Clive Russell and Tim Healy Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Clive Russell and Tim Healy

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. Two titans of British acting hit the road today as Game of Thrones star Clive Russell takes on Auf Wiedersehen, Pet star Tim Healy.


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Transcript


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-The nation's favourite celebrities...

-I've got some proper bling here.

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-..paired up with an expert...

-What? What?

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..and a classic car.

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Pick your legs up, girls!

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Their mission - to scour Britain for antiques.

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All breakages must be paid for.

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This is a good find, is it not?

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no easy ride. Who will find a hidden gem?

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Who will take the biggest risks?

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Put on my antiques head on.

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Will anybody follow expert advice?

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I think it's horrible!

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There will be worthy winners...

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This is better than Christmas!

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..and valiant losers.

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Time to put your pedal to the metal.

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This is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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On today's Road Trip, two titans of British acting -

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Clive Russell and Tim Healy - are braving the elements.

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It's getting quite spooky, isn't it? It's almost misty.

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Good weather for a horror movie.

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It's actually getting darker.

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It's not normally like this, the road trip, is it?

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They are usually in summer frocks and shorts.

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Fear not, chaps.

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The tranquil world of antiquing will be a walk in the park for such

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a hardy pair.

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Cracking hair, boys.

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Tim and Clive first met on the set of British sitcom Heartburn Hotel.

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I think it was 1999.

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We did two series and we did a Christmas special.

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-Are you into antiques, are you?

-It fascinates me in a way.

-Yeah.

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-There's a clutch on the left-hand side.

-All right, all right.

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Left-hand side's the clutch.

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THEY LAUGH

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CHUCKLING: Yeah. Remember, it's a left-hand drive, Clive.

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They are burning rubber and gears in a 1964 Mustang. Oh, yeah.

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# Mustang Sally. #

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The Mustang was manufactured before seatbelts were mandatory,

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which is why our celebs aren't wearing any.

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From humble beginnings as a welder in a factory,

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Tim shot to fame in the '80s hit Auf Wiedersehen, Pet.

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He worked with Clive again when the series returned in the noughties.

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He's since taken on many roles,

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for example, Still Open All Hours and as transvestite Lesley

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in hit comedy Benidorm.

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Clive too has had a colourful career, starring as Blackfish

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in international phenomenon Game Of Thrones.

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He's also featured in British classics such as Great Expectations,

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national favourites like Corrie, and cult drama Ripper Street.

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Armed with £400 each, they are going head-to-head.

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But after 16 years of friendship, I wonder how competitive they are.

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-Are you a good haggler?

-I am used to haggling a bit when I'm abroad.

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-Yeah.

-I've just come back from Spain, from Benidorm.

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You know, you never pay the price they ask for.

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It's sort of really, really, really doesn't matter who wins,

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-as long as it's me.

-As long as it's me, pal.

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I'm a little bit nervous about your international experience.

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-The international haggler.

-Haggling.

-The haggler.

-Haggler Healy.

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-Healy the Haggler.

-Healy the Haggler.

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Crikey! Haggler Healy, hey?

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Don't worry, Clive, here to even out the playing field are dealers

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David Harper and Margie Cooper.

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We've only worked once together.

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Why do I sense I've worked with you for 48 years?

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-Why?

-Because I talk a lot. I pack a lot in.

-Who is winning so far then?

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-Uh, you.

-So you need to get me on this trip.

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Oh, I will. I will, definitely.

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This is going to be one competitive Road Trip.

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David and Margie are eating up the miles in a 1974 Jensen Interceptor,

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and very much looking forward to meeting their celebs.

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-So, we've got two pretty cool characters today.

-Yeah, we have.

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They seem to know each other well, don't they?

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Auf Wiedersehen, Pet, which I remember really well with Tim.

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-I don't remember that.

-I loved that series. Never missed it.

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I can't resist a Geordie.

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Uh-oh. Look out, Tim.

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On today's Road Trip, we are travelling through Tim's home county,

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Northumberland, and across the border into Scotland...

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..ending up at an auction in Leith, in Edinburgh.

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Our journey starts by the beautiful walled city of Berwick-upon-Tweed.

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I can hear a crunch. I can hear... That is a...

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-Oh, it's a Mustang not going very quickly.

-Whey!

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Margie, you are dripping all over me. Go and get your Geordie fellow.

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Go on. Off you go.

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Go on!

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Hey, good morning!

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Good morning!

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Clive, come under my umbrella. Good to meet you too.

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Can we go somewhere warm?

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It's a quick hotfoot into the nice

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and dry shop called Auction House Berwick.

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Ha, that's confusing.

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Are you into any antiques in any way?

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-Well, my lady, Jo, actually, she's the antique fanatic.

-Oh, right.

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-She collects these little pigs.

-Oh, right.

-Porcelain pigs.

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-Right, all different types.

-Yeah, got hundreds of them.

-Oh, right.

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-Yeah. But...

-Let's see if we can find one.

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Will they find what they are looking for?

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-What? That's a nice-looking box.

-Yeah.

-Look at that.

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Right. Lovely mahogany box. Beautifully made. Look at that.

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Yeah.

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-Ooh.

-Oh.

-Some kind of early printing press.

-Right.

-£28.

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Cheap.

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This mahogany box was used to store items for printing purposes,

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such as movable type.

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It's a lovely bit of mahogany. Try making that...

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What do you think, made in '30s?

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-No, it's earlier than that.

-Earlier than that.

-Yeah.

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-I reckon that's tipping into late Victorian, Edwardian.

-Really?

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Well, look, shall we just get it... Let's tuck it away.

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-We are in the shop with those two.

-OK.

-So let's tuck it away.

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-Should we hide it?

-Yeah.

-Hide it.

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SHE GIGGLES

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That's one possible purchase squirreled away.

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How are Clive and David getting on?

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Do you have any interests in antiques?

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-I think on the broader side, it's really fascinating.

-Yeah.

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The history of objects and what they represent and stuff like that.

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As far as being in any way knowledgeable, no.

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Not to worry, Clive. Our David loves a challenge.

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Let's see if we're on the same wavelength

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-when it comes to things that we like.

-Yeah.

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So, I'm stood next to this sofa.

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I absolutely love it, for a number of reasons. But what do you think?

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-It's a delicate, feminine sofa, I'd say.

-Yeah, it is.

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And that's very pleasing.

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I like to go to sleep on a sofa.

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I think that means he likes it.

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And if you like sleeping on sofas,

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-can I just demonstrate something? As tall as you are...

-Yeah, go on.

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-..you could sleep on this. Let me show you.

-Go ahead.

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-One arm.

-One arm, yeah.

-This, Clive...

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..is a double-armed drop-arm sofa. You could recumbent on that.

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-I'm now going to lie on this.

-Please do.

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-One moment, please. I'll do it this way.

-Yep.

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So you've got the pillow ready.

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-Oh, my God, that fantastic.

-How tall are you?

-Somewhere...

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6'5", 6'6".

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Just a bit taller than David, then.

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Normally they drop-arm just one, but this, with a double drop-arm,

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is a really good feature.

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-I'm assuming it's a Victorian, Edwardian.

-Yeah, absolutely.

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Bang on. Yeah, I think safe to say described as Edwardian.

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A sofa of this quality nowadays could cost you thousands of pounds.

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Yeah, I think... I think we should go for this.

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Time to call on dealer Steve.

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Nice trousers, Steve.

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-You look so good with what you are wearing.

-It's colour-blindness.

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I'm colour-blind too.

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THEY LAUGH

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Now then. Edwardian sofa.

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-Yeah.

-Is it cheap?

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I've spoken to the vendor

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and he would be happy with somewhere around the £200 mark.

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Ah, right.

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Yeah, it's going to kill us, Clive.

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It needs to be 50 quid and I don't want to be cruel.

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No, no, no, I fully understand.

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It needs to be that for us to get it into sale.

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I'll see the best I can do. I mean, you said £50.

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You haven't moved upwards yet.

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50 to 70, tell him that sort of range.

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And it's a sale today.

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It might go... In auction, you might not get a bid on it.

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David's taken the lead on this one, so it is now a waiting game.

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Back with their rivals, Margie is onto something.

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-That is a coronation chair.

-All right.

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-The coronation chair, it's in Westminster Abbey.

-Yep.

-And if it...

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Oh, look, if it were silver, they fetch about 100, 120 quid.

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But it's not silver.

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Which is why its ticket price is just £10.

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But what about the box Margie's secreted away? Busy man today, Steve.

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We're just thinking, but we haven't decided about that box down there.

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The one with the printing thing, bit of a useless thing, actually.

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-Awful. Nobody's going to want it.

-Is that you trying to get a discount?

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SHE LAUGHS Oh, yes. Stand by.

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-It's a lovely box.

-It is, yeah.

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-How much is it?

-It's on at 28.

-Yeah.

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-It's a lot of money, isn't it?

-What are you looking at me for?

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Is the notorious Haggler Healy about to reveal himself?

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-I would've thought about...14.

-14?

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-You can't manage 14 quid?

-What a team.

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Anything you see in Benidorm, you say, "How much is that?"

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It's half price.

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Certainly a tactic you could try.

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-I can do 20.

-See you at 16.

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16? Well, that's fair.

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-Are you sure you want it?

-Yeah, I'll have it for 16.

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-Cash. Good lad.

-Our first...

-Thank you so much.

-You got a deal.

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-Our first... Well done.

-That's one thing we've got. That's good Right.

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We are on the way.

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Well, that was quick.

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So, that's one in the old bag.

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Ooh, look out. Margie's on the warpath.

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-"No access."

-No access.

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We're not going to bother about that. Right?

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-No access. Let's go.

-SHE LAUGHS

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Quick!

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I feel like a naughty schoolboy.

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Maverick Margie is leading Tim astray here.

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-Oh, crikey, Denise.

-That's Denise, my ex-wife, yes.

-Oh, your ex?

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And one of her scripts.

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In typical soap fashion, you just never know

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when an ex-wife is going to pop up in a basement. Ha!

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It's nice to see the old face.

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-LAUGHING:

-You'll get into trouble for that!

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-I don't mean the 'old' face.

-The familiar face.

-Familiar.

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Watch it!

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Clive and David are on the move again.

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-What period is that?

-I think that's 1950s.

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It reminds me of my childhood.

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-Does it?

-These boxes, particularly.

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Dad comes home from work at six and we say,

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-"Come on, let's go have a picnic on the beach."

-Yeah.

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"And have sandwiches."

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It's funny, isn't it, how an item, an object, can suddenly just

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-take you back in time, what, 50 years to when you were a kid?

-Yeah.

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I think it's got you, hasn't it?

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-It's grabbed you, this thing, hasn't it?

-Mm, absolutely.

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Clive's found another item he loves. Now all he needs to find is Steve.

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What on earth has happened to you?

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The face of a grandfather clock has just knocked me on the nose.

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Oh. Well, see, the dangers of the antiques business.

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But I've been the auctioneer, I'm still standing here.

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Well, we want to talk about this thing.

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-But first of all, let's cover the sofa.

-Would you do it at 80?

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Yes.

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-Sorry, I didn't consult you there.

-DAVID LAUGHS

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-Quick, quick.

-You've done it. You've done it. That's fine.

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Clive is quick to take control, but perhaps a bit quick to say yes.

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Let's see if you can improve on the picnic hamper. How much is it?

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Well, with the thermos missing, erm...

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I would be looking for about £40, £50.

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-That's a little bit scrubby, isn't it?

-It is. It needs a wiping.

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This damage. Down there, a little bit down there.

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-I can't see it down there.

-Yeah.

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-You don't hang about, you, Clive, do you?

-No, I like it.

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You're learning here.

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Mr Nice Guy has gone.

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So, can you come down to something like 25 for that?

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£25... There's a missing thermos.

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-And a bit scrubby.

-Yeah, I think that's reasonable.

-Yeah?

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-Have you done another deal, have you?

-Yeah.

-Well, I'm just...

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-Superfluous to demand.

-Totally, totally.

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Yeah. It's the Clive show.

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Well, that's two things I really like we've got. That's terrific.

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They are on a roll with two items in the bag for a grand total of £105.

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Tim and Margie are still out of bounds, though.

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Any bargains in the basement?

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Ahh.

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-Oh, those look nice.

-They're silver?

-Those are those...

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Well, there's no silver mark but it feels like silver to me.

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There's a maker's mark.

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It's a traditional Scottish brooch that would hold tartan

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fabric in place.

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-We're going to be in Edinburgh, of course.

-Yeah.

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-So it may be quite popular, might it?

-Yeah.

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-Yeah, it's got... It looks like silver.

-Yeah.

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-There's no marks telling us it is.

-Right.

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Let's just find out.

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Time to call on Steve again.

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We quite like these.

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I'm a bit worried that there's no silver mark, Steve.

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Do you know if this...?

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-They are definitely silver.

-Are they?

-I've had them tested.

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The owner is looking for around £100 for the two brooches.

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I was thinking 25 each.

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Would be about right, wouldn't it?

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-Oh, wow.

-25 quid each.

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Look out, Haggler Healy is back in action!

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30 quid, then. There, we've gone up by five.

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Well, look, they should be £100.

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-Erm... They should be.

-Hm.

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-I'll go to 80.

-80...

-You're still in with a good shout there.

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-Do you remember upstairs...

-Mm-hm.

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..when we saw that cheap little throne...

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-Oh, yeah.

-..that was like a money box.

-Yeah.

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£80 and I'll throw the chair in.

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I did you a real good deal on the box. Go on.

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-Well, let's say 75.

-Oh!

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-You see, I haven't primed him.

-£75.

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I think it's only worth a fiver, that chair.

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-75 and then we're happy, aren't we?

-£77.50.

-77.50. Done. OK.

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Well done, sir.

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Steve, you deserve a kiss for that.

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You're not getting one.

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Oh, lordy. Tim strikes a hard bargain.

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That's three items snapped up.

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£21 for the box and throne and £72.50 for the brooches,

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making Tim's total spend £93.50.

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-Nice doing business with you.

-Fingers crossed.

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-Hey!

-Ey! Ey, big fella.

-How's it going?

-How are you getting on?

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-Very good. We are very relaxed. How about you two?

-How many items?

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-Yeah, we had a great morning, haven't we?

-Yeah, we have.

-Have you?

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-Yeah, we've got the star purchase, haven't we?

-Good fun.

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Don't look at me like that.

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You've just got that overconfident look in you.

0:14:210:14:24

-Ha, has he?

-He used to be so likable.

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Things have never changed, have they?

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-Come on, let's go.

-Nice seeing you guys.

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-We'll follow you out.

-See you.

0:14:310:14:32

Clive and David are back in the car. Thankfully, it has brightened up.

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I'm competing against somebody I know rather well,

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who beat me at golf. He's heading for a fall.

0:14:530:14:56

So, we'll try to beat him, then, Clive, is that what you're...?

0:14:560:14:59

I think there's no point in coming out in second place.

0:14:590:15:01

Sounds like a man on a mission to me.

0:15:030:15:05

Now, in such a show like Game Of Thrones, that's a phenomena,

0:15:060:15:09

-isn't it?

-Yeah. That is a completely one-off in my life.

0:15:090:15:12

I've never been involved in anything with quite that visibility.

0:15:120:15:17

When I was chosen, the blogs were, "Who the... Who?

0:15:170:15:21

"Who is this?"

0:15:210:15:22

Clive and David have crossed the border into Scotland

0:15:240:15:27

and are heading to the small coastal town of Eyemouth,

0:15:270:15:30

a seemingly tranquil fishing port.

0:15:300:15:33

But Clive and David have come to learn about the brave community

0:15:330:15:36

whose rebellious nature and fearless fishing practices lead them to fall

0:15:360:15:41

victim to one of the worst British fishing disasters of all time.

0:15:410:15:45

-Hi. Hello, hi! I'm Peter.

-Hi, Peter. I'm Clive.

-Hi, Clive.

0:15:450:15:48

Hello Peter. David. Nice to meet you.

0:15:480:15:50

Thank you very much for coming. Welcome to Eyemouth Museum.

0:15:500:15:53

In the 19th century, Eyemouth was a thriving fishing town.

0:15:530:15:57

Home to a fleet of 45 boats,

0:15:570:15:59

the whole community was involved in the industry.

0:15:590:16:02

This was the booming fishing port in Scotland.

0:16:060:16:09

And so through the 1860s and 1870s in particular,

0:16:090:16:12

almost in every tide you had families from the Buchan headlands

0:16:120:16:16

to the Cornish inlets arriving at Eyemouth to make a living.

0:16:160:16:19

The fishermen of Eyemouth were notorious for braving the seas

0:16:190:16:21

in all weathers.

0:16:210:16:23

There were at least one dozen occasions in the 1860s,

0:16:230:16:25

1870s, leading up to 1881, when the Eyemouth fleet alone were

0:16:250:16:30

the only fleet out that day.

0:16:300:16:32

They then came back, with good catches,

0:16:320:16:34

there was high prices because the market was empty of fish.

0:16:340:16:37

So they became used to taking risks.

0:16:370:16:39

They also had a reputation for being a rebellious, unruly bunch.

0:16:390:16:43

People wouldn't go to church. People didn't get married so much.

0:16:430:16:46

They didn't really care. Children were born out of wedlock.

0:16:460:16:49

Why did that matter? Children didn't go to school.

0:16:490:16:51

"Why would we send children to school when we need them

0:16:510:16:54

"on the boats? We don't want to do that."

0:16:540:16:56

They're like rebels. It's a town of rebels.

0:16:560:16:57

-The Wild East.

-The Wild East.

0:16:570:16:59

The ministers and the local council and the laird,

0:16:590:17:04

they were virtually tearing their hair out.

0:17:040:17:06

Their anti-authoritarian attitude can be linked to a fallout with

0:17:060:17:10

the church dating back to the 1840s.

0:17:100:17:13

The Church of Scotland suddenly realised that only in Eyemouth

0:17:130:17:16

they were entitled to demand a full 10% of the fishermen's

0:17:160:17:19

earnings in something called the fish tithe.

0:17:190:17:21

And over the next 20 years or so, a row erupted.

0:17:210:17:25

At times, it was a violent row.

0:17:250:17:26

There were riots on the streets. There was also quite

0:17:260:17:28

sophisticated political pamphleting.

0:17:280:17:31

Eventually, the Lord Advocate intervened.

0:17:310:17:34

The church surrendered its claim to their catch and in return,

0:17:340:17:37

a one-off payment of £2,000 was issued.

0:17:370:17:39

That loan, which they had to borrow money from the bank,

0:17:390:17:42

doesn't expire until 1878.

0:17:420:17:44

So that lost 30 years when other ports - Anstruther, Wick,

0:17:440:17:49

Peterhead, Fraserburgh - all these other places got

0:17:490:17:51

substantial government money, Eyemouth got nothing.

0:17:510:17:54

This meant that plans to improve the treacherous harbour entrance

0:17:550:17:59

to make it accessible at all tides were never implemented.

0:17:590:18:03

Something that would have dire consequences on that fateful day

0:18:030:18:07

on 14 October 1881.

0:18:070:18:10

If you have a look at the stonework, you can

0:18:100:18:12

see the original harbour wall.

0:18:120:18:13

It was deeply unsuited to the needs of the fishing industries,

0:18:130:18:16

but it's what they had on October 14.

0:18:160:18:18

So on that fatal day, where did it all go wrong?

0:18:180:18:21

Everybody knew that there was a storm coming.

0:18:210:18:24

One crew decided they wanted to go off.

0:18:240:18:26

Now, the important thing about the fleet here in Eyemouth was, if one

0:18:260:18:29

boat decides to go, the entire fleet goes by honour,

0:18:290:18:32

duty-bound to follow.

0:18:320:18:33

And that's what happened.

0:18:330:18:35

What they didn't know was that Eyemouth was about to be

0:18:350:18:37

hit by one of the worst storms of the 19th century.

0:18:370:18:40

The main boats had gone out roundabout 12, 12.15.

0:18:400:18:44

The others were just making up there.

0:18:440:18:46

They started to play out their lines to fish for the haddock

0:18:460:18:50

when everything seemed to stop for a moment.

0:18:500:18:53

And then suddenly, the hurricane broke with amazing rapidity.

0:18:530:18:57

Those boats which had sails up,

0:18:570:18:59

the sails were ripped to shreds within minutes.

0:18:590:19:01

The others which hadn't got sails up, they'd bare poles,

0:19:010:19:04

they were rocked and tossed about and the entire fleet was scattered.

0:19:040:19:08

The skippers of the boats had a choice -

0:19:080:19:10

try and get through the perilous rocks back to harbour

0:19:100:19:13

or head out to sea and enter the eye of the storm.

0:19:130:19:16

For 19 boats, for 129 men, it was the wrong choice.

0:19:160:19:21

Most boats that try to re-enter the harbour were

0:19:210:19:24

destroyed on the rocks in full view of the men's families.

0:19:240:19:28

And how long before the whole thing about who had died was resolved?

0:19:280:19:32

-Was that weeks or days?

-It did take several days.

0:19:320:19:35

The bulk of the boats which survived that day - 26 boats did survive -

0:19:350:19:39

didn't attempt Eyemouth harbour, so boats were landing in Bridlington

0:19:390:19:42

for a couple of days after and other parts of Yorkshire.

0:19:420:19:44

And other boats, one boat in particular -

0:19:440:19:47

a boat called the Ariel Gazelle - two days after the disaster

0:19:470:19:50

it managed to sail home into Eyemouth Bay.

0:19:500:19:52

The skipper of the Ariel Gazelle

0:19:520:19:54

said he felt heart sorrow as he climbed up

0:19:540:19:57

the pier railings and onto the quayside

0:19:570:19:59

because he knew all the women that were looking at him

0:19:590:20:02

were going to be disappointed except for one - his own wife.

0:20:020:20:05

It was a terrible, terrible tragedy.

0:20:050:20:07

129 men were killed, yes, but there were 73 women widowed

0:20:070:20:11

and there were 263 children left without a father.

0:20:110:20:14

As somebody who's obviously got a direct family connection,

0:20:140:20:18

how do you go forward with it?

0:20:180:20:19

How has that taken on?

0:20:190:20:21

As a child growing up and being given stories of Black Friday,

0:20:210:20:25

which is what people in Eyemouth would refer to the disaster day as,

0:20:250:20:28

I became fascinated with the story

0:20:280:20:31

but also quite angry that history didn't accord a single

0:20:310:20:33

footnote to this dreadful, dreadful thing.

0:20:330:20:35

It's important that people are aware of what happened, why it happened,

0:20:350:20:39

and how this community won through against all that adversity.

0:20:390:20:42

It took over a century for the population

0:20:420:20:45

levels of the community to recover.

0:20:450:20:47

Tourism has now taken over from fishing as Eyemouth's primary

0:20:470:20:52

industry, and the town is once again a thriving hub.

0:20:520:20:55

The memory of the brave and maverick fishermen, however,

0:20:560:21:00

is still strong with those who live or have connections to the town,

0:21:000:21:04

just like Peter.

0:21:040:21:05

Tim and Margie are travelling 15 miles west to visit

0:21:090:21:13

the picturesque town of Duns.

0:21:130:21:15

This is your world, isn't it, this area? Is it a bit north for you?

0:21:150:21:19

This is what I call God's allotment.

0:21:190:21:22

Which is Northumberland. I mean, it's just...

0:21:230:21:27

It's beautiful.

0:21:270:21:29

-So, Benidorm.

-Yeah.

-My word.

-It's my sixth year.

-Sixth year?

0:21:290:21:34

Just finished. Oh, it's the best job.

0:21:340:21:37

The word Duns is derived from the Gaelic word dun,

0:21:370:21:41

meaning fortress or hilltop.

0:21:410:21:43

-Nice to meet you.

-Pleased to meet you.

0:21:430:21:44

-Thanks for having us.

-It's a pleasure.

0:21:440:21:46

They're visiting Duns Antique Centre

0:21:460:21:48

where they are meeting dealer John

0:21:480:21:50

who's got a wealth of interesting wares on offer.

0:21:500:21:53

Speaking of which...

0:21:530:21:55

-This came from a very, very old village just outside Duns.

-Yeah.

0:21:550:21:59

We just got it yesterday.

0:21:590:22:01

Tim and Margie still have just over £300 left to spend.

0:22:010:22:04

-Quite interesting. Because garden ornaments do sell.

-Do they?

-They do.

0:22:040:22:08

They do. As long as they are old.

0:22:080:22:09

-But there's no price on it, is there?

-No, there's no price on it.

0:22:090:22:12

-It's just literally in. I was looking for £65 on it.

-What?!

0:22:120:22:16

-65 for a lump of rock?

-But it's a carved lump of old rock!

0:22:160:22:20

Old rock, 65 quid? No.

0:22:200:22:23

Well, I was going to suggest 12 quid when I first saw it.

0:22:230:22:27

65, 12...

0:22:270:22:29

-Well, look, shall we have a little...

-I'll think on it.

0:22:290:22:32

-We'll have a wander.

-We'll have a powwow in the back.

0:22:320:22:35

Lovely. Thank you very much.

0:22:350:22:36

-Have you fallen out with us?

-Not at all.

-HE LAUGHS

0:22:360:22:39

Honestly, we are not in Benidorm now, Tim.

0:22:390:22:42

Luckily, John is thick-skinned.

0:22:420:22:45

-Is this for...fishermen?

-It is.

0:22:450:22:50

-Yeah, for salmon fishing, probably.

-Yes.

0:22:500:22:52

-It's a wading staff.

-Yeah.

-Yes. With some good age to it as well.

0:22:520:22:56

Is it? How old is it?

0:22:560:22:58

Probably sort of around 1900.

0:22:580:23:00

It's a bamboo and steel wading stick used to help

0:23:000:23:04

fishermen across slippery surfaces and to check the water depth.

0:23:040:23:07

You can also remove the end to put a landing net on it.

0:23:070:23:10

Any names on it or anything that gives it anything special?

0:23:100:23:13

No, but I think the top could possibly be Hardy.

0:23:130:23:16

Has it got a price on it?

0:23:160:23:18

That might see something like £18 on it.

0:23:180:23:20

-18 quid.

-Which, you know, for fishing...

0:23:200:23:22

Last of the big spenders, aren't we? And you've got something here.

0:23:220:23:25

That's a Hardy rod, yes.

0:23:250:23:27

I know that things like this can be interesting.

0:23:270:23:29

Hardy's is a prestigious brand of fishing equipment

0:23:290:23:33

that has been around since the 19th century.

0:23:330:23:36

The fishing rod is priced at £40, and the wading stick is 18.

0:23:360:23:41

And there's also that stone birdbath, remember?

0:23:410:23:43

So, what would be the absolute minimum on that?

0:23:430:23:46

I could do 35.

0:23:460:23:49

-I'm going to hit you with 30.

-We'll carry on. We'll carry on.

0:23:490:23:51

-I'll be happy with 30.

-You'll be happy with 30, would you?

-30.

0:23:510:23:54

-Shake my hand.

-Oh, go on, then.

-Good lad.

-That's a bargain now.

0:23:540:23:58

-30 quid for a lump of rock.

-THEY LAUGH

0:23:580:24:01

With a bird on it.

0:24:010:24:03

And not the right type of bird.

0:24:030:24:05

Tim is yet again focused on the deal. His method seems to be working.

0:24:070:24:11

-Well, we bought one thing.

-That's good, yes. Fine.

0:24:130:24:15

So we're going to carry on, are we?

0:24:150:24:17

Excuse me. Those are my sunglasses.

0:24:170:24:20

-I thought they were mine. Sorry.

-No, I just put them on there.

0:24:210:24:24

Do you want your watch back?

0:24:240:24:26

SHE LAUGHS

0:24:260:24:27

Honestly, you can't take him anywhere.

0:24:270:24:29

What has Margie spotted now?

0:24:290:24:32

We've got a horse's hoof.

0:24:320:24:34

Some dear horse that somebody has decided to take his hoof off

0:24:340:24:37

and make it into an ink well, which is quite common.

0:24:370:24:40

-It's Edinburgh silver, and it's 1891.

-Yeah.

0:24:400:24:42

-Horsey people would go for that, wouldn't they?

-They would.

0:24:430:24:46

Usually they have the name of the horse or pony on it.

0:24:460:24:48

-It's a memory.

-It's a memory.

-And with it being Edinburgh silver.

0:24:480:24:51

-I've never seen anything like that.

-No?

0:24:510:24:53

-And with it being Edinburgh silver.

-Yeah.

0:24:530:24:54

-We are going to Edinburgh, aren't we?

-So, shall we get John back?

0:24:540:24:57

-Yeah.

-Give him another...headache.

0:24:570:24:59

Give him another...

0:24:590:25:01

Its ticket price is a hefty £125.

0:25:010:25:04

John, are you... Are you free?

0:25:040:25:06

But is John willing to do another discount?

0:25:060:25:09

Do want to make an offer or do you want me...?

0:25:090:25:12

What would you like to do?

0:25:120:25:13

Lordy, don't ask Tim that.

0:25:130:25:15

Well, what can you give it us for...if I take that spike?

0:25:150:25:20

Wading stick.

0:25:200:25:21

Well, what about...

0:25:210:25:24

Well, what about the...

0:25:240:25:26

-Yeah.

-The inkwell, the rod, Hardy rod and the wading stick...

0:25:260:25:31

Oh, no. Yeah.

0:25:310:25:32

..for 110?

0:25:320:25:34

It does seem like a lot of money to me. I was thinking about 70.

0:25:340:25:38

80.

0:25:380:25:39

-77.50

-SHE LAUGHS

0:25:400:25:42

-OK, then.

-Done!

-I have been.

0:25:420:25:45

-We'll take the lot. Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much.

0:25:450:25:48

-We got there in the end.

-We did. We did.

0:25:480:25:50

Haggler Healy strikes again.

0:25:500:25:52

£40 for the inkwell and £18.75 each for the wading stick

0:25:520:25:57

and the fishing rod.

0:25:570:25:58

That makes Tim's total spend £107.50. Cor!

0:25:580:26:03

After all that wheeler-dealering, it must be time for some shuteye,

0:26:030:26:06

so nighty-night.

0:26:060:26:07

A new day has dawned, but has Clive finally mastered the left-hand drive?

0:26:120:26:17

-CLUTCH GRINDS TIM:

-Ooh.

0:26:170:26:19

Ooh-ooh-ooh!

0:26:190:26:21

Apparently not.

0:26:210:26:23

-Your own chauffeur in a classic car.

-Classic car.

0:26:230:26:26

-Only a few inches from the end of your life.

-Terrified.

0:26:260:26:29

I'm really looking forward to today.

0:26:310:26:32

I'm assuming that you are feeling very confident after your buying.

0:26:320:26:35

-Well, I am, actually.

-Yeah. You've got that look.

0:26:350:26:38

-I am, actually. Yeah.

-Just on the edge of overconfidence.

0:26:380:26:40

Well, we'll have to wait and see, won't we?

0:26:400:26:42

I'm in good hands with David, though.

0:26:420:26:44

-He's really, really good.

-Yeah.

0:26:440:26:46

Well, so is Margie.

0:26:470:26:48

Gosh, they're even competitive over whose expert is best.

0:26:480:26:52

Speaking of which...

0:26:520:26:53

-How's Tim?

-Oh, he's lovely. He really is.

0:26:530:26:56

He's lovely, and he's pretty good.

0:26:560:26:58

-He's got this tough north, you know, Geordie bit.

-Yeah, yeah.

-He goes...

0:26:580:27:02

-IMITATES TIM:

-Well, no, I was thinking £77.50.

0:27:020:27:05

-You know, if it's 80 quid.

-Sorry...

-We've got two deals at £77.50.

0:27:050:27:09

Clive is loving it, and Clive is lovely. Incredibly clever.

0:27:110:27:15

And has a great sophistication.

0:27:150:27:17

That comes out when he's looking at objects.

0:27:170:27:20

Aw, a budding bromance.

0:27:200:27:23

Yesterday, Clive was a winning student

0:27:230:27:25

and bought two items he loved -

0:27:250:27:27

an Edwardian double drop-arm sofa and a 1950s picnic box.

0:27:270:27:31

-It reminds me of my childhood.

-Does it?

0:27:310:27:34

They spent £105.

0:27:340:27:36

Tim unveiled more of a love of haggling than antiques...

0:27:360:27:40

Anything you see in Benidorm you say, "How much is that?"

0:27:410:27:43

It's half price.

0:27:430:27:45

..and picked up six items for £201 -

0:27:450:27:48

a mahogany printing box and miniature coronation throne,

0:27:480:27:52

two silver brooches, a bird in a bath...

0:27:520:27:55

30 quid for a lump of rock.

0:27:550:27:57

..and finally, a Victorian hoof inkwell

0:27:570:28:00

and fishing rod with wading stick.

0:28:000:28:02

I hear a Mustang. That is a Mustang. Oh, look at that.

0:28:040:28:07

-Oh, look at these two.

-Looking cool.

-Hey, very cool.

0:28:070:28:10

-Good morning!

-Good morning, Clive.

-What a day.

-Gorgeous, isn't it?

0:28:100:28:13

-There's no better, isn't it?

-Beautiful day. Mwah!

0:28:130:28:16

-Nice to see you.

-You are with me.

-I'm with you.

-Yep.

0:28:160:28:18

Our couples are heading north this morning to Scotland's capital,

0:28:180:28:21

the beautiful city of Edinburgh.

0:28:210:28:23

Go, David, go!

0:28:230:28:24

Clive and David are travelling to the suburb of Newington.

0:28:260:28:30

I'm really looking forward to today.

0:28:300:28:32

-But Haggler Healy has...

-DAVE LAUGHS

0:28:320:28:34

I've heard about Haggler Healy. He works in 50p.

0:28:340:28:37

THEY LAUGH

0:28:370:28:39

Hackler Healy inevitably has kind of spooked me.

0:28:390:28:41

You're not the only one, Clive.

0:28:410:28:43

You are 6'6", and you are an imposing figure,

0:28:440:28:48

so that's something to celebrate.

0:28:480:28:50

I think the truth is that my physicality has been

0:28:500:28:53

the secret to my longevity in the same way that Tim's is being

0:28:530:28:57

a small, pugnacious-looking animal.

0:28:570:28:59

Yeah.

0:28:590:29:01

Don't let Tim hear you say that.

0:29:010:29:03

Clive and David are visiting Anteaques,

0:29:030:29:06

a traditional teahouse, which also specialises in antiques.

0:29:060:29:09

Meeting them today is notre cher ami Cedric.

0:29:090:29:13

-This is a very posh tea room.

-Oh, good morning.

-Good morning.

0:29:130:29:17

Clive's still got just under £300 left to spend.

0:29:170:29:20

Any tactics today, boys?

0:29:200:29:22

Now, we are going into an auction,

0:29:230:29:24

so we want to be taking something that...

0:29:240:29:27

That people want to buy.

0:29:270:29:28

What a good idea(!)

0:29:280:29:30

..and that maybe they haven't seen,

0:29:300:29:32

so we need to be finding the extraordinarily different.

0:29:320:29:36

You're doing very well as my big brother.

0:29:360:29:38

I'm not sure 'big' is the correct word.

0:29:380:29:41

-WHISPERS:

-I don't want to lose.

-No.

-Do I?

-No!

-No.

-No, you don't. No.

0:29:410:29:46

I mustn't show it. I don't want to lose.

0:29:460:29:48

Don't tell anybody, but I don't want to lose either. Right? OK?

0:29:480:29:51

I won't tell a soul.

0:29:510:29:53

Not that anyone has been particularly quiet about wanting to win.

0:29:530:29:57

I spotted something that I quite like.

0:29:570:29:59

-Are they aesthetically pleasing?

-They are.

0:29:590:30:02

I'll have to try. I'm going to quiz you here.

0:30:020:30:04

What do you think they might be?

0:30:040:30:06

-Does it hold something down?

-It's a rest.

0:30:070:30:10

-For...

-Cutlery.

-You're kidding.

-No, it's a knife rest.

-Seriously?

-Yeah.

0:30:100:30:14

-We've got a full set there.

-Full set there.

0:30:140:30:16

But I can just see the name on the box, which is very exciting.

0:30:160:30:19

-Daum.

-Ah.

-French glass makers. Incredibly up-market. Very posh.

0:30:190:30:25

It's quite rare to find this object in its original packaging,

0:30:250:30:29

and that will add to the value significantly.

0:30:290:30:31

-I'm getting ridiculously excited about this.

-Time to call on Cedric.

0:30:310:30:34

We are very interested in these. I think they are very, very lovely.

0:30:340:30:38

-You have good taste.

-What kind of price are you talking for this?

0:30:380:30:41

The best price I could do for you on the set of 12, it's complete

0:30:410:30:45

and they are all in perfect condition...

0:30:450:30:48

-That's a big build-up, by the way.

-..is £90.

0:30:480:30:51

Sacrebleu!

0:30:510:30:53

-I was thinking 60.

-You were thinking 60?

-I was.

0:30:530:30:57

-Hm. Right, OK.

-OK, thank you very much.

-That's it. You've done it.

0:30:580:31:03

Clive, I think that was beautifully done.

0:31:030:31:06

I would have given you 80, but I'm sorry about him. Honestly.

0:31:060:31:09

-He's awful. I can't take him anywhere.

-You complete ratbag!

0:31:090:31:13

For £60, Clive is now the proud owner of 12 Daum crystal knife holders

0:31:130:31:19

in their original box.

0:31:190:31:21

There's still plenty more to uncover, cher Cedric.

0:31:210:31:24

I've spotted this box here.

0:31:240:31:27

Most people watching this will be screaming,

0:31:270:31:29

"Well, that's just a boring old plain black box."

0:31:290:31:32

-But to me, actually, I find that incredibly exciting.

-Because?

0:31:320:31:37

Because it is a late-19th-century piano box,

0:31:370:31:40

there's no doubt about it.

0:31:400:31:42

Very Sherlock Holmes, you know, from that kind of period.

0:31:420:31:45

But the most exciting thing for me is the fact that that material,

0:31:450:31:49

without any shadow of a doubt, is original.

0:31:490:31:53

If you bend down and have a feel of that and look at that,

0:31:530:31:55

it's a fake leather, something called Rexine that was

0:31:550:31:58

invented during the 19th century.

0:31:580:32:00

And most pieces of furniture that were made in Rexine

0:32:000:32:03

have been reupholstered several times.

0:32:030:32:06

It also has a maker's mark from Morrison & Co of Edinburgh,

0:32:060:32:09

who were a very high-end cabinet-making company

0:32:090:32:11

in the 19th century.

0:32:110:32:13

As a historic thing, it's...it's

0:32:130:32:16

of museum quality because

0:32:160:32:18

it's in its original material.

0:32:180:32:20

But you know what? Ruthlessly, it has to be cheap.

0:32:200:32:22

Got to be 20, 30 quid.

0:32:220:32:24

Cedric!

0:32:240:32:25

-You found something else?

-We have.

0:32:250:32:28

I told you you've got good taste.

0:32:280:32:29

Do you like it?

0:32:290:32:31

-Oh, yeah, I love it.

-Do you?

-It actually used to be mine.

0:32:310:32:33

-Is it cheap?

-It's affordable.

0:32:330:32:35

Ah.

0:32:350:32:37

-OK.

-How affordable?

-How affordable?

0:32:370:32:40

I could do £100 for you.

0:32:400:32:42

What do you think, Clive? Over to you.

0:32:420:32:44

-40.

-Oh, he's gone up!

-40?!

0:32:460:32:48

He's gone up!

0:32:480:32:49

-40?!

-I know it's ridiculous...

-Up from what?

-Ridiculous!

0:32:500:32:54

Well, at least Cedric is still laughing.

0:32:540:32:57

-I said 20, he goes 40.

-20!

0:32:570:33:01

-LAUGHING:

-No chance.

0:33:010:33:02

Is that what you say in Leith then? Nae chance.

0:33:040:33:06

That's right, very good! Nae chance.

0:33:060:33:09

We like you, Cedric.

0:33:090:33:11

Cedric, can I ask?

0:33:110:33:13

There's bits and pieces of old silver-plate and stuff,

0:33:130:33:15

is the box complete?

0:33:150:33:17

-Do we get everything that's in it?

-It's getting worse and worse.

0:33:170:33:19

CEDRIC LAUGHS

0:33:190:33:22

-And everything else around it?

-THEY LAUGH

0:33:220:33:25

CEDRIC SIGHS

0:33:250:33:27

Can you not make it 50?

0:33:270:33:29

I'd like to do a deal at 50.

0:33:290:33:32

It's yours.

0:33:320:33:33

Clive, beautifully done.

0:33:330:33:35

You are so tall!

0:33:360:33:38

That's been noted.

0:33:380:33:39

Clive, good bit of negotiating.

0:33:390:33:42

Yep, he's certainly getting better.

0:33:420:33:44

For £110, Clive now has two more items under his belt

0:33:440:33:48

and a cuddle from an incredibly charming Frenchman.

0:33:480:33:51

-Thanks very much.

-Pleasure doing business with you.

-Likewise.

0:33:510:33:54

Glad to see you again, Cedric.

0:33:540:33:55

MUSIC: Johnny B Goode by Chuck Berry

0:33:550:33:57

Tim and Margie are back on the road, chatting about Tim's time

0:33:570:34:01

as part of the Parachute Regiment in the Territorial Army.

0:34:010:34:04

What made you want to do that?

0:34:050:34:06

I was working as an apprentice welder,

0:34:060:34:09

and I hated every minute of it.

0:34:090:34:10

And I got so bored that I joined the TA.

0:34:100:34:13

And it gave me the confidence to throw the gear down at work one day.

0:34:130:34:17

-And I just walked out....

-Oh!

0:34:170:34:18

I walked out and I went to Durham Technical College

0:34:180:34:21

and said, "I'm going to be an actor."

0:34:210:34:22

And of course, in those days, everybody thought you were mad.

0:34:220:34:25

There weren't any working-class actors.

0:34:250:34:27

Right. God, that is brilliant.

0:34:270:34:29

And the rest, as they say, is history.

0:34:290:34:32

Tim and Margie are also en route to Edinburgh

0:34:320:34:36

and the area of Craiglockhart.

0:34:360:34:38

This was once home to the Craiglockhart War Hospital,

0:34:380:34:42

which during the First World War, pioneered the treatment

0:34:420:34:45

of shell shock, an undiagnosed mental illness similar to PTSD.

0:34:450:34:50

Given his military training,

0:34:520:34:53

this should be of particular interest to Tim.

0:34:530:34:57

-It's nice to see you.

-Nice to see you.

-I'm Catherine Walker.

-I'm Tim.

0:34:570:35:00

-Hi.

-Hi, Margie Cooper.

-Hi. Good morning.

0:35:000:35:02

-What a wonderful building!

-It's beautiful.

0:35:020:35:04

Craiglockhart was built in 1880 and was originally a hydropathic,

0:35:040:35:09

a sort of spa hotel.

0:35:090:35:10

It was taken over by the War Office as a hospital for shell-shocked

0:35:100:35:14

officers in 1916.

0:35:140:35:16

Shell shock, as it was commonly known,

0:35:160:35:18

was a term that the military didn't really like,

0:35:180:35:20

so in their admissions book, it is always neurasthenia,

0:35:200:35:23

which is like a kind of a war...a war exhaustion, a war neurosis.

0:35:230:35:28

Bombs, tanks and machine guns changed the machinery of war

0:35:280:35:32

and the injuries they inflicted, not just physically but also mentally.

0:35:320:35:37

Shell shock had never been formally treated or even recognised

0:35:370:35:41

before the First World War.

0:35:410:35:43

So what were actually all the symptoms of shell shock,

0:35:430:35:48

as it was called then?

0:35:480:35:49

The symptoms were quite unique in some cases.

0:35:490:35:54

There's walking against an imaginary wind, mutism,

0:35:540:35:58

where people just wouldn't speak,

0:35:580:36:00

paralysis sometimes of legs or arms.

0:36:000:36:04

Sometimes there was stammering,

0:36:040:36:07

bad dreams, hallucinations, migraines...

0:36:070:36:10

-So there was quite a variety of symptoms.

-Oh, dear.

0:36:100:36:12

Another fact of shell shock were nightmares and insomnia.

0:36:120:36:16

At night, the men would pace the hallways, smoking.

0:36:160:36:19

These were found up a chimney.

0:36:190:36:22

So for example, there's the cigarette packet which dates

0:36:220:36:25

back to the time of the war hospital.

0:36:250:36:27

It's very typical of the men's reactions at night.

0:36:270:36:31

Smoking was actually banned in the building, even then.

0:36:310:36:33

The number of the people leaving the front with symptoms of shell

0:36:330:36:36

shock increased, but it was still not classified as a serious illness.

0:36:360:36:40

The military were anxious to ensure that they were returned to

0:36:400:36:44

combat as soon as possible.

0:36:440:36:46

As a result, hospitals like Craiglockhart were created.

0:36:460:36:49

What treatments were they doing to these guys to get them

0:36:490:36:53

back on the front line?

0:36:530:36:54

Well, at Craiglockhart, there were two distinctly different treatments.

0:36:540:36:58

One was by Dr Brock. And his treatment was called ergo therapy.

0:36:580:37:03

And what he wanted to do was reconnect the officers

0:37:030:37:06

to things they would've been familiar with and comfortable with.

0:37:060:37:09

So he would send you out, perhaps, to the town and you could

0:37:090:37:13

teach at a school or help in an engineering work or help on a farm.

0:37:130:37:19

The other practice, used by Dr Rivers,

0:37:190:37:21

specialised more in psychoanalysis and dream therapies.

0:37:210:37:25

I suppose this was a very new thing at the time.

0:37:250:37:29

Because it sounds almost like a treatment that we would advise

0:37:290:37:33

nowadays, this far ahead.

0:37:330:37:35

So it must've been the very start of that then.

0:37:350:37:41

Yes, I suppose it must have been.

0:37:410:37:43

Another thing Dr Brock encouraged was creative writing.

0:37:430:37:47

A magazine was founded here, allowing patients a creative,

0:37:470:37:50

cathartic outlet.

0:37:500:37:52

So, it was quite a professional publication, wasn't it?

0:37:520:37:55

-Yes, it was.

-Was it done in-house?

0:37:550:37:57

It was published by Pillans and Wilson,

0:37:570:37:58

who are based in Edinburgh.

0:37:580:38:00

Yeah, it was put together very professionally.

0:38:000:38:02

The magazine's success was greatly aided by the presence

0:38:020:38:05

of two very famous writers.

0:38:050:38:07

Wilfred Owen, the great poet, edited six copies of the Hydra.

0:38:070:38:11

-He was here?

-And Siegfried Sassoon was here at the same time.

0:38:110:38:14

-Really? They made friends here.

-Yes.

0:38:140:38:17

Decorated war hero Sassoon ended up at Craiglockhart after

0:38:170:38:21

he wrote his statement against the war.

0:38:210:38:24

It was read out in Parliament.

0:38:240:38:25

To avoid being court-martialled,

0:38:250:38:27

his friend convinced the review board that Sassoon had shell shock.

0:38:270:38:30

"I am a soldier convinced that I am acting on behalf of soldiers.

0:38:300:38:34

"I believe that this war,

0:38:340:38:36

"upon which I entered as a war of defence

0:38:360:38:38

"and liberation, has now become a war of aggression and conquest.

0:38:380:38:42

"I believe..." This is a bit upsetting to read.

0:38:420:38:45

Owen was admitted, as he was traumatised from fierce fighting

0:38:450:38:49

and had been trapped for days next to the dead body of a fellow officer.

0:38:490:38:53

It was really important for these men to talk about what they'd seen

0:38:530:38:57

and to communicate their feelings through their poetry.

0:38:570:38:59

Here's a modern edition of Wilfred Owen's poetry,

0:38:590:39:02

which includes Dulce Et Decorum Est, one of the very famous poems

0:39:020:39:07

-written by him while he was actually at Craiglockhart.

-Yeah.

0:39:070:39:09

Let's have a read of it.

0:39:110:39:12

Hm.

0:39:120:39:13

My friend, you would not tell with such high zest

0:39:130:39:17

To children ardent for some desperate glory

0:39:170:39:22

The old lie

0:39:220:39:24

Dolce et decorum est pro patria mori.

0:39:240:39:28

Which means?

0:39:290:39:31

It is sweet and meet to die for one's country.

0:39:310:39:33

It is sweet and meet to die for one's country.

0:39:330:39:36

That says it all, doesn't it?

0:39:380:39:40

Wilfred Owen was sent back to the trenches.

0:39:400:39:43

He died one week before the end of the war.

0:39:430:39:46

Sassoon survived his return to fighting

0:39:460:39:49

and lived to a grand old age of 81.

0:39:490:39:51

Shell shock and the innovative treatments received here,

0:39:510:39:55

at Craiglockhart, were influential

0:39:550:39:57

in changing how mental illness was viewed and helped lay

0:39:570:40:01

the foundations for a more humane treatment of the mentally ill.

0:40:010:40:06

-Do you remember the old steam trains?

-I do.

-Do you?

0:40:060:40:09

Yeah, I grew up on steam trains.

0:40:090:40:10

Clive and David have made their way to South Queensferry,

0:40:100:40:13

on the southern banks of the Firth of Forth.

0:40:130:40:16

The Forth railway bridge, an iconic Scottish landmark,

0:40:160:40:19

was built between 1883 and 1890.

0:40:190:40:22

It has recently been named a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

0:40:220:40:26

Clive and David are visiting Sea Kist Antiques

0:40:260:40:29

and meeting owner Jenny.

0:40:290:40:31

-Hello.

-Hi there.

-Hi there.

-I'm Clive, nice to meet you.

0:40:310:40:33

Clive's still got £185 left to spend, but where to first?

0:40:330:40:38

-Shall we go rummaging then?

-Yeah.

0:40:380:40:40

I'll go rummaging there, you go rummaging there.

0:40:400:40:42

You are sending me packing, are you?

0:40:420:40:44

All right, we'll rummage together.

0:40:440:40:46

-All right, good, that's more like it.

-Shall I go first?

0:40:460:40:48

-Do you want to go first?

-No, you go first.

-I'll go first.

0:40:480:40:52

They're like a comedy double act, these two.

0:40:520:40:54

We are not really on a nautical theme, are we?

0:40:560:40:58

No, we weren't thinking of being nautical.

0:40:580:41:00

We could be nautical but nice.

0:41:000:41:02

-I thought that was really good.

-Really?

0:41:050:41:07

Let's scrap that double act idea, shall we?

0:41:070:41:10

Is there a market for these kind of things, like bits of boats?

0:41:100:41:13

Yeah, yeah, bits of boats are good news, I've got to say.

0:41:130:41:16

Architectural kind of things.

0:41:160:41:18

-What about that thing there?

-The propeller?

-The propeller.

0:41:180:41:23

I mean, feel the weight of that.

0:41:230:41:26

-Oh, my God.

-Isn't that fantastic?

0:41:260:41:29

-It really is heavy.

-It's amazing. And the shape...

0:41:290:41:31

-And it's worn as well. Bits knocked off it.

-Yeah.

0:41:310:41:34

It is a functioning thing.

0:41:340:41:35

Look at the way it is constructed, that is not a mass-produced thing.

0:41:350:41:38

Look, it's so... It's almost raw, isn't it?

0:41:380:41:40

Ticket price is £55.

0:41:400:41:42

At an auction in Edinburgh's port,

0:41:420:41:44

a nautical-themed item could be a good bet.

0:41:440:41:47

I think that's bronze.

0:41:470:41:49

It rings like a bell, doesn't it?

0:41:490:41:51

He is getting excited here, Jenny, I can sense it.

0:41:520:41:55

This is a worrying situation. This is very worrying.

0:41:550:41:58

No, it's good.

0:41:580:41:59

Clive's been drawn in hook, line and sinker.

0:41:590:42:01

But is Jenny willing to do a deal?

0:42:010:42:04

Let's be honest, that was chucked away.

0:42:040:42:06

So it's value...is tricky.

0:42:060:42:11

I could let that go for 30.

0:42:110:42:14

I think that will give you a chance.

0:42:140:42:16

-Probably scrap value.

-What would that go as an estimate at auction?

0:42:160:42:21

I think...20 to 30?

0:42:210:42:23

Possibly, possibly. Yeah.

0:42:230:42:25

I think at 20 quid-ish would be good.

0:42:250:42:29

And there's a possibility of a profit. But what do you feel?

0:42:300:42:34

20-ish?

0:42:350:42:37

-Only 20-ish...

-Ish is sounding good, yeah.

0:42:370:42:41

-25?

-That's a deal.

0:42:410:42:43

As always, Clive is quick to accept a deal.

0:42:430:42:47

Lovely, thank you very much.

0:42:480:42:50

Now, Tim would've asked to have the boat thrown in for free too. Ha!

0:42:500:42:54

Speaking of the devil...

0:42:540:42:55

Tim and Margie are still in Edinburgh, and in Newington.

0:42:550:42:59

They're visiting Courtyard Antiques, a real treasure trove.

0:42:590:43:02

-Good, isn't it?

-Wow!

0:43:020:43:05

-A typical antiques shop.

-Look at the stuff in here.

0:43:050:43:07

-That is the size of a real one, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:43:070:43:10

Tim's got £199 left to spend.

0:43:100:43:12

-Trying to win. Trying to beat that David and Clive team.

-Ha-ha.

0:43:140:43:19

Does Lewis have anything to add to their previous purchases?

0:43:190:43:23

What is that?

0:43:250:43:26

You could use that for tying flies.

0:43:260:43:28

You would hold them in these, um...

0:43:280:43:30

-..grips here and then wrap them through.

-Tie your fly.

0:43:320:43:35

Oh, gosh!

0:43:350:43:37

So, what would that...cost?

0:43:370:43:41

Normally, I would ask £25 for that.

0:43:410:43:43

-But you could have it for ten.

-That is a thought.

0:43:430:43:46

That could go with our wading stick.

0:43:460:43:48

It certainly is a possibility. But there is more to scout.

0:43:480:43:51

-I'd like to go upstairs, if possible.

-Yeah.

0:43:520:43:55

OK. You seem at home around here.

0:43:550:43:57

Hey, steady.

0:43:570:44:00

-Tim.

-Yeah.

0:44:000:44:01

Feast your eyes.

0:44:010:44:03

-Blimey!

-It's a good in here, isn't it?

0:44:050:44:07

-Huge, innit?

-Really good in here.

0:44:070:44:10

With such a variety, perhaps a guiding hand is needed here.

0:44:100:44:13

-I know what we can look at - fishing scales.

-Fishing scales?

0:44:140:44:18

-For weighing your catch.

-Oh, yeah.

-They are nice.

0:44:180:44:20

Well, how much is a little trifle like that?

0:44:200:44:24

-Um...

-Lewis?

-15.

-15 quid?

0:44:240:44:27

Here we go.

0:44:270:44:29

If you could do that and the magnifying glass for 15 quid...

0:44:290:44:33

-Have we got you with that?

-I thought you were going to say 20.

0:44:330:44:36

-No, I wouldn't.

-That would have actually made sense.

-No.

0:44:360:44:40

-I'm keeping out of this.

-17?

0:44:410:44:43

-I'm keeping shtum. This is your deal.

-17, and you got a deal.

0:44:430:44:46

Look out, Lewis, he is moving in for a handshake.

0:44:460:44:49

OK. Good man.

0:44:490:44:51

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

0:44:510:44:52

-He doesn't mess about, does he?

-No, a man of few words.

0:44:520:44:56

-I think that's...

-Thanks, Lewis.

-We've got a lot to win now.

0:44:560:44:59

And then some.

0:44:590:45:01

Tim adds this to his lot of fishing rod and wading stick.

0:45:010:45:04

And with that, their shopping is complete.

0:45:040:45:06

Time to catch up with the other team and reveal all their wares.

0:45:060:45:10

DAVID: Well, how are you two feeling?

0:45:100:45:12

-Very good, very good.

-Quite happy?

-A little nervous.

0:45:120:45:14

What are you nervous about?

0:45:140:45:16

Haggler Healy is what I'm nervous about.

0:45:160:45:18

'No need to be nervous, Clive.'

0:45:180:45:20

-There's quite a lot to reveal.

-Oh, my gosh!

0:45:210:45:24

-There we go.

-Are those knife rests?

0:45:240:45:25

-Yes.

-Well spotted.

-Oh, dear, I could never sell those.

0:45:250:45:28

What do you mean you could never sell those?

0:45:280:45:30

I've always had trouble selling those.

0:45:300:45:32

Because you're rubbish at selling things?

0:45:320:45:34

Is this Tupperware?

0:45:340:45:35

-Yes. Then we've got a propeller.

-And is this part of the hotel or...?

0:45:350:45:39

THEY LAUGH

0:45:390:45:42

And then we have a late-19th-century...

0:45:430:45:46

-Effectively, it is a duet stool. A piano stool.

-Two bottoms?

0:45:460:45:49

Well, we don't all have huge bottoms.

0:45:490:45:51

THEY LAUGH

0:45:510:45:53

It is a very good maker, and it is in its original fabric.

0:45:530:45:56

-It's a good maker?

-Yes.

-Oh, right.

0:45:560:45:58

'But what about Tim and Margie's buys?'

0:45:580:46:00

One, two, three...

0:46:000:46:02

-My gosh, that's a heavy birdbath!

-It is, isn't it?

-Is it...

0:46:040:46:07

-is it stone or...?

-Yeah, it is, and it is from an estate.

0:46:070:46:11

-You've left price tag on.

-Uh, no.

0:46:110:46:13

No, no. That's a little...

0:46:130:46:14

-Bird dropping?!

-Bird poop.

0:46:140:46:16

-LAUGHING:

-It's off of him!

0:46:160:46:17

-Right, we did a little fishing... We did a parcel.

-Yeah, OK.

0:46:190:46:23

-Right, and that is for tying your flies.

-That is for tying your flies.

0:46:230:46:26

-Yeah...

-If you're blind.

0:46:260:46:27

THEY LAUGH

0:46:270:46:30

-This is rather nice.

-Yes, this is good. For a horse's foot. Hoof.

0:46:300:46:34

-1891, Edinburgh.

-Is it plate?

-No, it's not.

0:46:340:46:37

-Silver?!

-Solid silver, Edinburgh silver.

0:46:370:46:39

-1891.

-What did you pay for that?

0:46:390:46:42

-£40.

-Well, that is going to double its money.

0:46:420:46:45

-We've got a lovely pair of plaid.

-Are they plated?

-No!

0:46:450:46:48

-They're silver?!

-Solid silver.

0:46:480:46:50

-What's all this about?

-Yeah, yeah. See, are you nervous now?

0:46:500:46:53

-I'm really nervous now!

-I'm nervous!

0:46:530:46:55

That is a rather nice box which held some kind of printing

0:46:550:46:58

-equipment.

-The Queen's chair.

-The Queen's chair?

0:46:580:47:01

-No, this is the Coronation Chair.

-Coronation Chair.

0:47:010:47:03

It's a six...a sixpenny bank.

0:47:030:47:05

'All very cordial so far.'

0:47:050:47:07

All right, good luck.

0:47:070:47:08

-We'll see you at the auction.

-And you.

-See you there.

0:47:080:47:11

'But what did they really think of each other's purchases?'

0:47:110:47:14

There are two very different sets of things to be sold.

0:47:140:47:18

I think it is even-stevens. I was impressed with their stuff.

0:47:180:47:20

I've got to say, I was as well.

0:47:200:47:22

-I reckon...

-We've got...

-..we could have the edge.

-Oh, that's fantastic!

0:47:220:47:27

-Don't you think?

-I think so.

0:47:270:47:28

-Would you swap any of ours for any of theirs?

-No.

-Brilliant.

0:47:280:47:32

-No. No, I'm not going there.

-Brilliant.

0:47:320:47:35

-Me neither. So we are still confident.

-I am.

0:47:350:47:37

-I feel quite confident.

-Good.

-And I really enjoyed it.

-Good. So have I.

0:47:370:47:40

-And I'll see you at the auction.

-I'll see you at the auction,

0:47:400:47:43

-darling.

-Bye, sweetheart.

-See you.

0:47:430:47:45

So, it is off to auction in Leith,

0:47:470:47:49

an area famously home to the five-star Royal Yacht Britannia.

0:47:490:47:53

And today, the boys are having a shot in the Jensen.

0:47:530:47:56

How are you feeling about this?

0:47:590:48:01

Really, I am really excited about it. Are you?

0:48:010:48:03

-I am quite nervous, to be honest.

-Yeah.

0:48:030:48:06

I'm really pleased with what we bought,

0:48:060:48:08

but I've really no idea.

0:48:080:48:09

-I am a bit worried about me...the rock.

-The rock?

0:48:090:48:13

-It's just a piece of rock.

-HE LAUGHS

0:48:130:48:16

-With a bird stuck on the top.

-With a bird stuck...

0:48:160:48:18

The bird's going to be... Somebody's going to buy it because

0:48:180:48:21

-of the bird.

-What about your settee?

0:48:210:48:23

-Oh, I love that.

-Do you?

0:48:230:48:24

I have no idea whether it will sell, but it's really intriguing

0:48:240:48:27

the idea that the things come down.

0:48:270:48:29

It is going to be quite interesting.

0:48:290:48:31

I think probably in the heat of it, all happening, it could get...

0:48:310:48:35

-it could get a little bit... What's the word?

-Get nasty.

-Nasty!

0:48:350:48:38

'I guess we'll soon find out.'

0:48:380:48:40

You're looking remarkably chipper and confident.

0:48:400:48:43

-No, I think we're going to have a good day.

-I do as well, actually.

0:48:430:48:46

I think I might win.

0:48:460:48:47

'Perhaps not nasty - ha - but definitely smug.'

0:48:470:48:50

Oh, here we are.

0:48:500:48:51

-Good morning, all.

-Hello, darling.

0:48:510:48:52

David, how are you? Good to see you.

0:48:520:48:55

THEY GREET

0:48:550:48:57

-Margie, David's got your slacks on.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:48:580:49:01

-Very nice.

-He loves his coloured slacks.

-Very nice.

0:49:030:49:05

They are blue, aren't they?

0:49:050:49:07

'Today, at Ramsay Cornish Auctioneers and Valuers,'

0:49:070:49:10

our celebs' antiques are for sale online, on the phone and in the room.

0:49:100:49:14

Wielding the gavel, or rather Biro, today is Martin Cornish.

0:49:140:49:18

The one item I am not so keen on is the Brexton picnic case.

0:49:180:49:22

We don't get much good weather in Scotland,

0:49:220:49:24

so it is something that is not so popular.

0:49:240:49:26

I think the two items that are probably going to hit

0:49:260:49:30

high prices are the two plaid brooches.

0:49:300:49:33

They are in beautiful condition.

0:49:330:49:34

I think, in Scotland,

0:49:340:49:35

they are something that will sell really well.

0:49:350:49:38

Wheeler dealer Tim and Margie went on a haggling frenzy,

0:49:380:49:42

picking up five lots.

0:49:420:49:43

They spent a total of £218.

0:49:430:49:47

Clive and his new best bud

0:49:480:49:51

spent £240.

0:49:510:49:53

Clive was eager to learn and bought just five items,

0:49:530:49:56

all of which he loved.

0:49:560:49:58

'Speaking of which, first up, it's his propeller.'

0:50:010:50:04

It looks like a piece of artwork.

0:50:040:50:06

'It does,'

0:50:060:50:07

yeah.

0:50:070:50:09

It would look very nice in a garden!

0:50:090:50:10

HE LAUGHS

0:50:100:50:13

50 to start it, quickly.

0:50:130:50:15

50 I'm bid.

0:50:150:50:16

55. 60. Five.

0:50:160:50:19

70. Five. 80. Five.

0:50:190:50:22

90. Five.

0:50:220:50:23

-SHE GASPS

-'100. Your bid in the back."

0:50:230:50:25

-Come on. Come on.

-That is a bad start for us.

0:50:250:50:27

At 100. Last call at 100...

0:50:280:50:31

-Very good.

-That's a blow.

0:50:330:50:35

-Thank you so much, Mother!

-THEY LAUGH

0:50:350:50:37

That's a blow.

0:50:370:50:39

What an incredible start to today's auction.

0:50:390:50:42

Next up is Clive's nostalgic 1950s picnic set.

0:50:440:50:48

£20, I'm bid for the Brexton picnic case.

0:50:480:50:51

At £20. 22. 24.

0:50:510:50:54

-'24 in the back.'

-Go on.

0:50:540:50:56

24.

0:50:560:50:57

26. At 26...

0:50:570:51:00

In front at 26...

0:51:000:51:02

-Oh! Done well.

-It is a pound.

0:51:020:51:05

-Done very well.

-Are you storming out?

0:51:050:51:07

Really good.

0:51:070:51:08

That is a loss after auction costs.

0:51:090:51:12

Let's hope Haggler Healy's as smug after his first lot -

0:51:120:51:16

the mahogany box and miniature Coronation throne.

0:51:160:51:18

30 for the two. 20 for them.

0:51:180:51:21

20 I'm bid.

0:51:210:51:22

'25. 30.

0:51:220:51:24

'Five. 40.'

0:51:240:51:25

Five. Go on.

0:51:250:51:27

45 in the very back.

0:51:270:51:29

-It's the box.

-The box.

0:51:290:51:31

'I have 50.'

0:51:310:51:32

At £50.

0:51:320:51:34

Standing at 50 in the room. At 50...

0:51:340:51:36

No-one on the internet? At 50...

0:51:360:51:39

Well done. Well done.

0:51:390:51:42

Good start.

0:51:420:51:44

'A very good start. Well done.

0:51:440:51:46

'Can Tim's collection of fishing paraphernalia land another win?'

0:51:460:51:50

40 for it?

0:51:520:51:53

£40 I'm bid for this.

0:51:530:51:55

55. 60.

0:51:550:51:57

-It's going, it's going.

-This is brilliant.

0:51:570:51:59

65.

0:51:590:52:01

70. Five.

0:52:010:52:03

80. £80 on the internet.

0:52:030:52:06

At £80...

0:52:060:52:08

A bit more.

0:52:080:52:09

-Come on!

-'80. 85.'

0:52:090:52:11

-Oh!

-Withdraw the bid!

0:52:110:52:12

At 85.

0:52:120:52:15

Against you at 85... No other offers, now at 85.

0:52:150:52:19

-Well done, Tim. Well done, Margie.

-I thought it'd do better than that.

0:52:190:52:22

No, that's good. Good profit. That's a good margin.

0:52:220:52:25

'Absolutely brilliant, I'd say. Another great profit.

0:52:250:52:28

'I think this is going to be a close one. Time for Clive's music box.'

0:52:280:52:32

50 to start it.

0:52:340:52:35

50. 50 I'm bid.

0:52:350:52:37

-'£50 I'm bid for this lot.'

-Come on.

-'55.'

0:52:370:52:39

60. Five. 70. Five. 80. Five.

0:52:390:52:43

90. Five. 100.

0:52:430:52:45

And ten. 120. 130. 140.

0:52:450:52:48

150. 160. 170. 180.

0:52:480:52:51

'180.'

0:52:510:52:52

180!

0:52:520:52:53

It hasn't finished yet!

0:52:530:52:56

At 180, last call...

0:52:560:52:59

-Done.

-Wow!

-Very good.

0:52:590:53:01

-Well done.

-That's a blow.

-That is a blow, isn't it?

-A blow.

0:53:010:53:04

Hey, Tim is not looking too happy,

0:53:040:53:06

but great news for Clive as he has more than tripled his money.

0:53:060:53:10

Now it is Clive's crystal knife rests.

0:53:100:53:13

Nice lot, this.

0:53:130:53:14

In immaculate condition.

0:53:160:53:17

-All signed.

-'All signed, yeah.'

0:53:170:53:19

30 for them. To start them. 30.

0:53:190:53:21

It'll add a bit of glamour to your dining table.

0:53:210:53:24

30. 20 to start them.

0:53:240:53:26

20 I'm bid. 25.

0:53:260:53:27

35. 40. Five.

0:53:270:53:30

-'45 here.'

-Oh, come on!

0:53:300:53:32

'At 45.'

0:53:320:53:33

For the knife rests, at 45.

0:53:330:53:35

Unusual lot, you sure you don't want to have another shot?

0:53:350:53:38

-Go on.

-'At 45...'

0:53:380:53:40

Last call. At 45. 50.

0:53:400:53:42

Five. 60. Five.

0:53:420:53:46

At 65.

0:53:460:53:47

On the right, standing, at 65.

0:53:470:53:50

-One more would be nice!

-'Nobody else.

0:53:500:53:52

-'At 65...'

-Go on, you know you want them.

0:53:520:53:55

At 65...

0:53:550:53:57

That's profit on paper.

0:53:570:53:59

-You nearly made a loss there.

-No, no.

0:53:590:54:00

-How much did you pay for them?

-60.

-60.

0:54:000:54:04

Competition is getting rather fierce.

0:54:040:54:06

So far, Tim has been rather quiet.

0:54:060:54:08

But will his bargain basement silver brooches brighten him up?

0:54:080:54:12

And I can start the bidding at £100.

0:54:140:54:16

-There you go. You're away.

-'£100.'

0:54:160:54:18

110. 120. 130. 140.

0:54:180:54:20

-It's going.

-'150.'

-You're there.

0:54:200:54:22

At 150... At 150.

0:54:220:54:25

They look fantastic with a kilt!

0:54:250:54:27

'At 150...'

0:54:270:54:28

At 150, last call.

0:54:280:54:31

And I'm selling them. Duff 150.

0:54:310:54:34

Very, very, very good. Well done.

0:54:340:54:37

-You can relax now. Oh, you are relaxed.

-I'm already relaxed!

0:54:370:54:41

Very close.

0:54:410:54:42

Just as Martin predicted,

0:54:420:54:44

another item that's more than doubled its money.

0:54:440:54:48

Tim's next item was a bit of a gamble.

0:54:480:54:50

It's his Victorian hoof inkwell with silver top.

0:54:500:54:53

What shall we start the bidding at?

0:54:530:54:54

£80 to get it going. 80 I'm bid.

0:54:540:54:56

-80 quid straight in.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:54:560:54:59

'85 on the internet.'

0:54:590:55:00

90 with me.

0:55:000:55:01

90. 95. 100. And ten.

0:55:030:55:06

120. 130.

0:55:060:55:08

-'140. 150.'

-Oh, somebody wants it.

0:55:080:55:10

-'150.'

-They're paying a lot of money for it.

-'At 150.'

0:55:100:55:13

For the horn. 160.

0:55:130:55:14

170. 180.

0:55:140:55:16

180...

0:55:160:55:18

Go on, say it. It's trotting off or something. Go on.

0:55:180:55:21

At 180, last call.

0:55:210:55:23

And worth it, well done. Tim.

0:55:230:55:24

-Well done.

-Yes!

-Well done.

0:55:240:55:27

-Tim has perked up with that.

-Was that Tim's purchase?

0:55:270:55:30

-Was that Tim's purchase?

-I'm terrible.

-You are getting smug.

0:55:300:55:33

-Look at him now, he's come alive now.

-You picked it.

0:55:330:55:35

That incredible profit sure has woken Tim up...

0:55:350:55:38

and pushed him into the lead.

0:55:380:55:40

Will his Victorian birdbath help maintain the winning streak?

0:55:410:55:45

50 to start it. 50 I'm bid.

0:55:460:55:48

-Yes!

-Got right in.

-'55.'

0:55:480:55:51

-Paid more than that for it.

-'Five.'

0:55:510:55:53

70. Five.

0:55:530:55:54

80. Five.

0:55:540:55:55

90. Five. Nobody else? Going at 95...

0:55:550:56:00

95. 100.

0:56:000:56:01

-Oh!

-'At 100.'

0:56:010:56:03

Last call, and I'm selling it at 100.

0:56:030:56:06

-Well done. Well done.

-Yes!

0:56:060:56:09

Tim.

0:56:090:56:11

-How are you feeling, big fella?

-I'm feeling like... That was wrong.

0:56:110:56:14

At every level, that was wrong.

0:56:140:56:16

It shouldn't have happened.

0:56:160:56:17

'Yep. The big fella's not happy at all.'

0:56:170:56:20

Tim has a good lead,

0:56:200:56:22

but the competition now rides on Clive's final item,

0:56:220:56:26

his double drop-end settee.

0:56:260:56:29

£50 I'm bid. 55.

0:56:290:56:31

60. Five. 70.

0:56:310:56:33

At £70. For the sofa.

0:56:330:56:36

-No!

-'A little bit more, anyone? At £70.'

0:56:360:56:38

-No!

-'At 70.'

0:56:380:56:39

-It can't be!

-A bit more.

0:56:390:56:41

Last call at £70. Nobody else? At 70...

0:56:410:56:45

-Of all the things, of all the things.

-That's a shame.

0:56:450:56:47

-Yes!

-I'm so sorry.

0:56:470:56:51

-Are you?

-I feel disappointed for you.

0:56:510:56:53

-Four-nil.

-Four-nil?

0:56:530:56:55

No, one-nil.

0:56:550:56:57

Gosh, what a shame. Clive loved that sofa.

0:56:570:57:00

But who has come out on top?

0:57:000:57:03

-Cheers.

-Very well done.

-Well done, guys.

0:57:030:57:04

-I am so pleased for you(!)

-Well done.

0:57:040:57:07

-It was really good.

-It was dreadful.

0:57:070:57:09

It has been a competitive Road Trip with both teams starting with £400.

0:57:090:57:14

Clive and David made an impressive profit of £121.62,

0:57:140:57:18

leaving, after auction costs are deducted,

0:57:180:57:21

with £521.62.

0:57:210:57:25

Tim and Margie, however, emerged victorious,

0:57:260:57:28

with £245.30 profit - ha -

0:57:280:57:33

leaving them, after costs,

0:57:330:57:34

with a whopping £645.30.

0:57:340:57:38

-HE LAUGHS

-Yes!

0:57:380:57:40

Well done, chaps. All profits go, of course, to Children in Need.

0:57:400:57:43

That's phenomenal. That really is phenomenal.

0:57:430:57:46

I've no idea, but you're brilliant. You are brilliant.

0:57:460:57:48

-THEY LAUGH

-Can I get a kiss too if I bend down?

0:57:480:57:51

Well done. Congratulations.

0:57:510:57:54

-Thank you very much.

-Amazing.

0:57:540:57:56

-I've loved every minute of it.

-It's been a delight, Clive.

0:57:560:57:58

-Thank you so much. Thank you very much.

-Brilliant.

-Thank you, mate.

0:57:580:58:01

-Off you go.

-Bye!

-7-litre motor, here we go.

0:58:010:58:04

-Bye!

-Goodbye!

0:58:060:58:08

Love you!

0:58:080:58:10

-Well, that was just fantastic. I really enjoyed it.

-Wasn't it?

0:58:100:58:13

So did I, all week. It has been a laugh, a gas.

0:58:130:58:16

-It has been a laugh, it's been... It's been a surprise.

-Yeah.

0:58:160:58:19

-Something different. More lines to learn.

-And meeting you.

0:58:190:58:23

-And meeting you again after all this time.

-After 60 years!

0:58:230:58:26

Brilliant. Well done, you.

0:58:260:58:29

Well done, both. Or should I say... Auf Wiedersehen, pets!

0:58:290:58:34

Two titans of British acting hit the road today as Game of Thrones star Clive Russell takes on Auf Wiedersehen, Pet and Benidorm star Tim Healy in an antiques battle. They shop around Berwickshire and West Lothian before a thrilling auction in Edinburgh.