Nigel Havers and Michael Whitehall Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Nigel Havers and Michael Whitehall

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. Actor and charmer Nigel Havers and his canny ex-agent Michael Whitehall explore the West Country.


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Transcript


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-The nation's favourite celebrities...

-Ooh, I like that.

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-..paired up with an expert...

-We've had some fun, haven't we?

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-..and a classic car.

-It feels as if it could go quite fast.

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-Their mission - to scour Britain for antiques.

-Yes!

-Fantastic!

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I'll do that in slow-mo.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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-Come on, boys!

-But it's no easy ride. Who will find a hidden gem?

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-Don't sell me!

-Who will take the biggest risks?

-Go away, darling!

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-Will anybody follow expert advice?

-I'm trying to spend money here.

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-There will be worthy winners...

-Yes!

-..and valiant losers.

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Put your pedal to the metal. This is the Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Today, we're in the West Country,

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in the company of one of our most talented actors,

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plus his old agent, who's a bit of a star in his own right.

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-So, what are we doing?

-Do you not know any of this?

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-Not really, no.

-Oh, God.

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No, because you tell me what to do and I just do it, generally.

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-Actors!

-I know.

-It's Nigel Havers and Michael Whitehall.

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We're going to these antique shops,

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we're buying antiques that we like,

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-but we're going to buy the best ones for the price...

-OK.

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..negotiate them down.

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-Your negotiating skills aren't exactly legendary.

-No.

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Nigel, star of the Oscar-winning Chariots Of Fire

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and also love rat Lewis Archer from Corrie,

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is sharing a Bentley with Michael, his old Mr Ten Percent.

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-You've got what I haven't got.

-Which is?

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Which is that you're a supreme actor.

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"Supreme" - I like that, thank you.

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You never know when you're telling the truth.

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Some of your performances are breath-taking.

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Having represented some of Britain's biggest actors,

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like Colin Firth, Dame Judi and Daniel Day-Lewis,

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Michael's also the father of comedian Jack Whitehall.

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They've even appeared together in their own TV show.

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He's already made a lot of jokes, of course, about antiques.

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In fact, he said to me on the phone the other day,

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"Have you two antiques gone off and bought these antiques yet?"

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Those two were agent and client for over 30 years

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and remain the closest of friends.

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Nigel was even best man at Michael's wedding,

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so they should make for a formidable combination.

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I'm going to say, "I'm afraid, for me, that will have to be £400."

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-How about that?

-You maybe need to be a bit more ruthless with it.

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-OK.

-AGGRESSIVELY:

-I'm afraid I'm only going to give you £400!

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-Take it or leave it! How about that?

-That's a bit over the top.

-OK.

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Fortunately, they'll have plenty of advice

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from our sagacious experts in the TVR -

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auctioneer James Braxton and dealer Margie Cooper.

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I'm with Nigel Havers and you've got the very funny Michael Whitehall.

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-Are you going to be swooning?

-I hope I don't come over all unnecessary.

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Do you? Margie, I don't want to get between you and Nigel.

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So, with £400 per couple, let's get cracking.

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We've just got married. This is why we're in this car.

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We took the ribbon off cos we thought it looked a bit flash.

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-Here we are.

-Yes, and we're so happy.

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-Right, so are you ready for the fray?

-Yes.

-Yeah.

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-What do we do now then?

-We go and find the shop.

-Do we? A shop?

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Yeah, we're going to find a shop.

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Buy ourselves a little wedding present.

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-JAMES:

-Such a shame to split you so early on.

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I wonder how Margie's coping with her charming chum.

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-I remember you from the massive Chariots Of Fire.

-Yes.

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Of course, when we made the film, we didn't know whether...

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-It was going to be a...

-No.

-Terrific.

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I went to see a little early screening and I thought,

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"Oh, dear, I wonder who's going to be interested

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"in these guys running around a track in 1924.

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"I wonder if we've made a mistake."

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And then we ended up in Hollywood for the Oscar night

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and the winner of the Best Film is Chariots Of Fire -

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we couldn't believe it!

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And everyone said, "You've got to hang around in Hollywood.

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"You're very hot." I said, "I can't.

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"I've got to go back to tomorrow cos I'm doing an episode of Jackanory."

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Consummate pro. Wither the Bentley boys then?

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My boss, when I first became an actors' agent, he had a Bentley.

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-Yeah.

-And he had a very, very talkative chauffeur,

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and I remember him saying to me...

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And I made the most terrible mistake.

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The first day my new chauffeur arrived,

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he said I didn't shut the partition

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and if you don't shut the partition on day one,

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you're stuck with him talking to you all the time.

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Well, whatever the social niceties,

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I think the Bentley's definitely looking like the wiser choice.

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Talk about chariots of fire!

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We've got smoke coming out of the back.

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Smoke's coming out of the back.

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They're right, you know. Better pull over.

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-Turn it off.

-I'm sure this doesn't happen on Nigel's usual productions.

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-Oh, Nigel!

-Oh, look at this.

-Oh, my Lord.

-Yes.

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So, what would happen? Would it blow up?

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It could do if it got really, really hot.

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-Well, luckily, I don't think we're far.

-Shall we leave it there?

-Yes.

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No-one's going to steal it. It's not going to go anywhere, is it?

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Right, let's go. Come on.

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I just hope it doesn't take too long

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because they're supposed to be starting out in Bristol

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and then motoring east

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before eventually arriving in London and an auction at Southgate.

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But first, that great city,

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whose motto is "By virtue and industry".

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And I'm sure it has more than enough of both.

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Plenty of buses too.

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Um, wait, hello, it's me. Yes.

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Just to let you know, our car blew up.

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We managed to get out before it exploded and we ran into a field.

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And then we hopped on a bus, eventually,

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and now we're going to work. Bye-bye.

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Always call your agent, eh? Come on now, Nigel, break a leg.

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-Hello, are you Steve?

-Hello, there.

-Hello, Steve.

-Hiya.

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-Nice to meet you.

-Lots of extras on set today.

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Another orange man! Are you following me or what?

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Amongst this boggling array,

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there has to be something to suit our pair.

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Margie, what is THIS?

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This is brilliant because this is a reclaimers'...

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Absolute wonderful place.

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So, basically, anyone who's got rubbish brings it here.

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These are places where you've just got to root

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and try and find stuff.

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You'll soon get the hang of it.

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This is brilliant!

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This colander - someone's converted it into a lampshade.

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-THEY LAUGH

-Isn't that good?

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-I'm absolutely speechless.

-But that's incredible.

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You put that in a very smart place, it would look amazing.

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That might be one of my extravagant and odd buys.

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I'd give him a couple of quid.

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-Maybe a fiver. Am I insane?

-We'll let you know.

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-It's all up for grabs in here though.

-This is just sweet.

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-There is a certain amount of age to it.

-Yeah.

-It's wearing off.

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It's wearing off.

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But you've got to think about at the auction,

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-when they hold that up...

-It doesn't look like much.

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-Yeah, is that going to be a problem?

-Let's have a look from a distance.

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-Good idea.

-And we have lot number...

-It looks better from a distance!

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-Plaque.

-£75.

-It's yours!

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Lordy! What can Margie come up with?

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These would go in grottos, wouldn't they,

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in the sort of 19th-century houses,

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where they used to have furniture made with the shell back.

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-Yeah, little seats in the grotto.

-Yeah.

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Is that a little weed growing out of the...? I'd like to keep that.

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-I love that.

-Another bucket.

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-Ooh!

-What are the chances, eh?

-Yes, it is. It's a cockle...

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-A cockle bucket.

-It's the real thing.

-That hasn't been altered.

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-I do quite like that.

-Do you? Well, if you really like that...

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Just for a second, here's your drawing room, here it is,

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and you have that as a waste paper basket.

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I think that's divine.

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Nigel's definitely got a thing about those.

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-Time to get Steve involved, methinks.

-We like the look of these.

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-Shell grotto type chairs.

-Yeah, they're called screamer stools.

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-They're from the 1890s.

-Really? Never heard of that!

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-It's cos of the face on them.

-Big, screamy face.

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-It's a big mouth there.

-What sort of money are they?

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-They're very heavy.

-They're about £60 a go.

-Yeah.

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-Are you interested, Nigel?

-I am quite interested in that.

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I'm also interested in this little baby here.

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-Oh, just a plaque.

-It's a plaque.

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-It came from one of the demolition jobs that we've been to.

-Yeah.

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-So whether it's old or new...

-It's obviously been outside, hasn't it?

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Yes, but it's just a paint thing.

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I'm quite intrigued by these

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-and I've noticed there's another one at the back.

-Oh, yes.

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-Is that a pair?

-Yes, it is a pair.

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You said £60 each but, obviously,

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you'd be able to go a bit lower if we bought the two.

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I'd come down to £100 for the two.

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Not so scary. Now for Nigel's bucket and some baskets too.

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You and your cockle bucket!

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Yeah, I found a really lovely cockle bucket

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-which has not been hacked about.

-Right.

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-If we put that, say, with these two baskets...

-Yeah.

-Bakery...

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-There's a sort of cockles, bread...

-How much is the cockle bucket?

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If you got it at what it cost me, it was £15.

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-The bread baskets?

-£5.

-These two... Can you not ease it a bit more?

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We're just gambling, aren't we?

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We're in a London auction that we don't know, Stephen.

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I'd have said if you were in London and you were selling those,

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-you'd get £80 each, easy.

-Yeah, I wish I hadn't said that now.

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Ha-ha, quite, Margie. Time to have a bit of a team talk, I reckon.

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Refocus.

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-Right, this cockle bucket...

-Yes.

-We've thrown out the baskets.

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We've thrown the baskets out.

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I think we should go for the SCREAMERS!

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THEY LAUGH

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I could have another tap at him.

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-Have another tap and maybe the cockle bucket at £10.

-Right.

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-£110 for the two.

-Right, and if he says no, what are you going to do?

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-"OK, £500! Whatever you want!"

-Stand by.

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-We've come to, um, I think, a wonderful conclusion.

-Go on.

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Which is that we'd like the SCREAMERS. I think they're fun.

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-And the cockle bucket.

-OK.

-And what if I said £110 for that lot?

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-I'd say yes.

-Oh!

-Good man!

-Thank you very much.

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So, with Nigel off the mark,

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it's time to find out what their opposite numbers are up to

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elsewhere in Bristol, in a car that still works.

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My first big client was Kenneth More.

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Reach For The Sky, Genevieve and all those films.

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He was such a sweet man

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and his great friend was a man called Michael Havers,

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who was the Attorney General, Lord Chancellor.

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I was in the Garrick Club with them both and Michael Havers said,

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"My boy is looking for a new agent.

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"The chap he's got at the moment is absolutely useless."

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And Kenny More said, "Darling, you must take him on.

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"He's such a sweet boy", and all that,

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so I trusted Kenny and took him on

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-and, as it turned out, he was a huge success.

-Yes.

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Those two are headed for a very different sort of gentlemen's club

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because tucked away in Bristol's city centre is a secretive spot

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that should suit art lover Michael down to the ground.

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-We're now walking into the Wigwam, which...

-Oh, wow!

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..is probably like no other wigwam you've ever seen.

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-No.

-It's modelled on a Gloucestershire barn.

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This is the headquarters of the Savages,

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a Bristolian artistic institution for well over 100 years,

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as curator Mike Newstead can explain.

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The club, as we know it, was started by Ernest Ehlers

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and he was a Bristolian of German extraction.

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And there's a long tradition of groups of Bristol artists

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-painting together.

-Yes.

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And one night - it was 18th February, 1904 -

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he decided to form a society,

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and they decided to call themselves the Bristol Savages.

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No-one knows exactly why they adopted that particular moniker,

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although the Edwardian fashion for all things Native American

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may have been an influence.

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The club came here to the Wigwam in 1920,

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with their somewhat eccentric methods already firmly in place.

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The artists meet on a Wednesday night, about six o'clock,

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and paint to a subject set by Chairman for the evening.

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So the artists don't have an apple or a model?

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It'll be whatever the Chairman thinks,

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as a sentence, a word, a catchphrase

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which might tickle his or their fancy.

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They have no prompts, they have to do it inside the studio.

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-In two hours.

-In two hours.

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It can be quite a challenge,

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although would-be Savages have to pass a stiff audition

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before they're entitled to wear the red feather,

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while the so-called lay members,

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who turn up later to enjoy the fun, wear green.

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The club, which still insists on remaining gentlemen only,

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has had many talented artists amongst its closed ranks.

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This picture here, In Sunshine And In Shade,

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was painted by an artist called Bartram Hiles and as a young man,

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he lost both his arms in an accident on Hotwells, run over by a tram,

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but he learnt to paint by using the brush in his mouth.

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And that's a portrait of Captain Robert Falcon Scott.

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In 1910, he came to our annual dinner and he gave a speech there

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and we had a collection which came to five guineas,

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which was sent to Captain Scott for him to use

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to buy a pony for his expedition. And there is one of the ice picks.

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I wouldn't mind having one of those

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-for when my son, Jack, misbehaves.

-Ah!

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And in 1937, his son, Peter Scott,

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came and painted with the artist members in the studio upstairs.

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-Yeah.

-And in our archive, we have the very painting that he did.

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-Did he do a bird?

-Surprisingly, yes.

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Well, he was an ornithologist, I suppose.

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I'm sure he'd easily have won his red feather.

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I wonder what our two will create when put to the Savage test.

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-Do we have a title?

-Yes, we do. I've written it on the board.

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The board, by the way,

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is the original board that's been used since 1907.

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I think the link with me with the Antiques Road Trip

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will be very spurious.

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-On your artistic marks then...

-The clock is ticking.

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MUSIC: Theme from Take Hart

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So much concentration going into that.

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Bear in mind that I was doing this cartoon in about 1945

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when I was five.

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That's stuck with me as the only thing I could do.

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-Have you finished?

-I have.

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-Crikey!

-How have we done?

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Well, I think there's a new "ism" coming on here.

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You should phone the London galleries.

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THEY LAUGH

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You may struggle to get into Savages at this stage,

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but it is only the first audition.

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I think that's what they call

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letting them down lightly, don't you?

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Now, let's get back to the shopping, still in Bristol,

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where Nigel and Margie have reached their next shop.

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-Here we go.

-Here we go.

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Gird your loins.

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-Hello.

-Hiya.

-I remember you.

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-Yes, from last time.

-Jay, hello.

-Nigel.

-Jay, nice to meet you.

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-I just spied this, um, this top hat here.

-Top hat.

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Do you mind if I..? Thank you.

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-That suits you.

-I do like a top hat. I went to Ascot on Tuesday.

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-Did you really?

-Yes.

-Glorious weather.

-It rained all day.

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It's sort of too big for me.

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MARGIE LAUGHS

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Do you remember that comedian called Parrotface Davies?

0:15:330:15:36

They may well have appeared together in panto.

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-I like these flags.

-Yeah?

-I do rather.

-Here we go.

0:15:390:15:42

Well, we'll see if anyone salutes it, shall we?

0:15:420:15:45

-There are a couple of moth holes in there.

-I don't mind.

0:15:450:15:47

-That's good, moth holes.

-Where's the price, Jay?

-It can be £15. Cheap.

0:15:470:15:52

-What year do you think that is?

-I would probably say '50s.

-'53?

0:15:520:15:57

-Coronation?

-It might well be.

-Shall we make it that?

-Let's make it '53!

0:15:570:16:02

Just think, when you've just won Chariots Of Fire.

0:16:020:16:05

I'll do that in slow-mo.

0:16:050:16:07

Wouldn't you just love to run round, having achieved a gold medal?

0:16:070:16:11

If we're having a dinner party or something,

0:16:110:16:13

-they'd put this in the middle of the table like that.

-Or a burial at sea!

0:16:130:16:16

-So, it's what? £10?

-£15. It's cheap as chips, that is.

0:16:160:16:19

Have you got anything similar to go with it?

0:16:190:16:22

Good plan. What can our Jay find?

0:16:220:16:25

-Are those all for sale?

-Yes, they're all for sale.

0:16:250:16:28

There's a tin there with a view of something.

0:16:280:16:30

-Oh, that's Fortnum & Mason.

-That would go with it, the flag.

0:16:300:16:34

-The flag.

-Could we get that tin down?

-Yes, let's have a little look.

0:16:340:16:37

-Do you want to squeeze past me?

-Jay, this is what you do for a living.

0:16:370:16:40

Climbing up furniture.

0:16:400:16:42

So, we want to have a look at this bottom one here.

0:16:430:16:46

So, we've got that one there.

0:16:460:16:48

Is that Tower of London? It's old London.

0:16:480:16:51

-That's the Tower, isn't it?

-I like it.

0:16:510:16:52

-That's where you went through if you were in big trouble.

-Yeah.

0:16:520:16:55

-Was it that one there you were looking at?

-Yes.

-Yes.

0:16:550:16:57

Ah, Crawford & Sons. Delicious!

0:16:580:17:01

Original ring on the top.

0:17:010:17:03

-I like that.

-Ooh, yeah.

-OK, these two tins appeal to me.

0:17:030:17:07

-Do they appeal to you?

-Everyone loves biccies.

0:17:070:17:10

Let's look at this one.

0:17:100:17:12

-Job lot of tins - is that where we're going?

-Yeah.

-Looks like it.

0:17:120:17:15

Let's just talk money for a minute cos we've got to be...

0:17:150:17:18

They've got no prices on, so...

0:17:180:17:20

-I was going to say I'd do the lot for £15.

-I think that's pretty good.

0:17:200:17:23

-Yeah.

-It's a bit like an old-fashioned sweet shop, this.

0:17:230:17:26

-While you're at it, I'll have a KitKat.

-She looks like a...

0:17:260:17:31

-Macfarlane Lang. I remember them.

-I think she's great. We're having her.

0:17:310:17:35

-Any danger of a deal, do we think?

-Union Jack was £15.

0:17:350:17:39

-Yeah, and these are £15.

-These were £15.

0:17:390:17:41

So, can we lump it all together?

0:17:410:17:43

-The word "Lump" is what I like.

-It's £30 for the two lots. That's cheap.

0:17:430:17:48

-Done.

-Smashing.

-Thank you very much.

0:17:480:17:50

They're certainly buying in bulk.

0:17:500:17:52

Right, let's try and get out of this hole.

0:17:520:17:54

But how does Margie reckon it's going?

0:17:540:17:56

I think we're buying some really funny and interesting things.

0:17:560:17:59

-I'm not sure about his cockle bucket.

-Quite.

0:17:590:18:02

But he's a very attractive man. And he's lovely as well.

0:18:020:18:06

He's lovely with it. So, yeah, enjoying it immensely.

0:18:060:18:10

MARGIE LAUGHS

0:18:100:18:12

Margie, what do you think of this?

0:18:120:18:14

-Is that old?

-No!

0:18:150:18:17

-Oh, bugger!

-MARGIE LAUGHS

0:18:170:18:19

Say what you like about our Nige, he certainly puts a shift in.

0:18:190:18:23

You have to really learn to look up, cos quite often,

0:18:230:18:27

things are up, up... Oh, there's an aeroplane up there.

0:18:270:18:31

Lots of things remind me of my childhood here.

0:18:310:18:35

Lots and lots of things, including this sledge.

0:18:350:18:39

Look at this! This is great! That's a two-seater.

0:18:390:18:42

I loved to go sledging. It was fantastic.

0:18:420:18:44

Of course, it used to snow a lot more in those days.

0:18:440:18:47

I'm quite interested in that.

0:18:470:18:48

So, with Nigel poised to buy the entire shop,

0:18:480:18:51

our other pairing have still to part with as much as a penny.

0:18:510:18:55

Michael, are you a collector?

0:18:550:18:57

I have sort of crazes of collecting things.

0:18:570:19:00

Um... So, I suddenly start buying commedia dell'arte paintings

0:19:000:19:06

-and I ended up with far too many pictures.

-Are you quite tough?

0:19:060:19:10

-Are you a tough negotiator?

-I am a tough negotiator.

0:19:100:19:13

My problem is that I do have slightly weird taste.

0:19:130:19:17

The sort of thing that appeals to me

0:19:170:19:20

very often doesn't appeal to anyone else.

0:19:200:19:23

Yeah, that's not helpful.

0:19:230:19:25

They're on their way, via a somewhat circuitous route,

0:19:250:19:28

to the same shop that Nigel and Margie are currently hoovering up,

0:19:280:19:31

so let's hope Michael isn't too bothered about flags,

0:19:310:19:34

biscuit tins or model planes, cos they've all gone.

0:19:340:19:37

-OK, I want you to look up...

-Yeah.

-..now.

0:19:370:19:41

Oh, crikey!

0:19:420:19:44

Going to be a lot of money, isn't it? So, it has flown?

0:19:440:19:47

-That would have flown at some point, yeah.

-But when you say it flies...

0:19:470:19:50

-How do you land it?

-I wouldn't have a clue.

0:19:500:19:52

-I just know how to stick it up there.

-I beg your pardon!

0:19:520:19:55

-How much is it?

-£350.

-Oh.

-I knew it would be.

0:19:550:19:58

£150? Just to get it out of the way.

0:19:580:20:01

Yeah, actually, it sort of already is.

0:20:010:20:04

-Well, if you're interested, ask for the best price.

-So... So, Jay...

0:20:040:20:08

-Yes?

-What's the best price for that, please?

-That WAS the best price.

0:20:080:20:11

-Was it?

-Yes.

-Perhaps the sledge will go down better.

0:20:110:20:15

CLATTERING

0:20:150:20:17

Whoops! Don't worry about that. Look at that.

0:20:170:20:19

-The runners are still there.

-Yeah, they are.

0:20:190:20:22

-See? Any brakes on it? No!

-There don't seem to be.

0:20:220:20:25

-I had one with brakes on.

-Did you?

-Yeah.

0:20:250:20:27

-You would, wouldn't you?

-Yeah, yeah. What's the best price on that, Jay?

0:20:270:20:31

It's £35 priced up, isn't it? A nice gentleman like you, it's £30.

0:20:310:20:35

-Oh, Jay!

-That's not even 10%.

-Over 13, actually.

0:20:350:20:40

-I don't think that's going to be a goer for £30.

-Nor do I.

0:20:400:20:44

-What are YOU thinking?

-I was thinking 20 quid.

-Yeah.

0:20:440:20:47

I could split the difference with you there. £25.

0:20:480:20:50

Don't look at ME. You found it!

0:20:510:20:54

-You found...

-£25! Yeah, £25.

-Deal?

0:20:550:20:59

-Thank you.

-Smashing.

0:20:590:21:01

-Done it now.

-In this together, eh, Margie? Hang on, there's more.

0:21:010:21:06

Look, Coronation souvenir book, 1937.

0:21:060:21:08

-Oh, that's lovely, to go with your flag.

-Yes.

-Well done.

0:21:080:21:12

-Jay wanted £5, but I got it for £3.

-Nigel!

0:21:120:21:15

-There, is that the Koh-i-noor diamond?

-Indeed.

0:21:150:21:18

-That must be so heavy on her head.

-That's why she's like this.

0:21:180:21:21

-Yeah.

-Uncanny(!)

0:21:210:21:24

£58 then, for that little lot - a flag, seven tins,

0:21:240:21:27

a book and a sledge - all cunningly concealed from our late arrivals.

0:21:270:21:30

-Bye, Jay.

-Bye-bye.

-Goody!

0:21:300:21:33

This isn't a bus shelter, you know. That's out there, the bus shelter.

0:21:350:21:39

-We're waiting for our limousine to take us home.

-Oh, right.

0:21:390:21:42

I thought it was the 175C. We'd better do some shopping.

0:21:420:21:46

-We'd better get on.

-Good luck. I hope it isn't cancelled, OK.

0:21:460:21:50

Time to see Michael in action.

0:21:500:21:52

Here's the proprietor, Jay. Michael.

0:21:520:21:54

-How do you do, Jay?

-Nice to meet you, Michael.

0:21:540:21:56

Bit late, perhaps, but definitely spoilt for choice.

0:21:560:22:00

Michael, take that in your hands.

0:22:040:22:06

When you hold something like that, what happens? Initial nerves?

0:22:060:22:10

-Can I get a tune out of it?

-It reminds me of my friend Elton John.

0:22:100:22:15

-Yeah, yeah.

-He has a quite elderly tambourine player in his group.

0:22:150:22:21

He's had him for 30, 40 years, right back to the old days.

0:22:210:22:26

-But he is really very old. He's even older than me.

-Really?

0:22:260:22:29

And he's beginning to run out of his...whatever it is you need

0:22:290:22:33

to play the tambourine.

0:22:330:22:35

-Your oomph. Or your smack, is it?

-Steady on!

0:22:350:22:38

-My son is a comedian, as you know.

-Yeah.

0:22:380:22:41

And in the old days, comedians, when they told jokes,

0:22:410:22:44

would say something and then they'd go...

0:22:440:22:47

HE BANGS TAMBOURINE

0:22:470:22:48

..at the end, just to let the audience know that the joke's there.

0:22:480:22:51

So, for example, you'd say, "I sent my wife to the West Indies."

0:22:510:22:55

-Jamaica?

-No, she went of her own accord!

0:22:550:22:58

HE BANGS TAMBOURINE

0:22:580:23:00

Keep smiling, Jay. They are getting there. What does this owe you, Jay?

0:23:000:23:04

-A fiver?

-15 quid!

-No!

-That's cheap for that.

0:23:040:23:07

-Think of the amount of fun you get out of that.

-He's still smiling.

0:23:070:23:11

When somebody's still smiling, they're not upset, are they?

0:23:110:23:14

-Well, I've said a fiver.

-That'll have to go back on the shelf.

0:23:140:23:17

-That can't be a fiver.

-Careful, James, you'll wear it out.

0:23:170:23:20

-How long have you had that up there?

-About ten days.

0:23:200:23:23

-Ten days and nobody's bought it!

-Nobody's bought it.

0:23:230:23:26

Are you beginning to feel nervous about that price?

0:23:260:23:28

You've just got to wait for the right punter.

0:23:280:23:30

That's what you've got to wait for - the right man to come in for it.

0:23:300:23:32

I tell you what I would be prepared to do,

0:23:320:23:34

-because I know you like it and I like it.

-Yeah.

0:23:340:23:37

-I would be prepared to go to £8.

-Really?

0:23:370:23:39

-Best I'd do is £12.

-£9.

0:23:390:23:42

-My final word. £9.

-£9.

0:23:420:23:44

-So it's either £9..

-£9

-..or "Nein".

-He's on a roll.

0:23:440:23:48

-Thank you, sir.

-Well done, well done. Voila.

-Danke schoen.

0:23:480:23:51

-So, there we are.

-Auf Wiedersehen.

0:23:510:23:53

-What a nice young man.

-Yes.

0:23:530:23:56

Now, with our two friends back together again,

0:23:560:23:59

it's down to business.

0:23:590:24:00

You know at the end of all this, when we do the auction,

0:24:000:24:03

because of our relationship,

0:24:030:24:05

I think that I should take a percentage of what your things make.

0:24:050:24:11

-Yeah.

-Obviously, that would have VAT on it.

-Nighty-night.

0:24:110:24:15

Ah, good to see the TVR's back on song. Let's hope it lasts.

0:24:190:24:25

We bought, as Michael said, a bit of nonsense.

0:24:250:24:28

I heard him say that he reckoned he was the oldest thing in the shop.

0:24:280:24:31

I think he was!

0:24:310:24:33

-NIGEL:

-I have made one purchase though,

0:24:330:24:35

-that she completely and utterly doesn't understand.

-Right.

0:24:350:24:39

It's made of metal and it's got holes in it.

0:24:390:24:42

-That's all I can tell you. What about James? How was he?

-Great.

0:24:420:24:45

Very good man, yeah.

0:24:450:24:47

Actually, he drove the car beautifully and there was a moment

0:24:470:24:51

when I wished I was sitting in the back reading the paper,

0:24:510:24:54

cos he'd make a lovely chauffeur.

0:24:540:24:56

Just as well, because there wasn't a lot of actual shopping

0:24:560:25:00

done by Michael and James yesterday,

0:25:000:25:02

with just £9 spent on their tambourine, man.

0:25:020:25:06

£9 or "Nein", we go!

0:25:060:25:09

Leaving them with an awful lot to buy and almost £400 to do it with.

0:25:090:25:14

While Margie and Nigel bought heaps, including that bucket,

0:25:140:25:18

a flag, a book, several biscuit tins,

0:25:180:25:21

-a wooden sledge and a pair of grotto chairs, or...

-SCREAMERS!

0:25:210:25:26

But they still have well over £200 left for today's purchases.

0:25:270:25:31

Hang on - looks like we're about to go off-road.

0:25:310:25:34

Thank God this Bentley's four-wheel drive, that's all I can say.

0:25:340:25:37

Yes, when I watch this programme,

0:25:370:25:40

they're sort of roaring along roads,

0:25:400:25:42

the sun's shining and there's sort of cornfields,

0:25:420:25:45

but I've never seen one where they're stuck

0:25:450:25:48

-in a muddy track in pouring rain.

-No.

0:25:480:25:52

He's obviously not watched for a while then.

0:25:520:25:54

Later, they'll be making for the capital

0:25:540:25:56

and that auction at Southgate,

0:25:560:25:58

but their next stop is in Somerset at Frome.

0:25:580:26:01

I think it might be brightening up, you know.

0:26:030:26:05

-What a lovely day.

-JAMES:

-It is a lovely day.

0:26:050:26:08

-Breathtaking.

-Are you going to go?

-I think we should go.

0:26:080:26:11

-NIGEL:

-Are you going to drive?

-Do you want me to?

0:26:110:26:13

-I'd love you to have a go.

-OK.

-Because it's such fun.

-Is it?

0:26:130:26:15

-JAMES LAUGHS

-Goodbye.

0:26:150:26:17

-JAMES:

-I must be ever-attending.

0:26:170:26:19

-There could be a job in it for me later.

-No promises.

-No promises.

0:26:190:26:24

I might be able to see my way to something for you.

0:26:240:26:28

Ah, still running smoothly, I see. Almost as smooth as Nigel.

0:26:280:26:33

Do you quite like playing, you know, the bad guy?

0:26:330:26:36

-The bad guys are much easier to play.

-Yeah, I'm sure.

0:26:360:26:39

And they're a bit more fun.

0:26:390:26:41

-Do people come up to you afterwards and tell you off?

-Yes, they do.

0:26:410:26:45

When I was in Corrie, I was queuing up in the supermarket

0:26:450:26:48

and people would say, "You owe Audrey 40 grand, you nasty man!"

0:26:480:26:52

We all love a banter.

0:26:520:26:55

Michael, I was very impressed with your haggling skills.

0:26:550:26:57

-Oh, really?

-Yeah.

-Oh, that's kind.

0:26:570:27:00

I mean, I've spent most of my life

0:27:000:27:02

sort of haggling for actors, you know.

0:27:020:27:05

What is the tip? Were you a king of the pause or silence?

0:27:050:27:09

I did the silence quite a lot.

0:27:090:27:12

And then the other one was walking away from it

0:27:120:27:14

and then you'd ring the actor and the actor would say,

0:27:140:27:17

"But what happens if they offer it to somebody else?"

0:27:170:27:20

I'd say, "Well, that is always the chance you have to take."

0:27:200:27:24

Nerves of steel, eh?

0:27:240:27:26

Rather ancient and very picturesque,

0:27:260:27:28

the town of Frome hosts an annual cycle race

0:27:280:27:31

up some of its steepest streets, called the Cobble Wobble.

0:27:310:27:36

-Hello.

-Oh, hello. I'm Michael.

-Nice to meet you. I'm Sophie.

-James.

0:27:360:27:40

-Sophie, this is James.

-Hello, very good to see you.

0:27:400:27:43

-What a lovely stock, isn't it?

-Thank you.

0:27:430:27:45

Spoken like men with exactly £391 between them.

0:27:450:27:49

Anything Sophie would especially like to big up?

0:27:490:27:53

-This is the lovely bronze.

-That's very good, isn't it?

0:27:530:27:55

-Nice sort of weight to it?

-TAPPING

0:27:550:27:59

It's all there. A lot of tapping.

0:27:590:28:01

-It's always good to tap and ring.

-It's not another tambourine!

0:28:010:28:04

-Age, Sophie?

-It's quite a modern piece

0:28:040:28:06

but I still think it's got a lot of quality.

0:28:060:28:08

What have you got on this, Sophie?

0:28:080:28:11

The bronze is £6,000 at the moment.

0:28:110:28:14

-Right.

-Right, well, we've got an idea of pricing structure now.

-Mmm.

0:28:140:28:18

Mmm, maybe something a bit more modest.

0:28:180:28:20

So, we've got a very terribly smart biscuit box here.

0:28:200:28:24

-This is by Huntley & Palmers, based on sort of Wedgwood.

-Mm-hmm.

0:28:250:28:29

And priced at a mere £5.

0:28:290:28:31

You can't all buy biscuit tins! Look again.

0:28:310:28:35

Sweet little enamels, aren't they? Ballooning.

0:28:350:28:38

People are quite potty about ballooning, aren't they?

0:28:380:28:41

Bristol's a great centre of ballooning.

0:28:410:28:43

They have a big ballooning festival. I rather like that.

0:28:430:28:46

-How much is that, Sophie?

-It's a whole £15.

-£15.

0:28:460:28:50

Well, that's a start, Sophie, well done.

0:28:500:28:52

I think we're going to think about that.

0:28:520:28:54

There are plenty of pictures in here too.

0:28:540:28:56

But what will tempt our boys?

0:28:560:28:59

I just noticed this.

0:28:590:29:00

When you're looking for something,

0:29:000:29:03

you want something that actually has a bit of craft about it.

0:29:030:29:06

-This has actually been painted, this one.

-Oh, right.

0:29:060:29:09

-Rather than been transferred.

-Yes.

-And the scene?

0:29:090:29:12

-Er, Don Quixote, isn't it?

-Don Quixote, yes, it is, isn't it?

0:29:120:29:16

-And the windmills, Spanish.

-Yeah.

0:29:160:29:18

This is earthenware, so this is Hispano-Moresque,

0:29:180:29:21

so it's a sort of tin-glazed earthenware of Spain.

0:29:210:29:25

Probably a holiday purchase, would you think, from somewhere?

0:29:250:29:28

I think so, but a man with more substance,

0:29:280:29:30

because he could have bought something six inches, couldn't he?

0:29:300:29:33

-Yeah.

-And he said, "No, darling, we'll go for the 12."

0:29:330:29:36

-Go for the 12.

-Yeah, but you know what they say about size.

0:29:360:29:40

Don Quixote. I always forget this fellow.

0:29:400:29:43

-I think he was called Sancho Panza - is that right?

-Ah.

-Yes.

0:29:430:29:47

-So he was like a sort of... He was his man, wasn't he?

-Exactly.

0:29:470:29:50

-In Bentley terms...

-Bentley terms?

0:29:500:29:52

-..that would be me and that would be you.

-Braxton.

0:29:520:29:55

Yeah, Braxton on the mule.

0:29:550:29:57

Time to sally forth.

0:29:570:30:00

If I may give that to you, sir. There you are.

0:30:000:30:02

-And I think this was the other thing.

-That was the other thing.

0:30:020:30:06

So, this is marked at £15 and this had on it...

0:30:060:30:11

-£20, I think it was.

-Yes.

0:30:110:30:13

If Sophie was Lew Grade there,

0:30:130:30:15

now how would you approach the whole thing?

0:30:150:30:17

I would probably say, I would pay for this plate, £20,

0:30:170:30:24

-provided I could take that with me too.

-£15 off?

0:30:240:30:30

I mean, I don't like to be ruthless this early in the day.

0:30:300:30:33

I think he DOES, you know.

0:30:330:30:35

-I couldn't squeeze you up a little bit?

-No.

-Not even to £25?

-No.

0:30:350:30:40

As you are such a lovely person and, obviously, YOU are as well...

0:30:400:30:44

-Well, I'm only the chauffeur.

-Well, OK.

-Sophie, it's very nice...

0:30:440:30:49

Thank you very much, it's very nice to meet you.

0:30:490:30:52

-He has his uses though, like lugging the lolly.

-Thank you very much.

0:30:520:30:56

-For you, Sophie.

-Thank you very much.

0:30:570:30:59

We'll call that £17 for the charger and just £3 for the beaker.

0:30:590:31:03

But while they head off in their trusty steed...

0:31:030:31:06

..the sometimes temperamental TVR is also in Somerset,

0:31:090:31:13

on the road to one of Nigel's favourite cities - beautiful Bath.

0:31:130:31:17

-Nigel, do you know Bath well?

-I do, I know Bath very well.

0:31:170:31:20

I've done many shows at the Theatre Royal

0:31:200:31:23

-and I do think it's a magical city.

-It is.

0:31:230:31:26

-Oh, look at the view there.

-It's beautiful.

0:31:260:31:28

Although Bath has been around since Roman times,

0:31:280:31:32

it was spectacularly reinvented during the 18th century

0:31:320:31:35

as a fashionable spa resort.

0:31:350:31:37

Nigel and Margie are here to find out

0:31:370:31:39

about one of the Georgian city's prime movers

0:31:390:31:42

from historian Dr Amy Frost.

0:31:420:31:44

-I'm standing outside my favourite theatre in England.

-Oh, good!

0:31:440:31:48

-Seriously.

-Before this was a theatre, in the early 18th century,

0:31:480:31:51

it was one of the houses where Beau Nash lived,

0:31:510:31:54

and he was the Master of Ceremonies of Bath

0:31:540:31:57

and a great performer for society,

0:31:570:31:59

so this is where he spent a lot of his time.

0:31:590:32:01

I imagine, was Beau a sort of nickname?

0:32:010:32:03

Yes, so his name was Richard and he sort of adopted this nickname

0:32:030:32:07

as he began to sort of brand himself quite early in his life.

0:32:070:32:12

He starts organising entertainments and he starts corralling society,

0:32:120:32:16

making them have things that they can go to,

0:32:160:32:19

-things that they can do and...

-Putting Bath on the map.

0:32:190:32:22

Yeah, well, he sort of gets invited to come down to Bath

0:32:220:32:25

to kind of build up the reputation of the place.

0:32:250:32:30

Amy credits Nash, along with Ralph Allen,

0:32:300:32:33

the man who owned the Bath stone quarry,

0:32:330:32:36

and the classical architects John Wood and Sons

0:32:360:32:39

as the men who made the city a must-visit destination.

0:32:390:32:43

So, Amy, what did they do for fun?

0:32:430:32:44

Well, I mean, you told people you were here to take the waters.

0:32:440:32:47

-That was the sort of polite explanation.

-Oh, right, yes.

0:32:470:32:50

But, of course, people would go shopping.

0:32:500:32:52

Bath became THE place for luxury goods.

0:32:520:32:55

Balls twice a week, musical entertainments, card games,

0:32:550:33:00

card parties, the theatre...

0:33:000:33:02

So, there was quite a lot for you to do,

0:33:020:33:04

but it was all entirely built on pleasure.

0:33:040:33:06

-This is where he lived originally.

-Yeah.

0:33:060:33:08

He gets up in the morning, he has a huge breakfast, I imagine,

0:33:080:33:11

-and then says, "It's time to go to the baths"?

-To the baths, yeah.

0:33:110:33:15

Society would be at the baths first thing in the morning

0:33:150:33:18

and then they'd be done with their bathing

0:33:180:33:21

by nine o'clock in the morning.

0:33:210:33:23

And then he would have a full day

0:33:230:33:25

of orchestrating what they did for the rest of the day.

0:33:250:33:29

He was that important?

0:33:290:33:31

-Yeah, yeah, he called himself the King of Bath.

-Gosh.

0:33:310:33:34

-So wherever he went, everyone would follow.

-Everyone followed.

0:33:340:33:36

-Shall we go and do a simple tour?

-Let's follow him.

0:33:360:33:38

-Let's follow him.

-Yeah.

-OK.

0:33:380:33:40

Although the Romans got there first, building these fine baths,

0:33:400:33:44

fashionable folk began flocking to take the waters

0:33:440:33:47

after Queen Anne took a dip in 1703.

0:33:470:33:50

-It's a warm bath.

-Yeah, you can feel the heat.

0:33:500:33:53

But bathing was just the beginning of Nash's very strict social whirl.

0:33:530:33:57

He created a set of rules for assemblies,

0:33:570:34:01

so there were two balls a week which were referred to as assemblies,

0:34:010:34:04

and he encouraged someone to set up an assembly room

0:34:040:34:07

that they would take place in.

0:34:070:34:08

And then he publishes these rules

0:34:080:34:10

and they're rules to be observed when in Bath.

0:34:100:34:13

And it's things like, um...

0:34:130:34:15

"Elderly ladies and children must sit around the edge of the room

0:34:150:34:21

"in a ball because they are beyond or not yet come to perfection."

0:34:210:34:26

Ladies are not allowed to be seen wearing a white apron.

0:34:260:34:29

Duelling and carrying a sword around town was frowned upon.

0:34:290:34:33

-And did people abide by these rules?

-Yeah.

0:34:330:34:36

Nash, meanwhile, was quietly making a fortune

0:34:360:34:38

from subscriptions to the society's venues

0:34:380:34:41

to an awful lot of gambling.

0:34:410:34:43

He's completely on the take,

0:34:430:34:45

so whatever is being made at the gaming tables,

0:34:450:34:47

he is being paid a percentage of what people are taking.

0:34:470:34:50

-Cos you can't really guarantee to make money out of gambling.

-No.

0:34:500:34:53

-But you can guarantee making money...

-Of what the house makes.

0:34:530:34:56

-And the house always wins.

-Yeah.

0:34:560:34:58

With the famous pump room at the hub of social life,

0:34:580:35:02

the King of Bath reigned as the city's MC for over 50 years.

0:35:020:35:07

Would they have food all day or was it...?

0:35:070:35:10

No, I mean, originally, actually,

0:35:100:35:12

it would have been empty of tables and chairs,

0:35:120:35:14

-other than chairs around the outside.

-Right.

0:35:140:35:17

And you would come here to look at the visitors' book

0:35:170:35:19

to see who'd arrived in the city and did you know them.

0:35:190:35:22

And then you just walked in a big circle,

0:35:220:35:24

so you would just walk around the room and you would walk,

0:35:240:35:27

making new acquaintances,

0:35:270:35:29

saying hello to people, gossiping with people.

0:35:290:35:31

-Being social.

-So, you just sort of circulate.

-Promenading.

0:35:310:35:35

Yeah, and it's still a fashionable place,

0:35:350:35:37

still doing its original function.

0:35:370:35:39

It's a place where people come almost entirely for pleasure.

0:35:390:35:43

Although this particular pump room was erected after Nash's death,

0:35:430:35:47

he's still honoured with a statue.

0:35:470:35:49

So, looking back on Nash's life, we have to respect him, don't we?

0:35:490:35:53

-Yeah, I think so.

-And I think we should give him a...

0:35:530:35:55

-For all his faults.

-Give him a quick...

-Give him a quick...

0:35:550:35:58

Yeah, cheers.

0:35:580:36:00

Well done, old Nash - even though you are an ugly old bugger.

0:36:000:36:03

THEY LAUGH

0:36:030:36:05

And speaking of which...

0:36:050:36:07

So, Michael - sorry, Mr Whitehall -

0:36:070:36:10

how do you think my chauffeuring probation's going?

0:36:100:36:14

I think probably listen more than talk

0:36:140:36:18

would be an early note I would give you.

0:36:180:36:20

I like the name. James is a very good name.

0:36:200:36:24

Or Braxton is a good name. In fact, I'd slightly veer to the surname.

0:36:240:36:29

You'd have to sort of smarten up a bit.

0:36:290:36:32

Those two have now motored over to Wiltshire and the town of Devizes

0:36:320:36:36

where, in the shadow of the tower brewery...

0:36:360:36:39

-It's a proper antique shop, this one.

-OK.

-No mattresses!

0:36:390:36:43

-Hello.

-I'm Michael. How do you do?

-I'm John.

-Hello.

-Vicki.

0:36:430:36:47

-Hello, I'm James.

-James.

-John.

-John.

0:36:470:36:51

Michael, hat off, please. Umbrella down.

0:36:510:36:54

-Let's go antiquing.

-Yes, let's.

0:36:540:36:57

-That's nice.

-That is very nice, isn't it?

-I like that.

0:36:580:37:01

That reminds me of Alfred Wallis's paintings.

0:37:010:37:04

-Do you know Alfred Wallis?

-I don't, no.

-He was a very elderly man.

0:37:040:37:08

I mean, he was in his sort of mid-80s and he lived in St Ives

0:37:080:37:12

in this funny little broken-down house,

0:37:120:37:14

and he started painting on bits of driftwood

0:37:140:37:17

and then any bits of stuff, rubbish, he could get hold of,

0:37:170:37:21

-and now his paintings are worth millions of pounds.

-Really?

-Yes.

0:37:210:37:26

Do you think he might have worked in a different medium?

0:37:260:37:29

-He might have done. It looks a little too sophisticated.

-Does it?

0:37:290:37:32

But I like it and I like the look of it. It's very decorative.

0:37:320:37:37

-How much have you got on this?

-£75.

0:37:370:37:40

-£75. That's not outrageous, is it?

-It's not, no.

0:37:400:37:44

-And if it turned out to be Alfred Wallis...

-Well, yes.

0:37:440:37:48

Sorely tempted. Back in Bath, Nigel's saying it with flowers.

0:37:480:37:53

-So, this is going to go into the cockle bucket.

-To liven it all up?

0:37:530:37:57

-To liven it all up.

-Push the sale.

-Exactly that.

0:37:570:37:59

-How much have you spent though?

-A tenner.

-Oh, that's all right.

-Is it?

0:37:590:38:03

-Yeah. I really hope it brings you luck.

-Thank you very much.

0:38:030:38:06

-You might need it.

-You've always had a thing about that cockle bucket.

0:38:060:38:10

Oh, well, never mind,

0:38:100:38:12

you've still got one last shop to look forward to.

0:38:120:38:15

This is more like it.

0:38:150:38:16

Yes, and with almost £200 left, they could have some fun in here.

0:38:160:38:20

-Look at this. "HRH".

-HRH.

-AS THE QUEEN:

-My suitcase!

0:38:220:38:27

This is an incredible thing! I didn't expect them to have that.

0:38:270:38:30

-Do you like it?

-I do like it but I've just seen the swing ticket.

0:38:300:38:33

-Ooh.

-£220, but it's a really good one.

0:38:330:38:36

Hey, here's a tin-plate reminder of Bath's past.

0:38:360:38:40

Nice and substantial, isn't it?

0:38:400:38:43

Shopkeeper Alex should be able to extol its virtues.

0:38:430:38:46

-Beautifully made. Accurate.

-Yeah.

-Even the wheel rims are of steel.

0:38:460:38:51

-It's got brake pads too.

-Got brake pads, it's all there.

0:38:510:38:54

There's a bit of age to it. What do you think? 50 years?

0:38:540:38:57

-I'd say not much more than 50.

-Yeah.

0:38:570:38:59

-I do like it but I've just seen the ticket.

-Go on, make me an offer.

0:38:590:39:03

-Well, go on then.

-The door's...

-I look at you immediately.

0:39:040:39:07

-The door is right behind you.

-Something in the region of £70.

0:39:070:39:11

I think it's going to be a little bit over £70,

0:39:110:39:15

-but can I just go away and...?

-Think about it.

-Course you can.

0:39:150:39:18

Now, there's a coincidence.

0:39:180:39:20

A little coach in Bath and that primitive boat in Devizes.

0:39:200:39:24

Anything else in this old house?

0:39:240:39:27

-Sort of goes on forever.

-Incredible!

0:39:270:39:29

-It's a bit like the Eiffel Tower here, isn't it?

-D'accord.

0:39:290:39:33

-This is amazing.

-Amazing, isn't it?

-Very Dickensian feel to it.

0:39:330:39:36

This was the children's nursery area, do you think?

0:39:360:39:40

I think it was, yeah.

0:39:400:39:41

This is nice. I like this.

0:39:410:39:44

-That's sort of Chinesey, isn't it?

-Very pretty, this.

-Yeah.

0:39:450:39:50

-Look, we've got a thing for a shelf, so this...

-Oh, yeah.

0:39:500:39:55

-That's probably...

-Ooh, careful.

-..that shelf there, isn't it?

0:39:550:40:00

-The door doesn't close now. There we are.

-Steady on, Braxton.

0:40:000:40:04

Bit worried you're going to demolish it before we've even bought it.

0:40:040:40:08

You can see I'm a natural for the self-assembly, can't you?

0:40:080:40:12

A natural something, certainly! John, the proprietor, is on his way.

0:40:120:40:16

-Just as well!

-Ah, I'm glad you've come up.

0:40:160:40:18

James is about to demolish this very elegant little cupboard of yours.

0:40:180:40:23

-Is that the shelf for it, John?

-It is.

0:40:230:40:26

Why didn't you ask him in the first place? I think that's very pretty.

0:40:260:40:30

-Do you? It's obviously very well-made, isn't it?

-Well, it was!

0:40:300:40:34

-It WAS, yes.

-Well said.

0:40:340:40:36

-And has it got any age to it?

-Not a great deal.

-No.

0:40:360:40:40

-It's more a decorative piece.

-Yes.

0:40:400:40:43

That's what they're about in North London, aren't they?

0:40:430:40:46

-Decorative items.

-Yeah. And is there a price on it?

0:40:460:40:49

-Um, I think probably £95.

-£95.

-Time to devise a deal.

0:40:490:40:54

We've got the after Alfred Wallis,

0:40:540:40:57

then we've got this after Chinese dynasty.

0:40:570:41:00

What's the best, John, you could do for those two pieces?

0:41:000:41:04

-For the two items.

-Two.

-Two-item deal.

0:41:040:41:06

-We got buy one get one free in the last shop, didn't we?

-Yeah, we did.

0:41:060:41:10

-Very generous.

-That's not caught on round these parts.

-No.

0:41:100:41:13

I was thinking £110, weren't you, for the two?

0:41:130:41:15

-I could do the two for £150.

-What do you think?

-I...I don't...

0:41:150:41:20

This is the moment where I remain silent, Michael.

0:41:200:41:23

What about £130 for the two?

0:41:230:41:25

I couldn't possibly, it would break my heart.

0:41:250:41:28

-So, what is your final price then?

-£145.

-£145.

0:41:280:41:32

£145 for the two items.

0:41:320:41:34

-For the two items carried downstairs.

-Carried downstairs.

0:41:340:41:37

-OK, let's go.

-Do you think so, Michael? Are you sure?

0:41:370:41:40

-Yeah, I'm happy with that.

-They got there.

0:41:400:41:42

But elsewhere, there's still work to be done. Now, that's familiar.

0:41:440:41:48

-There you go. Yeah, yeah. Oh, yeah.

-Yeah.

0:41:490:41:52

-And underneath, it says...

-£75.

0:41:520:41:55

£75!

0:41:560:41:58

So you'll be pleased about the one you picked up yesterday then!

0:41:580:42:02

-These little decanters here...

-Yes.

-Are they Georgian?

0:42:020:42:06

-They are Georgian.

-I thought they were.

0:42:060:42:08

-And they were probably once in a little stand at one time. £85.

-Yeah.

0:42:080:42:14

-I do like them.

-Yeah, they're very nice. A lovely pair!

0:42:140:42:17

-Can we just put those down here?

-Nice little stoppers on them.

0:42:170:42:19

-What can we do on these?

-They're lovely, aren't they?

0:42:190:42:22

-Let's sort of suggest maybe £65.

-It just shouts Georgian, that...

0:42:220:42:25

-It really does.

-That cut.

-I think they're divine.

0:42:250:42:28

So far, we have the tin-plate coach

0:42:280:42:31

and those decanters under consideration. Anything else?

0:42:310:42:34

This green bottle.

0:42:340:42:36

-It's a lovely colour, isn't it?

-It's a nice big carboy, yeah.

0:42:360:42:38

Oh, gosh, I don't know. We're in a right old pickle now, aren't we?

0:42:380:42:42

-How much is it?

-I could do that for £25.

0:42:420:42:47

Let's bring it out. So that's £20 for that.

0:42:470:42:49

£25, I think he said.

0:42:490:42:51

-AS THE QUEEN:

-I'm just going to get the carriage.

0:42:510:42:53

-Still in character, I see.

-Getting the carriage, I'm on my way.

0:42:530:42:56

-And this is our dilemma.

-Yeah.

0:42:560:42:59

-Georgian decanters, we have the coach...

-Mmm.

0:42:590:43:04

-50 years old, roughly, but very decorative.

-Yeah.

-And...

0:43:040:43:08

-Really cheap and cheerful.

-Cheap and cheerful.

0:43:080:43:11

But in my opinion, as silly as it sounds,

0:43:110:43:13

as utterly stupid as it sounds,

0:43:130:43:15

that will probably be more saleable than that.

0:43:150:43:18

-So, let's take those out of the equation.

-Then there were two.

0:43:180:43:21

So, how much was this in the end?

0:43:210:43:23

-You said we had to come up a bit in price.

-How about £80?

0:43:230:43:27

-We've got to get £100 to make a profit.

-How about £100 for the two?

0:43:270:43:31

-Yeah, £100 for the two?

-Yeah.

-Done.

0:43:310:43:33

-Done.

-OK, £100 for the two.

-Fantastic.

0:43:330:43:36

Yes, but they're almost as excited by what they DIDN'T buy.

0:43:360:43:40

-What about that tin caddy, that tin...?

-£75.

-£75! We had how many?

0:43:400:43:45

-We got seven for £15.

-Is that good for us?

0:43:450:43:50

-It's got to be good for us.

-Yay! Yay!

0:43:500:43:53

Hey, slightly embarrassing celebratory rituals completed,

0:43:530:43:56

it's time to take a peek at what our teams have bought.

0:43:560:43:59

-Shall we show them the spring of our jive?

-Shall we?

-One, two, three.

0:43:590:44:03

-Ah!

-NIGEL:

-Oh, that's wonderful!

-That's a very nice collection.

0:44:050:44:09

-JAMES:

-You could have furnished a bedsit with this, couldn't you?

0:44:090:44:12

-NIGEL:

-I think you've done really well.

-What is that?

0:44:120:44:15

-JAMES:

-A beaker, a small beaker.

0:44:150:44:17

-It's a little beaker.

-An English enamel beaker.

0:44:170:44:19

-JAMES:

-Decorated with balloons.

-NIGEL:

-With balloons.

-Oh, how sweet.

0:44:190:44:23

-Love your tambourine.

-NIGEL:

-Love the tambourine.

0:44:230:44:25

-I've had it retuned, listen.

-MICHAEL TAPS TAMBOURINE

0:44:250:44:27

-Is your tambourine old?

-Yes, it's quite old, isn't it?

-Very old.

0:44:270:44:31

It's got what's known as a bit of age to it.

0:44:310:44:34

And your little oriental cabinet there, quite sweet.

0:44:340:44:37

-That was our most expensive item, wasn't it?

-It was.

0:44:370:44:39

-It wasn't an easy guy, that one.

-JAMES:

-£75 for that.

0:44:390:44:42

-NIGEL:

-I think it's absolutely charming.

0:44:420:44:44

I like the little boat, too, I have to say.

0:44:440:44:46

-The boat is very you, I thought.

-It is.

0:44:460:44:48

-Dinky.

-JAMES:

-£70.

-Yeah.

0:44:480:44:50

-Not bad for a steamer, single funnel, is it?

-No.

0:44:500:44:53

I think we basically got one, two, three, four, five extremely good...

0:44:530:44:58

-NIGEL:

-I agree. A little round of applause for that.

-Thank you.

0:44:580:45:01

Curtain up. Time for Act II.

0:45:010:45:04

-We just take this off like this.

-Oh, nice.

0:45:040:45:06

-Look at that!

-There we go.

-JAMES:

-Look at that!

-What?

0:45:060:45:10

-JAMES:

-You could furnish a garden centre with that!

0:45:100:45:12

-NIGEL:

-Quite a lot going on here.

-JAMES:

-There is!

-There is.

0:45:120:45:15

I love that sort of carriage, the stagecoach. What a lovely model!

0:45:150:45:20

-NIGEL:

-Tell them about the chairs there.

0:45:200:45:22

Well, those stone chairs, to me, are called sort of grotto chairs.

0:45:220:45:25

-They are grotto chairs, aren't they?

-Yes.

0:45:250:45:28

But the guy came up with a funny name.

0:45:280:45:29

-NIGEL:

-He called them SCREAMERS!

-JAMES:

-Screamers?

0:45:290:45:32

There's a man on the front going like that. There's a pair.

0:45:320:45:35

-JAMES:

-A sledge.

-NIGEL:

-Yes.

-Oh.

0:45:350:45:36

-Just the weather for it.

-NIGEL:

-We thought that was it.

0:45:360:45:39

-JAMES:

-Moving into summer.

0:45:390:45:40

-NIGEL:

-But it's rare to get a tandem sledge, ie, a double.

0:45:400:45:43

-You can get two people on that sledge.

-Gosh.

0:45:430:45:45

-JAMES:

-That's very friendly, isn't it?

-NIGEL:

-Very friendly.

0:45:450:45:48

Moving over here, if you may. Of course, it's the Queen's birthday.

0:45:480:45:52

We have this collection of tins and goodies.

0:45:520:45:54

A particularly good tin there.

0:45:540:45:56

-And a coronation souvenir book of 1937.

-JAMES:

-Fabulous!

0:45:560:45:59

-It's a royal theme.

-JAMES:

-Isn't that lovely?

0:45:590:46:01

Well, I think we've all done really well.

0:46:010:46:03

-We've all done very well.

-I've really enjoyed it.

0:46:030:46:06

-NIGEL:

-May the best couple win.

-JAMES:

-May the best couple win.

0:46:060:46:10

Now for some backstage backstabbing.

0:46:100:46:12

-What do you think?

-I know Michael very, very well

0:46:120:46:14

and he was expecting me to go,

0:46:140:46:16

"I don't believe you bought all that junk!"

0:46:160:46:19

So, when I said, "That was brilliant," he was taken aback.

0:46:190:46:22

They certainly didn't get any of that stuff in an antique shop,

0:46:220:46:25

did they? I mean, some sort of bric-a-brac place.

0:46:250:46:29

If you were being unkind, what would you say?

0:46:290:46:32

I'd say they paid a little bit too much for the ship

0:46:320:46:34

-but people love things in glass cases.

-Yeah.

0:46:340:46:37

-I think their saving grace is their seats. I love their seats.

-Yes.

0:46:370:46:41

-They're good, aren't they?

-Yes.

-And a pair.

-Yes, a pair.

0:46:410:46:44

-A pair is always very good.

-I always like a pair.

0:46:440:46:47

After beginning back in "Brizzle",

0:46:490:46:51

they're now on their way to an auction

0:46:510:46:54

at the London suburb of Southgate.

0:46:540:46:56

Regrets? Well, one or two.

0:46:560:46:58

If I was an auctioneer and I was wanting to sell sledges,

0:46:580:47:03

I probably wouldn't do it in June or July.

0:47:030:47:06

-And in a completely flat town. Not a hill to be seen.

-No.

0:47:060:47:10

Come on, Nigel! Improbable sporting triumph?

0:47:100:47:14

Heroes and villains? Just like the movies!

0:47:140:47:17

-Let's go!

-NIGEL:

-I'm a little nervous, but we'll be fine.

0:47:170:47:19

-Don't worry, it'll be fine.

-JAMES:

-It'll be fine.

0:47:190:47:22

Let's go to work.

0:47:220:47:23

Nigel and Margie have spent £278 on five lots,

0:47:230:47:28

including a few joint ones,

0:47:280:47:30

while Michael and James have parted with just £174, also for five lots.

0:47:300:47:36

I wonder what auctioneer Andrew Jackson makes of their spoils.

0:47:360:47:41

The tin-plate coach, I like that. Arguably the best item.

0:47:410:47:45

It seems to be, er...homemade, as it were.

0:47:450:47:50

It's a very elaborate tambourine, I'm bound to say.

0:47:500:47:53

You could use it. I've tried it myself and it seems all right.

0:47:530:47:57

I'm not keen on the little boat, I'm afraid.

0:47:570:48:00

Very rustic, naive sort of thing. It's barely O level, is it?

0:48:000:48:05

Eh? O levels? Are we sitting comfortably?

0:48:050:48:09

-So exciting. Ooh, here we are.

-JAMES:

-Very exciting.

0:48:090:48:13

Well, just contain yourselves, because we're starting out small,

0:48:130:48:16

with Michael and James's most modest purchase.

0:48:160:48:19

Nice little beaker. Start me at £25 here.

0:48:190:48:22

-What?

-20 then.

-What?

0:48:220:48:24

-£20, little enamel beaker.

-It hasn't got a bid yet.

0:48:240:48:26

15, go on.

0:48:260:48:28

10? Start me off at 10. Come on. Nice little thing. £10?

0:48:280:48:32

I don't think we've caught anything yet.

0:48:320:48:35

£5 anywhere? £5 here?

0:48:350:48:38

-Well done, that man.

-Well done.

0:48:380:48:40

Thank you, sir. 5 I'm bid.

0:48:400:48:42

8, if you like. At £5 in front. 8 anywhere?

0:48:420:48:46

I think it's captured the imagination, hasn't it?

0:48:460:48:49

-£5. Thank you, sir.

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:48:490:48:51

-NIGEL:

-A £2 profit is not to be sniffed at.

0:48:510:48:53

No, quite a handsome return really.

0:48:530:48:55

-Any profit is good profit.

-Yeah.

0:48:550:48:59

Nigel's... Nigel's smiling.

0:48:590:49:02

MARGIE LAUGHS

0:49:020:49:04

I mean, if you make a couple of quid on that bucket,

0:49:040:49:06

good luck to you, is all I can say.

0:49:060:49:09

This is more like it.

0:49:090:49:11

Nigel and Margie's bit of tin-plate Bath elegance

0:49:110:49:13

and the auctioneer's favourite too.

0:49:130:49:16

Thank you, sir. 85 I'm bid.

0:49:160:49:18

-We're in!

-AUCTIONEER:

-90 then? 85 bid.

0:49:180:49:21

-Is this your lot?

-Yeah.

0:49:210:49:23

-AUCTIONEER:

-Nice piece.

-Wow!

0:49:230:49:25

90 anywhere? Last time then.

0:49:250:49:28

-85 it is.

-MARGIE:

-Oh, come on!

-85.

0:49:280:49:30

-At £85.

-MARGIE:

-We've made £15.

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:49:300:49:34

Well done! That was YOUR choice.

0:49:340:49:36

It's not quite a chariot, but certainly on fire.

0:49:360:49:39

-£15.

-£15 profit.

-Thank you.

-Wow, that was your choice.

0:49:390:49:43

-JAMES:

-Did they get the wrong lot number or something?

0:49:430:49:46

Cheeky! Will they be tilting at windmills

0:49:460:49:49

with this Don Quixote charger, I wonder?

0:49:490:49:52

We were thinking of taking it to Madrid

0:49:520:49:54

-to a sale there but we just didn't have the time.

-NIGEL:

-Difficult.

0:49:540:49:58

-Moresque charger.

-Moresque?

0:49:580:50:00

-I like Moresque.

-JAMES:

-Hispano-Moresque.

0:50:000:50:04

Very decorative piece.

0:50:040:50:05

-Start me off at 20.

-20.

-£20 here.

0:50:050:50:08

I like the way there's quite a pause.

0:50:080:50:12

25?

0:50:120:50:13

20 I'm bid. 25 anywhere?

0:50:140:50:16

-£20 on the right.

-£20!

-£20!

-Is there 5?

0:50:160:50:19

20 I'm bid. Last time then.

0:50:190:50:21

-MARGIE:

-£20, my word, you two! You're a success story.

0:50:210:50:25

-All done now? Thank you, sir.

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:50:250:50:27

-NIGEL:

-Hang on.

-Known as a maiden bid.

-JAMES:

-A maiden bid, well done.

0:50:270:50:31

And a £3 profit is still a profit - just!

0:50:310:50:35

Now, who can hear vague traces of skipping reels of rhyme?

0:50:350:50:40

Tambourine with black japanned and gilded walls.

0:50:400:50:43

-JAMES:

-The tambourine!

-At 25 now.

0:50:430:50:45

-This is the tambourine?

-MARGIE:

-The tambourine.

-Is this ours?

0:50:450:50:48

-Bang on!

-Thank you, sir. On the internet. 30.

0:50:480:50:50

-NIGEL:

-30!

-5.

0:50:500:50:53

-Mick Jagger's here, you see. Mick's on the phone.

-30 bid. 5 anywhere?

0:50:530:50:57

-30 in the room. 5 now?

-I knew there would be music lovers here.

-I knew.

0:50:570:51:02

-Are we all done then? At 30.

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:51:020:51:06

Southgate's lapping it up.

0:51:060:51:08

-We've not lost a penny yet.

-JAMES:

-It's very good, isn't it?

0:51:080:51:12

We should almost take this up professionally!

0:51:120:51:14

-NIGEL:

-I think both of you two should.

0:51:140:51:17

Actually, I know a few people in your business,

0:51:170:51:19

if you'd like me to have a word.

0:51:190:51:21

Have a word - that's very kind.

0:51:210:51:23

Time to go back to Nigel's childhood, his rosebud moment.

0:51:230:51:27

I didn't know that London was the centre

0:51:270:51:30

of sledging in this area.

0:51:300:51:32

-You've got Primrose Hill.

-JAMES:

-Primrose Hill.

0:51:320:51:34

-NIGEL:

-Not far away.

-People, I don't think at this time of the year,

0:51:340:51:37

-are in the mood for sledging.

-NIGEL:

-Think ahead, think ahead.

0:51:370:51:40

Right, 50 now.

0:51:400:51:42

-JAMES:

-50?!

-£50?! No!

0:51:420:51:44

40 then? 30? It's a good make,

0:51:440:51:47

lovely condition. 20, start me off. £20?

0:51:470:51:50

You'll be sorry you didn't buy it in December.

0:51:500:51:53

-10?

-10?

-5?

0:51:530:51:57

5? Oh. 10, sir?

0:51:570:51:59

Jolly good. 15, sir? 10 bid.

0:51:590:52:03

-15, anyone?

-MARGIE:

-Oh, go on!

-NIGEL:

-It's beautiful.

0:52:030:52:06

You'll make a profit if you can hang onto it for a couple of months.

0:52:060:52:09

-Are all done then at 10?

-JAMES:

-I'd say you're done.

0:52:090:52:12

-All done now? Thank you, sir.

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:52:120:52:14

Well, it seems some lucky sledger's got quite a bargain.

0:52:140:52:18

The cockle bucket is next.

0:52:180:52:20

Yeah, I think you're going to run into trouble

0:52:200:52:23

with that cockle bucket.

0:52:230:52:25

Don't forget the flowers and the one green bottle.

0:52:250:52:29

Somehow, in that funny shop where we bought the cockle bucket,

0:52:290:52:33

to now, is a big step forward really, isn't it?

0:52:330:52:36

It makes me feel a little insecure.

0:52:360:52:39

An Edwardian cockle bucket.

0:52:390:52:41

-Edwardian?!

-Together with Continental green glass globe.

0:52:410:52:45

Right, 30 here.

0:52:450:52:47

-Do you think cockles...?

-25.

-Oh, God, we're going down.

0:52:470:52:49

20? £20. Start me off with £20.

0:52:490:52:52

-You need a maiden bid now.

-MARGIE:

-And the vase.

0:52:520:52:54

-15?

-NIGEL:

-15 - the bid is going down.

0:52:540:52:56

-MARGIE LAUGHS

-What about the glass?

0:52:560:52:58

-AUCTIONEER:

-£10 now. Cockle bucket.

0:52:580:53:01

-MARGIE:

-He's not mentioned the glass.

-AUCTIONEER:

-£10. 5?

0:53:010:53:03

Ah, there's three 5s.

0:53:030:53:06

-MARGIE:

-We've got three 5s!

0:53:060:53:08

10, madam? 10.

0:53:080:53:11

15, sir?

0:53:110:53:12

15.

0:53:120:53:14

-There's a green bottle with it.

-MARGIE:

-There's a bottle with it.

0:53:140:53:17

15 bid. 20 anywhere? 20.

0:53:170:53:19

-Yeah, they know that.

-JAMES:

-They're doing quite well. £20.

0:53:190:53:22

20 bid. 5 anywhere?

0:53:220:53:24

-MARGIE:

-There's a bottle with it!

0:53:240:53:27

-20.

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:53:270:53:29

Sometimes, gilding the lily doesn't pay.

0:53:290:53:33

But I think James was right about those dealers from Morecambe.

0:53:330:53:36

If they'd been here that would have flown off the shelves.

0:53:360:53:40

Something else with a salty tang - Michael's possible masterpiece.

0:53:400:53:44

At 25 here.

0:53:440:53:46

20. £20.

0:53:460:53:49

Cute little lot.

0:53:500:53:52

15 then. I'll take 15 here.

0:53:520:53:55

You're better off with a cockle bucket!

0:53:550:53:57

-MARGIE LAUGHS

-10?

0:53:570:53:59

What comes...? I say, what comes before 10?

0:54:010:54:03

I suppose it's 5, isn't it?

0:54:030:54:05

Ah, 5 I'm bid. Thank you, sir.

0:54:050:54:07

-NIGEL:

-5, 5.

-That's another maiden bid.

-5 I'm bid.

0:54:070:54:10

-10 anywhere?

-JAMES:

-Don't stop, sir.

0:54:100:54:13

10 now? Are we all done then at £5?

0:54:130:54:16

HE BANGS GAVEL

0:54:160:54:18

I shouldn't laugh.

0:54:180:54:19

MARGIE LAUGHS

0:54:190:54:21

-Bit mean. I do feel a bit mean laughing, but...

-Stop.

0:54:210:54:24

Well, we are quite a long way from the seaside.

0:54:240:54:27

Ah, it looks like time for another of Nigel's collections.

0:54:270:54:30

Where's Nigel gone?

0:54:300:54:32

I think he's gone to wave our Union Jack

0:54:320:54:34

that we bought with our biscuit tins.

0:54:340:54:36

I think he's probably gone for a wee.

0:54:360:54:39

-Oh, here he is.

-I've rearranged it.

-You've rearranged it. Terrific.

0:54:390:54:42

-It's all about display.

-People were quite disinterested around it.

0:54:420:54:46

-Were they?

-Then I said, "Look." And they went, "Huh?"

0:54:460:54:51

I knew Nigel when he could go a whole afternoon

0:54:510:54:54

without going to the lavatory, and now it's all changed.

0:54:540:54:59

I was rearranging my tins!

0:54:590:55:00

-How many, sir?

-55.

-55.

0:55:000:55:03

-MARGIE:

-55! Nigel, well done!

0:55:030:55:06

-60 then? 55 bid.

-55?!

0:55:060:55:08

60 anywhere? No fivers here, eh? At 55 I'm bid.

0:55:080:55:12

Anywhere at 60, ladies and gents?

0:55:120:55:14

-Last time then at 55...

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:55:140:55:19

Well done!

0:55:190:55:20

Whatever he did, it seems to have worked.

0:55:200:55:23

Come on, Nigel, you go off back there somewhere

0:55:230:55:27

and then you come back and then somebody shouts, "55".

0:55:270:55:31

-You know, come on...

-I was...

-No.

0:55:310:55:33

Ventriloquism has always been something you wanted to do.

0:55:330:55:38

How about horror movies?

0:55:380:55:40

Presenting their screamer grotto chairs,

0:55:400:55:43

if they avoid a scary loss, they could well pip their rivals.

0:55:430:55:46

Had you ever seen one of those chairs then before?

0:55:460:55:49

-Yes.

-You have?

-At Chatsworth House.

-Chatsworth.

-Oh, right.

0:55:490:55:53

I'm surprised you didn't get that in the catalogue.

0:55:530:55:56

80 to start. Interesting.

0:55:560:55:58

60 then.

0:55:580:55:59

40? Start me off at £40.

0:56:010:56:03

£40 on these? 30?

0:56:030:56:06

-JAMES:

-Oh, come on, guys.

0:56:060:56:08

-20?

-MARGIE:

-Oh, no!

-JAMES:

-It's descending.

0:56:080:56:10

20 at the back. Thank you, sir. Here we go. 20 bid.

0:56:100:56:13

Is there 25 anywhere? 25, sir?

0:56:130:56:16

-JAMES:

-Shout "Chatsworth" suddenly.

-30, sir?

0:56:160:56:19

-5?

-This is better. You've got a bidding war.

-God!

0:56:190:56:23

-30 on the right now.

-NIGEL:

-I don't believe it!

0:56:230:56:25

-What you're getting for 30 quid!

-Are we all done at 30?

0:56:250:56:28

All done now? Nothing on the internet, no?

0:56:280:56:30

-No? Thank you, sir.

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:56:300:56:32

That's bound to encourage the others.

0:56:320:56:34

I don't know what to say about that except I'm deeply disappointed.

0:56:340:56:37

Deeply wounded.

0:56:370:56:39

Finally, that cabinet, which somehow survived James's attention.

0:56:390:56:44

There are people with a lot of taste here.

0:56:440:56:46

-It'll add enormous tone to any home.

-Mmm.

0:56:460:56:50

Right, 70 now.

0:56:500:56:51

-JAMES:

-70.

-I may even bid something.

0:56:510:56:54

-JAMES:

-Go on, just throw that voice.

-Get them going.

0:56:540:56:56

-Throw it, Nigel.

-NIGEL:

-What?!

0:56:560:56:58

40? 30 then? £30? Got to be worth 30, surely.

0:56:580:57:02

Nice little bookcase. 30 bid.

0:57:020:57:04

-MARGIE:

-There you go. You've started.

0:57:040:57:07

30 I'm bid. 35 now?

0:57:070:57:09

-40?

-Yes!

-35 on this.

-40?

0:57:090:57:12

40. Thank you, sir.

0:57:120:57:14

-40!

-40!

-All done then at 40.

0:57:140:57:17

-All done now.

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:57:170:57:19

Clearly, we've not smashed any records today

0:57:190:57:22

but it's certainly a close thing.

0:57:220:57:24

-I was never very good at maths at school.

-No, you weren't.

0:57:240:57:27

-However, I think...

-I mean, I'm not great.

0:57:270:57:30

I can work out 10% of anything

0:57:300:57:32

but otherwise I'm not that brilliant.

0:57:320:57:35

But I have a feeling that we might have just clinched it.

0:57:350:57:38

-I thought you charged 12.5.

-That was a special rate.

0:57:380:57:42

Nigel and Margie started out with £400 and after auction costs,

0:57:420:57:46

made a loss of £114.

0:57:460:57:49

So, they finished up with £286.

0:57:490:57:53

While Michael and James, who also began with £400,

0:57:550:57:58

made a slightly smaller loss, after costs, of £92.

0:57:580:58:01

So, with £308 left, they are today's top team.

0:58:010:58:05

-JAMES:

-We were cautious.

-I'm so, so sorry. Margie, darling...

0:58:070:58:11

THEY LAUGH

0:58:110:58:13

If only you'd been on MY team,

0:58:130:58:15

it would all have been so different for you.

0:58:150:58:17

-Oh, go on!

-Hogging the camera?

-Go on.

-Never!

0:58:170:58:20

-Bye-bye, James.

-Lovely time.

0:58:200:58:24

Now, what was Nigel saying about playing the cad?

0:58:240:58:27

-I'm keeping this car.

-Oh.

-I just think it's rather me.

0:58:270:58:30

-I think it suits you, son.

-Do you?

-Yes, I do.

0:58:300:58:33

Actor and charmer Nigel Havers and his canny, deal-making chum (and ex-agent) Michael Whitehall explore the West Country. Travelling by Bentley and TVR, they have £400 each and expert advice from Margie Cooper and James Braxton.

But what will do best at the auction - Nigel's old cockle bucket or Michael's tambourine?

And there is a trip to see some Bristol Savages and bit of Georgian elegance with the story of The King of Bath.