Naga Munchetty and Steph McGovern Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Naga Munchetty and Steph McGovern

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. It's a breakfast team battle as two of the nation's favourite journalists - Naga Munchetty and Steph McGovern - join the road trip.


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-The nation's favourite celebrities...

-Got some proper bling here.

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-..paired up with an expert...

-Wait! Wait!

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..and a classic car...

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Pick your legs up now, girls!

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Their mission - to scour Britain for antiques.

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All breakages must be paid for.

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This is a good find, is it not?

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no easy ride.

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Who will find a hidden gem?

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Who will take the biggest risks?

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Put my antiques head on.

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Will anybody follow expert advice? Ha!

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That thing is horrible!

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There will be worthy winners...

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This is better than Christmas!

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..and valiant losers.

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-Time to put your pedal to the metal... BOTH:

-Woo!

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..this is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Today, it's all about headlines.

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So you are going to go ugly...

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-Quirky.

-Ugly, quirk...

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GEARS GRIND

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THEY LAUGH

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I have to give them this back in one piece, don't I?

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That would be nice.

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These glamorous girls have swapped serving up news to the nation

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for a spot of antiquing.

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I think the trick is... I've noticed whenever I watch antiques shows,

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is like looking underneath things.

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I noticed a bloke picked a chair up the other day and looked underneath.

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I'm going to try and make myself look good by looking underneath

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things as well.

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Before she became a clever BBC business correspondent...

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It's expected to hit 81% of GDP next year.

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..Steph McGovern was an outstanding young engineer

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with a talent for Irish dancing.

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Especially in stilettos.

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I think you are going to be quite wily, you know.

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All that business sense. All that business acumen.

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You are going to put it all to really good use.

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Yeah, but you have got all that too.

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Yes, Naga Munchetty was a financial journalist as well

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before presenting BBC Breakfast.

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Hello, this is Breakfast with Roger Johnson and Naga Munchetty.

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She also plays a mean trumpet and has got a golf handicap to die for.

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In the 2012 Ryder Cup, which American player lost

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all of his matches except for a half in the final singles?

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-Tiger Woods.

-He was.

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More on that story later. Ha!

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Now, over to our roving reporters.

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It's fun, this.

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A drive in the country.

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I feel like I'm on a drama, though. Like murder mystery.

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Are we like the intrepid duo going to find out?

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-Yeah, like Cagney and Lacey.

-We could be Cagney and Lacey.

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McGovern and Munchetty will have £400 each and the guidance of

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antiques detectives and auctioneers Charles Hanson and Charlie Ross.

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-I watched those two.

-Yes.

-Every morning.

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I get a cup of tea, I go back to bed. Watch Naga and Steph.

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Could you imagine if we made a million with the economics lady.

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Think of the news. That would spread like wildfire.

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Now, without further ado,

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let the chaps in the E-type meet the newshounds in the Jensen Healey.

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-Hello.

-Hello.

-Hi.

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-Nice to meet you.

-Good to see you.

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Good to see you.

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-Hi, Steph.

-Hello.

-Sorry.

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We've been hanging around a bit, but it's great to see you.

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-Who's got who?

-What do you mean who's got who?

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-Who has drawn the short straw?

-Who do you want?

-I want the best one.

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You need to go with the older man, I think. Happy with that?

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-Works for me.

-Younger man. Hey-hey!

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-LAUGHTER

-I'm happy with that, Charlie.

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We are off, Charlie.

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-CHARLIE:

-Jensen Healey.

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Ladies first. Give me a high five.

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I like a man with manners.

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Ah, you'll get manners.

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You won't get much else from me, but you'll get manners.

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Manners and money.

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May the Force be with you, Charlie.

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Goodbye. Good luck!

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Let's get acquainted.

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Have you got antiques at home?

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-Nothing at all?

-SHE LAUGHS

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Nothing at all. Anything? What was the oldest thing in your house?

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-Other than your husband.

-LAUGHTER

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I don't even like shopping.

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Blimey! Ha!

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We start out in Failsworth and then explore Greater Manchester

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before slipping south to Cheshire and an auction in Knutsford.

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-There are bargains out there.

-Yeah.

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There are treasurers which I think reflect the industrial age of

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when the North was great.

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Yeah. There's got to be a lot of things left over.

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Steph's right, of course. And Failsworth, with its

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mill town heritage, could be just the place to begin.

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What fun.

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Come on, Naga.

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Ha!

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Do you think this is the boss?

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I think so. Hello. Ian, lovely to see you.

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-Hello, Ian. Charlie.

-Are you OK?

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We are very well. We are much better now we are inside here.

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This is big. Enough to bamboozle any beginner.

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There is so much. I don't know where to start.

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Don't walk too fast.

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Sage advice, Charlie.

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And hot on the heels is our other pairing.

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In the car, you mentioned about that bit of a jig.

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Are we doing it here? Are we doing it?

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-IRISH MUSIC PLAYS

-All right. Point your toe.

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-Yes.

-Go!

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One, two, three.

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Like that, yeah?

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Naughty Steph is already teaching our lad a few moves.

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But what can Charles offer in return?

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-Buy quality.

-Classy, is that what you are saying?

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Yeah, go classy and let's enrich

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the antiques market with some nice objects.

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Right. So not these, then?

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But then again, you know...

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She is messing with you, Charles. Keep trying.

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That's quite stylish.

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Is it? See, that just screams ugly to me.

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Eh?

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It's kind of like... Don't you think?

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HE GIBBERS

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Isn't that, to you, attractive and invigorating?

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Eh, no.

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No. I'll put it down. OK.

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Looks like Charles may have his work cut out here. What about Naga?

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They are not made of plastic, are they?

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There is a bit of plastic involved.

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Please don't tell me they are made of plastic.

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Oh, no! You hate it.

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-It's fun.

-It's fun. We don't...

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-No, no, no, no.

-But see, it's portable.

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This is about you. Not about me.

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And I freely admit this isn't something that I would buy.

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But I don't care because you spotted that,

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and somebody in this hall has spotted that.

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How much is it? It's not a lot of money.

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It's £12.

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I won't chastise you if you buy that.

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OK. I quite like red.

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Didn't take her long, did it?

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Any progress elsewhere?

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Look at these cameras. I like these.

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-Yeah, they are good, aren't they?

-Look at them.

-Yeah.

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Do you know, if there is one real area of the market that's

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-growing really quickly, it's cameras.

-Is it?

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It's frightening.

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If you had bought cameras five years ago, the return today -

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economics editor - is incredible.

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The market is taking off for cameras.

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If you want me on the Breakfast Show,

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I'm happy to come on and talk.

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Yeah, well, I'll speak to your agent.

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-THEY LAUGH

-One day, maybe.

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Yeah? Thanks a lot, yeah. Thanks a lot.

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You want it to be by Leica or Carl Zeiss for example here.

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But these are all quite well priced.

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Also, these would be harder to take a selfie on,

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-wouldn't they, these days?

-Exactly.

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They are certainly bonding a bit.

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This is quite unusual.

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It's quite fun and retro.

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And quite red.

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She really is a woman with a mission.

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This is something I like.

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ALARM RINGS

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That is... That would look really great on someone's wall.

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-Just to...

-ALARM RINGS

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All right, all right. We get the idea.

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19. He'll say yes to this, I'm sure.

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Watch out, Charlie.

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I put this on hold. Great.

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ALARM RINGS

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There is an alarm bell.

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An alarm clock. That would wake me up in the morning.

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-You'd need that at - when was it - 3.15? 3.45?

-3.45.

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It's quite fun, isn't it? I couldn't deny you.

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Well, it depends on the price. It's £19.

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Well, we can see about that.

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Don't forget the chair.

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Mm-hmm.

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-19 and 12 is...

-31.

-31.

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See what you can do.

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First haggle on her own. Stand by, everyone.

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Let's talk about a deal on this one. 19.

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Right.

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Ten. Straightaway. Cash. Done.

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15.

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Can we go halfway? £12.50.

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No, try a bit harder.

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£12.55.

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14.

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13.

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I can't do it. 14.

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(13. Come on.)

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-13.

-13. Done.

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OK, Ian, let's talk about the chair. The red heart chair.

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I quite like the look of that, but Charlie's got me under the thumb.

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He's got me under strict orders so I can't pay £12 for that.

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I can only do on that ten pounds.

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Nine. And then we can shake on it.

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No, I can't. Honestly. Ten on that one. You won the last one.

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SHE LAUGHS

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-Ten on that one.

-Ten... OK. I'm going to say yes.

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Thank you.

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I've done a deal on my own.

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So, with Naga already off to a colourful start,

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time for Steph to step up.

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I do like bags. And luggage.

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We are in trouble now.

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Relax, Charles.

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-Hatbox.

-Yeah. Oh, that's really cool!

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I'm sure, many years ago, the hat would have been lost.

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-Yeah.

-But voila!

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-It's got a hat in it as well.

-Yeah, exactly.

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But I think this hat is quite new.

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-Can you see this seam here?

-Yeah.

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I wonder whether we could almost say to the owner of the shop -

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could we put maybe a silk top hat, if one fits, into that box.

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Yeah.

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I like it. It suits you. Yeah, yeah. It suits you.

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Would that hat fit in there, for example?

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Beautifully. Look at that. That's really nice.

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-I like your style.

-I do like a good accessory.

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Why don't we see more top hats on the London Tube? Or bowler hats?

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To me, let's dress to impress our country.

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Hear, hear!

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But does it matter that this has obviously got a bit of...?

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It is tired. But it's got a certain air of distinction.

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Yeah. Like you.

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No price, though. Let's hear from Barbara.

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-We're just admiring this hatbox.

-Yes.

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I must be honest. We've taken out that hat over there,

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thinking we could replace the content with a nice, silk top hat.

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Right. Well, the price on that and that together would be...

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Yeah?

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..£75.

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-Say it again.

-£75.

-£75.

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Is there anything else in here you quite like?

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I really like the globes as well.

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That is a good globe. I like that one.

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Yeah, I really like that. I love maps.

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-It's quality. Oak base. That's a lovely globe.

-Yeah.

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-Age wise, what are we talking, 1930s?

-Yes.

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That's a good object. It's really very nice. And that must be...

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Yeah, there is a few little tears in the paper

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from where it's been applied.

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Yeah, and right around here it is a bit as well.

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But, of course, it's old. What's an antique by definition?

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-An antique is something old.

-Exactly.

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A lot older than either of Naga's buys so far.

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-I did a deal.

-How much... You've done a deal?

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Was I not supposed to?

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Depends how much it was.

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I got this for 13 and the chair for ten. 23.

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23 quid. I think that's a pretty good effort.

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-Yeah?

-Congratulations.

-Oh, brilliant!

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I'm thrilled for our team.

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ALARM RINGS

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Don't wear it out, old man.

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I've seen something that's red.

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-SHE GASPS

-Come on. Show me!

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There we go. I just think it's rather charming.

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It's Scandinavian. Scandinavian painted pine furniture.

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And it's probably 1920s. As old as that. So it's bordering on antique.

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And I think it's charming. It's an original, rush-seated stool.

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And the decoration, OK, it's a bit bashed and what have you.

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But look at that decoration. Hand-painted on there.

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I think it's rather charming. It's ten pounds.

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It would make a slightly mismatched and a very red lot with her chair.

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But I don't think it's Naga's cup of tea.

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Naga is very opinionated. She knows exactly what she likes.

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Wow.

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There's a lot here.

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It's not going to be easy for me, is it, to exert my authority here?

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I'm determined to buy one antique.

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And it'll probably be the only one that makes a loss.

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Meanwhile, back in that cupboard...

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There is no price tag on stuff. What would you pay for it?

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-And be quite...

-Yeah, yeah.

-Sorry. Sorry, Barbara.

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No, no. You're fine.

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40 quid.

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LAUGHTER

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-Is that too much?

-Well... Barbara. What did you think, Barbara?

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-Should we buy it now?

-I paid more than that for it.

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All right, sorry, Barbara.

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What would be the best price for the two together, Barbara?

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To an old mate.

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-£150.

-Oh...

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Is that too high?

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I was thinking probably somewhere nearer £100, Barbara.

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-Definitely not.

-What would be the very best?

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Um, the very best...

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..would be 145.

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Would 135 give you a margin?

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-It's very, very close.

-Yes.

-But I'll do it.

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Should we reserve these for the time being?

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-And then we can talk about it.

-Yeah.

-Or would you rather buy them now?

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I'm a kind of buy-them-now type person.

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Well said.

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-Right, deal.

-OK. Thank you.

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-Thanks a lot, Barbara.

-Thank you.

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We owe you £135. Where should we go next?

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-Do you fancy going to Brazil?

-Yeah.

-Or maybe even Argentina?

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Well, that was exciting.

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Charlie, meanwhile, is still trying his very best.

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The great thing about this is the practical use. You see?

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Oh, my goodness!

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No, but you don't use it for that.

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This just happens to have been a commode.

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But fix the top and you don't need to know about it.

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That is a pure Georgian piece of furniture. And nowadays...

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It's a wooden toilet.

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It's a wooden toilet.

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-I'm in the game of truth.

-You are, aren't you?

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Well, some of what you do is fiction, to be perfectly honest.

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-LAUGHING:

-How very dare you!

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I think it looks boring. I think it looks plain.

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I don't know anyone who has mahogany furniture.

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Oh, dear. Let's pay up and move on, shall we?

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My first ever antiques deal.

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It's a shame they weren't antique.

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No, but they were cheap.

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And they may just make a profit.

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Taking a break from all that acquisition are our other duo.

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-SHE LAUGHS

-Yeah, that's...

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I'm a northern guy, you know? Can you tell?

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-I can. It's the accent.

-I'm quite hard as well. I'm tough.

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-Is this going to turn into a fight?

-We have got one problem.

0:14:000:14:02

Yeah, go on?

0:14:020:14:04

I know you are a football fan. I am as well. I do support Derby County.

0:14:040:14:06

-That's really sad for you.

-Thanks.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:14:060:14:09

Cos I know you support Middlesbrough.

0:14:090:14:11

I do. I absolutely love Middlesbrough.

0:14:110:14:13

-Could you become an honorary Derby County fan?

-No.

0:14:130:14:15

-Sorry?

-No.

0:14:150:14:16

Our Championship chums are heading to the centre of Manchester

0:14:160:14:20

and the city's Museum of Science and Industry,

0:14:200:14:24

where Steph, a former Young Engineer for Britain,

0:14:240:14:26

is keen to find out about a great British inventor and industrialist.

0:14:260:14:31

-Hello, Katie. I'm Steph.

-Hi. Nice to meet you.

0:14:310:14:33

-Hiya. Nice to meet you.

-Hi. Charles. Good to see you, Katie.

0:14:330:14:35

So, Katie, what have we got here, then?

0:14:350:14:38

The museum holds the Ferranti Collection.

0:14:380:14:40

And that consists of archives

0:14:400:14:42

and nearly 2,000 objects that tell the story of the Ferranti Company.

0:14:420:14:46

Specifically, Sebastian Ziani Ferranti,

0:14:460:14:49

who founded the company.

0:14:490:14:51

From childhood, Sebastian, who was born in Liverpool to Italian

0:14:510:14:55

parents, showed a talent for electrical engineering,

0:14:550:14:58

as this remarkable archive demonstrates.

0:14:580:15:01

These are some of his sketchbooks from his school days.

0:15:010:15:04

He was kind of inventing from a really early age.

0:15:040:15:06

What age are we going back to? Late Victorian times?

0:15:060:15:09

-Yeah, so it's kind of... Well, he was born in 1864.

-OK.

0:15:090:15:13

-So it's kind of 1870s, 1880s.

-Right, OK.

0:15:130:15:15

So electricity was really in its very early days.

0:15:150:15:19

But he was kind of thinking ahead and wondering about its potential.

0:15:190:15:22

In his mid 20s, Ferranti designed the state-of-the-art

0:15:220:15:26

Deptford Power Station to supply Central London,

0:15:260:15:29

a fragment of which is being used for the frame of the museum's sign.

0:15:290:15:34

And this alternator was one of the many inventions that helped

0:15:340:15:38

found the company he established in the northwest.

0:15:380:15:41

Over the course of his career, he took out about 176 patents

0:15:410:15:45

for various kind of electrical innovation.

0:15:450:15:48

From metres to turbines, generators. He really was a genius.

0:15:480:15:53

The National Grid is a place I've visited quite a lot for work.

0:15:530:15:56

Incredible, spectacular place. Is it true he was part of creating that?

0:15:560:16:00

He did. He kind of championed the installation of the National Grid.

0:16:000:16:04

Because of the work that he'd done at Deptford,

0:16:040:16:06

installing the world's first high-voltage power station,

0:16:060:16:09

he saw the potential that electricity had for society.

0:16:090:16:13

By the outbreak of World War I, the company was an industrial giant,

0:16:130:16:17

employing thousands.

0:16:170:16:18

So when the Minister of Munitions, Lloyd George,

0:16:180:16:21

appealed for help, Ferranti answered the call.

0:16:210:16:24

The war was going to be fought not only on the battlefields

0:16:240:16:27

but in the workshops of Britain.

0:16:270:16:30

And so he masterminded the conversion of his factory to a

0:16:300:16:34

munitions factory, producing shells and fuses for the war effort.

0:16:340:16:38

Yeah, there's nothing like a bit of pressure in business.

0:16:380:16:40

And also, of course, that was the time of girl power, wasn't it?

0:16:400:16:43

Ladies came in force as well, and they really churned

0:16:430:16:47

the shells and things out.

0:16:470:16:48

It was. Ferranti's factory employed over 1,000 new women workers.

0:16:480:16:53

And actually, it was a bit of a family affair because his wife

0:16:530:16:55

Gertrude was actually involved in recruiting these new female workers.

0:16:550:17:00

And his own daughter, Vera...

0:17:000:17:03

-actually became one of the new workers in the factory.

-Wow!

0:17:030:17:06

She actually became quite a skilled mechanic herself

0:17:060:17:10

during those war years.

0:17:100:17:11

That is so forward-thinking, though, isn't it?

0:17:110:17:13

To allow a woman to be a mechanic.

0:17:130:17:15

Yup, the whole family was involved in the war effort

0:17:150:17:19

with sons Basil and Vincent joining up to fight at the front.

0:17:190:17:23

The Ferranti archive includes their correspondence

0:17:230:17:26

with their father, describing how the company's munitions were being used.

0:17:260:17:30

And inventor Sebastian had yet another roll to play.

0:17:300:17:33

He joined a panel of scientists

0:17:330:17:35

and engineers who gathered to come up with new ideas for warfare.

0:17:350:17:40

Part of his role was to assess the kind of steady stream of ideas

0:17:400:17:43

that were sent in by members of the public.

0:17:430:17:45

-Were there many crazy ideas put to the board?

-There were.

0:17:450:17:49

I think the majority of inventions that were sent in by the public

0:17:490:17:52

weren't things that were going to work.

0:17:520:17:54

Examples of some of the more weird and wonderful ones were

0:17:540:17:58

flea-filled shells, magnetic gun grabbers...

0:17:580:18:01

It makes me itchy just even thinking of that.

0:18:010:18:04

There were notable exceptions however, such as the portable

0:18:040:18:08

and effective trench mortar invented by civil engineer Wilfred Stokes.

0:18:080:18:13

He received a knighthood for his efforts in 1917,

0:18:130:18:17

a year that was devastating for the Ferranti family.

0:18:170:18:20

Tragically, Basil was actually killed after a shell attack.

0:18:200:18:24

And there is some really sad letters between Vincent and his father.

0:18:240:18:28

But although he was deeply affected,

0:18:280:18:30

he was very resolute that he was going to continue his own

0:18:300:18:33

war production, cos that's all he could do.

0:18:330:18:36

Victory was, of course, eventually achieved.

0:18:360:18:38

And with remarkable understatement,

0:18:380:18:40

Sebastian's diary for November 11, 1918, reads,

0:18:400:18:44

"Hostilities ceased. Works closed for the day."

0:18:440:18:48

-He was a top bloke.

-Yeah.

0:18:480:18:50

-Like you and I together, isn't it?

-SHE LAUGHS

0:18:500:18:52

We're not that clever, are we?

0:18:520:18:54

Meanwhile, back in Failsworth, Naga

0:18:580:19:01

and Charlie have moved on in their search.

0:19:010:19:04

Look at that. What about that?

0:19:040:19:06

What is it?

0:19:060:19:08

Is it a rake for the bunkers on a golf course?

0:19:080:19:11

I think it's for hay.

0:19:110:19:13

The thing I like about these, it's a split fork.

0:19:130:19:15

So it's just one piece of wood

0:19:150:19:17

and they have cut it and cut it and bent it.

0:19:170:19:20

And then they've put a wedge down there to keep them apart.

0:19:200:19:23

And then a bit of strengthening metal round there.

0:19:230:19:25

-It's just a bit of history.

-How old would that be?

0:19:250:19:28

I'd like to think that's late 19th century.

0:19:280:19:30

-I think that's probably 100 years old.

-That's good.

0:19:300:19:33

I think if it was ever so cheap, I'd buy it.

0:19:330:19:35

Naga permitting, of course.

0:19:350:19:36

-Hello there.

-Aha.

0:19:360:19:38

-I'm Naga.

-I'm Jim.

0:19:380:19:39

-Jim, pleased to meet you.

-Lovely to meet you.

0:19:390:19:41

-Hello, Jim. You are the boss?

-Yes, I am.

0:19:410:19:43

-Now, you are here to help me, Jim.

-Yes.

0:19:430:19:46

I've got this lovely young lady with me,

0:19:460:19:48

-and we've got a competition to win.

-Mm-hmm.

0:19:480:19:51

So we need to buy something, and I've been trying to buy an antique.

0:19:510:19:56

Sounds desperate, doesn't he? At least there is not a lot of red here.

0:19:560:19:59

Other shades, though. Wow.

0:19:590:20:01

-Lots of colour.

-That's a piano and a half, isn't it?

0:20:010:20:04

If Elton John ever loses his...

0:20:040:20:07

-Here is one going.

-Give us a tune.

0:20:070:20:08

SHE PLAYS NOTE

0:20:100:20:12

Quite musical, isn't it?

0:20:120:20:13

-Charlie?

-Hello.

0:20:130:20:15

Look at this.

0:20:150:20:16

That looks intriguing.

0:20:160:20:18

Oh, my goodness gracious me!

0:20:180:20:21

Oh, that's fantastic!

0:20:210:20:23

-Do you know, I thought it was a wardrobe.

-I did.

0:20:230:20:25

Oh!

0:20:270:20:28

It's a big music box.

0:20:280:20:29

-Yeah, it is. Jim!

-Yes?

0:20:290:20:32

-Jim!

-Yes?

-Does it work?

0:20:320:20:34

Come on, Jim.

0:20:340:20:35

OUT OF TUNE MUSIC

0:20:360:20:41

Jim, if I may say so, you need a spot of tuning.

0:20:420:20:45

THEY LAUGH

0:20:450:20:47

What a wonderful thing!

0:20:470:20:49

I've got a price on it at £4,000.

0:20:490:20:51

£4,000! Right, so I've got the cash.

0:20:510:20:54

No, you haven't.

0:20:540:20:55

You're right. I haven't.

0:20:550:20:56

That's enough of that. Something old but affordable, please.

0:20:560:21:00

I quite like that little French clock.

0:21:000:21:03

But that's going to be expensive, too. Do you see the little...?

0:21:030:21:05

-That's very sweet. I like that.

-Do you quite like that?!

-Yeah. I do.

0:21:050:21:08

-HE SHOUTS EXCITEDLY

-We like something together!

0:21:080:21:11

Darling, darling...

0:21:110:21:12

It's 1910-20. Enamel dial. A gilt metal case.

0:21:120:21:16

It's probably only gilded spelter.

0:21:160:21:18

Are we allowed to pick it out?

0:21:180:21:20

I would think so.

0:21:200:21:21

Oh, it's quite heavy.

0:21:210:21:23

Yep. Isn't that sweet?

0:21:230:21:25

-Do you think he'd like to sell us that cheaply?

-Jim!

0:21:250:21:28

-THEY LAUGH

-I love it!

0:21:280:21:31

There is an knackered clock here.

0:21:310:21:32

I think someone has wound it to such an extent that

0:21:320:21:35

it won't wind any more, will it? Is that ever so cheap?

0:21:350:21:38

It's never going to work again. It's got a cracked dial.

0:21:380:21:40

But we like it.

0:21:400:21:42

I think their negotiation is now officially underway.

0:21:420:21:46

Come on, Jim. Hit us with something really cheap.

0:21:460:21:48

-£45.

-Jim, now you're coming down to our price...

0:21:480:21:51

No, no. We've come down.

0:21:510:21:53

If you can get out of it at 35 quid,

0:21:530:21:54

I'll give you 35 quid now for it, Jim.

0:21:540:21:57

£40 and I can... Get your £40 out.

0:21:570:22:00

It does appeal more than a fire alarm.

0:22:000:22:02

THEY LAUGH

0:22:020:22:04

It's not a very good alarm clock, though.

0:22:050:22:07

That wouldn't wake me up.

0:22:070:22:08

-It would if I chucked it at you.

-THEY LAUGH

0:22:080:22:11

Steady on!

0:22:110:22:12

You don't want to toss me 35 or 40, do you?

0:22:120:22:15

I'll go for that.

0:22:150:22:16

Oh! Are you a gambling man?! Good idea!

0:22:160:22:20

-Head or tails?

-I want you to toss the coin.

0:22:200:22:23

Heads!

0:22:250:22:26

NAGA AND CHARLIE CHEER

0:22:270:22:30

-Are you happy, Jim?

-I'm happy.

0:22:300:22:32

You are a top man. Thank you. You're a top man.

0:22:320:22:36

Jim, thank you.

0:22:360:22:38

Blimey. Well, at least it's old.

0:22:380:22:40

Not bad. Three things bought.

0:22:400:22:43

But will tomorrow bring forth antiques,

0:22:430:22:46

vintage or just second-hand?

0:22:460:22:48

I think you've got to stand your ground, haven't you?

0:22:480:22:51

To a certain extent.

0:22:510:22:52

Yeah, but they know what they are talking about and we don't.

0:22:520:22:55

Oh, yeah, good point.

0:22:550:22:57

Yeah. Nighty-night.

0:22:570:22:59

So how was day one for you?

0:23:020:23:04

I got stuck into my passions. George III, mahogany.

0:23:040:23:07

-And surely Naga...

-Naga took one look at it...

0:23:070:23:09

No, she took one look at it and said, "That's a wooden toilet."

0:23:090:23:12

Really?

0:23:120:23:13

Why would you want an old wooden toilet next to your bed?

0:23:130:23:18

I tell you what it would be good for, when you come in steaming drunk

0:23:180:23:22

and you need to throw up.

0:23:220:23:23

THEY LAUGH

0:23:230:23:25

Yesterday, Steph and Charles splashed out £135 on a top hat

0:23:250:23:30

and hatbox, plus a globe...

0:23:300:23:32

Yeah, it suits you.

0:23:320:23:34

..leaving them with £265 still to spend,

0:23:340:23:37

while Naga and Charlie parted with a mere £58 for a clock,

0:23:370:23:42

an alarm bell, and a heart-shaped chair...

0:23:420:23:46

I've done a deal on my own.

0:23:460:23:47

..meaning they still have almost £350 at their disposal.

0:23:470:23:51

We haven't spent much.

0:23:510:23:53

Yeah, Charles kept telling me to go for smalls.

0:23:530:23:55

And I thought, "That's a whole other show, Charles."

0:23:550:23:58

THEY LAUGH

0:23:580:23:59

Our experts clearly have an awful lot to learn.

0:23:590:24:02

This is part of the plan.

0:24:020:24:04

-Right.

-I think if we...

0:24:040:24:06

-Hold on.

-It's impressive.

0:24:060:24:08

This is very impressive.

0:24:080:24:10

-HE GROANS There we go!

-Ta-da!

0:24:100:24:13

-There we go.

-We are here!

-Just like that.

0:24:130:24:15

-Good morning, Steph.

-Morning!

0:24:150:24:17

-How delicately done.

-What a way to do it, eh?

0:24:170:24:19

How are you enjoying antiques? Lots?

0:24:190:24:21

Yeah, I am. I've learnt... Oh, he's dead clever.

0:24:210:24:23

-He's a very bright boy, isn't he?

-Yeah, he is.

0:24:230:24:25

He's highly intelligent. Knowledgeable. Attractive.

0:24:250:24:29

-And he can dance.

-And I can dance.

0:24:290:24:30

That's not what I've seen.

0:24:300:24:32

When I saw Steph dance, it looked a different dance to me.

0:24:320:24:34

What's it now?

0:24:340:24:35

The main thing with this is, is it's all about your ankles. So...

0:24:350:24:38

SHE HUMS A TUNE

0:24:380:24:40

You see!

0:24:400:24:41

THEY LAUGH

0:24:420:24:44

Something like that.

0:24:440:24:46

Later, they'll be heading for an auction in Knutsford, Cheshire.

0:24:470:24:50

But our next stop is back in Manchester.

0:24:500:24:52

Morning.

0:24:540:24:55

Good to see you.

0:24:550:24:57

-Give me a high-five.

-Did you just randomly high-five someone?

0:24:570:24:59

I gave him a high-five, yeah. We had a high-five.

0:24:590:25:02

-He was on the outside, OK?

-You're just too cool, you.

0:25:020:25:04

No, Steph, he's really not.

0:25:040:25:07

But this shop might be.

0:25:070:25:09

-Hello. Hi, I'm Steph.

-I'm Lawrence.

-Hi, nice to meet you.

-You too.

0:25:100:25:12

-Hi, Charles Hanson. Good to see you.

-Yeah, good to meet you too.

0:25:120:25:15

Not too many traditional antiques here.

0:25:150:25:18

But bags of vintage, architectural and, of course, QUIRK.

0:25:180:25:22

Loads of stuff!

0:25:240:25:26

It is a lovely old building, isn't it, as well?

0:25:260:25:28

Yeah, it is a great building. Look at this, is that an old bar?

0:25:280:25:31

-What can I get you, sir?

-Pina colada, please.

-No bother.

0:25:310:25:33

-Thank you very much.

-We seem to be out of stock.

0:25:330:25:36

-Oh, no, don't say that.

-Anything else?

0:25:360:25:38

I think Steph is enjoying this.

0:25:380:25:40

Yeah! Yeah. Wow.

0:25:400:25:42

-They are quite heavy, actually.

-Can you just grab that for me?

0:25:420:25:45

-Are you OK?

-Yeah, fine. Yeah, yeah, yeah.

0:25:450:25:47

-I'm on it.

-Just grab those for me as well.

-Yeah. Yeah, here we go.

0:25:470:25:51

Those look a bit more like it.

0:25:510:25:54

These are really pretty, Charles.

0:25:540:25:56

-They're quite peculiar, aren't they?

-Practical as well.

0:25:560:25:59

You know, someone who has to do their hair and make-up all the time,

0:25:590:26:01

this is...

0:26:010:26:02

-They're almost like a little compact, aren't they?

-Yeah.

0:26:020:26:05

-Early morning...

-Keep your make-up or your jewellery in.

0:26:050:26:07

They are original from Rajasthan.

0:26:070:26:09

Yeah, I imagine them to be, like, shaving kit things.

0:26:090:26:12

So they are Indian.

0:26:120:26:13

-Yeah.

-And they probably are completely original.

0:26:130:26:16

They are very colonial. Quite folk art, aren't they? 1950s.

0:26:160:26:19

At least they are not new.

0:26:190:26:20

Do you want to buy one?

0:26:200:26:22

-I know you want to shop till you drop.

-Yeah, but...

0:26:220:26:24

They are not antique-y enough, are they?

0:26:240:26:26

So, how much are they, per unit?

0:26:260:26:28

-They're £45.

-And between friends?

0:26:280:26:32

-£40.

-THEY LAUGH

0:26:320:26:34

I have never seen anything like that, where it is practical

0:26:340:26:37

but would look really pretty on your dressing room table,

0:26:370:26:40

-wouldn't it? But I am not paying for 40 quid for it.

-Well...

0:26:400:26:43

Well...

0:26:430:26:44

-I have still got my eyes on prizes, man.

-I know, absolutely.

0:26:440:26:47

-I'm in it to win it. Would you give us 25?

-I will do one for 30 quid.

0:26:470:26:51

-30 quid?

-Oh, crikey.

0:26:510:26:52

They are getting there.

0:26:520:26:54

It could be a love token,

0:26:540:26:55

-a love token from a gentleman to his...

-I love your romanticism.

0:26:550:26:58

It could be an Indian love token

0:26:580:27:01

to a lady who wants a good casket.

0:27:010:27:04

I think it is a deal.

0:27:040:27:07

-Going, going...

-Well done.

0:27:070:27:10

-Thank you very much.

-Gone, sold!

-Thank you.

-Thank you, sir.

0:27:100:27:12

Congratulations!

0:27:120:27:14

-Nice doing business with you.

-You too.

-Thank you.

0:27:140:27:16

-Well done. Well done.

-I know, it is a good one.

0:27:180:27:20

Also in Manchester but on an altogether different cultural

0:27:230:27:27

plane, Naga and Charlie are off to the Royal Northern College of Music.

0:27:270:27:31

Hello, I am Naga.

0:27:310:27:32

-Hi, I'm Jeff.

-Lovely to see you.

-Nice to meet you.

-Charlie.

0:27:320:27:35

-Nice to see you.

-Welcome to the Royal Northern College of Music.

0:27:350:27:38

Nice to be here.

0:27:380:27:40

Musician Naga and her singing auctioneer are here to find

0:27:400:27:43

out about Charles Halle, the man behind Manchester's famous orchestra.

0:27:430:27:48

-Halle was German.

-Halle was German, yes. He was actually Karl Halle.

0:27:480:27:52

-And he was born in 1819.

-Yeah.

0:27:520:27:56

But he spent a lot of his early career in Paris.

0:27:560:27:58

-He got to know people like Berlioz.

-Hm.

0:27:580:28:02

And he came to Manchester in the late 1840s.

0:28:020:28:07

A talented musician and conductor,

0:28:070:28:09

Halle headed north to direct a series of gentlemen's concerts.

0:28:090:28:14

The orchestra he ultimately created is now one of our oldest

0:28:140:28:17

and most revered.

0:28:170:28:19

So, with Halle here, was he the main attraction for musicians

0:28:190:28:22

rather than London, for example?

0:28:220:28:24

Halle was a well-connected man,

0:28:240:28:26

so he was able to invite big names to Manchester.

0:28:260:28:30

He also was a very fine pianist.

0:28:300:28:34

And one of his ulterior motives, I'm sure, if you look at his concert

0:28:340:28:39

programming, is that he wanted to showcase himself as a pianist.

0:28:390:28:43

So his role as a conductor was relatively new, rather novel.

0:28:430:28:47

That's right.

0:28:470:28:48

The conductor as an individual really emerges in the 19th century.

0:28:480:28:53

Earlier than that, you would have somebody at the front with

0:28:530:28:56

a stick, but it wasn't a baton as we think of it.

0:28:560:28:58

It would be a long pole.

0:28:580:28:59

And they would literally bang the floor in time to the music.

0:28:590:29:03

Just to keep time through the whole...

0:29:030:29:05

That sounds bizarre now, doesn't it?

0:29:050:29:08

This is a baton that was presented to Halle in 1877 to mark

0:29:080:29:13

the 20th anniversary of the founding of the orchestra.

0:29:130:29:17

It strikes me as being an extremely humble...

0:29:170:29:19

It is very little different from one we might see today.

0:29:190:29:22

-There's a little bit...

-Yeah, it has got a metal tip there.

-A beater.

0:29:220:29:26

-But you could actually use this to conduct with.

-Yeah.

0:29:260:29:30

Whereas this one is very much a showpiece.

0:29:300:29:35

This was presented in 1879 by Bristol Choral Union.

0:29:350:29:39

It has a figure of Beethoven on it.

0:29:390:29:40

I thought I recognised the man on the top.

0:29:400:29:42

And you would be very hard pushed to use this to conduct with.

0:29:420:29:46

-It was intended as an objet d'art.

-Yeah.

0:29:460:29:49

Work beautifully in Antiques Road Trip, actually.

0:29:490:29:51

Make him an offer, Naga, make him an offer.

0:29:510:29:54

Not content with making Manchester a musical rival to the capital,

0:29:540:29:58

in the 1880s, Halle set about establishing the music school

0:29:580:30:02

which became the Royal Northern College.

0:30:020:30:05

He simply wrote to a lot of people saying,

0:30:050:30:08

"Would you fund a new music college in Manchester?"

0:30:080:30:10

Funding, yeah.

0:30:100:30:11

And we have a lot of letters from people saying yes or no.

0:30:110:30:15

-Famous people?

-Oh, very famous.

-Oh, really?

-For example, Tennyson.

0:30:160:30:20

Oh, really?!

0:30:200:30:21

This is a letter written on behalf of Lord Tennyson which says,

0:30:210:30:26

"Lord Tennyson cannot consent to become a member of the formal

0:30:260:30:29

"committee of the college of music in Manchester."

0:30:290:30:32

Halle had Queen Victoria's permission to use the royal title,

0:30:320:30:37

but London's Royal College of Music objected.

0:30:370:30:40

And so they have to, at the very last minute,

0:30:400:30:43

rethink the name of the college.

0:30:430:30:45

And apart from anything else, they have already had everything

0:30:450:30:48

printed with Royal College of Music Manchester on it.

0:30:480:30:51

-On all the official...

-So they had to stamp over it the new title.

0:30:510:30:55

So they came up with Royal Manchester College of Music.

0:30:550:30:57

That is what it was until

0:30:570:31:00

it and the Northern School of Music amalgamated in the early 1970s.

0:31:000:31:06

Halle became the first head and the chief professor of piano forte

0:31:060:31:09

until his death in 1895.

0:31:090:31:12

And as his correspondence with the public shows,

0:31:120:31:15

he remained quite a character.

0:31:150:31:18

So what kind of things were people asking Charles Halle?

0:31:180:31:21

Oh, there was a lovely one where somebody said,

0:31:210:31:23

"Can you learn the guitar at the college?"

0:31:230:31:26

Halle's answer was this.

0:31:260:31:27

"The guitar cannot be taught at the college.

0:31:280:31:31

"The less that instrument is cultivated, the better."

0:31:310:31:35

-Ouch!

-CHARLIE LAUGHS

0:31:350:31:37

Now, what about our other quite musical duo?

0:31:420:31:47

-I am quite supple.

-Yeah. You're flexible?

0:31:470:31:49

-People do call me Twinkle Toes.

-Do they?

-Twinkle Toes Hanson.

0:31:490:31:52

-You have got a quite a few names, though, haven't you?

-Yeah.

0:31:520:31:55

Well... Yeah.

0:31:550:31:57

-Handsome Hanson.

-Oh, get out of here!

0:31:570:31:59

Time to strut their funky stuff

0:31:590:32:02

down south, in Romiley.

0:32:020:32:04

-Look at that.

-This is looking good.

0:32:040:32:06

Hello. I'm Steph. Hi, are you all right?

0:32:070:32:10

-Hurry up, Charles.

-Charles.

0:32:100:32:12

Good to see you. Peter, good to see you. Nice to see you.

0:32:120:32:15

What a great shop.

0:32:150:32:16

Yes, you definitely have fallen on your feet, Twinkle Toes.

0:32:160:32:19

This is going to be the place where we buy something that Charles

0:32:190:32:22

really loves and it is really antique-y.

0:32:220:32:24

There has got to be something here.

0:32:240:32:26

We have still got loads of money left as well,

0:32:260:32:28

so we can go wild in here.

0:32:280:32:31

I am up for that. Are you up for going wild?

0:32:310:32:34

Very wild.

0:32:340:32:35

-If the right object goes wild...

-Look at him, he's wild!

0:32:350:32:38

-..with me, I'll go wild as well.

-SHE GROWLS

0:32:380:32:40

Naga and Charlie have a bob or two left as well,

0:32:400:32:43

and they too are now on the prowl...

0:32:430:32:45

Cat, cat!

0:32:450:32:47

Black cat, good news.

0:32:470:32:49

..in the nearby suburb of Stockport.

0:32:490:32:51

-Well, this is enormous.

-Vintage.

0:32:530:32:54

My name is Rupert, welcome to The Vintage Emporium.

0:32:540:32:56

Naga. Lovely to meet you.

0:32:560:32:58

Hello, Rupert, Charlie. Nice to see you.

0:32:580:33:00

-This is like a treasure trove.

-It certainly is. Clothing downstairs.

0:33:000:33:04

Turn-of-the-century through to 1980s.

0:33:040:33:06

Smaller pieces of furniture, glassware, homeware.

0:33:060:33:09

Second floor is industrial salvage and bigger pieces of furniture.

0:33:090:33:13

Industrial salvage?

0:33:130:33:14

-And I could kit you out with a frock or two.

-Well, that is for me.

0:33:140:33:17

-We'll have a look.

-Thanks very much.

-Enjoy. See you soon.

0:33:170:33:20

That's quite a list.

0:33:200:33:22

Sounds like you could find just about anything in here.

0:33:220:33:24

-Do you like lobsters?

-I love lobster.

0:33:240:33:27

-Well, what about buying a lobster pot?

-Hey!

0:33:270:33:30

Do you know, I wonder if it smells.

0:33:300:33:32

It is very fishy. You could flip it upside down.

0:33:340:33:37

And make it into a coffee table, couldn't you? You could.

0:33:370:33:41

What a novel thing.

0:33:410:33:42

Put some glass on it.

0:33:420:33:44

You are beginning to think now outside the box.

0:33:440:33:46

-A bit of glass on there, clean it up.

-Clean it up.

0:33:460:33:49

-It needs a good hose down and a good wipe down.

-Yeah.

0:33:490:33:52

How much do you think we should be buying something like that for?

0:33:520:33:56

I've never seen one for sale before.

0:33:560:33:58

No. It would definitely be a first.

0:33:580:34:00

It is 60 quid. Let's think about it.

0:34:000:34:03

Something to think about there, then.

0:34:030:34:05

Oh, that's nice. Yeah, what a good... What a good bird.

0:34:060:34:10

-Tea?

-Please. Yeah, and isn't it fun?

0:34:100:34:14

I mean, imagine being with your ladies in the afternoon

0:34:140:34:17

and serving tea out of a big cockerel teapot.

0:34:170:34:20

That's nice. We'll check the condition on him very carefully.

0:34:200:34:23

Has he been re-stuck?

0:34:230:34:25

Is that old glue or just enamel?

0:34:250:34:26

I think it has been re-stuck, can you see?

0:34:260:34:28

Oh, yeah, it is gluey, you are right.

0:34:280:34:29

-It has been cracked around there.

-The nose has been off.

0:34:290:34:32

His nose has been off.

0:34:320:34:34

But it's great. It's a great rooster. Is it rooster?

0:34:340:34:36

-Cockerel?

-What is the difference between a rooster and a cockerel?

0:34:360:34:39

-No idea, you tell me.

-Well, I don't know.

0:34:390:34:41

They are exactly the same.

0:34:410:34:42

Rooster is just the American version.

0:34:420:34:44

-Yeah, that stands out.

-The cock is dazzling, isn't he?

0:34:440:34:47

-SHE LAUGHS

-Pete, what is the best on this cock?

0:34:470:34:50

Yes... Rooster might be best.

0:34:500:34:52

-Is it 30 on it?

-It's 30 at the moment.

-20, how's that?

0:34:520:34:54

-20 quid...

-Pete, I would love you to say £15.

0:34:540:34:58

15 then. 15 it is. Yep.

0:34:580:35:00

-Take it.

-You think?

-Yeah, take it.

0:35:000:35:02

I think it is great.

0:35:020:35:04

-Go for it.

-Yeah. Pete, we'll take it.

-Yeah.

0:35:040:35:06

-Nice one, thanks.

-Pete, it's a deal.

0:35:060:35:08

We've still got more shopping to do, you know.

0:35:080:35:09

-£15 spent of our 235 left.

-220.

0:35:090:35:14

Quick, quick.

0:35:140:35:15

So quick that she has already spotted another animal-themed object.

0:35:150:35:20

-I have never seen a cameo of a lady carved...

-Holding a monkey?

0:35:200:35:23

..holding a monkey, never.

0:35:230:35:24

I think I could tempt you with a price on that, actually.

0:35:240:35:27

It was just that was bought in quite reasonable.

0:35:270:35:29

Her nose looks a bit worn.

0:35:290:35:31

But maybe she just looked like that.

0:35:310:35:34

They had funny noses in the 19th century.

0:35:340:35:36

I think they might be about to do a bit of monkey business, these two.

0:35:360:35:39

THEY GIGGLE

0:35:390:35:41

Not that sort!

0:35:410:35:43

It's marked up at £95. You can have it for 55.

0:35:440:35:47

What is your guide price?

0:35:490:35:51

I'm getting the lingo now and everything.

0:35:510:35:53

Turning into quite a team, aren't they?

0:35:530:35:55

Thank you for that discount.

0:35:550:35:56

Thank you for the offer. I think I'll counter-offer.

0:35:560:35:59

£40.

0:36:010:36:02

I'll do it for 45, how's that?

0:36:020:36:04

That stands a good chance. And I think she is well-carved.

0:36:040:36:08

I would give her...

0:36:080:36:09

..a romantic description for the sale.

0:36:100:36:13

"The woman with a broken nose holding the monkey."

0:36:130:36:15

Well, not quite like that.

0:36:150:36:17

No. You know, possibly...

0:36:170:36:18

-Some say a good night out in Middlesbrough.

-Yeah, that's it.

0:36:180:36:21

Well, Dark Lady, you know... I'll break my nose as well, you know.

0:36:210:36:25

-Why don't we do it?

-Do you reckon?

-Shake the man's hand.

-OK.

0:36:250:36:28

Yeah, we'll do it. Thank Peter.

0:36:280:36:30

-Going to have to high-five you.

-Thanks, Peter.

0:36:300:36:32

-There we are.

-Absolutely.

0:36:320:36:34

PHONE RINGS Who could that be?

0:36:340:36:36

It is Charlie Ross.

0:36:360:36:38

My dear old thing, are you there?

0:36:380:36:40

Charlie, it is the 11th hour, we're shopping, we are in the heat

0:36:400:36:43

of the moment. What do you want?

0:36:430:36:45

Wonderful. We have come to an enormous warehouse

0:36:450:36:48

which has no antiques.

0:36:480:36:49

'It is vintage clothes and things.'

0:36:490:36:51

Charlie, it is like a needle in a haystack, you must dig deep.

0:36:510:36:55

'I have.'

0:36:550:36:56

I have dug... I mean, I've dug, I've dug. Naga has dugged.

0:36:560:36:59

We've all dugged.

0:36:590:37:00

But there is no more digging or dugging to be done.

0:37:000:37:02

'Can we come to your shop, please?

0:37:020:37:05

'Hello?'

0:37:050:37:06

Uh...

0:37:060:37:07

I will put you on to your friend, hang on.

0:37:070:37:09

Think of the love, Steph.

0:37:090:37:11

-Do you know what, cos it's you...

-'Good friends.'

-Yeah, we are.

0:37:110:37:14

We are good friends.

0:37:140:37:15

Yeah, you are very welcome to come here.

0:37:150:37:17

(We've already got the good stuff.)

0:37:170:37:18

Thank you!

0:37:180:37:20

You're very welcome.

0:37:200:37:21

'OK, we are dashing over. We'll see you soon.'

0:37:210:37:23

-See you in a wee while.

-See you!

-'Bye.'

-Bye.

-'Bye!'

0:37:230:37:26

Come on, Naga. Come on, Naga!

0:37:260:37:28

-Come on, Naga!

-Let's go!

0:37:280:37:30

Cor, look at them go!

0:37:300:37:32

By the time they arrive,

0:37:320:37:34

their rivals will have scoured Pete's whole shop.

0:37:340:37:37

What I like about this clock garniture is it, in style,

0:37:370:37:42

is trying to invigorate the fact that it is Ming porcelain.

0:37:420:37:44

As a decorative lot,

0:37:440:37:48

to an interior decorator, it really is good value.

0:37:480:37:52

And you have got 225 on it,

0:37:520:37:53

called a French blue-and-white pottery clock garniture.

0:37:530:37:56

Steph, it is flamboyant, isn't it?

0:37:560:37:59

Yep. And we like a bit of flamboyance.

0:37:590:38:01

Will it make us money?

0:38:010:38:03

Cos I'm getting to the point now where I am feeling competitive.

0:38:030:38:06

Spoken like a business correspondent, hey, Pete?

0:38:060:38:09

-I was asking over 300 for it a while back.

-But not now. 225.

0:38:090:38:12

-It is now 225. To you, as a special offer, 125.

-125?

-That is cheap.

0:38:120:38:18

I was thinking a hard... Is it what you call a monkey?

0:38:180:38:21

Is that a oner?

0:38:210:38:22

I was hoping for a monkey and a quarter.

0:38:220:38:26

A ton and a pony, actually.

0:38:260:38:27

Would you take 100 quid?

0:38:270:38:30

-I don't want to.

-But would you?

-No.

0:38:300:38:32

Even if I give you a hug? Come on!

0:38:320:38:35

Now, look at us!

0:38:350:38:37

100 quid and a hug.

0:38:370:38:38

It's yours.

0:38:380:38:40

Oh, wow! Brilliant!

0:38:400:38:42

Loving your work, Steph.

0:38:420:38:43

That will make you a good profit at the auction. A real good profit.

0:38:430:38:45

-It is a funny old game.

-If it does, I will come round

0:38:450:38:48

-and give you a full-on snog.

-Oh, there you go.

0:38:480:38:50

Looks like the others can't get here a moment too soon.

0:38:500:38:52

Right, time is tight.

0:38:520:38:53

-Time is more than tight.

-We need to focus, don't we?

0:38:530:38:56

But we have got an opportunity here to find something.

0:38:560:38:59

-It is all there.

-That's great.

0:38:590:39:01

-Thank you very much.

-They are a bit scruffy, but they all count.

0:39:010:39:04

What are you saying about us, like?

0:39:040:39:06

-Hey, hey!

-Don't drop it, OK? Just be careful with that.

0:39:060:39:09

Oh, there they are!

0:39:090:39:10

What have you got?

0:39:100:39:12

Quickly, guard up. Get out of here, get out of here!

0:39:120:39:15

Stephanie, what on earth has happened?!

0:39:150:39:17

Is there something you are not telling me?

0:39:170:39:19

Yeah. We might have been busy.

0:39:190:39:21

Are you all right?

0:39:210:39:22

-We're going to your shop.

-Are you?

-Yeah. Come on!

0:39:230:39:26

-Good luck.

-Good luck.

-Good luck. Get out of here!

0:39:260:39:29

TIM: Hey, what a carry-on.

0:39:290:39:32

-Brilliant!

-Proper antique shop!

0:39:320:39:34

-Hello. Sorry. Naga, lovely to meet you.

-Hi, Naga.

0:39:350:39:39

I can't believe how excited you have made us.

0:39:390:39:42

Did you sell some nice things to our mates?

0:39:420:39:44

Never you mind, Charlie.

0:39:440:39:45

We are where we are.

0:39:450:39:47

And Naga is staying focused, thank goodness.

0:39:470:39:50

Now, something that caught my eye

0:39:500:39:52

is this lady here. I just think it is really sweet.

0:39:520:39:55

And I love seeing a woman playing golf.

0:39:550:39:57

I'm not sure what Charlie is going to think of it, so let's find out.

0:39:570:40:00

-Charlie!

-Hello, darling.

-Have a look at this lovely lady.

0:40:000:40:04

-I know nothing about it.

-Right.

-But I figured that...

-Oh-ho.

0:40:040:40:09

-The way that she is dressed...

-Yes.

-..is from the early 20th century.

0:40:090:40:14

You are absolutely right. It is from the Art Deco period.

0:40:140:40:17

So what I call the Charleston period - 1920s, 1930s.

0:40:170:40:21

-First question, is it bronze? No, it is spelter.

-It doesn't look bronze.

0:40:210:40:25

If it was bronze, it would be much colder to the touch.

0:40:250:40:29

It is not on a marble base, it is on an onyx base.

0:40:290:40:31

So we are not looking at the Rolls-Royce of figures.

0:40:310:40:34

Having said that, had that been bronze on marble, I think

0:40:340:40:38

it would be £450.

0:40:380:40:40

-So... It's 150.

-Should we ask?

0:40:400:40:43

Oh, Pete!

0:40:430:40:45

-How does 125 sound?

-We are not here to beat you about the head.

0:40:450:40:48

I mean, I daresay, Steph and Charles gave you a rotten time,

0:40:480:40:51

really, but we are much more...

0:40:510:40:53

-We are the gentler half.

-Yeah.

0:40:530:40:55

It cost me £100. You could have it for 100.

0:40:550:40:57

And that's it.

0:40:590:41:00

Naga, I have to say that if you want it, you have my blessing.

0:41:000:41:05

-And it is a proper object.

-It is a deal, then.

-Deal! Thank you so much!

0:41:050:41:09

Oh, my goodness! Steady! Steady, Naga, you'll break me golfer!

0:41:090:41:13

Good work. But we are running out of time.

0:41:130:41:15

I tell you what is interesting, that barometer.

0:41:150:41:19

That is completely different to any other barometer I have seen.

0:41:190:41:24

It looks very old-fashioned. I don't know what year it is from or...

0:41:240:41:28

I have no idea. We would have to talk to Charlie about it.

0:41:280:41:31

It is in Admiral Fitzroy barometer.

0:41:310:41:34

It is a bit toxic, you have got to be very careful.

0:41:340:41:36

Look at the size of the well of mercury in there.

0:41:360:41:39

But it has got a temperature gauge, hydrometer here.

0:41:390:41:42

It is like Carol in a box, isn't it?

0:41:420:41:45

It is just like Carol in a box.

0:41:450:41:47

It is also £165. Although Pete does have others.

0:41:470:41:51

Ah, this one might be a bit of a bargain.

0:41:510:41:54

-Now, this is an aneroid barometer.

-Mm-hm.

0:41:540:41:57

So it came in after the mercury barometer. Much safer,

0:41:570:42:00

more accurate, I would say, Peter, wouldn't you?

0:42:000:42:02

-Mm-hm.

-125.

0:42:020:42:03

What would be a ridiculous deal?

0:42:030:42:05

-A ridiculous deal would be 25.

-Yes.

-But I can't do that.

0:42:050:42:09

HE LAUGHS HYSTERICALLY

0:42:090:42:12

I will do it for 50 quid. That is very, very cheap.

0:42:120:42:15

We would be crazy people not to take this at £50...

0:42:150:42:18

-I think you have made...

-..and that is with complete inexperience.

0:42:180:42:21

Best give it a go.

0:42:210:42:23

-Then it is a deal.

-There is another handshake, Peter.

-Two things!

0:42:230:42:27

Are there no end to Pete's deals?

0:42:270:42:30

So far, they bagged a golfer and a barometer for £150.

0:42:300:42:34

Anything else for sports fan Naga?

0:42:340:42:36

-Yes.

-We both like games, don't we?

-Yep, yep.

0:42:360:42:40

That is lovely, I think.

0:42:400:42:42

But do you know what I really like about that?

0:42:420:42:45

It is those transfer numbers.

0:42:450:42:48

Nobody can ever have played it because every time you chuck

0:42:480:42:51

one of those at it, it would damage those numbers.

0:42:510:42:54

-Yeah, there aren't many marks on there, are there?

-No.

0:42:540:42:57

When would that have been from?

0:42:570:43:00

I want to say '30s and part of me is saying just post-war, '50s.

0:43:000:43:06

-Let's find out.

-BOTH:

-Peter!

0:43:060:43:08

We need you yet again. Pre-war or post-war?

0:43:080:43:11

I would've put it down and '40s, really.

0:43:110:43:13

-Which is probably just after the war.

-Yeah. Yeah.

0:43:130:43:16

So not exactly antique, but it has got age.

0:43:160:43:18

If it is really cheap, we'll buy it.

0:43:180:43:21

I know exactly where I think I want to be on that.

0:43:210:43:24

-OK.

-So...

-The asking price on that is 45 quid.

0:43:280:43:31

-Yeah.

-Ideally, ideally, I wouldn't want to take less than 25.

0:43:310:43:35

CHARLIE LAUGHS

0:43:350:43:38

What did I just whisper to you in the ear?

0:43:380:43:40

20 to 25.

0:43:400:43:42

-You really want it for 20 quid, don't you?

-I do, Peter,

0:43:420:43:45

-but, I don't... You know.

-Yeah.

-Are you sure?

-Yeah.

0:43:450:43:48

Forget the handshake! Woo!

0:43:480:43:50

Generous Pete.

0:43:500:43:52

Now with their shopping complete, fore!

0:43:520:43:56

-Let's have a look.

-Are you ready?

0:43:560:43:57

-Yeah, I'm ready.

-On the count of three.

0:43:570:43:59

-Three.

-Two.

-It's a bit windy. One.

0:43:590:44:01

Nice.

0:44:010:44:03

Feast your eyes on this.

0:44:030:44:05

I can't even figure out what some of them are.

0:44:050:44:08

-That's a globe.

-THEY LAUGH

0:44:080:44:11

You got a top hat and a leather case.

0:44:110:44:13

-That is the box for the hat?

-Yep.

0:44:130:44:14

TIM: She's good.

0:44:140:44:15

-CHARLES: The condition is superb.

-It is.

-It's silk.

-Maker's name?

0:44:150:44:19

Probably Christie & Co.

0:44:190:44:21

Probably? What do you mean probably?

0:44:210:44:24

-Likely, likely.

-You old flanneler.

0:44:240:44:27

Globe, wrong base.

0:44:270:44:28

No, we believe it is right.

0:44:280:44:29

It is a lovely Art Deco '20s piece, inter-war period.

0:44:290:44:32

-And what is this?

-Tell us about that.

0:44:320:44:34

That is a very, very functional Indian jewellery box.

0:44:340:44:38

So you can fold it away neatly and the mirror pops out

0:44:380:44:41

so you can use it. And that was a bit of a personal indulgence.

0:44:410:44:44

I am not so keen on the three-piece clock set.

0:44:440:44:48

Charlie, this was your heyday.

0:44:480:44:50

I know, that is the trouble. And my heyday's gone.

0:44:500:44:52

-THEY LAUGH

-And a chicken.

0:44:520:44:56

It's a cockerel!

0:44:560:44:58

-And it is a teapot.

-Who made it?

0:44:580:45:00

Probably Sadler.

0:45:000:45:02

-BOTH:

-Probably?

-An awful lot of probably here, Charles.

0:45:020:45:05

TIM: Probably their turn now.

0:45:050:45:07

Two, one...

0:45:070:45:08

# Dah, dah, dah-dah... #

0:45:080:45:11

-We were looking at that, the hoopla game.

-We love that.

-That's fab.

0:45:110:45:14

-We should have a game, definitely.

-We should.

0:45:140:45:16

-And you must've spotted this.

-Yeah, we did see that.

0:45:160:45:20

-And I thought you would see that.

-I can't resist a golfer.

0:45:200:45:23

That is lovely. What is this all about, though?

0:45:230:45:25

That doesn't look like an antique.

0:45:250:45:27

-You know how tough it is in the morning...

-Yeah.

-..to get up.

-Right.

0:45:270:45:31

-ALARM RINGS

-There we go.

0:45:310:45:33

Yeah, that will wake us up.

0:45:330:45:35

-We both said we were going to go for things that we liked.

-Yeah.

0:45:350:45:38

-Didn't we?

-Quite right.

0:45:380:45:39

-I just loved that chair!

-Did you?

-I did.

0:45:390:45:42

-I just thought it was really fun.

-But is it an antique?

-No.

0:45:420:45:46

It is definitely not an antique.

0:45:460:45:48

I think the whole of this game

0:45:480:45:50

depends on whether somebody is going

0:45:500:45:52

to go a bundle on your frightfully overstated three-piece clock set.

0:45:520:45:56

-Hm.

-And it is whether there is a client in that room with a good swing

0:45:560:45:59

who wants a good golfer.

0:45:590:46:01

Let's get off to the auction. Come on, Naga.

0:46:010:46:03

-We'll see you tomorrow.

-See you. Oh!

0:46:030:46:05

TIM: But let's find out what they really think, eh?

0:46:050:46:09

-That clock, that ugly clock set.

-Awful.

0:46:090:46:12

It could make 200.

0:46:120:46:13

They looked, like,

0:46:130:46:14

deeply unimpressed with our lot, didn't they?

0:46:140:46:16

-They loved your chair.

-Yeah.

0:46:160:46:18

I was shocked by the chair.

0:46:180:46:19

-I think the key item on their side is the golfer.

-Yeah. 100 quid.

0:46:190:46:23

Yeah, and I can see the auctioneer saying, "45, 48, all done, sold."

0:46:230:46:28

-Should we be worried?

-I think it is 50-50.

0:46:280:46:30

You want to puff your chest out and say, "Look, you know what?

0:46:300:46:33

"They are no match for us."

0:46:330:46:35

-Like the cockerel.

-Yeah, exactly.

-Shall we practise our strut?

0:46:350:46:38

Yeah, OK. Yeah, exactly. Exactly.

0:46:380:46:41

After a Manchester mystery tour,

0:46:410:46:43

our celebrities and experts

0:46:430:46:44

are now all to their Cheshire auction

0:46:440:46:46

in Knutsford.

0:46:460:46:48

It will be interesting to see what everybody is excited about there.

0:46:480:46:51

Like, whether, you know, people like that little jewellery box that

0:46:510:46:54

you think was a load of rubbish.

0:46:540:46:56

-I didn't say that!

-I could see it in your eyes.

-Yeah, the eyes don't lie.

0:46:560:47:00

Mind you, you didn't exactly love my chair.

0:47:000:47:03

Well, I thought this was an ANTIQUES road trip.

0:47:030:47:06

Nestling nicely within Cheshire's Golden Triangle and the model

0:47:060:47:11

for Gaskell's 19th-century Cranford,

0:47:110:47:13

Knutsford could be the ideal spot to shift their little collection.

0:47:130:47:17

-Oh, hello!

-Goodness me. The girls are ready for this, Charlie.

0:47:170:47:21

Nearly ran me over.

0:47:210:47:22

-Naga, would you be careful?

-Sorry. Hello!

0:47:220:47:26

-This is our day.

-Hello, darling.

0:47:260:47:27

-Good driving.

-Good to see you.

0:47:270:47:29

-Exciting.

-I'm really excited.

-I can't wait for this.

0:47:290:47:33

TIM: I wonder if their excitement is in any way shared

0:47:330:47:36

by Wright Marshall auctioneer Peter Ashburner.

0:47:360:47:40

The Art Deco golfer is a nice object

0:47:400:47:43

and, you know, the sort of thing that people want to buy, really.

0:47:430:47:46

The blue-and-white clock garniture, a bit traditional.

0:47:460:47:49

We might be able to find somebody somewhere between here

0:47:490:47:51

and Australia that is interested in buying it.

0:47:510:47:54

I love a cameo brooch. It's again quite a fun object.

0:47:540:47:57

There is a lady on it with some sort of animal. And we have had

0:47:570:47:59

a very serious debate as to exactly what the animal is.

0:47:590:48:02

Somebody thought it was a monkey, somebody else thought it was a cat.

0:48:020:48:06

I think it might be a dog. Anyway, I'm sure somebody will know.

0:48:060:48:09

I think it might be a lamb, actually.

0:48:090:48:11

Steph and Charles made the biggest outlay with

0:48:110:48:15

£325 spent on six auction lots

0:48:150:48:18

while Naga and Charlie ended up parting with just £228

0:48:180:48:22

for their six lots.

0:48:220:48:24

Now, with the sale about to start, where are they?

0:48:260:48:30

-I feel nervous.

-It is coming up.

0:48:300:48:32

Hats off to Steph. Top box, too.

0:48:320:48:35

We are going to start the bidding on this one.

0:48:350:48:37

£50 and away for it.

0:48:370:48:39

-'50.'

-Let's go. Let's go.

0:48:390:48:41

Down to 40 then. Let's get going. 40 for a top hat.

0:48:410:48:43

-It is a lovely hat.

-'Come on.'

-In its box.

0:48:430:48:46

I'll go to 30. 30 bid. Gentleman's bid at 30.

0:48:460:48:49

Just your size, sir. Any more now?

0:48:490:48:51

At five.

0:48:510:48:52

-'35.'

-Come on!

-'40, yes?'

0:48:520:48:54

£40. Come on, it must fit somebody else, surely.

0:48:540:48:57

Come on, sir, let's go.

0:48:570:48:58

-'At 40, the bid is on my left.'

-Come on. Don't live with the regret.

0:48:580:49:01

On £40 only.

0:49:010:49:04

Oh, no! I'm sorry, Steph.

0:49:040:49:06

TIM: Only a small loss.

0:49:060:49:09

-OK, let's move forward, let's be positive.

-Yeah.

0:49:090:49:11

So it is the globe next. That is a good one.

0:49:110:49:13

Who is going to start the bidding at £50? 50 for it?

0:49:130:49:16

-Hold tight.

-'Come on. It must be worth 50.'

-Uh-oh.

0:49:160:49:19

£40. Let's get started then.

0:49:190:49:22

-Come on, take on the world!

-Come on.

0:49:220:49:24

On bid at 40 only. Any advance now on 40?

0:49:240:49:27

-I'll take five.

-Naga, hold my hand on their behalf.

0:49:270:49:29

-Come on, it is cheap enough.

-It is.

0:49:290:49:31

Oh, there is a man bidding over there.

0:49:310:49:33

Good man, sir. Come on!

0:49:330:49:34

'On my right at 45.'

0:49:340:49:35

Any advance now? All done?

0:49:350:49:37

Got to go.

0:49:370:49:38

-'It is on my right in the corner.'

-Come on.

0:49:380:49:41

-At £45 in the room.

-And that is the end of it.

0:49:410:49:43

Ugh!

0:49:430:49:44

Thank you, sir, very much.

0:49:440:49:46

TIM: A lovely globe for a good price there.

0:49:460:49:49

You spent 85 on it and you got 45.

0:49:490:49:51

-Yeah, all right.

-Yeah.

0:49:510:49:53

TIM: Now for Naga's much-loved chair.

0:49:530:49:56

-I think that would make a great addition to the business area.

-Yeah?

0:49:560:49:59

-I could sit on that.

-Are you going to put a bid in, then?

-No.

0:49:590:50:03

Who has got £20 for it?

0:50:030:50:04

20.

0:50:050:50:07

-Down to ten, let's get it sold. 'Yes, sir.' Thank you.

-Well done.

0:50:070:50:10

-'Ten pounds I've got. Internet bid of ten pounds.'

-Well done.

0:50:100:50:12

All the way from the other side of the board.

0:50:120:50:14

Naga, you are a genius!

0:50:140:50:16

£15 down here.

0:50:160:50:18

Who has got 20?

0:50:180:50:19

-20. £20 on bid.

-Genius, darling.

0:50:190:50:21

'Any advance quickly on 20?

0:50:210:50:23

'Is there five? Yes or no then? At £20.'

0:50:230:50:25

Going at 20...

0:50:250:50:27

-Well done to you. You doubled up.

-That's amazing!

-You doubled up.

0:50:270:50:30

TIM: The ugly duckling comes good.

0:50:300:50:32

Also red, also Naga's, and it is very noisy.

0:50:320:50:36

I hope they are going to ring it.

0:50:360:50:38

# You can ring

0:50:380:50:39

-ALL:

-# My bell

0:50:390:50:42

# Ring my bell Ooooh... #

0:50:420:50:44

It is the wall-mounted fire alarm bell.

0:50:440:50:46

-ALARM RINGS

-Lovely tone.

0:50:460:50:49

Suddenly everyone leaves.

0:50:490:50:51

£20 for it.

0:50:510:50:53

20. Otherwise we'll start ringing it loudly.

0:50:530:50:55

-With some gusto.

-BELL RINGS

0:50:550:50:58

'£20. Down to a tenner.'

0:50:580:50:59

-Ten I've got. Ten pounds here.

-Well done.

-12.

0:50:590:51:01

-We need more than ten.

-'15.'

0:51:010:51:03

-Well done.

-'18.'

0:51:030:51:04

-20.

-Well done, team.

-£20.

-Naga,

0:51:040:51:06

-you are just wonderful!

-'At £20 bid.'

-Well done, team.

-'At 20.'

0:51:060:51:09

Any advance now? Quickly. The gentleman's bid at 20.

0:51:090:51:12

Is there a two?

0:51:120:51:13

-'Five.'

-25.

0:51:130:51:14

-THEY GASP Get out of here!

-'Internet bid.'

0:51:140:51:16

-Naga!

-'30. 30 I've got.'

0:51:160:51:19

Oh, he got £30!

0:51:190:51:20

£30 I'm bid. The firemen in the corner at 30.

0:51:200:51:22

-You are so proud.

-I am so proud of my Naga!

0:51:220:51:26

-He is in tears.

-Going at 30.

0:51:260:51:28

-Woo!

-Well done, team, well done.

0:51:280:51:30

Bravo, bravo.

0:51:300:51:31

TIM: What a start!

0:51:310:51:33

-I am proud of Naga.

-There is a long way to go.

0:51:330:51:35

Cos she has proved that you two know naught.

0:51:350:51:37

THEY LAUGH

0:51:370:51:39

Can Steph do likewise with her not-very-old vanity box.

0:51:390:51:43

I'm going to ask you £30 for this to start it. 30.

0:51:430:51:46

-Come on, hurry up.

-It's a good thing.

0:51:460:51:49

That would make a great present. Look how pretty it is.

0:51:490:51:51

It's a good thing. The experts know. £20 and away. Come on.

0:51:510:51:55

20? 20 bid. At £20, I'm bid.

0:51:550:51:58

-Any advance on 20, then?

-There is a bid coming in from India.

0:51:580:52:00

Come on, Internet!

0:52:000:52:02

25. 25. Any advance quickly on 25?

0:52:020:52:05

It is so unusual. Come on!

0:52:050:52:08

£30. £30, I'm bid. At 30.

0:52:080:52:11

'Is there another five?'

0:52:110:52:12

-Come on!

-I'll give you a kiss!

0:52:120:52:14

Come on, give him a kiss!

0:52:140:52:15

Five. 35. 35.

0:52:150:52:19

Did you want it, Simon? Don't look at yourself. 40.

0:52:190:52:22

-40.

-Come on!

-40!

0:52:220:52:24

With Simon at 40. On my right at £40.

0:52:240:52:27

-'Here to sell now...'

-That's OK.

0:52:270:52:28

-At £40.

-Yes!

0:52:280:52:30

Yes! You made a profit!

0:52:300:52:32

I think Steph's sweetener might have clinched it.

0:52:320:52:35

Hang on, I need to give this man a kiss now.

0:52:350:52:37

-Come on.

-MAN:

-Oh, Lord!

0:52:370:52:38

TIM: Oh, Lord!

0:52:380:52:40

Now, Simon needs to get back to his duties.

0:52:400:52:42

And let's see if we can get a good return on Charlie's proper antique.

0:52:420:52:46

£30 for it.

0:52:460:52:48

'Probably works, no doubt.'

0:52:480:52:49

TIM: Don't count on it.

0:52:490:52:50

-20.

-Lovely little...

-Who has got £20?

0:52:500:52:53

Oh, sir...

0:52:540:52:55

15, I'll take 20 now.

0:52:550:52:57

Oh, no.

0:52:570:52:58

'At 15. Come on,'

0:52:580:53:00

-bid up somebody!

-It is a lovely clock.

0:53:000:53:02

Bidding 20. £20, I'm bid. Five.

0:53:020:53:05

Come on, ladies and gentlemen.

0:53:050:53:07

'In the corner there at 25.'

0:53:070:53:08

-Any advanced quickly on £25?

-It's cheap.

0:53:080:53:10

-'Here to sell. Any more?'

-CHARLIE GROANS

0:53:100:53:13

Last chances. At 25.

0:53:130:53:15

-Oooh...

-Someone's got a bargain.

0:53:150:53:18

Antiques aren't doing frightfully well today.

0:53:180:53:21

-It wasn't red, was it?

-No.

-It wasn't red.

-It wasn't red.

-And it was old.

0:53:210:53:25

It was an antique. Grave error.

0:53:250:53:29

Now, could be a monkey, might it make a profit?

0:53:290:53:32

£60 and away for this lot.

0:53:320:53:34

60 quid, that's a bargain.

0:53:340:53:35

-40. Bid at 40. Any advance on £40?

-Come on, let's go.

0:53:350:53:38

'Take five now. At 40. Is there five anywhere?'

0:53:380:53:41

At £40. Seems cheap enough. At 40.

0:53:410:53:44

They're biding their time. They're biding their time.

0:53:440:53:46

Have we got 50? 50 bid. At £50.

0:53:460:53:48

-THEY WHISPER

-'Any advance on 50, then?'

0:53:480:53:50

Here to go at £50...

0:53:500:53:52

-'£50, all done.'

-Come on.

-Bit more!

0:53:520:53:53

50.

0:53:530:53:55

Oh.

0:53:550:53:56

TIM: This is just in - antique makes profit!

0:53:560:53:59

Will Naga's barometer go down a storm?

0:53:590:54:02

£30 for a quick start?

0:54:020:54:04

-30. Surely.

-Surely we could start at 50.

0:54:040:54:07

'25 bid. 25. Take 30 now.'

0:54:070:54:09

At £25 only. Any advance quickly on 25?

0:54:090:54:13

Take a 30. At £25. 30.

0:54:130:54:16

-£30.

-Got a silver plaque on it!

-Yeah.

0:54:160:54:18

At 35. Last chances then.

0:54:180:54:20

Oh, please, sir...

0:54:200:54:21

-'Here to go.'

-..get another one.

0:54:210:54:22

35.

0:54:220:54:23

Oh, dear.

0:54:230:54:25

Yep, their luck is changing, it seems. For the worse.

0:54:250:54:28

Can hoopla arrest the slide?

0:54:280:54:31

£20 and away for it.

0:54:310:54:33

Now is the time.

0:54:330:54:34

'20?' 'Yes, sir.'

0:54:340:54:36

-Thank you.

-Online.

-Invaluable.

0:54:360:54:38

£20. Any advance quickly on 20?

0:54:380:54:40

Take five. At £20. All done?

0:54:400:54:43

Good fun. Good fun game. Good fun game.

0:54:430:54:46

£20.

0:54:460:54:47

Well, that is better.

0:54:470:54:50

Now, wake up, it is rooster time.

0:54:500:54:52

-Hold tight.

-I think this is a handholding moment.

-He's got it.

0:54:520:54:55

Hold tight. This is now...

0:54:550:54:57

-£20 worth, surely.

-Come on, let's move.

-Come on.

0:54:570:55:00

-Who's got £20 for it?

-Come on.

0:55:000:55:01

-'£20 and away.'

-Come on.

-'15.'

0:55:010:55:04

Let's get it sold. Come on, hurry up, bid up somebody.

0:55:040:55:06

-15.

-Yes!

0:55:060:55:08

'15 bid. 15.'

0:55:080:55:10

18 if you want. 18.

0:55:100:55:11

-Come on, one more.

-20.

0:55:110:55:13

-Oh!

-Bid up!

0:55:130:55:14

£20 there. At £20.

0:55:140:55:16

Charles, you just bought it. Steady.

0:55:160:55:19

22, he's changed his mind. At 22.

0:55:190:55:22

One more.

0:55:220:55:24

22 then. Any advance?

0:55:240:55:25

Only a couple of quid more.

0:55:250:55:26

We are back in business.

0:55:260:55:28

'Are we?' 22.

0:55:280:55:30

-THEY CHEER

-Well done! Well done.

0:55:300:55:34

It is perking up for Steph and Charles.

0:55:340:55:36

This could be another one we're doing this,

0:55:360:55:39

getting closer and closer.

0:55:390:55:40

-I know.

-Come on.

-There is not much between us.

0:55:400:55:42

THEY LAUGH

0:55:420:55:44

Where did they find you two?

0:55:440:55:46

THEY LAUGH

0:55:460:55:48

Naga needs her little golfer to at least make par.

0:55:480:55:51

-It is the final handhold.

-Come on, guys.

0:55:510:55:55

That's it, exactly.

0:55:550:55:57

What about £80 for it? 80?

0:55:570:56:00

'60? Come on.'

0:56:000:56:03

£60 for it. Got to be.

0:56:030:56:05

£50. Come on. Somebody is hovering online.

0:56:050:56:07

Come on, bid. £50 on bid. At 50.

0:56:070:56:09

-Oh, Naga.

-'It is a start, but, come on,'

0:56:090:56:11

-it is worth more. You know it is.

-It is, sir.

0:56:110:56:13

At £50 only. Any advance on 50?

0:56:130:56:15

-'Five anywhere?'

-The joy of the auction(!)

0:56:150:56:18

Five. 55. 55.

0:56:180:56:19

-Oh, come on, sir.

-'55.'

0:56:190:56:21

-Milk it, sir.

-'This is painful.'

0:56:210:56:23

-Come on.

-Even the auctioneer has got his head in his hands.

0:56:230:56:25

-Come on...

-'I shouted long enough, they bid 60.'

-Oh! Well done, sir.

0:56:250:56:29

60. At £60. Try another five?

0:56:290:56:32

'Any more?'

0:56:320:56:33

-Selling at 60...

-That is really sad. That is really sad.

0:56:330:56:36

TIM: Well, Naga loved it.

0:56:360:56:39

Right, so it all comes down to the last one.

0:56:390:56:41

That is the story, all right.

0:56:410:56:43

Steph and Charlie's biggest spend needs to make its money back

0:56:430:56:46

for them to win.

0:56:460:56:48

-Do you want to hold hands?

-And now...

-Believe!

-Here we go.

0:56:480:56:51

£80 and away.

0:56:510:56:53

-Come on.

-It is a bargain, that.

0:56:530:56:54

'50, sir.'

0:56:540:56:55

50, that is very kind. Thank you. £50. I've got 50. Take five.

0:56:550:56:59

60. At 70.

0:56:590:57:01

80. 90.

0:57:010:57:03

-'100.'

-Oh, you've done it!

-'Any more?'

0:57:030:57:05

-Come on!

-£100 here.

0:57:050:57:07

'Yes, sir.' 110.

0:57:070:57:09

-Come on!

-'110.'

-It is a good thing.

0:57:090:57:11

110. Any advance then on £110?

0:57:110:57:15

-One more, sir, go on.

-Push it up a little more.

0:57:150:57:17

-120.

-Yes!

-120.

0:57:170:57:19

-Like pulling teeth.

-Come on, Internet.

-130?

-Wakey-wakey.

0:57:190:57:22

At 120 then, all done at 120.

0:57:220:57:25

Well done!

0:57:250:57:28

Woo! And old-fashioned antique triumphs at last.

0:57:280:57:32

-Time to go.

-Come on, girls.

-Time to go. Come on.

0:57:320:57:35

Naga and Charlie started out with £400

0:57:350:57:38

and made, after paying auction costs, a loss of £72.20.

0:57:380:57:44

Whilst Steph and Charles also began with 400,

0:57:440:57:47

but after auction costs, they made a slightly smaller loss of £65.06.

0:57:470:57:53

So, they are today's winners.

0:57:530:57:55

You're brilliant. And you are even more brilliant.

0:57:550:57:58

In fact, if you hadn't been with me,

0:57:580:57:59

-you would've won!

-THEY LAUGH

0:57:590:58:02

That's the great thing about classic cars - long goodbyes.

0:58:020:58:06

-Bye, darling! Missing you already!

-Bye!

0:58:060:58:09

Sometimes very long.

0:58:090:58:12

They've stalled it. Give them another push start. Come on.

0:58:120:58:15

Charlie and Charles, I mean, they are brill, aren't they?

0:58:150:58:18

There's so fabulous. I don't know if they'll have us back, though.

0:58:180:58:21

To be honest, I don't think we probably add much.

0:58:210:58:24

But you know what, they'd add loads to our red sofa.

0:58:240:58:27

Oh, they'd be brilliant!

0:58:270:58:28

It is a battle of the breakfast team as two of the nation's favourite journalists join the road trip. Naga Munchetty and Steph McGovern shop around Greater Manchester aided by regulars Charles Hanson and Charlie Ross before heading to a nail-biting auction in Knutsford, Cheshire.