Tanni Grey-Thompson and Jade Jones Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Tanni Grey-Thompson and Jade Jones

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. Top Paralympians Tanni Grey-Thompson and Jade Jones do battle in the north east of England.


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The nation's favourite celebrities...

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-Ooh, I like that!

-..paired up with an expert...

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-Oh, we've had some fun, haven't we?

-..and a classic car.

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It feels as if it could go quite fast.

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Their mission? To scour Britain for antiques.

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CONCERTINA WHEEZES

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-Yes!

-Fantastic.

-I do that in slow-mo.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction.

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-Come on, boys!

-But it's no easy ride.

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-Tah-dah!

-Who will find a hidden gem?

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-"Don't sell me!"

-Who will take the biggest risks?

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-Go away darling!

-Will anybody follow expert advice?

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-I'm trying to spend money here.

-There will be worthy winners...

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-Yes!

-..and valiant losers.

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Put your pedal to the metal -

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this is the Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Today, we'll be "gannin' about" the north-east of England with a couple

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of our finest Paralympians under starters' orders.

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It's not about the competing. It's about the taking part.

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Of course not. Absolutely. Yeah!

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-I definitely don't want to win!

-OK, I believe that(!)

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Yes, its wheelchair racers Tanni Grey-Thompson

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and her young protege Jade Jones.

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Titans of the track but strictly amateurs in a Jag

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when it comes to this malarkey.

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Do you know what sort of things you want to buy?

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I was thinking somewhere maybe along the lines

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of jewellery or something like that, maybe.

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-What about you?

-I really like glass things.

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But I just don't want to buy junk and pay a lot for it.

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Yeah, yeah, yeah. Exactly.

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Canny Tanni won 11 gold medals

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and broke 30 records during an astonishing athletics career,

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picking up her final Olympic gongs in Athens in 2004.

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I could be quite rude and say your medals are pretty much antique!

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And she then became first a dame and now a baroness,

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serving in the Lords as a County Durham peer,

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whilst also training young Jade.

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It's a shame we never really got to race against each other.

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-It's going to be a bit weird competing.

-I think it'll be fun.

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They first met at Jade's school when she was just 12 years old

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and not into sport one little bit.

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At first I was like, "I'm not sure if I really want to do this."

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But actually, I remember we went out for a bit of a push

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and there was another guy there that was off to the Paralympics.

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I think I saw him and just saw how fast he was

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and thought, "Right, OK."

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-Actually, it's quite good.

-Yeah, it's quite cool.

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Jade became very fast very quickly,

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competing in her first Olympics in London in 2012, and then Rio.

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Her tender age of just 20 making her, surely,

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our youngest ever Roadtripper.

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Have you seen the tape deck in it?

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I don't think I've ever listened to a tape!

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Really? We've probably got some tapes from probably the early '80s.

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-Oh, wow!

-Like, old music.

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So what's the oldest music you've listened to?

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Erm... Definitely '90s.

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MUSIC: Smells Like Teen Spirit by Nirvana

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Smells like antiques experts David Harper and Phil Serrell.

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Here we are. Now, entertain us.

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They're sportswomen and there's a massive sporting connection

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in the north-east, isn't there?

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-Yeah, there is.

-You've got all the footy.

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-You've got the rugby.

-Yeah.

-Wor Jackie - was it Wor Jackie?

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-Yeah, Wor Jackie.

-He was Newcastle legend Jackie Milburn, actually.

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Never mind, perhaps those two in the TVR

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should just concentrate on doing their thing.

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Starting out with an assignation in Hartlepool.

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Now, the unusual thing about this place is the alacrity with which

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its residents have accepted their almost certainly unjust reputation

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as the town that once tried and executed

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a shipwrecked Napoleonic monkey.

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Huh!

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Puts you on the map, I suppose.

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-Tanni, how are you?

-I'm good, thank you. How are you?

-Hello.

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-Lovely to see you.

-Nice to meet you.

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-Hello.

-Hello! How are you?

-Are you driving, Tanni?

-I am.

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Yeah. This is my car now. This is it.

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I think somebody's very local to here, aren't you?

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We probably know all the good shops. We're just going to slope off now, if that's all right?

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-OK.

-All right.

-Bear with us. We'll have to get your equipment out.

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-That's amazing, actually, isn't it?

-Perfect.

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Right. We're in the modern, trendy, young, funky TVR.

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-Oh, wow.

-Have a nice time.

-You too.

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-You two in the old grand tourer.

-Cheeky monkey!

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-Oh, he's revving his engine. Bye!

-See you, oldies.

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After kicking off amongst the Hartlepudlians,

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our athletes will head out on a whistle-stop tour of the north-east,

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before pushing south to a Yorkshire auction at Harrogate.

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Now, not sure they know it yet, but they're in the first shop together.

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-So stand by.

-There they are. For goodness' sake.

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Which direction have they come from? Quickly, let's go.

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Jade is really good at shopping.

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-Looking at stuff.

-You go in, I'll let her tyres down.

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Queensberry rules, please, Phil.

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There're racing, they're trying to get in before us. Can't believe it.

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Well, you know, we've got to steal

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a march somewhere. We're the old-timers in this thing.

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-I know!

-Speak for yourself.

-We're the young bucks.

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At least we have a neutral Kiwi proprietor to ensure fair play.

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-Good morning. Hello.

-How are you doing, guys? All right?

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Sweet, I'd say, Alan, with a chocka place like yours to explore!

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Have you ever been into a shop like this before?

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Never. Is that a hot water bottle?

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How did you spot that? You've got blinking good guys, haven't you!

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-Made from Bakelite.

-Tanni loves a good hot water bottle.

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-She takes them everywhere.

-Does she really?

-Oh, yeah!

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Oh, yeah. It's not all inside either,

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as Tanni and Phil have already discovered.

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How would you have got on in Seoul with that?

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Actually, my first racing chair was probably not far off that.

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-What's in there?

-Eh, eh?

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-Shall we go and have a look?

-We've got some leaded lights.

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See, I do like this coloured glass.

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-Do you?

-I do.

-You like glass, don't you?

-I do like glass, yes.

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-Shall we take this one out and have a look at it?

-Oh, do let's.

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So what we've got is a little bit of Edwardian,

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late 19th-century, possibly,

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leaded light glass, and the thing with this,

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when this breaks, it's an absolute pig to repair.

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-Yeah. I do like the colours.

-Come on, Phil, get rummaging!

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-What about that one, boss?

-Eugh.

-That's a no, then.

-No.

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SHE CHUCKLES

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-No.

-No, right, OK.

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They said she was easy to work with.

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Oh, that's nice. Oh, I like that.

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Isn't that lovely? There is some damage down the bottom.

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I like the colours on it.

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I mean, if you could get those two for a tenner...

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I want to make sure the others don't see them.

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-You seriously hiding them?

-Yeah, course I am.

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I've played with David Harper before, let me tell you.

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There we are. Right, swiftly moving on.

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But they are too busy,

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what with David trying to convince Jade

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to buy a moose head and now a buckskin.

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-That's funky, isn't it?

-Is it a proper cowboy outfit?

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-Look at that!

-Yeah, that's interesting.

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I'm not sure if it's for me.

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-SHE LAUGHS

-Would it suit you? Let's have a look?

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-I don't think it's my style.

-Oh, I don't know.

-I don't know.

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Quite like the tassels.

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Calamity Jade perhaps!

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-Now, there's a funky chair. Do you like that?

-I do. Yeah.

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I'm going to try it out.

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The cupboards, I quite like the cupboards on the side.

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-Cupboards.

-The cupboard things.

-That's amazing, isn't it?

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They're great, aren't they?

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Look at that! Shouldn't every chair have cupboards?

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Every chair should have cupboards.

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So, what you got here, you've got zones for bottles.

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-Right, OK.

-So you could have bottles of beer.

-Yeah.

-Bottles of wine.

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Whiskey, whatever you like it. This will recline, I'm sure.

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Oh, really? Oh, wow, OK.

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-That's brilliant.

-Cigar.

-Suits you.

-Port. Yeah.

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And then we have little magazine racks this side.

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-Oh!

-What dates do you think it comes from? What period?

-Oh, gosh, OK.

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-Have a guess.

-Now you're asking.

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Look at the shape and the design of the arms.

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-Right.

-Does that remind you of old cinemas?

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-Oh, wow, yes.

-So go back to the early part of the 1920s, maybe...

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-Really, that far back?

-Yeah, absolutely.

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-Wow.

-It's got that early sort of Art Deco feel to it.

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The upholstery itself is a bit rotten,

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I mean, it's much later upholstery,

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it would have been in a leather or may be what they call a moquette.

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Jade, would you have this in your house?

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Do you know what, I think I would.

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It's quite quirky, it's a bit different.

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Different is good. And in this business, different is brilliant.

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-Brilliant.

-It's quite comfortable, actually.

-Is it?

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Well, let's find out if the price is just as easy.

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What do you think of this?

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-I love it, myself.

-Well, you're bound to say that, aren't you?

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-I do, I love it.

-What sort of money is it to the lovely Jade here?

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Well, we had 75 on it,

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I can do it for about 50 quid if it's any good to you?

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Now, Alan here is used to serious negotiators coming in here.

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Is it worth us working very hard on the lovely Alan?

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Yeah, I think so.

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-What would you like to pay for it?

-35.

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-Maybe 45 is going to buy it, I think.

-What about 40?

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OK. We'll do it for 40, then.

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-Brilliant.

-You are an absolute natural.

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You've just done a deal, your first deal! Shake his hand. Brilliant.

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-Excellent, thank you.

-Thank you very much.

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Nice work. Out back, they have something

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a wee bit more industrial in mind.

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I'd definitely have that as a tool box.

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I've got enough tools to fill it.

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-Do you think people would buy it?

-Yeah, yeah, yeah, absolutely.

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-I'm bang on trend, up there with the kids. That's where I am.

-Down there.

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Down there with the kids? See, I'm not up there, I'm down there.

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I've even got that wrong.

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-Good grief!

-You'd sort of kind of just strip that.

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-What's it made out of?

-It's metal.

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And then wax it up...

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-I'd take that off it...

-Yeah.

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I think you've got a really cool kitchen cupboard, but, you know,

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if we could buy that for five or ten quid...

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Crikey, don't get your hopes up, Alan.

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-Oh, my gosh, what have we found here?

-That old steel cabinet.

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-Of all the places that we've been.

-This is great.

-Yes.

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Tanni, hang on, let's just start that...

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Let's rewind. Tanni, it's not great.

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-Oh, no, it's rubbish.

-It's rubbish, it's poor, it's rusting...

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-It's 20 quid.

-Oh, behave!

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And then of course there's the windows.

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How much will he want to take these of his hands?

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A fiver.

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-What, him to pay us?

-Yes!

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They really do want to win, don't they?

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-That's really killing me, that.

-So, what do you think?

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That cabinet and those stained-glass windows...

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That's what we were sort of thinking.

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-Well, I was thinking 20 quid.

-15 quid, you've got a deal for the two.

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-OK, 15 quid together.

-Thank you. Thank you so much.

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We've got to go have a look inside.

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-Thank you!

-Now, take a quick breather, Alan,

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because your other customers could be calling any minute.

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I really like the little teapots, I think they're...

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-Here, have a look at one.

-really cute, aren't they?

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I remember kind of like playing with little teapots

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when you're younger, you get the pretend sets...

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-Yeah.

-They were cute.

-So that what drew you in.

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Yeah, that's what made me think of it,

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you get the tiny little cups and saucers and things.

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-Yeah.

-Yeah.

-Actually it's odd because this business

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is very much about that, it's about memories.

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-Yeah.

-They're made by a company called Goss.

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-Right.

-And these things were really popular in the early part

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of the 20th century. All novelty miniature pieces.

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-Yeah.

-And often from different places.

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-There you go, there's Skegness.

-Oh, Skegness. OK.

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And so, you know, here we are in Hartlepool,

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you would buy them from Hartlepool.

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-Yes.

-And up until probably about ten years ago

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they were really collected.

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-Yeah.

-So, that whole tray there might have been worth...

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-..100 quid, 150, 15 years ago.

-Wow, really?

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They're probably not worth much more than ten quid.

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-For the lot. Honestly.

-OK. That's interesting.

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But the thing is, it's going to auction and it would make a good auction lot.

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-Yes.

-Yeah, it might. Oh, Alan!

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Can we get 15 quid for the lot?

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Jeez, that's a good deal.

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Well, let's see how many pieces we've got.

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So, we've got one, two, three, four, five...

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Can't even be bothered to count. More than ten pieces.

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-Including...

-The tray.

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Oh, we get the tray as well?

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-The lot.

-The tray's probably worth more, actually.

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-That's a bonus.

-I rate it. If Alan can do...

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-(For a tenner...)

-I think we all heard that whisper!

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OK, so you said 15.

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-Yes.

-Would you take seven?

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GEORDIE ACCENT: Shy bairns get nowt.

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-So they say.

-Where did that come from?

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-Make it a tenner and we've got a deal. That's great.

-OK. Brilliant.

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-Yeah.

-She's unbelievable!

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Well done, bonny lass.

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Time to pay the man £50 for the china and the chair.

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-Excellent, thank you.

-Brilliant.

-Lovely.

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And with Jade and Dave safely off the premises,

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will Tanni and Phil acquire anything else?

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-Is it me?

-You look cool.

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Up with the kids, then, eh, Phil?

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-Is that me?

-No, that might be, though.

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-What have you found?

-North Eastern Railway.

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"Persons are warned not to trespass on the railway.

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"Any persons so trespassing are liable

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"to a penalty of 40 shillings."

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-Was that a lot of money?

-Phil's more into groats.

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No price label on it, either.

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-What do you reckon?

-Well, railway stuff

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like that is massively collectable.

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-Right.

-Massively collectable.

-Do you want to see how much it is?

0:12:590:13:02

-Shall I go and see if I can find Alan?

-Yeah, go on, then.

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I spend so much of my life on the railway,

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because I live in the north-east but I work in London.

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I like the North Eastern Railway bit, I think that's fantastic.

0:13:090:13:13

You could clean that up and it would look really nice.

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Time for the north-east's premier Antipodean antiques vendor.

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-And how much is that?

-It's 150.

-Oh, my life!

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What were you thinking?

0:13:230:13:25

Well, I was thinking like 40 or 50 quid.

0:13:260:13:28

Oh, my God. It's not mine, it's somebody else's.

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-OK.

-I can get him on the phone.

0:13:310:13:33

Is there a chance, do you think? Or are we wasting our time?

0:13:330:13:35

Might be a chance. Might be a chance.

0:13:350:13:37

-It's a big ask, Phil.

-Can I offer you 60 quid for it?

0:13:370:13:40

£60. Oh, you're an absolute star.

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Let me just... I'll go and tell Tanni.

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It's her decision at the end of the day, but thank you so much.

0:13:460:13:48

-Yeah?

-Well, Tanni, Peter was the dealer and I think he's been

0:13:480:13:51

really, really kind to us. He wanted 80 quid,

0:13:510:13:53

-he said we can have it for 60 quid.

-Oh, good effort.

0:13:530:13:55

I think we should buy that, don't you?

0:13:550:13:56

-Yeah.

-Definitely.

-Let's have it.

0:13:560:13:58

They seem to have got an awful lot for their £75.

0:13:580:14:00

-80 quid.

-80. Fiver change. Thank you.

-Brilliant, thank you very much.

0:14:000:14:05

-Top place.

-A cabinet, two windows, and of course that sign.

0:14:050:14:09

Come on then, Tanni. Off we go. Onto the next, onto the next.

0:14:090:14:13

Time to discover the whereabouts of Jade and David.

0:14:150:14:17

It's incredible, isn't it,

0:14:170:14:19

how your life was changed from that one meeting with Tanni?

0:14:190:14:22

Yeah, it was just probably only a couple of hours

0:14:220:14:25

and that moment just changed everything.

0:14:250:14:27

What's the ultimate goal, aim for you?

0:14:270:14:30

Whenever anybody gets asked that they always kind of say,

0:14:300:14:33

"Oh, gold medal at the Paralympics or Olympics,"

0:14:330:14:35

and I think actually for me I just want to be the best I can be,

0:14:350:14:38

and I think the day I stop enjoying it is when

0:14:380:14:41

I will know that's kind of it.

0:14:410:14:43

I think that's a very good answer.

0:14:430:14:45

They've headed south to the River Tee, to the town of Middlesbrough.

0:14:450:14:49

That great industrial centre once named Ironopolis,

0:14:490:14:53

which is also Jade's home town.

0:14:530:14:56

Here we are. Now, being a Middlesbrough girl, have you been here before?

0:14:560:14:59

I haven't. I probably should have done.

0:14:590:15:01

They're here to find out about another local hero.

0:15:010:15:04

-Hi, there.

-Welcome to the Dorman Museum.

0:15:040:15:06

-Nice to meet you.

-My name is Sue, I'm the education officer here,

0:15:060:15:09

and I'm going to show you our Christopher Dresser Collection.

0:15:090:15:13

The Victorian designer Christopher Dresser wasn't actually born in

0:15:130:15:16

the town, but thanks to his role as art superintendent

0:15:160:15:20

at the local Linthorpe pottery,

0:15:200:15:22

he'll forever be associated with Boro.

0:15:220:15:25

You can go all over the world and find pieces of Dresser

0:15:250:15:27

in different museums. In New York, in Europe.

0:15:270:15:31

But this is the biggest collection

0:15:310:15:33

that you can go and see in the world.

0:15:330:15:35

Dresser designed everything, from ceramics to furniture,

0:15:350:15:38

metalwork and wallpaper.

0:15:380:15:40

And was a huge and lasting influence on 20th-century design.

0:15:400:15:44

Even though today he's much less well known

0:15:450:15:47

than his contemporary William Morris.

0:15:470:15:50

I have heard of him, but I don't know a great deal about him.

0:15:500:15:54

But like you said, I think it's great

0:15:540:15:55

to promote kind of positive things coming from Middlesbrough.

0:15:550:15:59

I think where I can I try and help that, too, with sports.

0:15:590:16:03

Despite becoming the first industrialised nation,

0:16:030:16:06

Britain in the early 19th century was falling behind its European

0:16:060:16:09

and American competitors in the field of design.

0:16:090:16:13

So, the government established specialised schools

0:16:130:16:16

from which Dresser was an outstanding early graduate.

0:16:160:16:20

What sort of things would he have studied there?

0:16:200:16:22

Most of it would have been flora and fauna,

0:16:220:16:24

and it were thought that these were good inspirations for design,

0:16:240:16:28

but he became really interested in the subject and he was even given a

0:16:280:16:31

doctorate from the University in Jena.

0:16:310:16:34

He could have went on to be a botanist,

0:16:340:16:36

but he chose a more lucrative career path.

0:16:360:16:38

He was already being commissioned

0:16:380:16:40

to do design when he was just a student.

0:16:400:16:42

People like Minton and Coalbrookdale and Wedgwood.

0:16:420:16:46

Unlike Morris, whose inspirations stemmed from Britain's pre-industrial past,

0:16:460:16:50

Dresser belonged firmly in the modern age,

0:16:500:16:53

believing that the combination of design and manufacture could create

0:16:530:16:56

mass-produced goods of high quality.

0:16:560:16:59

People could design for craftsmen,

0:17:000:17:02

but Dresser was looking to design for the machine,

0:17:020:17:04

which was the way forward.

0:17:040:17:06

His metalwork looks like it was designed in the 1970s.

0:17:060:17:09

-Exactly.

-And we get so many visitors who say,

0:17:090:17:12

"This looks so Art Nouveau and Art Deco."

0:17:120:17:15

And I'm like, "This is 1860s."

0:17:150:17:17

You can see what a pioneer of design and the man was.

0:17:170:17:20

Sometimes I think that's why he didn't fit so well in

0:17:200:17:22

with the Victorian natural design, because he was so forward-thinking.

0:17:220:17:27

The Middlesbrough connection came about when Dresser suggested that

0:17:270:17:31

a local factory owner convert his ailing brickworks

0:17:310:17:34

into Linthorpe Art Pottery.

0:17:340:17:36

Production began in 1879,

0:17:360:17:39

with Dresser firmly at the designing helm,

0:17:390:17:42

and Linthorpe became known worldwide after winning a medal at

0:17:420:17:46

the London International Exhibition in 1885.

0:17:460:17:50

Now, is this Dresser, then, at his height of his power, here,

0:17:500:17:53

designing for Linthorpe?

0:17:530:17:55

Oh, absolutely. You've got to remember at the time

0:17:550:17:58

the Linthorpe Pottery was so cutting edge

0:17:580:18:00

and no-one had ever seen anything like this before,

0:18:000:18:03

and it was selling off the shelves.

0:18:030:18:05

He was very innovative as well.

0:18:050:18:07

The Linthorpe Pottery was the first pottery in the country

0:18:070:18:09

where the kilns were run on gas,

0:18:090:18:11

and he was experimenting with the glazes that covered the pots,

0:18:110:18:14

and he was the first one to experiment

0:18:140:18:16

with spray painting pots as well.

0:18:160:18:18

And I think he got the idea from going to the barbers,

0:18:180:18:20

and seeing the barber spraying people's hair.

0:18:200:18:23

I love the colours, especially this one here, the teal one,

0:18:230:18:26

I really, really like that colour.

0:18:260:18:29

So where did he get the influence for these designs?

0:18:290:18:32

Well, previous to opening the pottery,

0:18:320:18:34

he went on one of his dreams.

0:18:340:18:36

He got the opportunity to go to Japan,

0:18:360:18:39

and the emperor gave him unlimited access to the whole of the country,

0:18:390:18:42

which has never been heard of before.

0:18:420:18:44

So he travelled, he was looking at factories, temples,

0:18:440:18:48

he was invited to ceremonies.

0:18:480:18:50

And he just absorbed it all,

0:18:500:18:52

and you can see it in the pieces when he came back.

0:18:520:18:55

He used a lot of his Japanese designs, the glazes, the patterns,

0:18:550:19:00

and quite a lot of the floral designs

0:19:000:19:02

he used in the Linthorpe pieces,

0:19:020:19:04

and that was revolutionary at the time.

0:19:040:19:06

Dresser then went one step further

0:19:070:19:10

by opening a store to sell his designs.

0:19:100:19:12

Although short lived,

0:19:120:19:14

the Art Furnishers' Alliance was to be yet another visionary move by

0:19:140:19:18

the designer who spent his later years

0:19:180:19:20

working with Liberty of London.

0:19:200:19:22

This is the Kordofan candlestick.

0:19:220:19:24

And this was designed exclusively for sale at Liberty's of London.

0:19:240:19:28

God. I mean, if that was in absolutely immaculate condition

0:19:280:19:32

you would say it was designed yesterday.

0:19:320:19:34

Terence Conran, from Habitat,

0:19:340:19:37

credits Dresser with being one of his biggest influences.

0:19:370:19:40

And this piece here is a Dresser design, it's a letter or toast rack,

0:19:400:19:45

and it's still produced today by Italian designers Alessi.

0:19:450:19:49

And something they're almost certain not to find in the next shop.

0:19:490:19:53

Now, what about Tanni and her commoner?

0:19:570:19:59

Which is more terrifying, House of Lords

0:19:590:20:02

or a start line in the Olympics?

0:20:020:20:05

-I'm going to guess the House of Lords.

-House of Lords.

0:20:070:20:09

What you do matters to people.

0:20:090:20:11

You know, so sport's important and...

0:20:110:20:14

You know, winning was massively important

0:20:140:20:15

to me, but nobody lives or dies, you know?

0:20:150:20:17

So we've done Dame, we've done Baroness, what's the next one up?

0:20:170:20:20

-That's it, for me, really.

-Queen Grey-Thompson?

0:20:200:20:23

Unless I marry a Duke, I'm kind of done with the titles, really.

0:20:230:20:25

And what does your husband think about that?

0:20:250:20:27

-Is he happy with that or is he...?

-Erm...

0:20:270:20:29

Quite. These two are working their way west towards Bishop Auckland,

0:20:310:20:34

yet another bonny sporting destination

0:20:340:20:37

to tick off on our north-east tour.

0:20:370:20:39

Come on then, boss, you go first.

0:20:390:20:41

-Right. If you could.

-The young Stan Laurel lived here as well.

0:20:410:20:45

-Hello, how are you?

-Hi.

-Hi, how are you?

-Nice to meet you.

0:20:450:20:48

-Hi, I'm Tanni Grey.

-I'm Yvonne.

0:20:480:20:50

-Philip. Hi, good to see you, my love.

-Hi, Philip.

0:20:500:20:52

Ah, we've definitely been here before.

0:20:520:20:55

Tanni likes her glass, so maybe this is the place.

0:20:550:20:59

-Wow.

-If you want to get ahead, get a hat.

-Oh, no, that's nice.

0:20:590:21:02

-Oh, that's cool.

-It is, isn't it?

0:21:020:21:05

-Is that copper?

-Yeah. So, this is a ship's light.

0:21:050:21:08

-Yes.

-I think it's early part of the 20th century.

0:21:080:21:12

Bit of a tip, here, if you go into an antique shop and you see

0:21:130:21:16

a really old faded label, it kind of means

0:21:160:21:19

it's been there for some long time.

0:21:190:21:22

-OK.

-That's just in the window in the sun.

0:21:220:21:25

-We haven't had any sun!

-Hats off to you, Phil.

0:21:250:21:30

-Anything else?

-Right, so what do you reckon about this, then?

0:21:300:21:32

-Oh... Definitely!

-That's me, isn't it?

0:21:320:21:34

Now, that's what a Baroness should look like.

0:21:340:21:36

-I think I should wear this all the time.

-It's got a certain dignity to it.

0:21:360:21:39

-It's nice, isn't it?

-Yeah, it's lovely.

0:21:390:21:41

It would be nice if it was real.

0:21:410:21:42

-Isn't it?

-Who's the expert around here?

0:21:420:21:45

Now, I'm an either going to make myself feel really quite clever

0:21:450:21:47

-or an idiot here.

-Yeah.

-But if you pick that blue vase up, there.

0:21:470:21:51

-Yeah.

-That should have "Maling's" written underneath it,

0:21:510:21:54

and Maling's is a porcelain company that worked in Newcastle.

0:21:540:21:57

So that's a local pot. Tell me if I'm right or wrong.

0:21:570:22:00

What does that say?

0:22:000:22:02

-Ringtons.

-That's the tea supplier, Tanni.

0:22:020:22:05

It says "Maling Ware" in the small print.

0:22:050:22:08

-That's really pretty. I like that colour.

-OK.

0:22:080:22:10

It reminds me of my grandmother.

0:22:100:22:12

-You know, when she...

-Was she blue and white?

0:22:120:22:14

She... She used to have something similar

0:22:140:22:16

she used to scoop out the tea leaves.

0:22:160:22:18

Let's have another look at it.

0:22:180:22:20

This is... This is a tea caddy. For Ringtons Ltd.

0:22:210:22:25

They were Newcastle-on-Tyne, and it is Maling Ware.

0:22:250:22:27

-But there's no price.

-OK. Will it help us win?

0:22:270:22:31

There comes a point in time where you've got to like what we buy,

0:22:310:22:33

and I think you kind of like that.

0:22:330:22:36

-Always the best way.

-I like the miner's lamps.

0:22:360:22:40

Oh, those there? There does seem to be

0:22:400:22:42

one recurring theme here.

0:22:420:22:44

-That one there, £68.

-Yeah.

0:22:440:22:48

That one there...

0:22:480:22:50

£68. That one there.

0:22:500:22:52

-Guess? Go on!

-£68!

-She's good isn't she?

0:22:520:22:54

She's on the money, this girl.

0:22:540:22:56

Makes choosing your favourite a bit easier.

0:22:560:22:59

My knowledge of miner's lamps...

0:22:590:23:01

..could be written on the back of a very small postage stamp.

0:23:020:23:05

-Oh, no.

-But what I want you to do is

0:23:050:23:07

I want you to hold that there and look at it.

0:23:070:23:09

-Yeah.

-Now, just hold...

0:23:090:23:12

Look at them.

0:23:120:23:14

So, that's really...smooth, and that's...

0:23:140:23:16

This supposedly has been down a mine.

0:23:160:23:19

-And that looks a bit sort of more used.

-Yeah.

0:23:190:23:21

I mean, I'm sort of... I quite like that one.

0:23:210:23:26

-And you'll never guess the price.

-£68?

-Well done!

0:23:260:23:28

Yeah, yeah. We'd better find out

0:23:280:23:30

what they can do them for, haven't we?

0:23:300:23:32

-Yeah, I think so.

-Come in, Yvonne.

0:23:320:23:34

-How are you, my love, all right?

-Yeah, great.

0:23:340:23:37

What's the best you can do on the bit of Maling's?

0:23:370:23:39

That's easy. That could be £10.

0:23:390:23:42

OK. What's the best you can do on the miner's lamp?

0:23:420:23:44

I could do...

0:23:440:23:46

-40?

-..and I'm hardly making anything here. I could do 45.

0:23:460:23:50

-Can we have the two for 50 quid?

-I knew you were going to say that.

0:23:500:23:53

Because it's Tanni, I want her to get something nice.

0:23:530:23:55

-Oh, thank you!

-So could we have those two for 50?

-Yes. You can.

0:23:550:23:59

-What a nice lady!

-£50, thank you very much.

0:23:590:24:02

-Thanks so much.

-Thank you.

-Lovely to meet you both.

0:24:020:24:05

-Good luck.

-Thank you. You take care, now. Cheers.

-Bye-bye.

-Bye-bye.

0:24:050:24:09

Quite a team, those two.

0:24:090:24:11

I tell you what, you're good in that.

0:24:110:24:12

Have you ever thought about racing it?

0:24:120:24:14

Do you know, I should give it a go, shouldn't I?

0:24:140:24:16

You should, you'd be quite good, I think.

0:24:160:24:18

Now, with shopping done for the day, Tanni and Jade are back together.

0:24:190:24:23

And have our experts inspired confidence?

0:24:230:24:26

What we needed to find out is what's the biggest losing team ever?

0:24:260:24:30

And try and beat that.

0:24:300:24:32

So we're not the biggest losing team ever. That could be our joint goal.

0:24:320:24:35

Yeah, OK.

0:24:350:24:37

Gawd! Nighty-night.

0:24:370:24:39

Now, this is more like open top weather.

0:24:420:24:44

-What do you think to the car, then?

-Oh, she's a little baby, actually.

0:24:440:24:48

There is something about the roar of a British sports car, isn't there?

0:24:480:24:51

You know what, it doesn't even have to go very quickly, does it?

0:24:510:24:53

-No, which is a good job.

-It is.

-Because they don't.

0:24:530:24:58

-What was the open-top car like?

-My hair was a mess.

-Yes!

0:24:580:25:01

That the car's incredible.

0:25:010:25:03

-I couldn't see a thing the whole way.

-This is so childish,

0:25:030:25:05

but even after a marathon, your hair looks lovely, so...

0:25:050:25:08

I am so happy that your hair was a mess!

0:25:080:25:10

That's so mean!

0:25:100:25:12

Yesterday, David and Jane purchased just a Goss assortment

0:25:120:25:16

and an easy chair...

0:25:160:25:17

-Shouldn't every chair have cupboards?

-Every chair should have cupboards.

0:25:170:25:21

..meaning they still have £350 to spend.

0:25:210:25:24

Whilst Tanni and Phil picked up a tea caddy, a miner's lamp,

0:25:250:25:29

some leaded lights, a metal cabinet, and a railway sign - as you do.

0:25:290:25:34

-40 shillings!

-Was that a lot of money?

0:25:340:25:37

Leaving £275 in their wallet for today.

0:25:370:25:41

-How did it go for you?

-It's just really weird what people buy.

0:25:410:25:44

-Yeah.

-And what they like. And I didn't see any glass,

0:25:440:25:48

so I was really looking hard to find some coloured, like...

0:25:480:25:51

Like, paperweights and things.

0:25:510:25:53

Yeah, OK. I think David wanted us to buy this great big moose's head that

0:25:530:25:56

-you stick on the wall, which was quite...

-A real one?

-Yeah!

0:25:560:26:00

-Eugh...

-It was awful.

0:26:000:26:02

And it would never have squeezed into the TVR.

0:26:020:26:05

-Here's the ladies.

-Come on, you two, are you just chatting?

0:26:050:26:07

Well, you know what it's like.

0:26:070:26:09

-Oh, come on.

-We're having a jolly good time.

-We've got shopping to do!

0:26:090:26:13

Later, they'll be heading towards Harrogate

0:26:130:26:15

for their Yorkshire auction,

0:26:150:26:17

but the first shop today is in Horsley,

0:26:170:26:19

a little village in Northumberland.

0:26:190:26:21

Not a lot here, but it does have a corner shop.

0:26:210:26:25

-What a fantastic place, Graham.

-Thank you.

-He's right.

0:26:250:26:29

Good thing they've still got a bob or two to spend.

0:26:290:26:32

So, tell me what you like. Let's get to see your taste.

0:26:320:26:36

I like... I like this.

0:26:360:26:38

-Ah, OK, tell me what you like in that?

-I like glass, I just like...

0:26:380:26:42

The way the light shines off it, is what I like.

0:26:430:26:45

-I just like the shape of it.

-Obviously it's a decanter.

0:26:450:26:48

I mean, the ticket tells you everything you need to know,

0:26:480:26:50

made in about 1960, but by Waterford Crystal, so it's cut crystal,

0:26:500:26:55

it's really high-end quality.

0:26:550:26:58

Now, let me just pass this to you,

0:26:580:27:00

because it is truly a thing of absolute delight.

0:27:000:27:03

-And be careful when you tip it over.

-Yeah.

0:27:030:27:06

-Because the stopper...

-Of course, yeah!

0:27:060:27:08

Now, just as you're handling it, of course, stoppers can fall out.

0:27:080:27:13

Yes, of course, yes.

0:27:130:27:14

So, the big thing with decanters is always check the condition of

0:27:140:27:17

the stopper, so go on, give it a twist and pull it out.

0:27:170:27:20

I mean, it looks like there's been no nibbles there.

0:27:200:27:23

-No.

-Look along the rim. It's seen no wild parties, has it?

0:27:230:27:27

-No.

-But a good stopper, generally speaking,

0:27:270:27:30

if you just plonk it in like that,

0:27:300:27:31

tip it over, it will fall out.

0:27:310:27:33

-Yeah, OK.

-So you lock it in place,

0:27:330:27:35

one and a half twists generally does it.

0:27:350:27:37

-Oh, OK.

-In. One...and a half.

0:27:370:27:41

-Yeah.

-So I'm going to now risk it. Put your hand out.

0:27:410:27:44

-Wow.

-So that's a nice tight-fitting stopper.

0:27:460:27:49

What's it priced at? 70 quid.

0:27:490:27:51

I mean, it's no money, but in auction it's going to be 20 or £30.

0:27:510:27:55

-You have nice taste.

-Thanks.

0:27:550:27:58

But the search goes on.

0:27:580:28:00

How about our other athlete and expert combo?

0:28:010:28:04

If you were to pick an event for me, what would you choose?

0:28:040:28:08

Tanni, you're laughing. I don't think it's very funny.

0:28:100:28:12

It was a serious question.

0:28:120:28:14

Could you please concentrate when I'm talking to you, Tanni?

0:28:140:28:17

Good luck with that, Phil.

0:28:170:28:18

The pair are off to the River Tyne and Gateshead.

0:28:180:28:21

Something of a track and field hotbed

0:28:210:28:23

thanks to the likes of Messrs Foster and Cram.

0:28:230:28:26

-Right, let's have a look.

-Hello.

-Hi.

-Hi.

0:28:260:28:29

-Hiya. Welcome to McCartney's Yard.

-Hi, I'm Tanni.

-Debbie.

-Philip.

0:28:290:28:32

-Hello.

-How are you, all right?

0:28:320:28:34

-You've got a lot here, haven't we?

-We have, yeah.

0:28:340:28:37

Well, at least David asked Jade what she liked.

0:28:370:28:40

I can't see Tanni finding a lot of fine glass in this establishment.

0:28:400:28:42

So, how old does it have to be? I'm guessing all this is too new.

0:28:420:28:46

Well, antique is almost as old as me.

0:28:460:28:48

The thing is it's got to be 100 years old,

0:28:480:28:50

so you could be in this silly situation

0:28:500:28:52

where something's not an antique today, but it is tomorrow.

0:28:520:28:54

Not something that's ever bothered our Phil too much, mind you.

0:28:540:28:57

-These are cowls off a roof.

-Oh, of course, yeah.

0:28:570:29:00

And they're air vents. They're 150 quid.

0:29:000:29:04

-Is that a bit steep?

-Yeah.

0:29:040:29:06

I mean, I think they're worth £40, £50.

0:29:060:29:09

I do like this kind of... Are they love seats or just...

0:29:090:29:12

-They're garden arbours.

-Yeah.

-Don't think there's much age to them.

0:29:120:29:16

£125.

0:29:160:29:18

-OK.

-There's one big "but".

0:29:180:29:20

-Phillips screws.

-Oh, is that...?

0:29:200:29:22

-So that's pretty much zero age, there.

-I like the little one.

0:29:220:29:26

-I prefer that one.

-That's very pretty.

0:29:260:29:28

-Let me go and have a look at that one.

-OK.

-That's £90, Tanni.

0:29:280:29:31

-But if that was £50...

-I like it.

0:29:310:29:35

I'd like one in my garden.

0:29:350:29:37

But is it going to make money?

0:29:370:29:39

Spoken like a serial winner.

0:29:390:29:41

That will look nice with some nice flowers in.

0:29:410:29:43

It's an old feed trough, isn't it?

0:29:430:29:45

-Yeah.

-That's why all this stuff has become collectable,

0:29:450:29:47

people are now using them as garden ornaments.

0:29:470:29:50

Meanwhile, back in Horsley...

0:29:510:29:53

Why the long face?

0:29:530:29:55

That Arabian stallion, the Ferrari of the ancient Chinese world,

0:29:550:30:01

is about 1,000 years old.

0:30:010:30:06

It's absolutely astonishing.

0:30:060:30:08

It sends shivers down the back of my spine.

0:30:080:30:12

Yes, but what are you going to actually buy?

0:30:120:30:14

Paperweights. They're good, aren't they?

0:30:140:30:17

Apparently this one was made in Sunderland.

0:30:170:30:20

-That's a bit more like it.

-This is really nice.

0:30:200:30:23

Might be one to show to David.

0:30:230:30:25

He, meanwhile, seems to have had the bright idea

0:30:250:30:27

of getting Graham to recommend something.

0:30:270:30:29

This has just come in, David, which is quite interesting.

0:30:290:30:32

-It's a horn beaker.

-Yeah.

-With a sterling silver rim and crest.

0:30:320:30:35

-Which is not unusual in itself.

-No, it's not.

0:30:350:30:38

It's hallmarked 1876,

0:30:380:30:40

and it's been engraved across the top there "Ellen Terry".

0:30:400:30:43

She became a top actress in the Victorian period.

0:30:430:30:45

-OK. I've never heard of her, I've got to say.

-Yeah.

0:30:450:30:47

Yeah, she was really quite famous, David.

0:30:470:30:50

-What sort of money is that?

-The best, to you,

0:30:500:30:53

you could have that for £180.

0:30:530:30:55

But, you know, I think, to the right collector, that's an unusual piece.

0:30:550:30:58

You seem reasonably confident, bearing in mind it's not your money.

0:30:580:31:01

-No.

-There's no such thing as a fixed price in this business.

0:31:010:31:04

As Tanni is fast finding out.

0:31:040:31:05

It's been a really good experience. I've learnt lots.

0:31:070:31:09

I think what actually what I've learned

0:31:090:31:11

is whatever the price says, it's always negotiable.

0:31:110:31:13

-As our expert will now demonstrate.

-Now, Debbie, have a seat.

0:31:130:31:17

This might take some time.

0:31:170:31:19

There's three things that Tanni likes.

0:31:190:31:21

-I like the arbour.

-Yeah.

-The smaller one.

0:31:210:31:23

I like the trough with the bars.

0:31:230:31:25

And then there's this one here as well.

0:31:250:31:27

-Right. OK.

-Let's start here. What's the best you can do on that?

0:31:270:31:30

-60.

-Have I ever told you how sad my life is?

0:31:300:31:33

It's been tough, dragged up...

0:31:340:31:36

-He has to work with me!

-Dragged up through the streets of Worcester.

0:31:360:31:39

-50.

-Family of five, never eating. No roof on the house.

0:31:390:31:43

-45.

-Holes in me shoes.

-40.

-Hold on.

0:31:430:31:47

Can't afford a car. Have we done the car? I'm wearing out, here.

0:31:470:31:49

No, you're doing really well. Keep going. I'm not looking.

0:31:490:31:52

-What else is there? Outside toilet.

-35.

0:31:520:31:55

-Did she say 30?

-35.

0:31:550:31:57

-Whose side are you on?!

-I'm all right with 35!

0:31:570:32:01

35 and it's yours.

0:32:010:32:03

OK. What about the other one? The other trough is 125.

0:32:030:32:06

Just tell me what the rock bottom you can do on that is?

0:32:060:32:09

-75.

-OK.

0:32:090:32:11

And what about the arbour?

0:32:110:32:13

-75.

-Time to apply some peer pressure.

0:32:130:32:16

What will Tanni plump for?

0:32:160:32:18

What you like is totally irrelevant.

0:32:180:32:20

You're going to buy this just on price alone.

0:32:200:32:22

-Yeah.

-Correct?

-Yeah. I prefer that one, but my head says buy that one.

0:32:220:32:27

-THEY LAUGH

-Yeah.

0:32:270:32:29

Do you remember me saying to you at the outset

0:32:290:32:31

-that I wanted you to buy things that you really liked.

-Yeah.

0:32:310:32:34

-And forget making a profit.

-I'd have that in my house.

0:32:340:32:36

I would have that.

0:32:360:32:39

-Absolutely. Yes.

-Shall we buy that, then?

0:32:390:32:41

-Yeah.

-I'll go and tell her.

-Cool.

0:32:410:32:43

You'll get used to him.

0:32:470:32:48

That £35 means that Tanni and Phil are just about done,

0:32:480:32:52

but Jade's still on the lookout,

0:32:520:32:54

so what will she make of the celebrity beaker?

0:32:540:32:57

We're going to show you something here.

0:32:570:33:00

-OK.

-And I want your opinion,

0:33:000:33:02

and Graham's going to give you a hard selling job.

0:33:020:33:05

JADE LAUGHS

0:33:050:33:06

What's unique about this one, it's engraved here "Ellen Terry",

0:33:060:33:10

and she was a famous Victorian lady in about 1870s,

0:33:100:33:13

and she was famous for acting in Shakespeare's plays.

0:33:130:33:16

-Oh, OK, yeah.

-And later in the 19th century,

0:33:160:33:18

she became Dame Ellen Terry, because of her acting.

0:33:180:33:21

-Right.

-Are you impressed so far?

0:33:210:33:23

-I do like it.

-And it's 400 years since Shakespeare died,

0:33:230:33:26

and it's sort of apt at the moment.

0:33:260:33:28

How much premium do you think you have to pay in this business

0:33:280:33:31

to tap into 19th-century celebrity?

0:33:310:33:34

It would be a fair amount, wouldn't it?

0:33:340:33:36

-I kind of feel like it would be.

-Well done.

-Yeah...

0:33:360:33:38

I'm going to guess a couple of hundred more than that.

0:33:380:33:42

Oh, my goodness me. Whose side are you on?

0:33:420:33:45

-It's £180, Jade.

-It's 180.

0:33:450:33:47

-Yeah.

-I think that is a bit of a risk, isn't it?

0:33:470:33:49

-Do you take risks in life?

-Yeah, of course you do.

0:33:490:33:51

But it could lose you the show.

0:33:510:33:53

Yeah. I think at the same time, it could probably win it.

0:33:530:33:56

You make a very good point there, Jade.

0:33:560:33:59

But don't forget your paperweight, either, love.

0:33:590:34:01

Oh, well, OK. Gosh, OK.

0:34:010:34:03

-Tell me why you like it.

-I love the flowers,

0:34:030:34:05

I think it's really different. I've not seen anything like that before.

0:34:050:34:08

-OK. Bit of local interest going on.

-Yes, Sunderland.

0:34:080:34:11

-Sunderland, yeah.

-So...

0:34:110:34:13

Sunderland's a really well-known area for making glass,

0:34:130:34:15

and not very many people actually know that, do they?

0:34:150:34:18

Priced at £125.

0:34:180:34:20

To you, it would be £85.

0:34:200:34:22

-85.

-I think in an auction it would probably go at 30-50 as an estimate.

0:34:220:34:27

Yeah, I think... I think we should take a risk.

0:34:270:34:30

There she goes again.

0:34:300:34:32

-Do you want to see if we can do a package deal?

-A package deal? OK.

0:34:320:34:36

We might even get a buy-one-get-one-free.

0:34:360:34:39

Not that sort of place, I don't think.

0:34:390:34:41

So I've said 180 for this, you could have the two for £240.

0:34:410:34:45

240. Yeah, I think we should do it.

0:34:450:34:49

OK. Do you want to go with them both?

0:34:490:34:50

-Yeah, let's do it.

-Go on, then, risk-monger.

0:34:500:34:53

-Yeah. Do it.

-Well done.

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:34:530:34:56

No-one can accuse our Jade of being risk-averse.

0:34:560:34:59

-Are they in safe hands?

-Yes, they are.

-Good.

-Let's go.

0:34:590:35:02

Meanwhile, Tanni and Phil have her apprentice very much in mind.

0:35:040:35:08

Here's a loaded question for you.

0:35:080:35:11

Do you think she's going to be as good as you?

0:35:110:35:14

-Yeah.

-Is that because of the coach?

0:35:140:35:16

-Obviously.

-Oh, it's all the coaching.

0:35:160:35:18

That's what I was thinking.

0:35:180:35:20

If she wants it, yeah.

0:35:200:35:22

She could be very, very, very good.

0:35:220:35:25

Not at this game though, eh?

0:35:250:35:27

Those two now have shopped up, with enough time for Tanni to indulge

0:35:270:35:31

her passion for glass

0:35:310:35:33

in the historic Wearside city of Sunderland.

0:35:330:35:36

Ready, steady...

0:35:360:35:38

THEY LAUGH

0:35:380:35:40

That is unfair!

0:35:410:35:42

They've come to the National Glass Centre to find out about the place

0:35:430:35:47

where British glass manufacture began.

0:35:470:35:49

-Hi, I'm Tanni, how are you?

-Hi, I'm Keith, pleased to meet you.

0:35:490:35:52

Keith, Philip. Hi. Nice to see you.

0:35:520:35:54

Welcome to the National Glass Centre. Thank you.

0:35:540:35:56

One of the reasons for the city's claim to be the heart

0:35:560:35:59

of British glass is the role

0:35:590:36:00

of a certain 7th century Northumbrian abbot.

0:36:000:36:04

Benedict Biscop was actually a local Anglo-Saxon nobleman and he became

0:36:040:36:07

fired up with Christian zeal and decided to create the best monastery

0:36:070:36:12

in the world right here in Sunderland.

0:36:120:36:14

You can still see part of it, now, just across the road here.

0:36:140:36:17

And he travelled to Rome extensively,

0:36:170:36:20

and each time he went to Rome

0:36:200:36:21

he brought back with him great art works,

0:36:210:36:23

great books, and actually people.

0:36:230:36:25

He brought glass-makers from France and they were really started

0:36:250:36:28

the tradition of making glass,

0:36:280:36:30

and they taught local people to make glass.

0:36:300:36:32

And those craftsmen created the first glass windows,

0:36:320:36:35

and we have lots of glass here

0:36:350:36:36

that actually dates from the 7th century

0:36:360:36:38

and was made here in Sunderland,

0:36:380:36:40

and that's the first time anywhere in the UK that glass was being made.

0:36:400:36:43

But despite that head start,

0:36:430:36:44

it wasn't until the Industrial Revolution that glass

0:36:440:36:47

really began to take central stage in Sunderland.

0:36:470:36:51

The very first factory was founded in the late 17th century,

0:36:510:36:55

and by 1817, the city boasted seven bottle factories

0:36:550:36:57

and three glassworks. All smoking.

0:36:570:37:01

Was Sunderland particularly good for the glass-making industry

0:37:010:37:04

-because of what's around?

-Yeah, I mean, obviously,

0:37:040:37:06

the city is here right on the River Wear,

0:37:060:37:08

and that river was not only able to bring in the raw materials

0:37:080:37:12

needed for glass-making but also to export glass across the world,

0:37:120:37:15

because what we also had in this area was an abundance of coal,

0:37:150:37:19

and that fired the kilns that were needed for melting glass,

0:37:190:37:22

and not only did we have that history going back to the Anglo-Saxon times

0:37:220:37:25

but we also had all the raw materials that we needed right here.

0:37:250:37:28

By the mid-19th century,

0:37:280:37:30

Sunderland was producing several thousand bottles every day,

0:37:300:37:33

and the city was even partly responsible

0:37:330:37:35

for housing the Great Exhibition of 1851.

0:37:350:37:38

Hartley Wood factory, here in Sunderland,

0:37:390:37:41

made large bits of glass plates that were used to make the Crystal Palace

0:37:410:37:45

for the exhibition, so, you know, really,

0:37:450:37:48

Sunderland was very much at the heart

0:37:480:37:50

of an international industry in glass-making.

0:37:500:37:52

But the centre doesn't just celebrate

0:37:520:37:55

the city's glass-making past.

0:37:550:37:57

Time for Tanni to get stuck in.

0:37:570:38:00

-Pleased to meet you.

-Thanks for letting me do this.

0:38:000:38:03

Now, I've decided that you can sit and watch...

0:38:030:38:05

-I'm superfluous, aren't I?

-..the master craftsman at work.

0:38:050:38:08

# Soon turned out had a heart of glass... #

0:38:080:38:11

-OK.

-Just put it in the white.

0:38:110:38:13

-Like that.

-Oh, right, OK, yeah.

-And because it's so fine,

0:38:130:38:17

the white glass just sticks to the hot glass.

0:38:170:38:19

You make that look really easy.

0:38:190:38:20

-Well...

-How long have you been doing this for?

0:38:200:38:24

I've been doing it since I left school, for 44 year.

0:38:240:38:27

This is the traditional style of glass-making.

0:38:270:38:30

We don't use any moulds. This has been around since the Roman days.

0:38:300:38:34

So, this time, we get the end hot,

0:38:340:38:36

and we'll pick up some of the yellow chips.

0:38:360:38:38

OK, yeah.

0:38:380:38:40

And just snip it there. Now.

0:38:400:38:42

And the opposite side.

0:38:420:38:45

It cuts easy... Oh, no, it's getting...

0:38:450:38:47

It's getting harder all the time.

0:38:470:38:49

-That's it, stay there.

-Oh, my God.

-You OK?

-Yeah.

0:38:490:38:53

-It's all right, you can't feel it.

-You can't feel it.

0:38:530:38:55

-It's well insulated.

-You think you're going to feel it.

0:38:550:38:58

-Yes.

-But you're not.

-Out.

0:38:580:38:59

-That's warm.

-Yeah, that's very warm.

0:38:590:39:02

-That's it.

-You've just got a pile of molten glass in there?

0:39:020:39:05

Yeah. Exactly. It's just like getting honey out of a jar.

0:39:050:39:09

Into there.

0:39:090:39:11

Back again. That's great.

0:39:120:39:15

-Yeah, you've done very well.

-LAUGHING:

-Thank you.

0:39:150:39:18

Right, then, Tanni, so there we have it.

0:39:180:39:20

Get hold of this. And then tap the iron.

0:39:200:39:22

-Just there?

-Yeah.

-How hard?

0:39:220:39:23

Now, tap it. Bit harder.

0:39:230:39:25

That's the one.

0:39:250:39:27

TIM LAUGHS

0:39:270:39:28

She finally got that glass she was after.

0:39:280:39:30

-Well done.

-Thank you very much.

-Well done.

0:39:300:39:32

A box ticked for Tanni, eh?

0:39:320:39:34

But the other two are still on the road,

0:39:360:39:38

and we know David loves his wheels.

0:39:380:39:40

I'm impressed with the chair that you use, it's incredibly light.

0:39:410:39:44

-But that's not a racing chair, is it?

-No, no, it's not.

0:39:440:39:47

And the race chair's quite a bit different, actually.

0:39:470:39:49

And what sort of speeds can you get to?

0:39:490:39:52

It varies a bit, but there's a race that we do through the Tyne Tunnel,

0:39:520:39:57

and the fastest guys get up to about 50mph.

0:39:570:40:01

Which makes it a very exciting spectator sport.

0:40:010:40:03

-It does.

-I've got to say.

-Yeah, absolutely.

0:40:030:40:05

And that's why I think cycling is so great.

0:40:050:40:07

I think wheelchair racing's actually a lot more like cycling than it is

0:40:070:40:10

like running, so the crashes and things do make it really exciting.

0:40:100:40:14

Well, let's safely get ourselves across to Corbridge,

0:40:140:40:18

quite close to Hadrian's Wall.

0:40:180:40:20

And, yes, that's the River Tyne again.

0:40:200:40:23

-After you.

-OK, let's see what we can find.

0:40:230:40:25

Shouldn't be too hard in here, Jade.

0:40:250:40:29

So, Jade, this is a centre.

0:40:290:40:31

So every section you see is owned by a different person.

0:40:310:40:34

Oh, OK. Right, I see, yes.

0:40:340:40:36

So there's probably, I'm guessing, 20 dealers here?

0:40:360:40:39

-Right.

-So it's a collective, which is a great idea.

0:40:390:40:42

Always nice if the dealer turns up, though.

0:40:420:40:44

What about this one?

0:40:440:40:46

HE LAUGHS

0:40:460:40:48

Blinking heck. OK, that's good fun, isn't it?

0:40:480:40:50

-How old is that, then?

-Well, look at the top.

0:40:500:40:53

-What does it say?

-Yeah, 6D.

0:40:530:40:55

6D. So that pre-decimalisation.

0:40:550:40:58

When was decimalisation? You're the intelligent one here.

0:40:580:41:01

-I've no idea. OK.

-You know what? OK, let me try and work it out,

0:41:020:41:05

because I can just remember it.

0:41:050:41:07

I know people are going to find this hard to believe,

0:41:070:41:09

I should remember it really well, but I think it was '71.

0:41:090:41:13

Very good, David. And he was only three!

0:41:130:41:16

-Aw!

-What do you reckon?

0:41:160:41:19

No, I like it. It's cool, isn't it? It's different.

0:41:190:41:23

Yeah. Got to be 1950s, maybe early '60s.

0:41:230:41:26

Don't think I've ever actually used one like that.

0:41:260:41:28

-You've never used one?

-No.

-Oh, it's an experience.

0:41:280:41:31

-Who buys them? Is the question.

-Yeah. Would you buy it?

0:41:310:41:36

I don't know what I'd do with it.

0:41:360:41:38

It looks really cool, but I'm not sure what I'd do with it.

0:41:380:41:41

-They're very popular in auction.

-Oh, really?

-Yeah.

0:41:410:41:44

-It's different, it's fun.

-You're a proper gambler, though, aren't you?

0:41:440:41:47

I do. Yeah, I think it's good.

0:41:470:41:50

What does our shopkeeper Steve make of it?

0:41:500:41:53

It's a great thing, yeah.

0:41:530:41:54

It's really good value, because you don't have to put money in.

0:41:540:41:57

You can actually play it without putting any money in.

0:41:570:41:59

-Does it work?

-Yeah.

0:41:590:42:01

Oh! OK.

0:42:020:42:03

You get that. The downside is you don't win anything.

0:42:030:42:06

Jade has never, ever played a bandit machine.

0:42:060:42:09

-Do it!

-There we go.

-Well done.

0:42:090:42:11

-Isn't that great, though, isn't it?

-That's really cool.

-Don't you think?

0:42:110:42:15

-Oh, happy days!

-I know, it brings back memories, doesn't it?

0:42:150:42:18

It does bring back memories. Now, we are trying to get a date on it.

0:42:180:42:21

When was decimalisation?

0:42:210:42:23

-Oh, was it '71, something like that?

-I think it was '71.

0:42:230:42:27

Because they had those little rhymes, didn't they?

0:42:270:42:29

Give us a rhyme.

0:42:290:42:30

-SINGSONG:

-£1 equals 100 new pennies.

0:42:300:42:32

100 new pence to the pound.

0:42:320:42:35

You give more, you get change.

0:42:350:42:37

You give more, you get change.

0:42:370:42:39

Was that a hit in '71?

0:42:390:42:41

Well, "Grandad" was, so anything is possible.

0:42:410:42:44

-Do you own it?

-I don't own it, but I do know the person that does.

0:42:440:42:48

What's on it? £175.

0:42:480:42:52

-Which is more than they have left.

-Might be able to do a little bit.

0:42:520:42:56

-Do you want to find out?

-Yeah.

-Do you mind?

0:42:560:42:59

OK. OK, come back to us.

0:42:590:43:01

OK. Well, what have we got left?

0:43:010:43:03

-We've got about 110.

-110.

0:43:030:43:06

I might just pass this over to you now.

0:43:060:43:08

-OK.

-You know what you've got.

-So say 100.

-Good luck, Jade.

0:43:080:43:11

Right. It's very good news. No longer is it 175, it's £150.

0:43:120:43:17

-It's very bad news.

-Why?

-One, we don't have 150.

0:43:190:43:23

-Oh. Oh, right.

-And two, we want it to be...

0:43:230:43:26

Yeah, we kind of wanted it sub 100.

0:43:270:43:30

-Ideally.

-That's just not going to happen.

0:43:300:43:33

140, something like that.

0:43:330:43:36

-Well, again...

-140 would be pushing it.

-That's impossible.

0:43:360:43:39

-Another big hit from 1971.

-OK, cards on the table.

0:43:390:43:42

We have only got 110. So this could go on all day.

0:43:420:43:46

-110.

-We can have it?

-110.

-Brilliant.

-We've done it.

0:43:460:43:49

-Perfect!

-You're going for it?

-We've done it.

0:43:490:43:50

-Thank you, Steve. Thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you very much.

0:43:500:43:53

-Wise choice.

-OK, that's it. We've actually literally blown everything.

0:43:530:43:56

Yeah, they're definitely the gamblers.

0:43:560:43:59

-OK?

-We're off.

-Now, with our shopping bags fit to burst,

0:43:590:44:04

it's time to visit the social club

0:44:040:44:06

to unveil what exactly they've bought.

0:44:060:44:08

What I want to know is, was this one as competitive as this one?

0:44:080:44:11

That's what I want to know.

0:44:110:44:13

Actually, Jade has shown her true colours.

0:44:130:44:16

She is incredibly competitive.

0:44:160:44:18

-That doesn't surprise me.

-I wonder where she gets that from, then?

0:44:180:44:20

I wonder. Show us yours, Phil.

0:44:200:44:22

-You ready? Just hang on.

-I'm a bit nervous about this, actually.

0:44:220:44:25

Ooh. Ooh.

0:44:250:44:27

-Urgh.

-TANNI LAUGHS

0:44:270:44:28

-There's a bit of a theme here.

-What kind of theme is that, Phil?

0:44:280:44:32

Kind of Grotbags' skip or what?

0:44:320:44:35

Hey, wash your mouth out with soap and water!

0:44:350:44:37

I don't know - what's the theme? What's the theme?

0:44:370:44:39

We've got a bit of Northern stuff going on here.

0:44:390:44:42

We got a miner's lamp, we've got a bit of Ringtons, I believe.

0:44:420:44:44

-Malings tea caddy.

-Yeah.

-An original North Eastern Railway sign.

0:44:440:44:48

-Yeah, I like that.

-60 quid.

0:44:480:44:49

-That's not bad, that's not bad.

-I thought that was for nothing.

0:44:490:44:52

-And that won't be heavy at all, will it?

-No, no.

0:44:520:44:54

Dead easy to pick up.

0:44:540:44:55

Whilst we're on this sort of lightweight, easy to move stuff,

0:44:550:44:58

we thought we'd have a go at this cast-iron pig trough here.

0:44:580:45:01

Nice, very nice. Yeah, I wonder where you'd put that in your home.

0:45:010:45:04

-But you know...

-Flowers, flowers.

-Have you not got one?

0:45:040:45:07

-It is unbelievable!

-35 quid.

-I don't know how to value it.

-No.

0:45:070:45:12

-It's interesting, isn't it?

-PHIL:

-Jade!

-That's polite.

0:45:120:45:15

-I'm being nice!

-TANNI:

-Did you know what that was?

0:45:150:45:18

No. And I thought those bits were just ready to go to the bin.

0:45:180:45:21

-LAUGHTER

-I'm not going to lie.

0:45:210:45:24

-PHIL:

-I tell you what, you'd better find yourself a new coach!

0:45:240:45:27

-Show us yours.

-OK. Ready? Phil, that's going to make you mad.

0:45:270:45:31

-I like that! I like that!

-And...

0:45:310:45:35

We know that paperweights are ten a penny,

0:45:360:45:38

cos any idiot can make one of those.

0:45:380:45:41

The Goss. Is anyone collecting that these days?

0:45:420:45:45

-Nobody collects Goss.

-It's cute.

0:45:450:45:46

There's not one person in the world that collects...

0:45:460:45:48

-Apart from Jade and I.

-Apart from me!

0:45:480:45:50

-PHIL:

-The chair's cool.

-The chair's very cool.

-I like the chair.

0:45:500:45:53

And I love the one-armed bandit.

0:45:530:45:54

-How much was that?

-Well, that was our final purchase.

0:45:540:45:57

-It was.

-And everything that Jade had in her pocket...

0:45:570:46:01

we paid for that.

0:46:010:46:02

Because we have spent every single pound.

0:46:020:46:06

-PHIL:

-I like the horn beaker.

-JADE:

-This one was...?

0:46:060:46:09

-That was £180.

-£180 for that?!

-Yes! Yes.

0:46:090:46:13

-What?!

-Don't.

0:46:130:46:15

Apparently, it was somebody who acted Shakespeare's plays.

0:46:150:46:20

-Ellen Terry.

-Ellen Terry was a famous 19th-century Shakespearean actor,

0:46:200:46:25

who later became a dame.

0:46:250:46:27

Let me stop you there. We don't deal in Dames, right?

0:46:270:46:31

Unless they're a Baroness, frankly, I'm not interested.

0:46:310:46:35

-We shall see you at the auction.

-All the best.

-All the best to you.

0:46:350:46:38

-Come on, you.

-So let's now be candid, shall we?

0:46:380:46:40

-We have bought some tat, haven't we?

-Looks a bit shabby.

0:46:400:46:43

-A bit?

-I was quite pleased, and then their stuff looked so nice.

0:46:430:46:47

They might get us on the budget.

0:46:470:46:48

We've definitely got better stuff, it's just if we can sell it.

0:46:480:46:51

-We do, we do.

-The cup, bit expensive.

-A bit?

0:46:510:46:54

-Are you feeling confident?

-Yeah, I am.

-Silver or gold?

-Gold!

0:46:540:46:59

-Gold medal or silver medal?

-Gold.

-OK, that's good enough for me.

0:46:590:47:02

If they're half-blind!

0:47:040:47:06

After setting off from the County Durham town of Hartlepool,

0:47:060:47:11

they're now on their way to an auction in Yorkshire at Harrogate.

0:47:110:47:15

Travelling in style.

0:47:150:47:17

What do you think of the new chauffeur? I'm trying him, but...

0:47:170:47:20

-Yeah...

-Tanni, you have changed. You've changed.

0:47:200:47:23

I can remember you when you were just one of the people,

0:47:230:47:27

but that House of Lords, it's changed you.

0:47:270:47:29

I'm on gate duty now, am I?

0:47:290:47:31

-I think so, yeah.

-Won't be long, madam.

-Thank you.

0:47:310:47:34

TANNI AND JADE LAUGH

0:47:340:47:35

-He's doing all right, isn't he?

-He's not so bad.

0:47:350:47:38

He doesn't look too impressed, mind.

0:47:400:47:42

Don't forget to close it, Phil.

0:47:420:47:44

Follow the country code.

0:47:440:47:46

Welcome to the delightful spa town of Harrogate,

0:47:460:47:49

the great tea and bun destination.

0:47:490:47:51

And this is Thompson's Auctioneers, a sort of antiques arena.

0:47:510:47:54

-Good morning, Tanni.

-Good morning, how are you?

0:47:540:47:57

-Very well. Oh, sorry, I didn't say hello to you.

-Go on, in we go.

0:47:570:48:01

-Right, let's go.

-Tanni and Phil spent just £160 on their five lots,

0:48:010:48:06

whilst Jade and David splashed all of their 400, also on five lots.

0:48:060:48:11

I wonder what auctioneer Lawrence Peat

0:48:110:48:14

thinks will prove as tasty as a toasted teacake?

0:48:140:48:18

I think the star lot, I would say, is the railway sign,

0:48:180:48:20

without a shadow of a doubt. Railwayana - there's a strong,

0:48:200:48:23

strong interest in that. I think that's a winner.

0:48:230:48:25

The one-armed bandit, I think, is a bit of fun, really.

0:48:250:48:28

It's portable, just about, so it's not a large item.

0:48:280:48:31

But does it work, is the question?

0:48:310:48:34

So, hold or nudge? We'll soon find out.

0:48:340:48:35

Now, Jade, have you been to an auction before?

0:48:350:48:38

-Never.

-Never?!

-So it's interesting.

0:48:380:48:40

-Don't mess about, do they?

-Brilliant.

-Wow.

0:48:400:48:42

Tanni, have you been to an auction?

0:48:420:48:45

Not since I was a teenager, so this is quite exciting.

0:48:450:48:48

-Phil, have you been to an auction?

-I did once, but I didn't like it.

0:48:480:48:52

First up is Tanni's sign.

0:48:530:48:55

The auctioneer's favourite.

0:48:550:48:57

-I am really excited...

-Oh!

-Oh, here it is.

0:48:570:49:00

Look, our best lot's up now. My cost is £60.

0:49:000:49:03

-OK.

-There's a profit in this.

-Good.

0:49:030:49:04

Commissions starts here with me at £120.

0:49:040:49:07

-Get in.

-JADE:

-Whoa.

0:49:070:49:08

-60 quid done.

-120.

0:49:080:49:09

It's good value at 120.

0:49:090:49:11

Any advance...?

0:49:110:49:12

They're away, these two.

0:49:120:49:13

Are we all done? I shall sell at 120.

0:49:130:49:16

-Hello!

-Is that it?

-Doubled your money!

0:49:160:49:18

-What?!

-PHIL:

-It's the way we roll, you know? Isn't it?

0:49:180:49:21

-It's the way we roll.

-Well, I hope this is not the way you roll!

0:49:210:49:24

Already on the back straight.

0:49:240:49:26

There's a long way to go yet.

0:49:260:49:28

OK, I'm pleased with that.

0:49:280:49:29

-Yeah. That's good.

-It's all right.

0:49:290:49:31

Don't look too impressed, just play it down, play it down.

0:49:310:49:33

-Yeah, be cool, be cool.

-Yeah, it's fine.

-Be cool about that.

0:49:330:49:36

-Whatever.

-Now for one of Jade's big spends.

0:49:360:49:40

Will she hit the jackpot?

0:49:400:49:41

This isn't normal, to double your money all the way.

0:49:410:49:43

-OK.

-I don't want you to be too disappointed with me, that's all.

0:49:430:49:46

-You've upset me now.

-Yeah, I think so.

-Interest on the book here.

0:49:460:49:48

-At £90.

-Come on!

0:49:480:49:50

100, 110, 120.

0:49:500:49:52

-Come on!

-120 in the room. At £120.

0:49:520:49:54

-At 120.

-Go on! A bit more!

0:49:540:49:56

130, 140, 150?

0:49:560:49:59

-No?

-Come on! We need to double our money, Jade!

0:49:590:50:02

Are we all done? I shall sell. Standing, at £140.

0:50:020:50:06

-It's a start.

-We made money.

0:50:060:50:08

-It's all right.

-Yeah, not double your money. But not too bad.

0:50:080:50:12

It wasn't three bells, but it was two cherries.

0:50:120:50:14

Two cherries? Two cherries will do.

0:50:140:50:16

You've got other good stuff, though, haven't you?

0:50:160:50:19

-Yeah, we have.

-Our sign was the best.

0:50:190:50:21

-Excuse me! So have we!

-Sorry, we've got really good stuff(!)

-Yeah.

0:50:210:50:24

Like the piggies' choice.

0:50:240:50:26

Their alternative garden ornament.

0:50:260:50:28

We're hoping we're going to have our noses in the trough here, aren't we?

0:50:280:50:31

You've already had them in with that blinking railway sign.

0:50:310:50:35

And I can start here with me at £45. 50 anywhere?

0:50:350:50:37

-Oh! 45?!

-No way!

-55 and 60.

0:50:370:50:40

Still cheap at £60.

0:50:400:50:42

He's going to double his money again.

0:50:420:50:45

65, 70, 75, 80,

0:50:450:50:47

-85...

-No way!

0:50:470:50:50

You look shocked? I'm shocked and horrified.

0:50:500:50:53

Are we all done at £80? With the gentleman at 80.

0:50:530:50:56

Selling at 80...

0:50:560:50:59

-Good effort.

-Good effort.

-Well done.

0:50:590:51:02

-Thank you very much.

-Well done.

0:51:020:51:04

-Wow.

-I know. So sorry, Jade.

0:51:040:51:06

I'm really sorry, honestly!

0:51:060:51:08

-I know!

-Another great result leaves them hogging the lead.

0:51:080:51:12

I was really happy with that. Do you know, I really liked it,

0:51:120:51:15

but I didn't think it would kind of go for that.

0:51:150:51:18

Because Jade was saying we had rubbish.

0:51:180:51:20

And I think she'd kind of convinced me that I had.

0:51:200:51:22

-Oh, no, she's still right!

-Yeah, I did.

0:51:220:51:25

Jade's turn - the bargain chair.

0:51:250:51:27

I think 20 quid profit.

0:51:270:51:30

-That would be good.

-Would be nice, wouldn't it?

0:51:300:51:32

But I don't think we're in the Serrell territory here.

0:51:320:51:34

-This is my worry.

-Commissions start here with me at £30.

0:51:340:51:38

-Come on.

-There we go.

-38 has it.

0:51:380:51:41

-No, 40. 42.

-Good, good.

0:51:410:51:44

-Go on!

-48, 50,

0:51:440:51:46

52, 55...

0:51:460:51:48

-When do they go to bigger jumps?

-Go on!

0:51:480:51:50

58? Are you sure?

0:51:500:51:53

55 there, at 55.

0:51:530:51:54

58, new bidder.

0:51:540:51:56

-60.

-Go on.

-Yes!

-Yes!

0:51:560:51:58

68, 70, 72, 75...

0:51:580:52:02

Go on. No? 72 here.

0:52:020:52:04

At £72. 75, well done.

0:52:040:52:06

78? No, 75.

0:52:060:52:08

-Oh, this is good!

-Yeah! I'm happy with that.

0:52:080:52:11

We shall sell at £75.

0:52:110:52:13

-Yes!

-PHIL:

-See, annoyingly, that deserved that.

0:52:130:52:16

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

-He's right.

0:52:160:52:18

A comfortably large profit.

0:52:180:52:21

This is so quick, I can barely keep track.

0:52:210:52:23

-I know.

-Of actually how quick he's going,

0:52:230:52:25

but how much we money we're making or not making.

0:52:250:52:27

-It's just...

-It's really hard.

0:52:270:52:28

This is the big one, Tanni.

0:52:280:52:30

If your rivals don't do well with this beaker, the podium beckons.

0:52:300:52:34

In this environment, where everything's going so quickly,

0:52:340:52:37

I think we'd in for a bit of a nosebleed here, I'm afraid.

0:52:370:52:39

Or you could do amazingly well and then you could change of mind.

0:52:390:52:42

-Maybe.

-And then I will, yeah. I will backtrack completely.

0:52:420:52:45

Victorian polished horn beaker with the sterling silver hallmark

0:52:450:52:48

for Ellen Terry, the famous Victorian Shakespearean actress.

0:52:480:52:52

Commission starts with me just at £25.

0:52:520:52:55

-No.

-30, 35, 40,

0:52:550:52:57

45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70.

0:52:570:53:00

65 here. 65, 70, 75, 80.

0:53:000:53:03

85, 90, 95, 100.

0:53:030:53:06

110, 120, 130 and 140.

0:53:060:53:09

-140 takes it.

-Come on!

-It's still no money at 140.

0:53:090:53:13

-Say something, Jade.

-At 140?

0:53:130:53:16

Well, it could have been much worse.

0:53:170:53:19

Certainly could. They've got away with that a bit.

0:53:190:53:22

We've got a bit of local social history next.

0:53:220:53:25

-What have you got?

-Miner's lamp.

0:53:250:53:26

-JADE:

-Oh, nice.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:53:260:53:28

-Yeah?

-I like miner's lamps.

0:53:280:53:31

Oh, sorry. Wonderful. Wonderful. Love miner's lamps.

0:53:310:53:34

-I have a miner's lamp.

-Oh, yeah, me too.

0:53:340:53:36

He always gets bitter when he loses money.

0:53:360:53:39

Yeah, come on, David. Nothing wrong with a nice lamp though.

0:53:390:53:42

Commissions starting with me at £30.

0:53:420:53:44

Two anywhere? 32, 35, 38, 38 with the lady.

0:53:440:53:48

40, 42? No. 40 seated here.

0:53:480:53:51

-At £40.

-Maybe they're back in fashion, I don't know.

0:53:510:53:54

-What do I know?

-At £40.

0:53:540:53:56

-Oh.

-Wiped its face.

0:53:560:53:58

Whose expression was that?

0:53:580:54:01

Can Jade's Sunderland glass help her catch up a bit?

0:54:010:54:05

If you want to buy a really good paperweight,

0:54:050:54:07

this is the one you want to have.

0:54:070:54:09

Now, this is a unique Tanni Grey-Thompson.

0:54:090:54:12

Tanni Grey...? It's not a Tanni Grey-Thompson!

0:54:120:54:14

-It is a Tanni Grey-Thomson.

-This is from the Baroness range.

0:54:140:54:16

-Oh, look. Look, it's up.

-The bid is with me at 25.

0:54:160:54:19

Do I see...? 28 takes it in the room now.

0:54:190:54:20

Come on. No!

0:54:200:54:22

30, 32, 35, 38?

0:54:220:54:24

No. 35 here.

0:54:240:54:26

Oh, it's a nasty one.

0:54:260:54:27

I shall sell at £35. GROANING

0:54:270:54:30

-Oh, no.

-Not to worry. Again, it was a beautiful thing.

0:54:300:54:33

-I think we'll hang onto ours.

-I think so.

0:54:330:54:36

Good idea. They don't seem keen.

0:54:360:54:39

Great bit of social history for us next,

0:54:390:54:41

Malings of Newcastle tea caddy.

0:54:410:54:43

-Tea caddy.

-Yeah.

-Was it Ringtons? Ringtons, is it?

-Ringtons, yeah.

0:54:430:54:46

-Really pretty.

-It is nice.

-I love the blue.

0:54:460:54:48

And quite rare, because they made 48 million of them.

0:54:480:54:51

He is bitter.

0:54:510:54:53

Now, they like a cup of tea around here,

0:54:530:54:55

and it has Ripon Cathedral on it.

0:54:550:54:57

-Commission starts here on £18.

-There you go.

-Wow.

0:54:570:55:00

On commission at £18.

0:55:000:55:03

Are we all done? 20 at the back.

0:55:030:55:05

-Double bubble Serrell.

-It's a funny old world, isn't it?

0:55:050:55:09

Funny old world.

0:55:090:55:11

Disappointed, really, cos we just doubled our money there, didn't we?

0:55:110:55:15

Now he's just rubbing it in.

0:55:150:55:17

Do you know what? If I came here,

0:55:170:55:18

I'd end up spending more money than I made.

0:55:180:55:20

An auctioneer's skill is to sell you something

0:55:200:55:22

that you wanted to buy for more than you wanted to pay for it.

0:55:220:55:25

-OK.

-So if your limit's 15 quid, he wants to sell it you for 20 or 25,

0:55:250:55:30

and he can do that in a number of ways too.

0:55:300:55:32

One of the best tricks I heard is if you want someone to bid again,

0:55:320:55:35

you just nod at them. Most people always nod back at you.

0:55:350:55:38

-Oh, yeah.

-So you leave it till the last, going, "One more?"

0:55:380:55:40

-They always nod back.

-Yeah, interesting.

0:55:400:55:42

-I'm not going to nod at all!

-No.

0:55:420:55:44

Well, I hope for Jade's sake that

0:55:440:55:46

someone gives her Goss collection a nod or two.

0:55:460:55:49

Fiver. Five away. Five to the hand, and five.

0:55:490:55:53

-Go on.

-Any advance on £5?

0:55:530:55:54

Eight, ten, 12, 15, 18?

0:55:540:55:57

-No, 15.

-Go on! Go on, keep going.

0:55:570:56:00

On the front at £15. Are we all done?

0:56:000:56:03

I shall sell at £15.

0:56:030:56:05

-It's all right, Jade.

-£5.

-Keep the spirit.

-That's all right.

0:56:050:56:08

That's done well for them, hasn't it?

0:56:080:56:11

Yeah, for us, that's really good!

0:56:110:56:13

It's respectable, is what it is.

0:56:130:56:15

Jade, don't worry, cos it's not all over yet.

0:56:150:56:17

These two have got one more item to sell. What did you pay for this one?

0:56:170:56:21

It's not... Listen, we're bang on trend here, up there with the kids,

0:56:210:56:24

-aren't we?

-Yes.

-Up there with the kids, cutting-edge.

0:56:240:56:26

-Down there with the kids.

-Down there? Is it down there?

0:56:260:56:28

-Yeah.

-Well, up and down with the kids, we are.

0:56:280:56:30

-Yeah, yeah.

-And £15 for our steel cupboard and our bits of glass.

0:56:300:56:35

Yeah, they really took a punt on those.

0:56:350:56:37

The bid is with me at 20.

0:56:370:56:39

Oh, well done. I'm so pleased for you.

0:56:390:56:41

28 with the lady, it's no money at 28.

0:56:410:56:43

-That's it, new nickname.

-30, 32. 30 with you, sir.

0:56:430:56:47

-32.

-Disappointing, Tanni, this, isn't it?

0:56:470:56:49

Just doubling its money again, you see?

0:56:490:56:51

-Keep a straight face. Keep a straight face.

-It's not normal.

0:56:510:56:55

-Yeah.

-This is not normal. You're regretting spending time with me.

0:56:550:56:57

-At £48...

-Did that just double our money again?

0:56:570:57:01

-I think so.

-Tripled, actually.

0:57:010:57:03

Come on then, Double Bubble, let's exit and work these figures out,

0:57:030:57:06

-shall we?

-We might be a bit slower than you,

0:57:060:57:08

cos we're weighed down with money.

0:57:080:57:09

-Ha-ha-ha!

-Shall we go?

0:57:090:57:12

Right, let's go.

0:57:120:57:14

Jade and David started out with £400 and, after auction costs,

0:57:140:57:18

made a loss of £67.90.

0:57:180:57:21

So they ended up with £332.10.

0:57:210:57:25

While Tanni and Phil, who also began with 400,

0:57:250:57:28

made a profit, after costs,

0:57:280:57:30

of £92.56.

0:57:300:57:33

So, with £492.56, they are the clear victors.

0:57:330:57:38

All profits will go to Children In Need.

0:57:380:57:41

In every event, there are gold medal winners

0:57:410:57:44

and there are those that end up with silver,

0:57:440:57:47

sometimes bronze.

0:57:470:57:49

Now, I'll let you work out...

0:57:490:57:51

-Right.

-Who got gold and who's got tin.

0:57:510:57:56

-Oh, no!

-Jade, we're silver, I'm afraid. We're silver.

0:57:560:57:58

Not bad for rubbish, was it?

0:57:580:58:00

-You ready? One, two, three.

-BOTH: Yes!

0:58:000:58:03

Fun's almost over. It'll soon be back to the training regime.

0:58:030:58:07

-It's been a good day, hasn't it?

-It's been loads of fun.

0:58:070:58:09

-Brilliant, well done.

-Now, some of us are old enough

0:58:090:58:12

to remember the '80s,

0:58:120:58:14

and have the cassettes to prove it.

0:58:140:58:16

# Gold! Always believe in your soul

0:58:160:58:20

# You've got the power to know

0:58:200:58:22

# You're indestructible

0:58:220:58:24

# Always believe in... #

0:58:240:58:27

Do you know what? That was absolutely first class.

0:58:270:58:30

THEY LAUGH

0:58:300:58:32

Top wheelchair Paralympians Tanni Grey-Thompson and Jade Jones do battle in the north east of England. Tanni has a record haul of medals and records, while her promising young protege Jade is just starting out on her athletics career.

In the company of experts Phil Serrell and David Harper, the baroness from County Durham and Middlesbrough's Jade are on the lookout for antiques to take to auction in Harrogate.

Tanni also tries her hand at traditional glass making and Jade learns about the man who was a design champion of the region.