

Any advance at £45? I will sell.

0:53:030:53:06

Make no mistake. At £45 in the pink, there.

0:53:060:53:09

What do we think? Is that good? It's more than 30.

0:53:110:53:14

-I know but we paid 80.

-Oh.

0:53:140:53:17

Yeah, good try there, Helen. Still, not a huge loss.

0:53:190:53:25

I've just done a quick calculation

0:53:250:53:27

and Greece are in better shape than we are.

0:53:270:53:30

Very good.

0:53:300:53:31

So I'm going to have to go and speak to the IMF

0:53:310:53:34

to get us out of this.

0:53:340:53:35

Yes.

0:53:350:53:37

Helen is certainly in the lead right now.

0:53:370:53:40

But all that can change on an item.

0:53:400:53:43

Time for her beloved Italian piano accordion.

0:53:430:53:47

There are accordion collectors out there. I'm sure there are.

0:53:470:53:50

And this is coming up now.

0:53:500:53:53

Who would like to start the bidding at £50 for the accordion?

0:53:530:53:57

Button accordion there.

0:53:570:53:59

-30 then to bid.

-Oh, no!

0:53:590:54:01

I am lowering the bid. Any interest now?

0:54:010:54:03

We will have to lower it. 20. Come on, anyone.

0:54:040:54:07

-Oh, come on!

-He can't sell it.

0:54:070:54:08

Thank you very much. At £20. Are we all done then? That's all we have.

0:54:080:54:13

At £20. I'm going to sell.

0:54:130:54:15

Make no mistake.

0:54:150:54:16

He's laughing.

0:54:160:54:19

With you, not at you, Helen.

0:54:190:54:21

I think this is a strong ukulele room.

0:54:210:54:24

That will certainly help Hardeep catch up.

0:54:260:54:29

Next up, it's his 1930s sugar shaker. Fingers crossed.

0:54:310:54:35

We need £2,000 on this one

0:54:350:54:37

to make up the money we lost on all the others.

0:54:370:54:39

£30 anywhere?

0:54:390:54:41

£30 on the net. Take it away at £30.

0:54:410:54:44

In the room or on the phone anyone?

0:54:440:54:48

The internet bid has it and I'm selling. It's a single bid.

0:54:480:54:52

-I'm going to sell at £30.

-What?!

-£30 only. There we go.

0:54:520:54:55

-Still a bargain. You should have made a profit.

-£16 profit on that.

0:54:550:55:00

-That was such a good thing.

-Very cheap.

0:55:000:55:03

It's Hardeep and Catherine's first win of the day

0:55:040:55:07

and they have over doubled their money.

0:55:070:55:09

Can Helen's lizard brooch do as well? Old slinky.

0:55:110:55:14

I had to have it.

0:55:140:55:16

-I know that's bossy but...

-I liked it when you were bossy.

0:55:160:55:19

And we'll start the bidding here at £20. 20 is bid.

0:55:210:55:25

-Any advance on £20 now? I'll take 22 if you wish, madam?

-Come on!

0:55:250:55:28

On the net. Anywhere? At £20 only.

0:55:280:55:31

All done and I will sell on commission at £20.

0:55:310:55:35

-I'm upset now.

-Commission bid.

-It's a shame, actually.

-Yeah.

0:55:350:55:38

I expected that do a bit better.

0:55:380:55:41

That's only a small loss.

0:55:410:55:43

How will Hardeep's ginger jug get on?

0:55:460:55:50

£30 is bid. At £30 straight in.

0:55:500:55:53

We need more. We need a lot more.

0:55:530:55:56

Any further interest in the room or on the net?

0:55:560:56:00

At £30 then. All done and we'll sell.

0:56:000:56:02

£30 for 290.

0:56:020:56:06

I'm disappointed for you. It should have done a bit more than that.

0:56:060:56:09

I'm disappointed for you because you really liked it.

0:56:090:56:12

I really like them. I think they're really nice things.

0:56:120:56:15

Hardeep seems happy enough just to have bought something that he loved.

0:56:150:56:19

Up next is their final item of the auction, Helen's walking stick.

0:56:190:56:23

We can start the bidding here at £20. Any advance on 20 now?

0:56:230:56:27

Any advance of £20? 30, 40.

0:56:270:56:30

At £40 we have the internet commission bid.

0:56:320:56:35

-A commission bid.

-We're in profit. We're in profit.

0:56:350:56:37

Anyone else if you wish. No?

0:56:370:56:40

£40 only. All done.

0:56:400:56:42

£50 anywhere in the room? Last chance.

0:56:420:56:45

-I thought it might be a bit more than that.

-We got 50.

0:56:450:56:48

-Sold.

-Did it make 50?

0:56:480:56:51

-It made 40.

-I thought somebody said...

-Congratulations. Well done.

0:56:510:56:55

£40 still means a decent profit. You can walk away happy with that one.

0:56:550:57:00

-I'm happy to take the profit.

-I'm thrilled.

0:57:000:57:03

I'm absolutely beyond thrilled that thick...

0:57:030:57:08

-Overall it's not been a great performance.

-It's been hard.

0:57:080:57:11

-It's been very hard.

-Do you know what? It's been great fun.

0:57:110:57:13

-Oh, it has.

-We've had a lovely time.

0:57:130:57:15

-We've massively enjoyed it.

-Shall we go and get a cup of tea?

-Yes.

0:57:150:57:19

Both teams started their trip with £400.

0:57:190:57:22

Hardeep and Catherine made a loss of £141.90,

0:57:220:57:28

leaving them after auction costs with £258.10.

0:57:280:57:32

Helen and Mark made a smaller loss of just £42.20, leaving them

0:57:320:57:37

after costs with a final tally of £357.80,

0:57:370:57:42

making them today's lesser loser.

0:57:420:57:45

I mean, overall winner!

0:57:450:57:47

-We won!

-Yay!

-Well done.

-Well done to you.

0:57:470:57:50

-I can't believe it!

-I think antiques was the winner.

0:57:500:57:53

It was!

0:57:530:57:56

Well done on your road trip and you've learnt so much.

0:57:560:57:59

-We are going to let you drive off.

-Thank you, thank you.

0:57:590:58:02

Right, let's burn some rubber.

0:58:040:58:05

I'm going to burn some rubber, just as soon as I'm harnessed. Yes.

0:58:050:58:09

-Ciao.

-Bye.

0:58:090:58:11

Bye!

0:58:110:58:13

-Amazing, amazing, amazing.

-What a lovely way to spend a few days.

0:58:150:58:19

It's been a journey, hasn't it? It's been an odyssey.

0:58:210:58:25

-I wouldn't have missed it.

-No.

-I've had time out from my normal life.

0:58:260:58:30

-We've had a laugh.

-We've had a great laugh.

0:58:300:58:33

And so have we. Cheerio, chaps!

0:58:330:58:36

Comedian Hardeep Singh Kholi and much-loved comedy actress Helen Lederer join the road trip. Aided by experts Mark Stacey and Catherine Southon, they hunt for antique treasure around London and head to auction in Essex.