John Stapleton and Lynn Faulds Wood Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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John Stapleton and Lynn Faulds Wood

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. Award-winning journalists John Stapleton and Lynn Faulds Wood head to Stockport for auction.


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Transcript


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The nation's favourite celebrities...

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-Ooh, I like that.

-..paired up with an expert...

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-Ooh, we've had some fun, haven't we?

-..and a classic car.

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It feels as if it could go quite fast.

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Their mission? To scour Britain for antiques.

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FLAT NOTE

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-Yes!

-Fantastic.

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-I'll do that in slo-mo.

-The aim,

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to make the biggest profit at auction.

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-Come on, boys!

-But it's no easy ride.

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-Ta-da!

-Who will find a hidden gem?

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-Don't sell me!

-Who will take the biggest risks?

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-Go away, darling.

-Will anybody follow expert advice?

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I'm trying to spend money here.

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There will be worthy winners...

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-Yes!

-..and valiant losers.

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Put your pedal to the metal - this is the Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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On today's show, we're joined by a couple of celebrities

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who are a celebrity couple.

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It's married, award-winning journalists and presenters,

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John Stapleton and Lynn Faulds Wood.

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-20 years of bliss.

-Absolutely...

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-Until this moment.

-Never a dull moment.

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Never a cross word.

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-Until this moment.

-Perhaps until today.

-THEY LAUGH

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I do hope not.

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# I predict a riot

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# I predict a riot. #

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Seasoned broadcaster John

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has over 40 years' experience in newspapers and television

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and has previously been awarded the Royal Television Society

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News Presenter Of The Year.

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It's seven o'clock on Thursday the 19th of May

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and this is the BBC's Breakfast Time programme.

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A very good morning to you.

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Fellow journalist and presenter Lynn is best known as a consumer champion

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and was named Consumer Journalist Of The Decade in the '80s.

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So, what do you think?

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Are stores right when they say that we actually like having sweets

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within easy reach of the checkout?

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Or would you prefer something else?

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Make-up, for example? Or tights?

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Herbs and spices?

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This could be the end of the long and glorious marriage.

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They don't come as cheap as me, you know.

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-Oh, I don't know.

-JOHN LAUGHS

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I say!

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Our married duo are motoring around the North West of England

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in this saucy little red 1971 TVR Vixen.

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I'd forgotten we were the first married couple presenters

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on British television. We predated Richard and Judy.

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We did. But I... I genuinely can't remember this -

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how long is it since we stopped doing Watchdog?

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1912.

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By Jove, you're both ageing well.

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On this journey, John and Lynn will be joined by antique gurus

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Thomas Plant and Margie Cooper.

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They're whizzing towards the meeting point

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in this beautiful blue Series One Jaguar E-Type, made in 1964.

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Which means it was manufactured before seat belts were mandatory,

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which is why they're not wearing any.

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Got it?

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I've never driven a Jaguar E-Type in my life.

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What an amazing, what an iconic car.

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I'm sort of trying to get to grips with it.

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-You're doing very well...

-Well, that's very kind...

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-THOMAS LAUGHS

-Well, I can't keep my eyes off you.

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THEY LAUGH

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Once paired up, our teams will begin their epic adventure

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with £400 in their pockets.

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Starting in Wrightington, Lancashire,

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our teams will take to the road, buying around the North West,

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before finally finishing up in Hazel Grove in Stockport

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for auction.

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Where are they? We've been, what? Five minutes, ten minutes?

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Obviously, this is a faster car and there's a jalopy coming,

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so I'm having this one.

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-And just on cue...

-Oh, it's not a Reliant Robin.

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And who do we see?

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That one's Thomas Plant.

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I'd like Thomas, please, if you don't mind.

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Now, this is a bit more like it.

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That is a colour I can live with.

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Thank you very much indeed. Sky blue, Manchester City blue.

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Perfect! And look who's there!

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Hi! Welcome.

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-Manchester United...

-We were destined to be together.

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How lovely to meet you.

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-And you as well.

-And I'm so glad I've got you.

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-Are you?

-Cos I know nothing.

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-Oh, really?

-Yes.

-What about John?

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-Do you know a lot?

-Absolutely nothing...

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-Really?

-I'm looking to you...

-Well, we will be your helpers.

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..for benevolent guidance.

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So, are you two competitive?

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Let me tell you, she is the most competitive person you will ever meet.

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I reckon John's quite competitive.

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-MARGIE:

-We're going to sort that out.

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Well, let's find out, but I hope he loses.

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-Come on, let's go.

-Are you going to drive?

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-I'll drive. Can I drive?

-Of course you can.

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Paired off, it's time to hit the road.

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Thank you so much.

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-Here we go.

-See you!

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Look at that.

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And opportunity to get to know one another.

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So, have you ever driven a classic car before?

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Does my car count as classic?

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-How old's your car?

-11 years old.

-No way!

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Is that not classic?

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Well, it was made in, like, 2005 or something, isn't it?

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It's a noughties car.

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It's a beautiful car, this.

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But not the easiest in the world to drive.

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I can smell rubber.

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If you see smoke, give me a shout, will you?

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This morning, our teams are heading to the market town of Chorley

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in Lancashire, where they will both kick off their shopping.

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Because of your seriousness,

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your gravitas when it comes to journalism

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and your in-depth knowledge on subjects

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and the way you research...

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That was very nice of you to say this.

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..you would be probably masters at negotiation.

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No, I'll be hopeless.

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No, no, come on. Give yourself some credit there.

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You've got to be masters.

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Hang on, I've just mastered this car.

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You've got to be masters at negotiation.

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Well, if you give me a clue...

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What we call... I was born in Glasgow, we call it nuttings.

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-Nuttings?

-I used to specialise in doing villains...

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-Yeah?

-..who were refusing to sort out problems,

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give people their money back,

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-and I used to go and doorstep them.

-Yeah?

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So I'm good at that sort of stuff.

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This is the same thing.

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Er, it's not really, Thomas.

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I'd always wanted to be a journalist and I wrote to 33 newspapers

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before I got a job as a journalist, aged 17, yeah.

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So you showed persistence and that is the answer.

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That's one of the key things, persistence.

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-It is, persistence.

-Dogged determination.

-Absolutely.

-Yeah.

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So you met Lynn on a television programme?

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No, I met Lynn in a pub.

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-She was a barmaid.

-MARGIE LAUGHS

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-Really?

-She was pulling pints in a pub in Richmond.

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Actually, she was a teacher, she was a French teacher,

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-supplementing her income as a barmaid.

-Was she?

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And I used to pop into this pub with my mate.

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I was a researcher on This Is Your Life at the time

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and we used to pop in this pub on the way home and she used to...

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We never had any food in the fridge, you know,

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she used to slip us lumps of cheese to make an omelette.

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-MARGIE LAUGHS

-So love was omelette-shaped...

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So she wasn't in journalism then?

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No, well, she wasn't at that time,

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she was teaching French and then she very quickly got into journalism,

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magazines and newspapers.

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And then, eventually,

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she got into consumer affairs,

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because I bought her a nightie that didn't fit. Right?

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-MARGIE LAUGHS

-For Christmas.

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And she took it back and she started investigating it,

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-they refused to give her her money back or something like that.

-Ah!

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Anyway, she started investigating her rights and that's how she became

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a consumer journalist and eventually we wound up on Watchdog,

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-working together.

-Good gracious, what a story.

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All over a nightie?

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All over a nightie, yeah.

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While John's been busy reminiscing,

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Lynn and Thomas have arrived at the first shop.

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You're now entering my territory.

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-And we're ahead of John.

-I know, which is good, isn't it?

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It's always good to be the first ones in.

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Heskin Hall Antiques houses a huge selection of treasures,

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from vintage crockery to fine antiques.

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Hello, Lynn. I'm Lynn.

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-Hello!

-Can we come in and get some great deals from you?

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-Well, we can try.

-Yeah?

-Us Lynns stick together.

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Well, I've just noticed.

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Aha! Look who's arrived.

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Unfortunately, Margie...

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-They have arrived.

-They've beaten us to it.

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They have. Right.

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-Here we go.

-Right.

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JOHN STRAINS

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It wouldn't be The Antiques Road Trip

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if you had a car that was easy to get out of.

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-JOHN LAUGHS

-Come on, let's see what we've got.

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Where is the best place to find your best bargains?

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Come on, come on, get out the way!

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-Out the way...

-We'll go upstairs, we'll go upstairs.

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-They beat us to it. I'm John.

-Hello, John.

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-Nice to meet you.

-Hi. Hello. Hi.

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-Thanks for looking after us.

-No problem at all.

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I hope you enjoy it. Have a good wander around.

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-Are they going to get all the best deals now they're here first?

-Losers! Losers.

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-We'll see.

-Bye!

-We'll see.

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Friendly banter aside, time to get down to business.

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So what sort of thing am I looking for?

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I think something decorative. If it catches your eye, it's going to be good.

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-You said... get something quirky.

-MARGIE LAUGHS

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It doesn't get much quirkier than this, does it?

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You know, dafter things than that have been purchased

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-on The Antiques Road Trip.

-Have they really?

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Step away from the cuddly toy, John.

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You know, I was saying maybe I'd like something Scottish?

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And this makes me think of bagpipes.

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Well, it's a push box.

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-Yeah, but do these sell?

-They do.

-Let's see if it works.

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DISCORDANT NOTES

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That will sell, yes.

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-You can tell I'm musical.

-I can see.

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-So you're missing the straps.

-A-ha.

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Here's the maker here, CGH.

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They're normally made on the Continent.

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A squeeze-box, £60.

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-But you are missing quite a bit of material.

-Yeah.

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-You're missing a button there.

-Yeah.

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I mean, some of these boxes can make hundreds of pounds.

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-But not that one?

-Well, I don't know enough about them, to be candid.

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-Yeah.

-60 quid doesn't seem like a great deal of money.

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-If something like 20 quid, 25 quid?

-HE PLAYS NOTE

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Yeah, but it's marked at 60. I love your optimism here!

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-Yes.

-I love your optimism, it's great.

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-But?

-I think you haven't got a cat in hell's chance of getting it.

-I'm a fool, OK.

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You're not a fool, but it's worth having a go.

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-Look out!

-Careful.

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-Look who's here.

-What are you doing?

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-Just checking on you lot.

-You're not allowed to look.

-Look at this.

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We're not allowed to look, we're just here to say hello,

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-how are you doing? We're doing brilliantly down there.

-Have you bought, have you bought?

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We've got some...

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-Come on.

-Bye.

-See you later.

-Bye!

-No rush, no rush, bye.

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No, there is a rush. Bye!

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THOMAS LAUGHS

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Lynn, right now, will be upstairs driving a very hard bargain,

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you can bet your boots. She's got an eagle eye for a bargain,

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she'll have spotted something and she'll be giving the shop owner the

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Glasgow Kiss, as they call it!

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Well, thankfully, she's not head-butting anyone,

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but she is making a cheeky bid on the £60 German squeeze-box.

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She's squeezing the price.

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I can only offer you really silly money on it,

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because it's got no leather straps,

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there's some of the fretwork missing, there's one little knobby thing that's missing.

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-Tell me what silly money you're thinking of?

-20 quid.

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-Er...

-Go on! I haven't bought anything yet today.

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I can do 25, but I couldn't do 20.

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I have to consult my colleague.

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You've done... I couldn't believe you.

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My husband says I'm the most competitive person he's ever met.

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-I can't believe that.

-And I'm rotten at haggling,

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so you're my first haggle.

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I love you, Lynn, thank you very much, 25 quid.

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-You're welcome, all right.

-Perfect, thank you.

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-Thank you, Lynn.

-You're welcome.

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Ha, the consumer champion is a champion consumer.

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A fabulous first deal there for just £25.

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-Are we going to play a happy tune to the auction?

-Yeah, what can you play?

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I can't play very much.

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-I wish I had...

-HE PLAYS A NOTE

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Oooh!

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Best stick to the day job, Thomas.

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Back inside, though, Margie's onto something.

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-That's a pretty vase.

-These?

-This one here.

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It's a... That's Noritake, which is Japanese.

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They're always nice quality, Noritake vases.

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You've always got nice gilding, pretty hand-painted flowers.

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-It is nice.

-It says on here,

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there's a pair, but I can't see it.

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-And what's the price?

-The price is £180,

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so I'm only showing you because I just thought you might like it.

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-I do, I think it's lovely.

-But...

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Yeah, it is lovely, but where's the other one?

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Whether they've got it

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-downstairs...

-Yes.

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And what era?

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-Oh, that's, it's 100 years old.

-Is it?

0:12:300:12:34

Yeah, late Victorian, early 19th century.

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Even though its partner has gone AWOL,

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John and Margie have decided to try to do a deal on the Noritake vase,

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which would cost £180 if it was a pair.

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We don't know where the other one is,

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so we'd possibly like to buy this on its own, right?

0:12:510:12:56

What's your best price?

0:12:570:12:59

As a single...

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As it's you, we'd let it go for 60, but that would be the very best.

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Can it come down another ten, could you do 50 on it?

0:13:050:13:08

Not really, no, I can't.

0:13:080:13:10

What about 55, meet us halfway?

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-55, yeah, go on.

-Shake the lady's hand.

-Go on.

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-Thank you very much indeed, Lynn, thank you.

-You're welcome.

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£55 buys John and Margie their first lot for auction.

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Top job!

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-Look at this.

-Oh, my goodness me.

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Don't get my pot wet.

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I'm going to link your arm.

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-Thank you very much.

-Right, come on.

0:13:310:13:34

Lynn and Thomas have hit the road and made their way to Liverpool.

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At the end of the 19th century,

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Liverpool had one of the biggest ports in the world,

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with merchants and sailors arriving at its docks with goods from all

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over the globe. Unfortunately,

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sailors often returned from voyages to exotic lands with unknown and

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deadly diseases.

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In 1898, the ground-breaking Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine,

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also known as LSTM, was set up to research the symptoms,

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causes and potential cures.

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It was the first school of its kind in the world.

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Lynn and Thomas are meeting Dean of Clinical Sciences

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and International Public Health, Professor David Lalloo,

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to find out more about the illnesses the 19th century sailors faced.

0:14:210:14:26

Give us an example of what sort of diseases these sailors were coming

0:14:260:14:30

-back with.

-Certainly malaria would be one of the things that would be

0:14:300:14:33

causing the greatest amount of damage, causing deaths and disability.

0:14:330:14:38

Did we call it malaria at that time?

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Did we know that's what it was?

0:14:400:14:42

Well, so the concept of malaria had been discovered fairly,

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slightly earlier than that, but it wasn't understood how it worked,

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what was transmitting the disease,

0:14:490:14:50

what parasites were causing the disease.

0:14:500:14:52

That really only came in the late, the very late 19th century.

0:14:520:14:56

And who discovered that?

0:14:560:14:58

Ronald Ross was the first person to work out that malaria was transmitted

0:14:580:15:02

-by mosquitoes.

-That must have been a Eureka moment.

0:15:020:15:05

We were getting sick, but we didn't know why we were getting sick,

0:15:050:15:08

because it was these little things here, critters.

0:15:080:15:12

It was a hugely important discovery because it meant you could start,

0:15:120:15:15

first of all, to work out how you could control mosquitoes and therefore

0:15:150:15:19

-malaria.

-Ronald Ross sounds like an amazing man.

0:15:190:15:22

Yes, clearly he was.

0:15:220:15:23

He was, in many ways, one of the first tropical physicians.

0:15:230:15:27

And in 1902, he got the Nobel Prize for that discovery.

0:15:270:15:30

Wow! I'm really interested in promoting women's part in any of this.

0:15:300:15:34

Were there women involved in setting up the school?

0:15:340:15:37

Yes, Mary Kingsley was a remarkable woman who was an explorer in the

0:15:370:15:41

-late...

-An explorer?

0:15:410:15:43

An explorer, a female explorer in the late 19th century,

0:15:430:15:45

at a time when women didn't travel around Africa.

0:15:450:15:49

A lot of her work and writings really has influenced the philosophy of the

0:15:490:15:53

way that LSTM does work in the tropics.

0:15:530:15:55

What's important was the influence that she had over how the

0:15:550:16:00

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine did its work.

0:16:000:16:02

-Really?

-It was the whole idea that you did this in partnership with people

0:16:020:16:06

in Africa, rather than imposing in a very colonial way.

0:16:060:16:09

That's a philosophy that we espouse to this day.

0:16:090:16:12

Everything we do is about working with people,

0:16:120:16:14

finding solutions together with these populations that are suffering from diseases.

0:16:140:16:19

So you're still going to the outer reaches of the world,

0:16:190:16:21

where diseases, animals bite people and things go wrong?

0:16:210:16:24

Yes, many of our researchers travel all the time.

0:16:240:16:27

Probably in slightly more luxury than Mary Kingsley did.

0:16:270:16:30

-Yes.

-But we go out there and we investigate and we treat these diseases.

0:16:300:16:35

The LSTM is world famous for its pioneering work on pesticides,

0:16:350:16:40

antimalarial medicines and has a unique resource for snake venom research.

0:16:400:16:46

Urgh!

0:16:460:16:47

David's letting Lynn and Thomas get a rare look at some snakes being

0:16:470:16:51

milked for their venom by herpetologist Paul and senior lecturer Nick.

0:16:510:16:56

What they're doing, they're getting this snake out, this is a puff adder,

0:16:570:17:01

which is a snake you find all over Africa.

0:17:010:17:03

They're enormous snakes, as you can see, and have got a very potent venom.

0:17:030:17:07

What they're doing now is just controlling the snake,

0:17:070:17:09

to make sure that it's safe.

0:17:090:17:11

You can see there that Paul is holding the head of the snake there.

0:17:110:17:14

That's quite dangerous for Paul, is it?

0:17:140:17:17

This is all experience, so really experienced people can do it well.

0:17:170:17:20

What he's doing now is just getting the snake to clamp down onto that

0:17:200:17:25

-clingfilm there, and you can see the venom milks down.

-You can see...!

0:17:250:17:28

Absolutely. It's that venom that's crucial for use in our research and

0:17:280:17:33

for use in making antivenom, which is the treatment for a snake bite.

0:17:330:17:36

Snake bites kill around 95,000 people every year,

0:17:360:17:40

so the milking of snakes done here

0:17:400:17:42

is key to the school's research into antivenom.

0:17:420:17:46

-And...

-Oh! He means it, he means it!

0:17:460:17:49

-They're pretty nasty snakes, though.

-Yeah.

-Look at all that coming out.

0:17:490:17:52

You can see the power there as well.

0:17:520:17:53

-Wow.

-I can see how dangerous that could be,

0:17:530:17:56

if you didn't know what you were doing.

0:17:560:17:58

But we use that venom to actually understand whether we can make better

0:17:580:18:01

treatments, by investigating what the components of that venom are.

0:18:010:18:05

The Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine remains one of the most

0:18:090:18:12

respected scientific institutes in the world,

0:18:120:18:15

thanks to the pioneering efforts of people like Sir Ronald Ross

0:18:150:18:19

and Mary Kingsley.

0:18:190:18:21

Meanwhile, without a snake in sight,

0:18:260:18:28

John and Margie have made their way to Bretherton and their next shop.

0:18:280:18:33

Gosh!

0:18:330:18:35

THEY LAUGH

0:18:350:18:36

God.

0:18:360:18:38

It gets deeper and deeper down there.

0:18:380:18:40

It does. Quick, quick, quick!

0:18:400:18:41

Dealer Aidan has an Aladdin's cave of goodies,

0:18:460:18:49

and John and Margie still have £345 in their pocket.

0:18:490:18:53

Time to get shopping.

0:18:530:18:54

You tend to not look up, I always look down.

0:18:570:19:00

Look up, because you see all sorts of things hanging about.

0:19:000:19:03

-It's good for your double chin as well.

-Plenty of stags...

0:19:030:19:06

Certainly better profile, darling, yeah, much better. I'll remember that.

0:19:060:19:09

That's quite sweet.

0:19:150:19:16

That's sweet, there.

0:19:160:19:18

That's Tunbridge ware, that box.

0:19:180:19:20

-Really?

-Hm.

0:19:200:19:22

-Could be a snuffbox.

-Yeah. They're designed?

0:19:220:19:24

Yeah, they're all tiny, little minute pieces of wood that are all

0:19:240:19:28

-put together.

-Really?

-It started in Tunbridge, Tunbridge Wells,

0:19:280:19:32

-as souvenir work.

-So every bit of that design...

0:19:320:19:34

They're called tesserae, yeah, little, tiny squares of all different woods.

0:19:340:19:39

-That's fascinating.

-And it was souvenir ware.

0:19:390:19:42

We'll have a look at that, if we can remember.

0:19:420:19:45

There's no ticket price on the Tunbridge ware snuffbox,

0:19:450:19:48

so one to ask Aidan about later.

0:19:480:19:51

Now, it looks like something shiny has caught John's eye.

0:19:510:19:55

Got a bit of silverware here.

0:19:550:19:57

You know me and a bit of silverware.

0:19:570:19:58

Yes. What's that, just an ornamental bowl?

0:19:580:20:00

-It's a little bonbon dish.

-A bonbon dish.

-Yeah, a bonbon dish.

0:20:000:20:03

But it's nice. I'll tell you why it's nice, it's on little splay feet.

0:20:030:20:06

-Yes.

-Which makes it really pretty.

0:20:060:20:09

And a snip at 125 quid?

0:20:090:20:11

Well, I think that's negotiable.

0:20:110:20:14

So that and that little snuffbox, potentially.

0:20:140:20:18

-Yeah.

-That's two to think about.

-Yep.

0:20:180:20:21

Potential purchases are stacking up.

0:20:210:20:24

Gosh, these look nice. Look at that, gosh.

0:20:240:20:28

It sounds daft question, it's a lamp...

0:20:280:20:31

-Yeah.

-..but...

-Off a carriage. A horse and carriage.

0:20:310:20:33

-Oh, horse and carriage!

-Horse and carriage.

0:20:330:20:35

-Oh, I see.

-Yeah. That's really nice.

0:20:350:20:37

Wow. Do you know many people who have got a horse and carriage?

0:20:370:20:40

SHE LAUGHS

0:20:400:20:42

It's a sort of practical question a journalist is bound to ask you,

0:20:440:20:47

-really.

-Well, I wasn't really thinking,

0:20:470:20:50

I was just thinking antique wise, they are pretty rare,

0:20:500:20:54

because there's one behind you.

0:20:540:20:56

So we've got a pair.

0:20:560:20:58

-But they're going to be dear.

-Are they?

0:20:580:21:00

-Yeah.

-Vintage, do you think?

0:21:000:21:02

Georgian. Early 19th century, 1820.

0:21:020:21:05

-Yeah.

-I like those.

0:21:050:21:07

So get those, all I need now is a horse and carriage!

0:21:070:21:09

SHE LAUGHS

0:21:090:21:11

With three possible lots, are there deals to be had with Aidan?

0:21:110:21:16

First up, the Victorian silver bonbon dish.

0:21:160:21:19

You've got 125 on the ticket here.

0:21:200:21:22

And what are you thinking?

0:21:220:21:24

Well, we're pushed, aren't we? Because we've got some other things in mind.

0:21:240:21:27

-We've got plans for you, Aidan.

-Yeah, we have.

-Have you got plans for me?

0:21:270:21:30

-We have.

-The gallows are at the back!

0:21:300:21:32

We're looking for a very good deal in here.

0:21:320:21:33

Could it be 60?

0:21:330:21:35

65?

0:21:350:21:37

60.

0:21:370:21:39

-Go on, then.

-You're a good man.

0:21:390:21:40

-I want you to do well.

-You're a good man. Thank you very much indeed.

0:21:400:21:43

We do try.

0:21:430:21:45

That's the silver bonbon dish bagged for less than half price.

0:21:450:21:49

Time for the turn of the Tunbridge ware snuffbox.

0:21:490:21:53

It's a bit dirty.

0:21:530:21:55

It wants a good clean.

0:21:550:21:56

It does, and there's a bit of damage there.

0:21:560:21:59

Hawk eye!

0:21:590:22:00

SHE LAUGHS

0:22:000:22:02

-I am worried now.

-Are you?

0:22:020:22:03

-Yeah.

-Why, because of the mark?

-There's a chunk there.

-Oh, I see.

0:22:030:22:06

-How much is it?

-35.

0:22:060:22:09

-35?

-That has got to be...

0:22:090:22:10

Look, come on, it's 20 quid, isn't it?

0:22:100:22:12

To some people.

0:22:120:22:15

No, I would happily give you £30,

0:22:150:22:17

we would happily give you £30 if it wasn't for a great, thundering chip.

0:22:170:22:22

-Go on, I agree.

-Do you want that for 20 quid?

0:22:220:22:24

-For 20 quid.

-You can't lose, you've got two pieces, top and bottom.

0:22:240:22:27

-Will you clean it as well?

-I'll give it a clean.

0:22:270:22:30

That's the Tunbridge ware bought for £20,

0:22:300:22:34

AND with a clean-up thrown in for free.

0:22:340:22:36

Right, John and Margie still have £265.

0:22:380:22:41

Can they strike a deal on the rare Georgian coach lamps?

0:22:410:22:45

-They're not cheap.

-I didn't think they were. Go on.

0:22:450:22:48

-You're looking at five or 600 quid.

-You're kidding!

-Yeah.

0:22:480:22:51

-They're rare.

-Are you in for a deal or not?

0:22:510:22:54

I'm always in for a deal.

0:22:540:22:56

It's a huge purchase for us, isn't it?

0:22:560:22:58

Massive, I mean, it's like...

0:22:580:23:00

All your budget, all your budget!

0:23:000:23:02

-More than our budget.

-What sort of price would you really...

0:23:020:23:05

-Bottom line.

-Bottom line.

0:23:050:23:07

-350.

-We haven't got that.

0:23:070:23:09

-No, we haven't got that.

-So, 200 would be out of the question?

0:23:090:23:13

How's 225, then?

0:23:130:23:14

I'd like to try but...

0:23:160:23:17

-I think they could fly.

-But it is a gamble.

0:23:170:23:19

It's a big outlay, but let's do it.

0:23:190:23:22

-Go with her instinct.

-Yeah, let's do it.

0:23:220:23:24

-Gut feeling.

-Yeah.

0:23:240:23:25

That's what we use every day, isn't it, darling?

0:23:250:23:27

-Shall we do it three ways?

-Three ways, how's that?!

0:23:270:23:30

-Thank you very much.

-It nearly blew their bank balance,

0:23:300:23:33

but that's the rare coach lamps secured for £225.

0:23:330:23:39

That trio of lots bought brings an end to a very successful first day

0:23:390:23:44

of shopping for our two teams.

0:23:440:23:45

I bid you all nighty-night.

0:23:450:23:48

It's a new morning.

0:23:530:23:55

Lynn and John are reunited and swapping stories about their experts.

0:23:550:23:59

Margie's fantastic.

0:23:590:24:01

Margie is so reassuring.

0:24:010:24:04

I mean, she's a very jolly lady, got on with her very well,

0:24:040:24:07

kindred spirit, Northern lass, bound to work, wasn't it?

0:24:070:24:10

-Man City fan?

-And a Man City fan, what more could you ask for, really?

0:24:100:24:14

I'm surprised I didn't marry her, really.

0:24:140:24:17

-Steady on, John.

-Thomas is lovely.

0:24:170:24:20

I know nothing about antiques. I keep saying "I love it".

0:24:200:24:24

And he really does know things.

0:24:240:24:27

He's very... Again, he's very reassuring.

0:24:270:24:29

I'd like to take him home, would that be all right?

0:24:290:24:31

By all means, darling, by all means, if you can afford him.

0:24:310:24:34

I think she probably could!

0:24:340:24:36

As ultra-competitive Lynn has only forked out for one item so far,

0:24:360:24:41

the German beechwood squeeze-box,

0:24:410:24:42

which means she still has a huge purse of £375.

0:24:420:24:47

While big spenders John and Margie have bagged an impressive four lots.

0:24:480:24:52

The Noritake vase, the Victorian silver bonbon dish,

0:24:520:24:57

the Victorian Tunbridge ware snuffbox,

0:24:570:24:59

and the rare pair of Georgian coach lamps,

0:24:590:25:02

leaving them with a mere £40 to spend today.

0:25:020:25:05

Margie and Thomas are on the road, hurtling towards Leasowe, to meet

0:25:060:25:11

their celebrity team-mates.

0:25:110:25:13

How did it go with John yesterday?

0:25:130:25:15

Great. We had a lovely day.

0:25:150:25:16

And you know something? I don't know whether I should tell you.

0:25:160:25:20

I've only got £40 left.

0:25:200:25:21

Get in! Get in!

0:25:210:25:23

So we'll see what £40 brings today.

0:25:230:25:26

I love that!

0:25:260:25:28

You've got a real sense of, you know, devil-may-care about you.

0:25:280:25:32

I have. And how was your day?

0:25:320:25:35

Our day,

0:25:350:25:36

we only got bought one thing, and I am slightly apprehensive because you've gone

0:25:360:25:41

out there and you've done it, Margie.

0:25:410:25:42

I have, I have, four items purchased.

0:25:420:25:45

I love that.

0:25:450:25:46

-I've only got one.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:25:460:25:49

Panic, panic, panic, panic.

0:25:490:25:50

I know, I know, I know.

0:25:500:25:52

I'll be honest, I would quite like to beat you just once in my life,

0:25:530:25:56

you know, that would be quite nice. But I won't sort of be crying myself

0:25:560:26:01

-to sleep if I don't.

-Do you think I'm a hard nut?

0:26:010:26:04

I think you've got your moments, yes, darling.

0:26:040:26:06

Oh!

0:26:060:26:08

We have been married a long time.

0:26:080:26:10

I wonder if it will last this Antiques Road Trip.

0:26:100:26:13

Gosh, I do hope so.

0:26:130:26:15

-We're here first.

-I know we are, look.

-We're here first!

0:26:150:26:18

Ah! Good morning.

0:26:190:26:21

How are you?

0:26:210:26:23

It gets a little bit easier,

0:26:230:26:25

-but... Not as hard. How are you?

-You all right?

0:26:250:26:28

-Nice to see you.

-Good to see you.

0:26:280:26:29

-Good morning.

-Good morning.

-We've got to get our game on.

0:26:290:26:32

Margie knows. Margie knows. They've bought four things.

0:26:320:26:34

Four things purchased.

0:26:340:26:36

-LYNN:

-Right, OK.

-Are you worried?

0:26:360:26:37

-I am dead worried.

-JOHN:

-Good, you should be.

-We're in a hurry, then!

0:26:370:26:40

-We are in a hurry.

-Oh, OK.

0:26:400:26:41

-Are you going to drive?

-I think so.

-Fantastic.

-Are you ready?

-Yes.

0:26:410:26:44

-BEEPS HORN

-Yay! On the road again.

0:26:490:26:51

This morning, Lynn and Thomas will head to New Brighton in the

0:26:510:26:54

north-east corner of the Wirral.

0:26:540:26:57

And now is a perfect opportunity for Thomas to quiz Lynn about her career

0:26:580:27:03

as Britain's consumer queen.

0:27:030:27:05

I ended up doing a lot of safety stuff because people wrote to me.

0:27:050:27:08

Like, one example, TV-am,

0:27:080:27:12

a couple wrote to me because their son died,

0:27:120:27:14

he was six and he put a pen top in his mouth, the way little kids do,

0:27:140:27:19

-and somehow or other inhaled it into his windpipe...

-Yeah.

0:27:190:27:22

..and he died, because it blocked

0:27:220:27:24

his windpipe. Other people wrote to me because their children had had

0:27:240:27:28

the same thing happen.

0:27:280:27:29

A doctor rang me and said, "Why don't they put a hole in the end and

0:27:290:27:32

"then, when they get to hospital, we can save their lives?"

0:27:320:27:36

So I rang up Bic, and the other pen manufacturers, and I said,

0:27:360:27:39

"Why don't you put a hole on the end of the pen?" Because I had by then about 12 deaths.

0:27:390:27:44

-Yes.

-And all the other pen manufacturers

0:27:440:27:47

said, "Yes, we can do that."

0:27:470:27:49

Bic said, "We couldn't possibly do that because the ink might dry out."

0:27:490:27:52

And it took eight years before they finally put a hole in the end of the

0:27:520:27:57

-pen top.

-But they did it.

0:27:570:27:58

Yeah, they did and all credit to them because Bic is a beautiful looking,

0:27:580:28:02

iconic pen top. Thank you very much, Bic, for putting that hole in.

0:28:020:28:06

Well, well done, you.

0:28:060:28:07

Well done indeed.

0:28:070:28:09

This pair are armed with £375 to spend at their first shop of the day.

0:28:090:28:14

I think I'm going to like this.

0:28:160:28:18

-One gets quite hot in the car, don't you?

-Yeah.

0:28:180:28:21

Right.

0:28:210:28:22

-Look at this.

-Hello. I'm Lynn.

-Good morning. Nice to meet you, Lynn.

0:28:240:28:27

I'm Sean, welcome to New Brighton.

0:28:270:28:29

-Thank you very much.

-Have you got some great stuff here that we could

0:28:290:28:33

have at very nice prices?

0:28:330:28:35

We have stuff. We have piles and piles of stuff.

0:28:350:28:38

He's not kidding.

0:28:410:28:43

Sean's stock's piled high, especially downstairs.

0:28:430:28:47

Lordy, look at that lot.

0:28:470:28:49

Wow, can we get in here?

0:28:490:28:50

Sean, you have got some stuff.

0:28:500:28:53

Yeah, we have people who come down here and I forget they're down there.

0:28:530:28:56

-Do you?

-At the end of the day, I go to close up and I hear a noise...

0:28:560:29:00

People rummaging. I'll leave you to it, guys. Give me a shout if you need anything.

0:29:000:29:04

Yeah, yeah.

0:29:040:29:05

Lynn, we've got our work cut out.

0:29:050:29:09

This is going to be a bit of fun.

0:29:090:29:12

I'm not sure Lynn is convinced about fun.

0:29:120:29:15

Good luck wading through this lot, though.

0:29:150:29:17

Look, there's a three-legged Clydesdale.

0:29:180:29:21

A three-legged shire.

0:29:210:29:23

Oh, look, they obviously collect them, there's a two-legged one.

0:29:230:29:26

Is that a two-legged one?

0:29:260:29:28

Oh, dear.

0:29:280:29:29

While Lynn and Thomas plough through the piled-high room,

0:29:290:29:34

John and Margie are still on the road.

0:29:340:29:35

So, politics, prime ministers.

0:29:360:29:39

-Yes.

-You must have interviewed a lot of those.

0:29:390:29:42

Yes, I've had the privilege - it is a privilege, actually -

0:29:420:29:45

of interviewing every Prime Minister since James Callaghan, back in the

0:29:450:29:49

-1970s.

-Good gracious.

0:29:490:29:51

So... In one form or... Some of them several times, actually.

0:29:510:29:55

Margaret Thatcher, obviously, was someone who you couldn't possibly forget

0:29:550:30:00

and was a challenge, to put it mildly.

0:30:000:30:03

Most people you interview, there's a bit of small talk

0:30:030:30:05

before the actual interview. Not in the least interested.

0:30:050:30:08

"Get on with it,

0:30:080:30:09

-"get down to it."

-Oh.

-And I found her quite intimidating, actually.

0:30:090:30:13

-Really?

-Yeah, I did.

0:30:130:30:14

Well, thankfully, Margie is no Iron Lady, so you can relax.

0:30:140:30:18

Back in New Brighton,

0:30:210:30:22

Lynn's knee-deep in antiques and collectables.

0:30:220:30:25

-Any luck?

-I just saw a box that I thought was quite interesting.

0:30:260:30:30

-Where did you see that?

-It's over there, but it won't be worth much.

0:30:300:30:34

-The tin?

-Yeah.

0:30:340:30:36

Because there's some tins up there.

0:30:360:30:37

You could do a job lot of tins.

0:30:370:30:39

Ready, get set.

0:30:400:30:42

Oh!

0:30:440:30:46

Was it worth the effort?

0:30:460:30:48

So this is an early 1900, 1920s tin.

0:30:480:30:51

Look at the lovely graphics on there.

0:30:510:30:53

Isn't that great?

0:30:530:30:54

Um... It's not floating my boat.

0:30:540:30:57

It's not, is it? No.

0:30:570:30:59

Hmm. Lynn may need a bit more convincing, Thomas.

0:30:590:31:02

A job lot of tins isn't what she had in mind.

0:31:020:31:05

I'm loving this, are you loving this?

0:31:050:31:07

I've found some Scottie dogs, I'm beginning to love it a bit more.

0:31:070:31:11

But I'm not going to beat John with tins, am I?

0:31:110:31:14

When we do our reveal and...

0:31:140:31:18

We'd better put the better ones on top.

0:31:180:31:20

We've looked at a lot of these tins and they're not really in very good

0:31:200:31:24

nick. Don't they have to be in better nick to sell?

0:31:240:31:26

I have sold tins, extraordinarily enough,

0:31:260:31:30

-for hundreds and hundreds of pounds.

-Have you sold tins like these?

0:31:300:31:34

Not for hundreds.

0:31:340:31:35

But I think we try and buy them for very, very little.

0:31:350:31:38

-A pound.

-Crikey.

0:31:380:31:40

How dirty are you? Look at your hands.

0:31:400:31:44

Look at that.

0:31:440:31:46

-Welcome to my world.

-Lovely.

0:31:460:31:47

Thank you. Next time I come into your world, I shan't wear white trousers.

0:31:470:31:51

Look, and I know I'm entering my world and I'm wearing white trousers!

0:31:510:31:55

Right, are you going to offer a pound?

0:31:550:31:57

-I'm going to offer £1.

-Lovely.

-Yeah.

-Right, come on.

0:31:570:32:00

There's no messing with Lynn Faulds Wood.

0:32:000:32:03

-Lynn and I have been busy.

-You've been down there about an hour.

0:32:030:32:06

-Yeah.

-THEY LAUGH

0:32:060:32:07

I think we've done you a service.

0:32:070:32:09

Yeah, perhaps you could pay us to take it.

0:32:090:32:10

I'm feeling a bit guilty, that I should be paying you to take it away.

0:32:100:32:14

In that case, could we take that for £1?

0:32:140:32:17

Well, I'm a businessman, so I think I need more than £1.

0:32:170:32:20

Maybe about £15.

0:32:200:32:22

Oh, no, that's... You see, because I'm not sure I can make a profit on that.

0:32:220:32:26

Well, make it two quid.

0:32:260:32:28

Sean, you're a wonderful man, I'll do two quid.

0:32:280:32:31

Lovely.

0:32:310:32:32

The champion consumer strikes again, as Lynn secures the huge

0:32:320:32:36

selection of Victorian and Edwardian tins for just £2.

0:32:360:32:41

Bye-bye, Sean. Thank you.

0:32:410:32:43

Now, how to fit them in the tight TVR?

0:32:430:32:47

-Oh!

-Will you stand here and look decorative?

0:32:470:32:50

I'm in.

0:32:510:32:52

Would you like me to buy something smaller?

0:32:540:32:56

-Please.

-That tea caddy looks a bit knackered. Is that a technical term?

0:32:560:33:01

We call it "whacked".

0:33:010:33:03

-Whacked?

-Whacked.

0:33:030:33:04

My favourite one's that red one.

0:33:040:33:06

-But for two quid...

-Yeah.

0:33:060:33:08

For two quid. Right, there you are, we're done.

0:33:080:33:11

And we don't keep that to carry them.

0:33:110:33:14

Sell it back to him. A quid for his crate.

0:33:140:33:17

A quid for his crate? Right, I'll be back.

0:33:170:33:20

-Good luck.

-Crikey, Moses.

0:33:200:33:21

John and Margie, meanwhile, have made their way to Birkenhead.

0:33:240:33:28

And are arriving at the Wirral Transport Museum.

0:33:300:33:33

Wow, look at this lot.

0:33:340:33:35

My goodness me. Oh, we've got the light on here.

0:33:350:33:38

They've come to learn about an eccentric American entrepreneur,

0:33:400:33:43

George Francis Train.

0:33:430:33:45

A man who revolutionised public transport in Britain in

0:33:450:33:48

the mid-19th century by introducing the American streetcar.

0:33:480:33:53

John and Margie are meeting tram expert Rob Jones to find out more.

0:33:530:33:58

Streetcars at that stage were pulled by horses.

0:33:580:34:01

-Yes.

-What was the reception when he came here initially?

0:34:010:34:03

Well, he was helping run his uncle's shipping line in Liverpool.

0:34:030:34:06

He thought, "What Liverpool needs is these streetcars that they have in

0:34:060:34:10

"New Orleans and New York and Boston and Philadelphia.

0:34:100:34:12

"I'll try and sell the idea to Liverpool." But they thought he was a bit too

0:34:120:34:17

extrovert. So, on the rebound, he came over the water to Birkenhead

0:34:170:34:22

and saw the chairman of the town commissioners, who was John Laird,

0:34:220:34:25

a big employer in the town.

0:34:250:34:27

John Laird said, "Well, we'll give you a try.

0:34:270:34:30

"We'll give you six months' try, and after six months,

0:34:300:34:32

"if it's a failure, you must take it away at your own expense."

0:34:320:34:36

And George Francis thought,

0:34:380:34:39

"I've got an inroad here."

0:34:390:34:41

And he made a success of it.

0:34:410:34:44

A brilliant businessman who travelled the world,

0:34:440:34:47

it's claimed that GF Train was the real-life inspiration for the

0:34:470:34:52

fictional character Phileas Fogg in Jules Verne's

0:34:520:34:56

Around The World in Eighty Days.

0:34:560:34:59

In the late 19th century,

0:34:590:35:00

the horse-drawn trams that Train had introduced were eventually replaced

0:35:000:35:05

by electric ones.

0:35:050:35:07

And what was its advantage over the horse-drawn tram?

0:35:070:35:10

Well, it was cheaper to run, it could carry more passengers,

0:35:100:35:14

and it went twice the speed of horse trams.

0:35:140:35:17

And, I suppose, one other advantage was that you didn't need men following

0:35:170:35:21

the tram, picking up the... You know what, the manure.

0:35:210:35:24

You're right. When the horse trams finished,

0:35:240:35:26

one of the few redundancies was the manure salesmen that Liverpool

0:35:260:35:30

-employed.

-Oh, dear.

0:35:300:35:31

But everybody else was taken on.

0:35:310:35:33

You say it was such a success here in Birkenhead.

0:35:330:35:36

Did other cities and towns follow suit?

0:35:360:35:38

Yes, it gradually got more enthusiasm.

0:35:380:35:41

Within 25 years, there were about 100 towns

0:35:410:35:45

and cities in our country that had trams.

0:35:450:35:49

What caused the decline of the tram?

0:35:490:35:51

After the First World War, trams were in decline because of motor buses.

0:35:510:35:55

The technology was growing at a fantastic rate and motor buses came in.

0:35:550:36:00

Actually, I used the B word here.

0:36:000:36:03

We don't... We're a tram place here, so we talk about the B word.

0:36:030:36:08

With the B word banned,

0:36:120:36:14

Rob is kindly letting John take a turn in driving a tram.

0:36:140:36:19

All aboard!

0:36:190:36:20

-John.

-Sir.

-This is Dave.

0:36:220:36:24

Hello, Dave, pleased to meet you.

0:36:240:36:26

Dave's going to look after you, make sure you do everything spot on.

0:36:260:36:29

Now then, obviously, I don't want to crash this.

0:36:290:36:31

What do I need to know?

0:36:310:36:33

Well, the first thing you need is the key.

0:36:330:36:35

-Yeah.

-So this actually goes in there.

0:36:350:36:37

Let me do that for you. That's great.

0:36:370:36:39

-Push forward.

-Oh, I got it.

-That's it.

0:36:390:36:41

-OK.

-All set?

-Bells.

-Margie? Everyone?

0:36:410:36:44

-Bells.

-HE RINGS BELL

0:36:440:36:46

Here we go.

0:36:460:36:48

Oh, yes. Hey, I rather like this.

0:36:480:36:50

MARGIE LAUGHS

0:36:500:36:51

-We're actually doing some speed.

-Yeah. Two.

-Now we're racing, now.

0:36:510:36:55

Hey, it's quite fast, isn't it?

0:36:550:36:57

It is, yeah. It soon picks up.

0:36:570:36:59

Blimey. Hey.

0:36:590:37:01

You're doing great, John.

0:37:030:37:05

Thank you very much, sir.

0:37:050:37:07

It's quite a speed this, actually. I'm really quite impressed.

0:37:070:37:10

-Bring the control back to off.

-Yes.

0:37:100:37:12

To slow it down again.

0:37:120:37:13

Birkenhead will go down in history as the town that

0:37:130:37:16

took the plunge and secured Britain's first tram system.

0:37:160:37:19

All thanks to George Francis Train.

0:37:190:37:22

It would have been so much easier if he'd called himself Tram.

0:37:220:37:26

Lynn and Thomas, meanwhile, have made their way to West Kirby,

0:37:280:37:32

where they've arrived at their final shop...

0:37:320:37:35

..still armed with a whopping £373.

0:37:360:37:39

They've got some serious money to spend.

0:37:390:37:42

-Hello.

-Hello there.

-I'm Lynn.

-Good to meet you, Lynn.

0:37:420:37:45

-I'm Bob.

-You're Bob.

0:37:450:37:46

-Yes, hello.

-And this is Thomas.

0:37:460:37:48

Hello, Thomas. Good to meet you.

0:37:480:37:51

We're really interested... You've got lovely stuff.

0:37:510:37:53

-Thank you.

-I'm just hoping you can do us great

0:37:530:37:55

-deals on them.

-We'll see what we can do. We need to make a living.

0:37:550:37:58

Well, you see, I have to beat my husband, John Stapleton.

0:37:580:38:01

Is that a hobby?

0:38:010:38:03

It is, yeah.

0:38:030:38:04

With winning on their minds, Lynn and Thomas get stuck in.

0:38:050:38:09

And it doesn't take long for our Tom to dig up something.

0:38:120:38:15

Go for it, Tom-Tom.

0:38:150:38:16

Look at this, Lynn.

0:38:160:38:18

I've never seen a wooden spade before.

0:38:180:38:21

It's a cool thing. I love the size of it.

0:38:210:38:23

-I love it, too, but I have got a lot of money.

-Shh!

-Oh.

0:38:230:38:27

I have got very little money to spend if I'm going to thrash my husband.

0:38:270:38:31

Thomas is taken with the 19th-century treen spade,

0:38:330:38:36

which is ticketed at £36.

0:38:360:38:39

And Lynn has spotted something in the shop window.

0:38:390:38:42

Is it a doggy?

0:38:420:38:44

The one that attracted my eye most was that lovely kind of

0:38:440:38:47

Art Deco feeling pendant.

0:38:470:38:49

-The gold pendant at the back?

-Yes.

-Well, it's probably not deco.

0:38:490:38:53

-Oh.

-No, it's going to be earlier than that.

-Oh, really?

0:38:530:38:56

-It's Art Nouveau.

-Oh, right, OK.

0:38:560:38:57

And it looks, with those flowers and the peridot...

0:38:570:39:01

-And what's the little green stone?

-It's a peridot.

-I've never heard of that.

0:39:010:39:04

We call it an olivine. It's a paradise stone.

0:39:040:39:07

It's got a great sort of lovely green to it.

0:39:070:39:10

But that is extremely wearable.

0:39:100:39:12

I told you I knew nothing. I've never heard of peridot.

0:39:120:39:14

But you've got an eye, you've got an eye, haven't you?

0:39:140:39:17

It's a pricey piece at £225, but Lynn likes it,

0:39:170:39:23

so another it's for consideration.

0:39:230:39:25

Would pictures sell at this auction?

0:39:260:39:28

Oh, definitely. Absolutely.

0:39:280:39:31

What... I mean, do you like her?

0:39:310:39:33

She's lovely, but I prefer the fat baby.

0:39:330:39:35

-Oh.

-Look at that.

-I hadn't seen the fat baby.

0:39:350:39:37

Look at the fat baby. What's a fat baby doing there?

0:39:370:39:40

Oil on canvas. Hercules And The Serpents.

0:39:400:39:46

With a £110 price tag,

0:39:460:39:48

the oil painting is added to the list of other potential purchases.

0:39:480:39:52

Anything else, chaps?

0:39:520:39:53

Now, what's that? Is that an ashtray?

0:39:540:39:57

-The dish?

-Yeah.

0:39:570:39:58

The silver dish. Antique silver dish.

0:39:580:40:00

-Sri Lankan.

-And what are those animals round it, horses and...?

0:40:000:40:04

Well, you've got lions.

0:40:040:40:05

You've got horses, you've got elephants and you've got some extraordinary

0:40:050:40:09

-exotic birds.

-Yeah.

0:40:090:40:10

With a ticket price of £79,

0:40:110:40:13

the white metal Sri Lankan dish is also set aside for negotiation.

0:40:130:40:18

That pendant is still playing on Lynn's mind.

0:40:180:40:21

Time for a closer look.

0:40:210:40:23

So you've got the Art Nouveau design.

0:40:230:40:25

The chain is not associated, it's sold with it.

0:40:250:40:28

I'm just going to turn it over. So we've got the lovely design here.

0:40:280:40:31

Turn it over.

0:40:310:40:32

-And...

-It's beautiful.

0:40:330:40:35

-It is beautiful.

-And what's this stone?

0:40:350:40:37

-Peridot?

-Peridot, yeah.

0:40:370:40:38

Peridot. It's actually a good-looking thing, isn't it?

0:40:380:40:41

-It is.

-It is good-looking.

0:40:410:40:43

-You like that?

-It's lovely, it's lovely.

0:40:430:40:45

The price. Yes.

0:40:460:40:48

Right. So, we like that, we like that.

0:40:480:40:51

And Lynn's not done yet.

0:40:510:40:53

I really like the fat baby.

0:40:530:40:55

The fat baby. On the ticket, it says, "After Sir Joshua Reynolds,

0:40:550:40:59

"circa 1900s."

0:40:590:41:00

Turn it over and show the back to me.

0:41:000:41:03

So what you've got here is the modern frame, which is fine.

0:41:030:41:07

So if I just peel this off.

0:41:070:41:08

There we are, look. So if we do that there, there's a bit of writing on there.

0:41:080:41:12

We can't see what it is. This is 1900 board.

0:41:120:41:16

It's got £110 on the ticket, but

0:41:160:41:20

I'm going to speak to our friend Bob, if we

0:41:200:41:23

-want to do a deal on that.

-You can see the infant Hercules.

0:41:230:41:26

-Can you see that?

-Yes.

-The infant Hercules.

0:41:260:41:28

It's quite interesting that we've got that bit of copperplate writing

0:41:280:41:31

on there.

0:41:310:41:34

That's three lots on the counter,

0:41:340:41:36

but Thomas has one more he'd like to add.

0:41:360:41:39

My spade. Right.

0:41:390:41:41

This is what you are so attracted to.

0:41:410:41:45

I love my spade.

0:41:450:41:47

Well, I've never seen anything like it.

0:41:470:41:49

Lynn is not convinced on that spade.

0:41:490:41:51

So they've decided to try and do a deal on the dish,

0:41:510:41:54

pendant and oil painting,

0:41:540:41:56

which have a combined ticket price of over £400.

0:41:560:42:01

Well, the best offer I can do...

0:42:010:42:03

..is 275.

0:42:050:42:07

I have to say, that's an immensely fair reduction.

0:42:070:42:10

Would you come any lower than that, because I feel I should haggle?

0:42:100:42:14

250?

0:42:140:42:15

250, I could do.

0:42:160:42:18

-And with the spade?

-265?

0:42:180:42:21

265, including the spade?

0:42:210:42:23

-That's a good deal.

-Yeah.

0:42:230:42:24

-Bob...

-Are you going to do it?

0:42:240:42:26

Yes. You're a lovely man.

0:42:260:42:28

Thank you very much.

0:42:280:42:30

And a very generous discount.

0:42:300:42:32

Which means Lynn and Thomas get the pendant for £140,

0:42:320:42:36

the painting for 60, the white metal dish for 50, and the spade for 15.

0:42:360:42:41

Wow!

0:42:410:42:42

We've done it, but I don't know whether we're going to beat John.

0:42:440:42:47

Come on, we've got the tins!

0:42:470:42:49

-Yes.

-We've got the tins!

-SHE LAUGHS

0:42:490:42:52

While Lynn and Thomas have been busy buying,

0:42:560:42:59

John and Margie have made their way to the picturesque town of Frodsham

0:42:590:43:03

in Cheshire.

0:43:030:43:04

Situated in the shadow of Frodsham Hill,

0:43:040:43:07

this vibrant market town is home to John and Margie's final shop.

0:43:070:43:12

-All right, here we go.

-Yeah.

0:43:140:43:16

Last call of the day.

0:43:170:43:19

-Oh.

-It gets no easier.

0:43:190:43:21

SHE LAUGHS

0:43:210:43:23

Come on. In we go.

0:43:230:43:25

After blowing most of their £400 budget yesterday,

0:43:270:43:30

John and Margie have just £40 left to spend.

0:43:300:43:33

-What's this?

-What?

0:43:350:43:37

Oh, that's branny, that is, as they say in the trade.

0:43:370:43:40

-A branny? What does that mean?

-Brand-new.

0:43:400:43:42

-Oh, I see.

-Yeah. That's just trying to be something it isn't.

0:43:420:43:46

-Not for us, then.

-No. That's not for us. But well spotted.

-This is nice.

0:43:460:43:49

Yeah, that's quite nice, isn't it?

0:43:490:43:51

Nice meat plate.

0:43:510:43:53

I could see my roast beef on that.

0:43:530:43:55

-Yeah, it's all right, isn't it?

-Mm.

0:43:550:43:57

Oriental background.

0:43:570:43:59

Yeah, no, that's English...

0:43:590:44:01

-Is it?

-Well, yeah, that style is sort of the Western,

0:44:010:44:06

what we assume that it's like in the Orient.

0:44:060:44:10

That is willow pattern, isn't it? It is all transfer printed.

0:44:100:44:13

-You can see the join there, can you see?

-SHE LAUGHS

0:44:130:44:16

-Do you see that little bit there?

-Yes.

-They transfer print and...

0:44:160:44:19

-Oh, I see.

-Yes, it's all very clever, but...

0:44:190:44:22

So what, they print the whole thing on?

0:44:220:44:24

Yeah, they, like, put a stencil on it and roll it and...

0:44:240:44:29

It's not hand-painted.

0:44:290:44:31

-Well, for 32 quid...

-It's actually quite nice, that.

0:44:310:44:35

-It is good.

-Yeah.

-Yeah, I like that.

0:44:350:44:37

Dealer Jill is on hand to help get a closer look.

0:44:370:44:40

Let's get a mark, yeah.

0:44:420:44:44

That's made in Swansea...

0:44:440:44:45

-Swansea!

-..which is interesting, yeah.

0:44:450:44:47

That is interesting. In the late 19th century, there was a huge interest in

0:44:470:44:51

Japanese... Anything to do with Japanese.

0:44:510:44:53

The Mikado was inspired by the Japanese interest.

0:44:530:44:56

And this stuff was just so immensely popular.

0:44:560:44:59

And still looks fabulous today.

0:44:590:45:01

I mean, it's a lovely, attractive plate.

0:45:010:45:03

-Yeah, we like that, don't we?

-We do like it.

0:45:030:45:05

-Yeah.

-Do you know much about it, Jill?

0:45:050:45:07

I don't. It's another dealer's stock.

0:45:070:45:09

Oh. We haven't actually got much money left.

0:45:090:45:12

-Right.

-We've come to you with very little.

0:45:120:45:14

Can you ring the dealer and ask him what his best price on that might be

0:45:140:45:17

for us, given that we genuinely don't have much money?

0:45:170:45:19

-Honestly.

-Yeah, certainly. I'll give him a call for you.

0:45:190:45:22

The 19th-century meat plate sports a £32 ticket price,

0:45:220:45:27

but how low will the dealer go?

0:45:270:45:29

-Could do it for 22.

-22?

-Yes.

0:45:310:45:33

-Yeah, that's great.

-He'll do it for 22.

-Well, that would be nice, wouldn't it?

0:45:330:45:36

-I think that's all right.

-That's very kind. Thank you very much.

-We'll shake on that.

0:45:360:45:40

-Brilliant.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:45:400:45:42

And with that generous discount, John and Margie are all bought up.

0:45:420:45:46

Thank you.

0:45:460:45:47

Right, shopping done and dusted, time for a spot of show and tell.

0:45:490:45:53

It'll be something delicate. Good heavens!

0:45:560:45:58

THEY LAUGH

0:45:580:46:00

I thought you were supposed to get four or five things?

0:46:000:46:03

This is one lot.

0:46:030:46:05

You look as though you've bought an entire grocery shop.

0:46:050:46:08

How much do you think we paid for this lot here?

0:46:080:46:10

Well, I haven't the faintest idea.

0:46:100:46:12

-I mean...

-£15.

0:46:120:46:14

-I'd say a tenner.

-Lower.

0:46:140:46:16

-£1. A bit more.

-£1.50.

0:46:160:46:18

-£2. £2.

-THOMAS LAUGHS

0:46:180:46:21

I offered £1 and then we felt sorry for him because he said he was a

0:46:210:46:24

-businessman.

-MARGIE:

-There's got to be a little bit of a profit there.

0:46:240:46:27

-There'll be some mark-up on that.

-I'm sure.

0:46:270:46:29

There's some good boxes in here.

0:46:290:46:32

-Well, yes.

-This could be a runaway hit.

0:46:320:46:33

There are some great tins in this.

0:46:330:46:35

Yes, they're in lovely, original condition.

0:46:350:46:39

Also known as a bit battered.

0:46:390:46:41

John, Margie, your turn.

0:46:410:46:43

-Oh.

-Oh.

-Oh!

0:46:450:46:48

You have quantity. May I suggest here we have quality, right?

0:46:480:46:53

So we've got the coaching lamps, which I am immediately looking at,

0:46:530:46:57

because they are cylindrical.

0:46:570:46:59

I've never seen cylindrical ones.

0:46:590:47:01

Margie, you would have paid a fair bit of money for those.

0:47:010:47:03

I have. We have.

0:47:030:47:05

We have paid. And what are your thoughts about that?

0:47:050:47:07

-Noritake vase.

-MARGIE:

-Yes, but...?

0:47:070:47:09

-Noritake?

-Noritake.

-Does that mean vulgar?

0:47:090:47:12

Well, it's from Japan and it will have a hand-painted scene on it.

0:47:120:47:16

-With very nice gilding.

-Yes.

-£25?

0:47:160:47:19

-Come on.

-Don't be silly.

0:47:190:47:21

-Come on!

-Oh, they paid more.

0:47:210:47:23

-45.

-55.

-55.

0:47:230:47:26

-OK.

-I like those coaching lamps.

0:47:260:47:28

Yes, I like those coaching lamps.

0:47:280:47:30

Those items you've got before all of that are all going to make a profit.

0:47:300:47:34

-You think so?

-Yes. The coaching lamps could let you down.

0:47:340:47:37

I have to confess, I think the coaching lamps are a gamble, but in

0:47:370:47:41

the hands of my expert, in whom I have absolute faith, I love it.

0:47:410:47:46

-I think we'll go off and have a cup of tea.

-Yeah. Good luck.

0:47:460:47:49

-MARGIE:

-Bye.

0:47:490:47:51

Out of earshot, what do they really make of each other's lots?

0:47:510:47:54

Well, I tell you what, I saw those tins.

0:47:560:47:58

That's just a load of old tat, isn't it?

0:47:580:48:00

But it's quite clever because they only paid two quid for it,

0:48:000:48:03

-so they'll make money out of that, I think.

-I think they could win.

0:48:030:48:06

-Really?

-You see, I like those coach lamps.

0:48:060:48:08

They're the kind of thing that people buy to do up houses differently.

0:48:080:48:12

-No? Oh.

-No.

0:48:120:48:14

OK, I bow to your superior knowledge.

0:48:140:48:16

After starting in Wrightington,

0:48:170:48:20

Lynn and John are now motoring towards Hazel Grove in Stockport for

0:48:200:48:24

the big finale.

0:48:240:48:25

As the most competitive person I've ever met in my entire life...

0:48:270:48:30

-You still think that?

-I still think that.

0:48:300:48:32

How are you rating your chances today?

0:48:320:48:34

I think, I think...

0:48:340:48:36

Well, I'm meant to say I think we'll win, but I have my doubts.

0:48:360:48:40

-You have your doubts?

-I have my doubts.

0:48:400:48:42

I've never seen you even with a scintilla of doubt about anything you've ever done.

0:48:420:48:46

-I'm just loving the game.

-Well, this is a first.

0:48:460:48:49

While the competitive couple are gearing themselves

0:48:490:48:51

up for the sale,

0:48:510:48:53

our experts have arrived at Maxwells auctioneers under their own steam.

0:48:530:48:57

Well, here they are.

0:48:570:48:59

Good morning, sir. How are you?

0:49:020:49:04

-Are you going to slip out of that?

-Good to see you again.

0:49:040:49:07

-Yeah.

-So.

-Good to see you.

0:49:070:49:10

-Yeah.

-Good to see you again.

0:49:100:49:12

Looking forward to this?

0:49:120:49:13

-LYNN:

-I am.

-Our tins are going to win it.

0:49:130:49:15

-Your tins.

-Our tins are going to win the day.

0:49:150:49:17

Right, let's go in. Come on.

0:49:170:49:19

Well, we'll soon find out.

0:49:190:49:21

On this tremendous trip, Lynn and Thomas spent £292 on six auction lots.

0:49:210:49:26

While John and Margie bought five lots,

0:49:280:49:31

almost blowing their entire budget, spending £382.

0:49:310:49:36

Bravo. The man with the gavel today is Max Blackmore.

0:49:360:49:40

So, what does he make of our celebrities' lots?

0:49:400:49:43

Some quite unusual items, like the concertina.

0:49:430:49:47

Shame it's not in better condition.

0:49:470:49:48

The coaching lamps are a very attractive pair.

0:49:480:49:51

They could do quite well.

0:49:510:49:53

Today's auction has buyers online and in the room.

0:49:550:49:58

Our teams are settling in.

0:49:580:49:59

Let the battle of husband versus wife commence.

0:49:590:50:02

The opening lot is the 19th-century treen spade that Thomas adored.

0:50:060:50:11

-Ten I have on the net.

-£10. Oh, you got £10.

0:50:110:50:13

-It's decorative.

-Take twos if you wish.

0:50:130:50:16

-12.

-Whey!

-MARGIE:

-12.

0:50:160:50:19

-Come on.

-£12, the gentleman. In the room at £12.

0:50:190:50:22

-15.

-You've got it. Swiped...

0:50:220:50:25

Selling this time, then at 18.

0:50:250:50:27

The spade secures Lynn and Thomas their first profit.

0:50:290:50:33

I loved it.

0:50:330:50:35

I'm really pleased you're happy.

0:50:350:50:36

And I'd buy it again.

0:50:360:50:38

From a Thomas favourite to one of Margie's.

0:50:390:50:41

The Noritake vase is next.

0:50:410:50:44

Start me at £10.

0:50:440:50:46

£10. Ten bid. At £10.

0:50:460:50:49

12. 15. 18.

0:50:490:50:51

20. 22. 25.

0:50:510:50:55

-Oh, it's getting there.

-£25 we have from the lady.

0:50:550:50:58

-Oh, dear.

-At £25.

0:50:580:51:00

At £25 on my left, I'm selling it.

0:51:000:51:03

-Oh, what a shame.

-LYNN:

-How much did you buy it for?

0:51:030:51:06

-55.

-Stop rubbing it in.

-I feel sorry for you.

0:51:060:51:08

-Just lost 30 quid.

-Oh, I'm so sorry.

0:51:080:51:10

Not as sorry as Margie must be feeling.

0:51:100:51:13

-That's a disappointment.

-That was one of our bankers.

0:51:130:51:15

MARGIE LAUGHS

0:51:150:51:17

Next up, Lynn's German beechwood squeeze-box.

0:51:170:51:21

-£30 bid.

-Oh, you're in.

-LYNN:

-Whey!

0:51:210:51:23

-Yes.

-Profit.

0:51:230:51:25

Come on. At £30.

0:51:250:51:28

That's fine.

0:51:280:51:30

Another profit for Lynn and Thomas. Well done.

0:51:300:51:33

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:51:330:51:35

We can easily overtake that.

0:51:350:51:37

Fighting talk, John. I like it.

0:51:370:51:40

Look, your Victorian bonbon dish is up next.

0:51:400:51:43

50 bid. At £50.

0:51:430:51:45

-Lady's bid at 50. 52.

-Oh!

0:51:450:51:48

55. 58.

0:51:480:51:51

60.

0:51:510:51:53

-£60, the lady's bid.

-Surely not.

0:51:530:51:55

-It's wiping its face.

-Now in the room.

0:51:550:51:57

Selling, then, at 60.

0:51:570:52:00

-I'm disappointed.

-There isn't a lot of love in the room for poor old

0:52:000:52:04

John's lots. But at least it wasn't another loss.

0:52:040:52:06

Even he thought we'd make more than that.

0:52:060:52:08

-Even I did.

-C'est la vie.

0:52:080:52:11

Moving on, it's the turn of the £2 tins.

0:52:110:52:14

There must be a profit for Lynn here, surely.

0:52:140:52:18

20 bid. I have £20.

0:52:180:52:20

-Wow.

-That's better.

0:52:200:52:21

-20. Two. Are you bidding? 25.

-Yes!

0:52:210:52:24

Oh, you've got a tins collector.

0:52:240:52:27

30. 35 I have. We're in fives.

0:52:270:52:29

-40. 40 bid.

-I don't believe it!

0:52:290:52:33

£40. 45? £45

0:52:330:52:36

-on the net. Against the room.

-Well, I congratulate...

0:52:360:52:39

45 for that load of old tosh!

0:52:390:52:41

-Yes!

-Oh, thank you so much, net.

0:52:410:52:44

-Well done, internet.

-Lynn hoped they'd do well,

0:52:440:52:47

and didn't they just? What a profit!

0:52:470:52:49

How do we make a dignified exit?

0:52:500:52:52

THEY LAUGH

0:52:520:52:55

Don't go anywhere yet, John, here comes your 19th-century meat plate,

0:52:550:52:58

-old boy.

-Starting at £10, then.

0:52:580:53:00

-Come on.

-Come on!

-This is going to creep up.

-£8, then.

0:53:000:53:04

This is a quality piece.

0:53:040:53:06

-No, it's not...

-LYNN:

-It is a quality piece.

0:53:060:53:07

-Gosh!

-Anybody want it? £8 I have.

0:53:070:53:09

Eight, we've got eight, with the auctioneer's wife.

0:53:090:53:12

Thank you very much. I'm selling at £8.

0:53:120:53:14

No!

0:53:140:53:16

Oh, dear. This is not John and Margie's day.

0:53:160:53:19

-What's happened to us?

-I'm speechless.

0:53:190:53:21

We've gone down the slippery.

0:53:210:53:23

-I'm speechless.

-THOMAS:

-I'm really sorry.

0:53:230:53:25

Oh, stop it! You don't mean a word of it.

0:53:250:53:27

-You don't mean a word of it.

-THOMAS:

-I do, I do, I do.

0:53:270:53:29

I believe you, Thomas. Though thousands wouldn't.

0:53:290:53:33

Time now for Lynn and Thomas's white metal Sri Lankan dish.

0:53:330:53:37

Come on, 20, then. Let's start nice and low.

0:53:370:53:40

20 bid. In the front.

0:53:400:53:41

-Further bids?

-Come on, come on, take it.

0:53:410:53:43

22? It's a competition.

0:53:430:53:45

-It's beautiful!

-25.

0:53:450:53:47

-I'm embarrassed now.

-28. I'll come back to you. 30.

0:53:470:53:50

32. 35. 38.

0:53:500:53:54

-Oh...!

-40.

0:53:540:53:56

£40. Front row again?

0:53:560:53:57

-Go one, sir!

-£40? It's with the lady.

0:53:570:53:59

-Well done.

-42.

-Go on, madam.

0:53:590:54:02

£45.

0:54:020:54:03

That's the lady's bid. Anybody else now?

0:54:030:54:05

All done? I'm selling.

0:54:050:54:07

-Oh, dear!

-Just missed a profit.

0:54:070:54:09

-LYNN:

-Just missed washing its face.

0:54:090:54:11

A small loss for Lynn and Thomas.

0:54:110:54:13

-Bad luck.

-We're clawing our way back, Margie.

0:54:130:54:16

-THOMAS:

-You are.

-JOHN:

-We're clawing our way back.

0:54:160:54:18

-THOMAS:

-We're on the ropes. We're on the ropes. And those blows are coming in.

0:54:180:54:21

Stay tuned.

0:54:210:54:23

Can John and Margie make a comeback with their Victorian

0:54:230:54:25

Tunbridge ware snuffbox?

0:54:250:54:27

30 bid. At £30.

0:54:280:54:30

There you are, straight in.

0:54:300:54:32

-Wow.

-32.

0:54:320:54:33

-Ooh!

-32? No, 32.

0:54:330:54:35

35. 38. 40.

0:54:350:54:39

-Thank you.

-Well done, you've doubled your money.

0:54:390:54:41

£40 for the lady standing.

0:54:410:54:43

I'm selling it. At £40...

0:54:430:54:46

Doubled their money! Top-notch.

0:54:460:54:49

-Congratulations.

-JOHN:

-We're on your tail, mate.

0:54:490:54:51

-We're on your tail.

-Lynn and Thomas are up again,

0:54:510:54:54

this time with their oil painting of the infant Hercules.

0:54:540:54:58

30 bid. At £30.

0:54:580:55:01

Any further bids now?

0:55:010:55:03

-35.

-Come on!

0:55:030:55:05

It is beautiful!

0:55:050:55:07

-40 bid.

-Yes!

-£40. 45?

0:55:070:55:10

Yes, £45.

0:55:100:55:12

-Oh, you're getting there.

-Go on!

0:55:120:55:13

-It's a proper picture.

-It's going, going...

0:55:130:55:16

Gone. The fat baby flopped.

0:55:170:55:20

-Oh, dear.

-Somebody got a bargain there because that was beautiful.

0:55:200:55:23

-It was a good thing.

-I loved it.

0:55:230:55:24

Right, then, hold tight. Here comes John and Margie's big gamble,

0:55:260:55:29

their rare Georgian coach lamps.

0:55:290:55:31

Good luck. They'll need it.

0:55:310:55:33

-Start me at 60.

-Ooh!

0:55:340:55:36

£60. For a good pair of Georgian coach lamps.

0:55:360:55:39

They are really good.

0:55:390:55:40

They are good, and they're not mine.

0:55:400:55:42

They're not mine, and they're good.

0:55:420:55:45

-90.

-A long way to go.

-£90 in the front row.

0:55:450:55:48

-At £90.

-Come on, they're gorgeous.

-They are good.

-£90.

0:55:480:55:50

There's no interest on the net.

0:55:500:55:52

-We're in the room.

-No interest on the net!

0:55:520:55:54

Any further bids now? £90 it is.

0:55:540:55:56

-Oh, I feel for you.

-And selling.

0:55:560:55:58

What a disappointment. But never mind.

0:56:000:56:03

Never mind?! Oh, dear. Top marks for your positivity, Margie,

0:56:030:56:07

but that is a crushing blow.

0:56:070:56:09

I thought there was a telephone bid coming up.

0:56:090:56:11

I thought there was. With somebody hovering around on the phone,

0:56:110:56:13

I was worried. Genuinely.

0:56:130:56:15

-JOHN:

-I think they were ordering their lunch.

-THEY LAUGH

0:56:150:56:17

Time for the last lot of the day, then.

0:56:170:56:19

Lynn's peridot pendant.

0:56:190:56:21

There could be a profit here.

0:56:210:56:23

At 55. 60. 65.

0:56:230:56:27

70. 75.

0:56:270:56:29

80. 85.

0:56:290:56:31

Well, it's doing all right!

0:56:310:56:33

95. 100.

0:56:330:56:36

-Oh, dear.

-110.

0:56:360:56:38

120. 130. 140.

0:56:380:56:41

-Whey!

-150.

0:56:410:56:42

-Yes!

-160.

0:56:420:56:44

-All done this time?

-That's good.

0:56:440:56:47

And we end on a profit.

0:56:470:56:49

Great stuff.

0:56:490:56:51

Many congratulations.

0:56:510:56:52

-Thank you.

-JOHN:

-Yes, well done.

0:56:520:56:54

-Have we won?

-MARGIE LAUGHS

0:56:540:56:56

Good one, Lynn.

0:56:560:56:58

John and Margie started with £400 and, after paying auction costs,

0:57:000:57:04

sadly, they made a pretty dramatic loss of £199.14.

0:57:040:57:10

Which means they end this trip with £200.86.

0:57:100:57:16

Lynn and Thomas also kicked off with £400 and, unfortunately,

0:57:160:57:19

they too failed to make a profit after auction costs.

0:57:190:57:22

Although their loss was somewhat smaller of just

0:57:220:57:25

£10.74, which means the wife wins.

0:57:250:57:30

Oh, yes. Lynn finishes with £389.26.

0:57:300:57:34

-Well done, darling.

-Well, thank you, darling.

0:57:360:57:38

I'm so sorry you lost.

0:57:380:57:39

That will teach you to be rude about me.

0:57:390:57:41

And being with you has been reward enough for me.

0:57:410:57:43

How sweet. I feel even worse now.

0:57:430:57:46

Sufficient reward just being with you.

0:57:460:57:48

-Given that you've won, will you drive me home?

-Certainly.

0:57:480:57:50

-Bye-bye.

-Bye. See you.

0:57:530:57:55

Well, I tell you what, I found this a really,

0:57:580:58:01

really lovely and fascinating experience.

0:58:010:58:03

-I mean, it's quite educational, isn't it?

-Absolutely brilliant.

0:58:030:58:06

And, oh, I can get in top gear here.

0:58:060:58:09

I think we've really missed out over the years.

0:58:090:58:12

I didn't realise how great auctions were for buying good stuff at good

0:58:120:58:16

prices. And the antique shops...

0:58:160:58:18

I'm going to go in more of them in future.

0:58:180:58:21

Now I know slightly what I'm looking for.

0:58:210:58:23

-You've got the bug?

-Yeah.

0:58:230:58:25

I'm pleased to hear it. Safe travels, road trippers.

0:58:250:58:28

A celebrity couple road trip with award-winning journalists John Stapleton and Lynn Faulds Wood. Joining them on this jolly jaunt are Thomas Plant and Margie Cooper. With £400 in their pockets, the teams kick off in Wrightington, Lancashire, and head to Stockport for auction.

Lynn and Thomas find themselves literally knee-deep in antiques while hunting for old biscuit tins, while Margie tries to convince John that some rare lamps will make a profit.

John learns how an American revolutionised British public transport, and Lynn sees why snakes are milked in Liverpool.