Rick Wakeman and Ian Lavender Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Rick Wakeman and Ian Lavender

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. Prog rocker Rick Wakeman and best mate Ian Lavender enjoy a jolly B-road ride around Norfolk.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Rick Wakeman and Ian Lavender. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

-The nation's favourite celebrities...

-Oh, I like that.

0:00:020:00:04

-..paired up with an expert...

-Oh, we've had some fun, haven't we?

0:00:040:00:07

-..and a classic car.

-It feels as if it could go quite fast.

0:00:070:00:11

Their mission - to scour Britain for antiques.

0:00:110:00:14

-Yes!

-Fantastic!

-I'll do that in slow-mo.

0:00:140:00:16

-The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

-Come on, boys!

0:00:160:00:20

-But it's no easy rise ride.

-Ta-da!

0:00:200:00:23

Who will find the hidden gem?

0:00:230:00:25

"Don't sell me!"

0:00:250:00:26

Who will take the biggest risks?

0:00:260:00:28

Go away, darling!

0:00:280:00:29

Will anybody follow expert advice?

0:00:290:00:32

I'm trying to spend money here.

0:00:320:00:34

-There will be worthy winners...

-Yes!

0:00:340:00:36

..and valiant losers.

0:00:360:00:37

Put your pedal to the metal, this is the Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

0:00:380:00:43

Yeah!

0:00:460:00:47

Today, we are road tripping through East Anglia with two

0:00:510:00:54

of Britain's best-loved stars from stage and screen.

0:00:540:00:58

It's none other

0:00:580:00:59

than old buddies Rick Wakeman and Ian Lavender.

0:00:590:01:02

-How long have we known each other?

-30, 30-plus years.

0:01:030:01:06

IAN MUMBLES

0:01:060:01:08

Their vehicle of choice is this 1957 Morris woody Traveller.

0:01:080:01:13

When was the first time you went in a car with me?

0:01:130:01:15

-First in a car?

-Can you remember?

-I try not to.

0:01:150:01:18

-I think it was in Spain.

-In Spain? Oh, my word!

0:01:180:01:23

We did a golf tournament.

0:01:230:01:25

I remember being sat to you whilst you've been trying to change...

0:01:250:01:27

put my knee into third gear.

0:01:270:01:29

THEY LAUGH Bit familiar, Rick. Ha!

0:01:290:01:33

Musician, songwriter and actor,

0:01:340:01:36

the exuberant Mr Wakeman is best known for being a member of

0:01:360:01:39

the 1970s band Yes and for his prog rock keyboard prowess.

0:01:390:01:45

Ian's already getting the jitters.

0:01:500:01:53

-You have the advantage of me in this.

-Yes.

0:01:530:01:57

-Cos you've got one of these.

-I've got one of these, yeah.

0:01:570:02:01

The great thing is that people are so polite to you in the car.

0:02:010:02:03

They let you out.

0:02:030:02:04

You can get in the wrong lane and everybody goes,

0:02:040:02:06

"Oh, it doesn't matter, go wherever you like."

0:02:060:02:08

-You know?

-Isn't that because they see you and go,

0:02:080:02:11

-"It's that old pensioner."

-RICK LAUGHS

0:02:110:02:14

Most loved for his role as Private Pike in Dad's Army,

0:02:150:02:19

that stupid boy was ready with his gun

0:02:190:02:22

in the late '60s, early '70s sitcom.

0:02:220:02:24

Ian's graced stage and screen since then

0:02:240:02:28

from comedies like Yes Minister to a role in popular soap EastEnders.

0:02:280:02:32

Helping the celebrities hunt for antiques are two experienced

0:02:350:02:38

road trippers - David Harper

0:02:380:02:40

and Raj Bisram,

0:02:400:02:42

who are battling through the elements in a 1954 Austin Somerset.

0:02:420:02:47

Well, David.

0:02:470:02:48

-Here we are in sunny Norfolk(!)

-DAVID LAUGHS

0:02:480:02:51

I was going to say, that's a bit overenthusiastic, isn't it?

0:02:510:02:54

-It's chucking it down!

-I know, I know, I know.

0:02:540:02:56

But I tell you what, I'm happy, Raj,

0:02:560:02:57

because I'm in a fantastic Somerset car.

0:02:570:03:01

I've never driven one of these before.

0:03:010:03:03

Well, it shouldn't be a Somerset car, shouldn't it be a Norfolk car?

0:03:030:03:06

Of course it should be a Norfolk car!

0:03:060:03:08

The Somerset was manufactured before seatbelts were mandatory,

0:03:080:03:11

which is why they're not wearing any. Got it?

0:03:110:03:14

Any thoughts on the celebrities, chaps?

0:03:140:03:17

-These two guys know each other, I think.

-They do, they do, they do.

0:03:170:03:19

They've got some history.

0:03:190:03:21

In fact, they're quite competitive, I think,

0:03:210:03:23

so we'll have to see how that goes.

0:03:230:03:25

We will indeed.

0:03:250:03:26

With £400 each to spend,

0:03:290:03:31

this road trip kicks off in the North Norfolk village of

0:03:310:03:34

Burnham Market before snaking through the county of Norfolk and

0:03:340:03:38

then a heading into Nottinghamshire for auction in Nottingham.

0:03:380:03:41

Time to decide the teams.

0:03:430:03:44

But a tardy Rick and Ian have left our experts waiting patiently

0:03:440:03:48

in the rain.

0:03:480:03:50

RAJ: I can see they're on their way. A bit late.

0:03:500:03:52

Oh, pour souls! Oh, Lordy!

0:03:520:03:56

It's a moggy, minor trouble. And Rick's driving. Of course he is!

0:03:560:03:59

Of course he is!

0:03:590:04:01

ALL: Good morning.

0:04:010:04:04

-Lovely to meet you, Dave.

-Great to meet you.

-Wonderful.

0:04:040:04:06

And I'm loving the outfit.

0:04:060:04:08

-Looking forward to this?

-Yes! With...trepidation.

0:04:080:04:12

We decided to put the two good-looking ones together,

0:04:120:04:15

-so I'm going with you.

-That's us two, then, Rick.

0:04:150:04:17

-That's us two, yeah.

-THEY LAUGH

0:04:170:04:19

You're the older couple.

0:04:190:04:21

They will be kissing on the backseat at this rate.

0:04:210:04:23

Raj and Ian plump for the Morris

0:04:230:04:26

whilst David and Rick are in the Austen.

0:04:260:04:29

And both our chaps are letting their dates drive. How modern.

0:04:290:04:33

Off they head, then. Time now to talk tactics.

0:04:330:04:36

I think I'm going to look for quirky.

0:04:360:04:40

Quirky is good!

0:04:400:04:42

I like something that they'll go, "Oh, what's that?"

0:04:420:04:44

If I can find some quirky stuff,

0:04:440:04:48

if it's in an auction room,

0:04:480:04:51

then it's going to stand out.

0:04:510:04:52

How about the other team?

0:04:520:04:54

The tactic is to win, OK? We've got £400.

0:04:540:04:58

My advice would be - let's go out and spend it.

0:04:580:05:02

That's the spirit, Raj. Quick off the mark,

0:05:020:05:05

David and local boy Rick are first to arrive in Hunstanton,

0:05:050:05:10

a Norfolk seaside town built on The Wash bay as

0:05:100:05:13

a resort during Victorian times.

0:05:130:05:15

Here we go, our first one.

0:05:150:05:17

Right. Come on.

0:05:170:05:19

They've come to spend at antiques centre Le Strange Old Barns.

0:05:220:05:26

Stand by.

0:05:260:05:28

-How are you?

-Hi, I'm Rick.

-Lydia.

0:05:280:05:31

-And?

-Pat.

-Pat!

0:05:310:05:33

-I thought you said Rick?

-No, I'm Rick.

0:05:330:05:35

-That's Lydia. You're?

-I'll be Pat.

0:05:350:05:38

-You be Rick.

-No, you be Rick.

-You can be David.

0:05:380:05:41

All right, we'll go that way. We've got no time.

0:05:410:05:43

I remember games like this when I was in the band.

0:05:430:05:45

Yeah, yeah, keep going. Thanks, Lydia.

0:05:450:05:47

Makes you realise while why Rick's band was simply called Yes!

0:05:470:05:51

Rick's bought from the shop in the past so knows his way around.

0:05:520:05:56

I can't see any antiques.

0:05:560:05:57

When you come through here, you'll start seeing some stuff.

0:05:570:06:00

-OK.

-This is the room, really.

-Oh! No, OK, OK.

0:06:000:06:03

What's the plan, then, chaps?

0:06:030:06:05

-I think we'd better cover it pretty quickly.

-Yeah,

0:06:050:06:07

before the other two come in.

0:06:070:06:09

No flies on this pair,

0:06:100:06:11

and something's already caught Rick's eye.

0:06:110:06:14

-Doulton.

-Yeah. I like Doulton. Do you?

0:06:140:06:16

-I do like Doulton, it's good quality.

-Yeah.

0:06:160:06:18

These guys were making pots and vases like that for family homes,

0:06:180:06:23

middle-class homes,

0:06:230:06:24

at the very same time as making sewage pipes for the Empire.

0:06:240:06:28

-Wow.

-It was a great moneymaking firm.

-I didn't know.

0:06:280:06:30

Oh, they were churning them out left, right and centre.

0:06:300:06:34

These 19th-century vases are a good find.

0:06:340:06:36

-I like those.

-You were drawn to them.

0:06:360:06:38

-Yeah, I was.

-I'm going to get a key.

0:06:380:06:40

Here comes Pat.

0:06:400:06:42

Or was it Lydia?

0:06:420:06:43

-Do you want to help yourself?

-Yeah, lovely. Shall we have one each?

0:06:450:06:48

-Careful!

-Here you go.

-All right, thank you very much.

0:06:480:06:52

What does a closer look reveal?

0:06:520:06:54

Well, there is no damage that I can see, not on this one.

0:06:550:06:57

OK, now, let's have a look at the date.

0:06:570:06:59

So, we've got Doulton Burslem. You can see that there is

0:06:590:07:02

no England stamped. That was introduced in 1891, 1892.

0:07:020:07:06

-Yeah.

-So they are pre-1892 for certain.

0:07:060:07:10

Ticketed at £38 per vase,

0:07:100:07:13

Rick's going to need all his charm to secure a discount. But hurry!

0:07:130:07:17

Ian and Raj have finally made it to Hunstanton.

0:07:170:07:20

-Well, my goodness.

-They are here before us.

-They are here before us.

0:07:200:07:23

-The swine!

-We've got some catching up to do.

0:07:230:07:26

-Let's go and... Let's go and dug some scullery here.

-Absolutely!

0:07:260:07:30

-They have the advantage of us.

-They certainly do.

0:07:310:07:34

My goodness, maybe I should let their air out on their tyres

0:07:340:07:37

so they can't get away too quick.

0:07:370:07:39

Look lively, then, Ian. This isn't the Home Guard now, you know.

0:07:390:07:44

Wait for me!

0:07:440:07:45

Come on, come on, here we go. Hello, hello, hello.

0:07:450:07:48

-Where are they?

-Where are they? Yeah.

0:07:480:07:50

Don't sell them anything yet!

0:07:500:07:52

Oh, hang on. Oh!

0:07:520:07:53

-Hello, hello, hello.

-I think this would look lovely...

0:07:530:07:56

That's a real antique.

0:07:560:07:57

..on somebody's mantelpi...

0:07:570:08:00

Oh, look! Look who's here.

0:08:000:08:02

-Found anything yet?

-No.

-No.

-No?

0:08:020:08:04

-No.

-Been here a long time?

-No.

-Not a thing.

-No, no.

0:08:040:08:08

We're just having a little browse, really.

0:08:080:08:11

Don't do any trade with them, please,

0:08:110:08:13

they are just not nice people.

0:08:130:08:15

-Carry on, then.

-Don't give them any discount.

0:08:150:08:17

No, none whatsoever.

0:08:170:08:19

All right, chaps, back to business.

0:08:190:08:21

Time to discuss a price on the vases.

0:08:210:08:24

Are they 38 for the pair?

0:08:240:08:26

-No, that is...

-Really?

-..38 each.

0:08:270:08:31

The vases belong to another dealer, so while Pat gets on the phone,

0:08:310:08:35

just round the corner, Ian and Raj have found some walking canes.

0:08:350:08:39

You know what we could do? We could buy both of them.

0:08:390:08:43

Why not?

0:08:430:08:44

What he's asking? He's asking...

0:08:440:08:47

What's that on there? What's he asking?

0:08:470:08:49

He's asking 50 on that and 38 on that, so 88.

0:08:490:08:52

Hm.

0:08:520:08:54

-Estimate for auction, they should be estimated £50 to £80.

-A pair?

0:08:540:09:00

For the two of them, yeah?

0:09:000:09:01

We could make top estimate.

0:09:010:09:03

So we really...

0:09:030:09:04

I know they've got 80 on the two...

0:09:040:09:06

-This is where my problem comes in.

-OK.

0:09:060:09:08

-I'd be perfectly happy to pay £80 for the pair.

-I can tell. OK.

0:09:080:09:11

-I've got to stick very close to you.

-Yes, right.

0:09:110:09:14

OK, because I already know there's going to be some competition

0:09:140:09:17

here. We should try to get these, if we can, between

0:09:170:09:22

£40 and £60.

0:09:220:09:25

But I'm more tending to go to the 45, OK?

0:09:250:09:30

One of the things, when buying, especially as a dealer,

0:09:300:09:34

is not to look too keen, I think, on something, you know...

0:09:340:09:38

Oh, dear!

0:09:380:09:39

This is where I learn how bad an actor I really am.

0:09:390:09:42

I hate them, hate them!

0:09:420:09:44

Meanwhile, Pat's been unable to speak to the owner,

0:09:440:09:46

but he's made an executive decision -

0:09:460:09:49

£50 for the pair of vases.

0:09:490:09:50

-Shall we just do it?

-Yeah. Please.

-Do it, shake his hand.

0:09:500:09:53

Thank you very much. Pat, you're a great gentleman.

0:09:530:09:55

Thank you very much. Thank you. And be careful with those.

0:09:550:09:58

-It's done.

-They're not maracas.

0:09:580:10:00

Certainly not at that price, huh!

0:10:000:10:02

-Do you want to just put them on there?

-Very gently.

0:10:020:10:06

-So I'm carrying the money, am I? What have we agreed?

-Ten.

0:10:060:10:09

-20, 30, 40, £50.

-£50?! Are you sure?

0:10:110:10:14

-Trust me.

-I am trusting you, Rick.

0:10:140:10:17

-Shall I take responsibility?

-I think it is probably safer. I drop things.

0:10:180:10:23

RICK LAUGHS

0:10:230:10:24

-Cheers, Pat.

-Good luck with them, David. Thank you.

0:10:240:10:27

Meanwhile, Raj and Ian have found the cabinets. What's this?

0:10:270:10:32

Oh, that, that...

0:10:350:10:37

-Oh, that's divine.

-That is lovely, isn't it? It is really lovely.

0:10:370:10:41

-A bit out of fashion, it's an ashtray.

-Yes.

0:10:410:10:43

I was just about to say exactly the same thing.

0:10:430:10:45

It's a shame it's an ashtray, which makes it not as saleable,

0:10:450:10:49

-but it's still... It's a piece of...

-BOTH: The Mouseman.

0:10:490:10:52

It's not ridiculously priced either.

0:10:520:10:55

With a ticket price of £68,

0:10:550:10:57

Mouseman - real name, Robert Thompson -

0:10:570:11:00

was a British maker of oak furniture in the early 20th century.

0:11:000:11:03

He featured a trademark carved mouse on his finished pieces

0:11:030:11:07

from about 1920.

0:11:070:11:09

OK, well, don't look too excited when we get Patrick.

0:11:090:11:11

-I quite like that.

-OK, let's put it back.

0:11:110:11:14

Yep. I'm not that wild about it, I just quite like it.

0:11:140:11:17

That's it! You're an actor, you're an actor. Perfect!

0:11:170:11:21

Getting a good deal may need an Oscar-winning performance,

0:11:220:11:26

though. Where is Patrick to talk money?

0:11:260:11:29

-Patrick.

-Raj.

0:11:290:11:31

Have you got a smile on your face?

0:11:310:11:33

Well, I think we are almost there.

0:11:330:11:35

I have been in touch with the dealers and the best I can

0:11:350:11:39

-offer will be 55 for the two sticks...

-Yeah.

0:11:390:11:44

..and 38 on the Mouseman ashtray.

0:11:440:11:47

That's £93.

0:11:490:11:51

What about £90 cash and we'll take them.

0:11:510:11:54

I don't think we can argue for £3.

0:11:540:11:57

-That is a pound for every dealer.

-Fantastic.

-£90.

-£90.

0:11:570:12:01

-We'll go for those.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

-Right.

0:12:010:12:04

Oh, I'm ready. This is my favourite part.

0:12:060:12:09

There are four of those and I think I have another...

0:12:090:12:11

Yes, I do. There, look.

0:12:130:12:16

-That's perfect.

-Voila.

-I don't even need to get change.

-You don't. £90.

0:12:160:12:21

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

0:12:210:12:23

-Thanks very much.

-Fantastic.

0:12:230:12:26

Bravo! A fine performance.

0:12:260:12:29

And their showbiz duties might not be over yet.

0:12:290:12:31

First shop's done. Ian, two fantastic items.

0:12:320:12:36

-Let's hope they make a bit of money.

-And if they don't, if they

0:12:360:12:39

don't, well, we'll just have to be a song and dance team together.

0:12:390:12:42

THEY LAUGH

0:12:420:12:44

We've got the sticks, baby, we got the sticks.

0:12:440:12:46

18 miles down the road,

0:12:500:12:51

Rick and David are flying this one solo in King's Lynn.

0:12:510:12:55

The word "lynn" means pool in and probably refers to a tidal pool

0:12:550:13:00

on the River Ouse.

0:13:000:13:01

Well, the old Somerset... The Somerset behaved herself well.

0:13:010:13:04

-Done all right, hasn't she?

-Yeah. Here we go.

0:13:040:13:07

Inside, awaits an eclectic mix of furniture and porcelain.

0:13:080:13:12

No "Lynn" for us today, but a dealer named Ruth. Hi, Ruth.

0:13:120:13:16

-I hope you have a good day.

-Well, thank you very much.

0:13:160:13:19

-Do you want to go one way, I'll go the other?

-That's a good idea.

-Yeah.

0:13:190:13:22

Shout me if you need any help.

0:13:220:13:23

Crikey! There is a lot on offer.

0:13:290:13:32

But Rick knows what he wants.

0:13:350:13:36

It's got to be big. I like big.

0:13:360:13:39

I do like big.

0:13:410:13:43

Ho, ho, ho!

0:13:440:13:45

-David?

-Yeah?

-You know I like big.

0:13:470:13:50

-You like big?

-Big. I found big.

0:13:500:13:54

-LAUGHS:

-How big?

0:13:540:13:55

Big.

0:13:550:13:57

Rick's not joking. It's a big Art Deco cabinet.

0:13:570:14:01

Oh, hello!

0:14:010:14:02

-Tell me why you love it.

-I just think that's gorgeous.

0:14:020:14:05

As a style icon, that is perfect

0:14:050:14:09

because it transports you back to

0:14:090:14:12

a period in time that you can date pretty much within 10 or 15 years.

0:14:120:14:17

1925 to 1939.

0:14:170:14:20

This Art Deco could charm at auction,

0:14:210:14:23

but it's a gamble nevertheless.

0:14:230:14:26

Will it have a big ticket price to match?

0:14:260:14:29

-Ruth.

-Yes.

-How much is the Deco cabinet in the hallway?

-Expensive.

0:14:290:14:33

-Oh.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:14:330:14:35

-It's expensive. Does that mean it's more than £80?

-Yes.

0:14:350:14:38

-It's more than £80.

-Yes. Yeah.

-How much more?

0:14:380:14:42

SHE WHISPERS, HE GASPS

0:14:420:14:44

So expensive she has to whisper it!

0:14:440:14:46

£260.

0:14:460:14:48

We'd never get that back.

0:14:480:14:50

-I don't think.

-Don't you think?

-No.

-No.

0:14:500:14:53

-Ruth, can it be sub-100?

-(No.)

0:14:530:14:56

-No?

-No, can't do that!

0:14:560:14:58

Ah. I sense a plan afoot.

0:14:580:15:00

-Right, we're warming her up.

-We're warming up,

0:15:000:15:03

cos Ruth looks like one of those really kind ladies...

0:15:030:15:05

DAVID LAUGHS

0:15:050:15:07

..you know, that cares about all musicians.

0:15:070:15:11

You are here to pick up antiques, Rick, not a wife.

0:15:110:15:14

Something else has caught Mr Wakeman's eye -

0:15:140:15:17

some substantial Japanese-style meat dishes.

0:15:170:15:20

-There is some weight to that.

-Exactly.

0:15:200:15:22

Let's bring it round into the light.

0:15:220:15:24

OK, so...

0:15:240:15:25

-The ribbing in that here.

-Yeah, yeah. Do you know what that is for?

0:15:250:15:28

-It's for meat, obviously, for the juices.

-Absolutely, absolutely.

0:15:280:15:33

Despite their Oriental pattern, the Fenton Stone Works was

0:15:330:15:36

based in Staffordshire, around the early part of the 19th century.

0:15:360:15:40

I'm looking for cracks and things on the back, and I cannot...

0:15:400:15:43

-I can't see any.

-Give them a bit of a whack.

0:15:430:15:45

If you hold each dish from the centre and whack one end...

0:15:450:15:50

TAPPING

0:15:500:15:52

Almost a tune.

0:15:540:15:56

I can see where your gold discs came from, Rick!

0:15:560:15:59

-I do like them.

-Now it is down to price.

-Oh!

0:15:590:16:04

Ticket price for the pair - £125. Stand by.

0:16:040:16:08

-Ruth.

-Yes?

0:16:080:16:10

Do you think I could possibly show you a few things and you could tell

0:16:100:16:13

me a bit about them and...?

0:16:130:16:15

Well, I can try. I'm not as knowledgeable as David.

0:16:150:16:19

Who's he(?) Is he arriving later?

0:16:190:16:22

-Those two dishes.

-Yeah.

0:16:220:16:24

-See, I would have to ring somebody up about those.

-OK.

0:16:240:16:27

-What's our offer?

-We'd be looking, I'd say,

0:16:270:16:31

60 to 70, top whack, really.

0:16:310:16:33

Time to get Zoe on the line.

0:16:330:16:36

Zoe. How are you?

0:16:360:16:40

As you probably know, we do like your Fenton.

0:16:400:16:44

We were hoping you might consider somewhere around about the 65 mark.

0:16:440:16:50

70? I'll tell you what, I'll take a punt at 70.

0:16:540:16:57

I think we've got a fair chance. You're an absolute darling.

0:16:570:17:01

Well done. Now, how about the £260 Art Deco cabinet?

0:17:040:17:08

-Ruth, I'm actually going down on my knees.

-Oh!

0:17:080:17:11

-Lordy!

-Have you got problems or something?

0:17:110:17:14

It's a bit worrying now, isn't it?

0:17:140:17:16

-I've only ever done that before to propose.

-Oh, right.

-Several times.

0:17:160:17:19

Thank you very much, David(!)

0:17:190:17:22

-Thanks so much for helping us out on those.

-Do I come down as well?

0:17:230:17:27

You are a reserve to come down.

0:17:270:17:30

-Do that.

-Excuse me just one second.

-Block your ears.

0:17:300:17:32

-When I go to the line, like that, "Is it possible?"

-OK.

0:17:320:17:35

-That's when you go down.

-Will you remind me to get up again?

0:17:350:17:38

-Just wink.

-Yeah, I will.

0:17:380:17:40

When I say, "Is it possible?" that's when you're down.

0:17:400:17:43

Thanks so much for helping us out on those plates,

0:17:440:17:47

they really are lovely. We do love that Art Deco cabinet.

0:17:470:17:52

I know that it's lots of money.

0:17:520:17:57

But we were hoping very much to ask you,

0:17:570:18:01

is it possible...

0:18:010:18:03

IS IT POSSIBLE...

0:18:030:18:05

SHE LAUGHS

0:18:060:18:08

Is it possible for you to come down a little bit on it

0:18:080:18:13

so that I can walk away a happy man with a smile on my face?

0:18:130:18:19

Would it be possible for something like 150?

0:18:190:18:23

160, I would do, on it.

0:18:230:18:25

A great offer, but Rick is not finished yet.

0:18:260:18:29

I suppose there's no chance, just to help us out,

0:18:290:18:34

to split between our 150 and 160 at 155? Would there?

0:18:340:18:39

-Yeah, I'll make fiver on it.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:18:410:18:44

Isn't she lovely? Isn't she lovely?

0:18:440:18:46

Aw.

0:18:460:18:48

Ruth, I shall come back here with my wife.

0:18:480:18:51

-Thank you, Ruth, thank you so much.

-OK. Thank you.

0:18:510:18:53

-You've been brilliant.

-I shall come back with my wife.

0:18:530:18:55

-Good.

-And I shall let her go loose.

0:18:550:18:57

You've been absolutely wonderful, thank you so much.

0:18:570:19:00

That brings the total spend to £275 so far.

0:19:000:19:05

Meanwhile, Ian and Raj have motored the Morris to just outside

0:19:070:19:11

King's Lynn to Houghton Hall to hear about one of the most

0:19:110:19:14

important battles of World War II.

0:19:140:19:18

This looks fascinating.

0:19:180:19:20

-And I was a soldier. You played a soldier.

-Well, sort of.

0:19:200:19:24

This could be quite exciting. Let's see what there is.

0:19:240:19:27

Their host is Lord David Cholmondeley.

0:19:290:19:32

-Hello there.

-Hello.

0:19:320:19:34

-Good to see you.

-Good to meet you too.

-How do you do, sir?

0:19:340:19:38

-Lovely to meet you.

-Good to meet you. Good to have you here.

0:19:380:19:41

Thank you!

0:19:410:19:42

My father would be thrilled cos he would never go out

0:19:420:19:46

when Dad's Army was on.

0:19:460:19:47

How lovely!

0:19:470:19:49

I wouldn't either.

0:19:490:19:50

In the summer of 1942,

0:19:520:19:53

the First Battle of El Alamein saw the Allied forces

0:19:530:19:57

hold firm against the German commander in Egypt,

0:19:570:20:00

Erwin Rommel.

0:20:000:20:01

It was vital to the Allies' success in World War II that they

0:20:010:20:05

held this position in the desert, and only one man

0:20:050:20:08

might topple Rommel - Field Marshal Montgomery.

0:20:080:20:12

Monty took command with an order which

0:20:120:20:14

has become one of the most famous in British military history.

0:20:140:20:18

"If we can't stay here alive, then let us stay here dead."

0:20:180:20:22

One of the officers serving Monty

0:20:220:20:25

at this time was Lord David's father, Lord Hugh Cholmondeley.

0:20:250:20:29

He'd always wanted to go into the Army, like his father.

0:20:300:20:34

He fought all through the North African campaign,

0:20:340:20:37

then up through Sicily and Italy, and then France,

0:20:370:20:43

through to Germany.

0:20:430:20:45

But it was at El Alamein that Lord Hugh's mettle

0:20:450:20:47

was put to the test.

0:20:470:20:49

At Houghton Hall, there are dioramas showing, in stunning detail,

0:20:490:20:52

some of these skirmishes in an unforgiving desert.

0:20:520:20:54

EXPLOSIONS

0:20:540:20:56

We've got a couple of scenes from in the desert,

0:20:560:20:59

and one of them my father used to say this is exactly as

0:20:590:21:03

he remembered it. And the figure with binoculars, he said,

0:21:030:21:08

"This is me looking out, seeing when Rommel's Africa Korps are

0:21:080:21:13

"coming over, in the distance, over the hills."

0:21:130:21:17

Erwin Rommel was the German commander in North Africa.

0:21:170:21:21

An incredible military strategist,

0:21:210:21:23

he was famous across the world as the Desert Fox.

0:21:230:21:26

But with Monty now at the helm in El Alamein, 14 days of major

0:21:260:21:30

fighting ended with Rommel's once invincible army in full retreat.

0:21:300:21:35

Monty's success depended on intelligence.

0:21:350:21:37

Lord Hugh and his small unit of men from the Royal Dragoons

0:21:370:21:41

were in the thick of things.

0:21:410:21:42

This scene here, Lord Cholmondeley, really depicts a scene that

0:21:430:21:47

your father would have actually been in when he won the Military Cross.

0:21:470:21:52

Absolutely. It's reconnaissance.

0:21:520:21:54

That's really what the armoured cars

0:21:540:21:56

were very much used for at that time.

0:21:560:21:59

He commanded a troop of three armoured cars for most of

0:21:590:22:02

that part of the war.

0:22:020:22:04

So here we have them on reconnaissance in the desert

0:22:040:22:08

somewhere, and you can just see in the distance, Rommel's tanks,

0:22:080:22:13

the Africa Korps tanks.

0:22:130:22:15

So they're cooking breakfast, my father and his team,

0:22:160:22:21

and of course they'd have to throw it all way.

0:22:210:22:23

That was the low point of the day, losing breakfast.

0:22:230:22:26

-Slinging the brew.

-THEY LAUGH

0:22:260:22:29

Lord Hugh was decorated with the Military Cross for gallantry

0:22:290:22:32

after the war ended for commanding his troop

0:22:320:22:35

under incredibly harsh conditions.

0:22:350:22:37

He was 23, 24.

0:22:380:22:41

Yes, it seems very young to be doing something like that.

0:22:410:22:45

There's no question, Lord Hugh was a capable officer who

0:22:450:22:49

understood how battles worked, an aptitude that may well have been

0:22:490:22:53

instilled in him from his childhood passion for model soldiers.

0:22:530:22:58

A keen collector as a boy, before the war,

0:22:580:23:00

he'd amassed several thousand,

0:23:000:23:02

which she would use to precisely recreate some of the greatest

0:23:020:23:06

struggles in British military history,

0:23:060:23:08

including the Battle of Waterloo,

0:23:080:23:10

Omdurman, and the Napoleonic era.

0:23:100:23:12

So, I guess when you were young, you would have seen all these

0:23:140:23:17

-soldiers on planning tables.

-They were.

0:23:170:23:20

They didn't have glass, so they needed dusting.

0:23:200:23:22

I was given the job often of dusting them after school.

0:23:220:23:26

I actually really enjoyed it, and that's how I sort of learned

0:23:260:23:29

about them, and I am still very fond of them.

0:23:290:23:31

The largest private collection of model soldiers in the world,

0:23:310:23:35

this incredible set is of international importance, boasting

0:23:350:23:39

20,000 little soldiers under the same roof, many incredibly rare.

0:23:390:23:43

And it's not just model collectors that are interested in gazing

0:23:430:23:47

through the glass at British victories. Oh, no.

0:23:470:23:50

This is the biggest diorama of Waterloo.

0:23:500:23:54

And I remember coming down when President Mitterrand of France

0:23:540:23:59

came here.

0:23:590:24:00

My father said, "Would you like to see my soldier collection?"

0:24:000:24:03

He said, "Oh, yes."

0:24:030:24:04

And of course, it's all British victories over the French.

0:24:040:24:08

Oh, dear!

0:24:080:24:10

At Waterloo especially.

0:24:100:24:12

So he came here, he said, "Not our finest hour."

0:24:120:24:15

It strikes me that this is something to be so proud of.

0:24:150:24:17

What's going to happen to the collection in the future?

0:24:170:24:21

Oh, well, I hope it will always be open to the public,

0:24:210:24:25

and people are very fascinated by it,

0:24:250:24:27

and it's a great memorial in memory of my father and his great hobby.

0:24:270:24:32

I don't know if you've seen Ian's collection of model soldiers?

0:24:320:24:36

-Oh, look.

-Look at that.

0:24:360:24:39

I recognise the scarf.

0:24:390:24:40

You recognise the scarf!

0:24:400:24:42

-I'm quite proud of it.

-It's lovely, isn't it?

-It's very good.

0:24:430:24:46

It's lovely. It's wonderful.

0:24:460:24:49

Private Pike.

0:24:490:24:50

And off they go. We'll expect military precision tomorrow, chaps.

0:24:500:24:55

It's been a delightful day antiquing, though,

0:24:550:24:57

but for now, nighty-night.

0:24:570:24:59

It's a new day and our celebrities are back in the Morris.

0:25:030:25:06

Here we go again, then.

0:25:060:25:08

-Another lovely day.

-Absolutely.

0:25:080:25:10

I've just got to hope it'll be as good as yesterday.

0:25:100:25:13

-We had...

-We had a scream.

0:25:130:25:14

I've learned an incredible amount.

0:25:140:25:16

I will tell you one thing, I'll be brutally honest,

0:25:160:25:19

either...

0:25:190:25:20

And I think David agrees with me.

0:25:200:25:24

I say I think he agrees with me, it was very, very hard

0:25:240:25:27

to understand him while he had his head in his hands.

0:25:270:25:30

But I actually think that I will either do incredibly well,

0:25:300:25:35

in which case it'll be very much down to David, or it could be

0:25:350:25:38

one of the spectacular losses

0:25:380:25:40

that's there's ever been on Celebrity Road Trip.

0:25:400:25:42

And what about David and Raj?

0:25:440:25:46

Oh, dear, what happened to military precision, eh?

0:25:480:25:51

-The clutch has gone.

-Oh, dear.

0:25:510:25:53

Yeah. It's done for.

0:25:530:25:55

Here come the cavalry.

0:25:550:25:57

Oh, look, it's broken down!

0:25:570:25:58

-It's yours.

-What do you mean? Oh, it's mine, innit?!

0:25:580:26:01

HE LAUGHS

0:26:010:26:02

That's not funny at all.

0:26:020:26:05

Oh, come on, that's not...

0:26:050:26:07

Oh, yeah, ha-ha-ha(!)

0:26:070:26:10

Oh, look at this.

0:26:110:26:13

-Come on, Rick.

-They've sabotaged our car.

0:26:130:26:16

I think we sabotaged it yesterday. I don't know what we've done.

0:26:160:26:21

-Who was driving it all day yesterday?

-It's broken!

0:26:210:26:24

-I'm sorry. Raj, you've done this?

-I have got nothing to do with this.

0:26:250:26:30

Come on, this is meant to be a road trip.

0:26:300:26:33

-Do you want the car?

-I want the car so badly it's unbelievable.

-I do.

0:26:330:26:37

No tricks.

0:26:370:26:38

At the end of the day, you two are, we know, you're car nuts.

0:26:380:26:41

-We're quite happy to be... To walk, aren't we?

-Seriously?

0:26:410:26:44

Yeah, well, we could call a cab.

0:26:440:26:46

Well, eventually, I'm sure we might call...

0:26:460:26:48

I think there's a trick, but I want to go.

0:26:480:26:50

I think there's a trick, but I'll go for it.

0:26:500:26:52

-So we have the car?

-We'll take it.

-We'll take it.

0:26:520:26:54

-The keys are in there.

-The keys are in there.

-Right.

0:26:540:26:57

Heavens! Glad we sorted that out.

0:26:570:26:59

He is my best mate,

0:26:590:27:01

but I wouldn't trust him as far as I could throw them.

0:27:010:27:03

-Something's very, very odd.

-CAR STALLS

0:27:030:27:06

-Oh, there's that, though.

-Nice one!

0:27:060:27:08

We didn't tell you about that.

0:27:080:27:10

Aha!

0:27:100:27:11

The trustee Morris Traveller, living up to its reputation as the

0:27:110:27:15

car that got Britain moving after the war.

0:27:150:27:17

-Do you want to get out of the car and rock it?

-Yeah, I'm trying to.

0:27:170:27:21

Where's the coffee?

0:27:210:27:22

Yeah, and I think we should go and have a coffee now.

0:27:220:27:24

Losers!

0:27:240:27:26

There they go. Hey!

0:27:260:27:29

David and Rick are headed to the

0:27:320:27:34

Norfolk market town of Wymondham

0:27:340:27:36

with £125 in their pocket.

0:27:360:27:39

I think there's something wrong with those two,

0:27:390:27:41

they don't like cars at all. I think there's... I think they need therapy

0:27:410:27:44

-of some sort.

-I know. Ian and I have so much in common being great mates,

0:27:440:27:47

-bosom buddies, but cars... He can take them or leave them.

-Yeah?

0:27:470:27:52

-And he's left this one.

-He's left this. Ha! We've got it.

0:27:520:27:55

Established about 35 years ago, this place has a mix of antiques,

0:27:570:28:00

collectibles and furniture.

0:28:000:28:03

-Hello.

-Hello there. I'm Rick.

-Nice to meet each you.

0:28:030:28:06

-I'm Donna.

-Hello, Donna.

0:28:060:28:07

Nice to meet you. Come in, welcome, have a look around.

0:28:070:28:10

-Brilliant.

-Upstairs and down. Do you want to start upstairs?

0:28:100:28:12

-Shall we go upstairs?

-Yeah, then we can fall down afterwards.

0:28:120:28:15

-Do you trust us, Donna?

-Yeah.

-Are you sure?

0:28:150:28:17

With no time to waste, they get straight to it.

0:28:170:28:20

-Shall we do a bit of tactics? I'll go in here.

-OK.

0:28:200:28:23

-And I'll do the next room.

-Yeah.

0:28:230:28:25

-OK.

-You go down there. Yeah.

0:28:250:28:26

Sounds like a plan.

0:28:260:28:28

Do try and keep focused, Rick.

0:28:310:28:33

That's better. Is all that glitters really gold? Time for some advice.

0:28:370:28:42

David.

0:28:420:28:44

-Here I am.

-Sir.

-OK.

0:28:440:28:47

What I would do with that is I would pitch the frame to a buyer as simply

0:28:470:28:52

a frame. You can put a picture in it.

0:28:520:28:54

-Yeah.

-You can put a better mirror in it.

-Yeah.

0:28:540:28:56

-And it is a lovely size.

-Yeah.

0:28:560:28:58

I'm surprised it's big enough for Rick. Ha!

0:28:580:29:01

While they ponder the gilt frame at £58,

0:29:010:29:03

let's see how the other two are doing.

0:29:030:29:05

Ian and Raj have given up on walking and are cabbing their way

0:29:060:29:11

to just outside Norwich city centre.

0:29:110:29:14

Mike, I have to say, this is a beautiful,

0:29:140:29:18

-beautiful city you live in.

-Thank you.

0:29:180:29:21

Tell me some interesting facts about Norwich.

0:29:210:29:24

Norwich, erm,

0:29:240:29:27

used to have a church for every week of the year and

0:29:270:29:30

-a pub for every day of the year.

-THEY LAUGH

0:29:300:29:34

Brilliant! Perfect!

0:29:340:29:37

Here we are, Ian. We are at the shop.

0:29:400:29:44

This place is a whopper,

0:29:440:29:46

with over 60 dealers spread over two floors.

0:29:460:29:49

-This goes everywhere!

-I told you it was big.

0:29:500:29:53

What's also of some size is this pair's wallet,

0:29:530:29:57

they've got £310 to play with.

0:29:570:30:00

-Look! Oh, those trains.

-That is lovely.

0:30:000:30:05

-Hornby train goods set number 20.

-Oh, I think that is gorgeous.

0:30:050:30:10

I had the Hornby train set when I was six.

0:30:100:30:14

Ian, there is so much more to look at, OK? We need to keep moving.

0:30:140:30:18

-I know.

-That's good.

0:30:180:30:19

That's good, that's something we can possibly look at.

0:30:190:30:22

You are slapping me on the wrist, aren't you?

0:30:220:30:24

No, I'm not slapping you on the wrist at all.

0:30:240:30:26

The Hornby engine and carriage have no ticket price,

0:30:260:30:29

but one to keep in mind. We'll leave Ian and Raj to browse.

0:30:290:30:34

11 miles down the road in Wymondham,

0:30:360:30:38

David is excited with another find.

0:30:380:30:40

Right, let me introduce you to something which I think is

0:30:410:30:45

very interesting.

0:30:450:30:47

-Pole screen.

-Pole screen, yeah. Do you know why they were designed?

0:30:470:30:51

-I've got no idea.

-This is designed for reading or working by the fire.

0:30:510:30:57

So let's say it's wintertime, you're sat in front of the fire,

0:30:570:30:59

you're a lady, you are crocheting, you're making a tapestry,

0:30:590:31:03

the heat of the fire is burning maybe the middle part of your body,

0:31:030:31:06

so you'll adjust the pole screen.

0:31:060:31:08

Maybe it's burning your face,

0:31:080:31:10

-you'll adjust it to remove the heat from your face.

-Oh, wow.

0:31:100:31:13

It's a very clever little contraption.

0:31:130:31:15

And then, in the summer months, when the fire is not in use,

0:31:150:31:18

it would simply sit in front of the fire as a lovely display piece,

0:31:180:31:23

and that's why you would have a lovely piece of artwork

0:31:230:31:27

-effectively in the panel there.

-Excellent.

0:31:270:31:30

So, with the ticket price of 85 for the pole screen and £58 on the

0:31:300:31:35

frame they spotted earlier, it's time to apply their charm.

0:31:350:31:39

Donna! Hello.

0:31:390:31:42

Walk this way. You're doing a good job.

0:31:420:31:45

Right, now, we have been told that you are the money lady of

0:31:470:31:50

this joint, OK?

0:31:500:31:52

Be prepared to be charmed.

0:31:520:31:55

-We are going to do our very best to charm you.

-Right.

-OK.

0:31:550:31:58

-We love the Victorian frame.

-Yeah, lovely.

-We really like that.

-OK.

0:31:580:32:03

-And we like the pole screen.

-Yeah.

0:32:030:32:06

We would like to be able to pick the pair of these up for

0:32:060:32:09

around about 70, 75 quid.

0:32:090:32:11

SHE SIGHS

0:32:110:32:13

Crikey. That is tough.

0:32:130:32:14

Um, the best I can do on the two together...

0:32:140:32:18

..is 85.

0:32:200:32:22

Oh!

0:32:220:32:24

-That is the absolute best.

-Well, I don't think...

0:32:240:32:27

I don't think the lovely Donna would be bluffing that that's best.

0:32:270:32:30

We can... We can just literally stretch to that

0:32:300:32:34

-with what we've got left.

-So, have we done a deal, then?

0:32:340:32:37

-Oh, I think so. Are you happy?

-Yeah.

0:32:370:32:38

-Are you happy, Donna?

-Yeah, I'm happy.

0:32:380:32:40

-We're all happy.

-Thank you very much.

0:32:400:32:41

-Thank you very much.

-Donna, bless you. Thanks very much.

-Thank you.

0:32:410:32:44

-Rick doesn't carry cash.

-No.

-I've been married too many times.

0:32:440:32:48

Donna, you're an angel. Thank you so much.

0:32:480:32:50

-Thank you very much. Thank you.

-Bless you, thanks.

0:32:500:32:52

Sorry for charming you so.

0:32:520:32:54

That is the gilt frame for £35 and the pole screen for £50.

0:32:540:32:58

-Well done, Rick.

-Thank you kindly, sir. A goodly day.

0:32:580:33:02

Well done, David and Rick. That is you all shopped up.

0:33:030:33:06

Back in Norwich, Raj and Ian have been working their way

0:33:090:33:12

-around the two floors of Lucy's Emporium.

-Oh!

0:33:120:33:17

Oh, stand lively, what has Ian spotted?

0:33:170:33:19

-Oh, Lorna Bailey.

-Do you like that?

-I do.

0:33:210:33:25

-That teapot, I think, is absolutely glorious, straightaway.

-I do too.

0:33:250:33:30

I think that Lorna Bailey is really collectible.

0:33:300:33:33

Lorna Bailey's ceramics were produced in limited editions in the

0:33:330:33:37

late '90s, early '00s.

0:33:370:33:39

Though not antique,

0:33:390:33:40

Lorna's been described as the new Clarice Cliff.

0:33:400:33:43

She's actually stopped working now,

0:33:430:33:46

so her pieces will go up in the future.

0:33:460:33:48

If I was going to choose one piece in here, Ian,

0:33:480:33:51

there is only one piece I would choose, and that's the truth,

0:33:510:33:53

and that is the teapot as well.

0:33:530:33:55

-We could put two of them together.

-A pair.

-Yeah, the pair of teapots.

0:33:550:33:59

Let's say, for the two... What's on the other one?

0:33:590:34:02

67, right. We've got 67, 73.

0:34:020:34:05

-Right, if you could...

-140.

0:34:050:34:09

-If you could get those two...

-100? 90?

0:34:090:34:12

-80?

-Come on, come on!

0:34:120:34:14

-70?!

-Yeah!

-What? Both of them for the price of one?

0:34:140:34:18

Good luck with that, then.

0:34:180:34:20

But before the big haggle, there's a chance to split up for one

0:34:200:34:24

last scout about.

0:34:240:34:26

Oh, oh, isn't he beautiful?

0:34:260:34:30

I know he's not old, I know he's not antique,

0:34:300:34:33

but I just love him.

0:34:330:34:35

I wonder what Raj will say.

0:34:350:34:37

I love him. I absolutely love him. Raj!

0:34:370:34:41

-Yeah.

-Where are you?

0:34:410:34:44

I'm over here. I'm over here.

0:34:440:34:46

I was calling you over here to see something else,

0:34:460:34:48

but I just want to see your face when you see this.

0:34:480:34:51

From here, I can see this clown's reduced.

0:34:510:34:54

£109.

0:34:540:34:56

-Raj.

-Oh, my goodness. Have you gone mad?

0:34:560:35:01

I love him! I love him! Gone mad?

0:35:010:35:04

-What's he made of?

-KNOCKING

0:35:060:35:08

-Fibreglass.

-Yeah, it's fibreglass, Ian.

0:35:080:35:11

-I tell you what, if we could get that...

-Yeah. For?

0:35:110:35:14

£40, £50,

0:35:150:35:18

-it would be... It would be a fun item.

-The least we can do...

0:35:180:35:22

-The least we can do after all that is give him a name.

-I think so too.

0:35:220:35:26

-How about...?

-I know what you're going to...

0:35:260:35:30

-Ricky!

-Ricky!

0:35:300:35:31

I can't see the resemblance myself.

0:35:310:35:34

OK, so, you're going to go downstairs with two clowns.

0:35:340:35:38

And I don't know what Mr Wakeman will make of this.

0:35:380:35:41

It's been a long day.

0:35:410:35:42

HE CHUCKLES

0:35:420:35:45

The man in charge of the deals today is Patrick.

0:35:450:35:48

First up, Ricky the clown.

0:35:480:35:50

It's going to have to be very, very cheap.

0:35:510:35:54

I mean, I can see it has been reduced and reduced and reduced.

0:35:540:35:56

-It's got to be a joke.

-Yeah, it's got to be a price that...

0:35:560:35:58

Yeah, I can ring somebody on that.

0:35:580:36:00

It actually belongs to one of my daughters.

0:36:000:36:02

Goody! She'll be on speed dial. This will be quick.

0:36:020:36:06

75 would be the death.

0:36:060:36:08

-Shall we think about it?

-Yep.

0:36:080:36:11

I don't think Ricky's sold. How about the Lorna Bailey teapots?

0:36:110:36:15

As a pair, what's the very best you can do on that?

0:36:150:36:17

Without ringing the dealer, I can only take 10%,

0:36:170:36:20

but I can ring her and get back to you on that one.

0:36:200:36:24

10%.

0:36:240:36:26

-OK.

-That would be lovely if you would.

-Back on the blower, Patrick.

0:36:260:36:30

-I've got Judy on the phone about the teapots at the moment.

-OK.

0:36:300:36:33

-She saying 130, the pair.

-That's just 10%.

0:36:330:36:38

Yeah, that's... No, that's way too high.

0:36:380:36:42

-Would you have a word with her?

-I certainly would.

-Yeah?

0:36:420:36:44

-I'll put you on the phone to him.

-Hello, Judy.

0:36:440:36:47

Hello, this is Raj here. I've got Ian as well with me.

0:36:480:36:52

We do like your teapots, but we'd offer you 80 for them.

0:36:520:36:56

'I can't go any lower, that's what I paid on them...'

0:36:560:37:00

How about we go to 85?

0:37:010:37:05

She's saying 90.

0:37:050:37:08

-90.

-90 it is.

0:37:080:37:10

Raj seals the deal. Next up, the Hornby train set.

0:37:100:37:14

Ian, your turn.

0:37:140:37:16

The next thing we do need to know is... Because there's no price on...

0:37:160:37:21

-No, it is mine, that.

-Oh, it's yours?

0:37:210:37:23

So you don't want to sell it, then?

0:37:230:37:24

Well, I will sell it at a price, but it's going to be about...

0:37:240:37:28

Very best, 150.

0:37:300:37:31

I'm not even going to look at you when I say this. How about 75 cash?

0:37:310:37:35

I can't do that. I would be losing on it.

0:37:350:37:38

-£80.

-£80.

0:37:380:37:40

-£80, we've got a deal.

-We've got a deal.

-Wow.

-Ricky, I'm sorry.

0:37:400:37:44

-We're going to leave Ricky.

-Yeah, leaving Ricky.

0:37:440:37:47

That's it, that's all right.

0:37:470:37:49

Brilliant. We got there.

0:37:490:37:50

-That's wonderful.

-There you go.

0:37:500:37:52

-Oh, Patrick, thank you. Thank you so much.

-Well done, Ian.

0:37:520:37:55

Well done indeed.

0:37:550:37:56

That's the Lorna Bailey teapots for £90 and the Hornby train set in

0:37:560:38:01

an original box for 80.

0:38:010:38:02

180. You'll need £10 change.

0:38:020:38:05

If you don't mind.

0:38:050:38:06

-Yes! Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much.

0:38:070:38:11

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Well done, chaps.

0:38:110:38:13

-Four down, one to go.

-Absolutely.

0:38:150:38:16

-I'm sorry we had to leave Ricky behind.

-Be careful with those!

0:38:160:38:20

Shopping complete, David and Rick

0:38:240:38:26

are headed to the fine city

0:38:260:38:28

of Norwich to uncover

0:38:280:38:29

some incredible history hidden in

0:38:290:38:31

the cathedral, and it seems

0:38:310:38:33

Rick's a familiar face around here.

0:38:330:38:35

-You know this place pretty well.

-I know this place very, very well.

0:38:350:38:38

I've done a couple of concerts here with choirs and opera singers.

0:38:380:38:41

It's beautiful.

0:38:410:38:43

David and Rick are here to uncover a hidden heritage that offers

0:38:430:38:47

a fascinating glimpse into Norwich's history. Worshipers left

0:38:470:38:51

their mark here, quite literally, 500 years ago.

0:38:510:38:55

Archaeologist Matthew Champion is part of

0:38:550:38:58

a team uncovering Norfork's medieval graffiti.

0:38:580:39:02

We've got everything from medieval ship graffiti, we've got prayers

0:39:020:39:06

on the walls, we've got witch marks, we've got text, faces, hands,

0:39:060:39:11

the lot, just about anything you can possibly think of.

0:39:110:39:14

Amongst all this graffiti, apparently,

0:39:140:39:16

you've got musical graffiti, which I never ever knew existed anywhere.

0:39:160:39:20

We do indeed. It is extremely rare.

0:39:200:39:23

Musical graffiti is one of the rarest types of graffiti you can

0:39:230:39:26

come cross anywhere in the country - there are only about five or six

0:39:260:39:30

really good inscriptions, and one of them is here in Norwich Cathedral.

0:39:300:39:33

-Shall we go and add some, Rick?

-That's a very good idea.

0:39:330:39:35

I'm sure Matt won't mind.

0:39:350:39:37

I'll do a heart with "I love David" in the middle of it,

0:39:370:39:40

that would be nice.

0:39:400:39:41

Ha-ha-ha!

0:39:410:39:43

The graffiti wasn't done under the cover of darkness

0:39:430:39:46

by 16th-century rebellious youths.

0:39:460:39:48

Oh, no, worshipers sanctioned

0:39:480:39:50

by the church left their mark to educate others.

0:39:500:39:54

There are over 5,000 graffiti markings in Norwich Cathedral,

0:39:540:39:58

all almost invisible to the naked eye.

0:39:580:40:02

Fortunately, Matthew knows where to look.

0:40:020:40:04

Most of the time you can walk past it and you just don't realise

0:40:040:40:08

-it's there.

-No, you wouldn't.

-No.

0:40:080:40:10

So what we do, quite simply, is we use one of these -

0:40:100:40:13

a very powerful light.

0:40:130:40:14

And what you do is you shine it obliquely right across the surface.

0:40:140:40:18

-Oh, my goodness me!

-Oh, heaven!

-It looks like a different wall.

0:40:180:40:22

Recent archaeological discoveries hope to shine new light on

0:40:220:40:25

the meanings and motivation behind Norfolk's medieval graffiti.

0:40:250:40:30

There are 650 medieval churches in the county with secretive

0:40:300:40:34

scrolling scratched onto the surfaces of most of them.

0:40:340:40:37

-So as...

-Oh, wow.

0:40:370:40:39

As I move that light around, you can see it completely changes.

0:40:390:40:43

-Oh, look, down on the bottom, there's...

-Date, 1650.

0:40:430:40:47

Lost for hundreds of years,

0:40:470:40:49

experts are only now starting to work out what they mean.

0:40:490:40:52

There's 17th-century graffiti in there.

0:40:520:40:54

There is 18th-century graffiti.

0:40:540:40:56

What I wanted to show you, Rick, is down here.

0:40:560:41:00

Oh, the music, yeah.

0:41:000:41:01

And what we've got here are two lines of musical notation,

0:41:010:41:06

and you'll note they're on a four-line stave

0:41:060:41:08

rather than a modern five-line stave.

0:41:080:41:10

And you can just see across here, you've got the notes

0:41:100:41:13

all the way across.

0:41:130:41:15

It's believed this music graffiti dates from around 1550 and is

0:41:150:41:19

likely to be a medieval chant.

0:41:190:41:21

You can understand why people would leave a mark - their name, you know,

0:41:210:41:25

a date - but why on earth

0:41:250:41:27

would somebody leave that as a mark here?

0:41:270:41:30

We're assuming that this is someone either trying to work out

0:41:300:41:33

a piece of music or they're teaching someone else a piece of music.

0:41:330:41:36

I've written music down on all sorts of things. When an idea comes

0:41:360:41:40

to you... I've done it on napkins,

0:41:400:41:42

I've done it on lavatory paper.

0:41:420:41:44

If I've got... And suddenly, "Oh!"

0:41:440:41:48

You'll likely rush it and you'll write it down and you won't do

0:41:480:41:51

a lot, but that is enough

0:41:510:41:52

for when you come to write and do it properly.

0:41:520:41:55

-It's almost a memoir.

-Absolutely.

0:41:550:41:57

Sounds plausible.

0:41:570:41:59

But can Rick make sense of it?

0:41:590:42:02

It's not difficult to know when notation goes up,

0:42:020:42:04

how much it goes up by and how much it comes down by.

0:42:040:42:07

You know what I'm going to ask you to do.

0:42:070:42:09

I haven't got anything here to play...

0:42:090:42:12

-Surely we can find an organ, can't we?

-I'm sure we could.

0:42:120:42:15

-Give it a go?

-Well, I can have a go.

-Let's hear it.

0:42:150:42:17

There'll be a lot of musical medieval experts who

0:42:170:42:19

-will go, "That's wrong!" But I don't care.

-Who cares! Come on.

0:42:190:42:23

The cathedral organ beckons.

0:42:250:42:27

If I had to try and translate it in Wakeman terms, shall we say,

0:42:270:42:33

if I wanted to see if I could get a choir to sing this,

0:42:330:42:36

they did lots of fifths and fourths,

0:42:360:42:38

they didn't have the modern sounding...

0:42:380:42:40

HE PLAYS A CHORD

0:42:400:42:42

..nice, bright thirds and things we have now, and triads,

0:42:420:42:45

so if you took the notes and went...

0:42:450:42:48

And then came down...

0:42:530:42:55

Although beautiful, medieval chants were very simple.

0:43:000:43:03

The graffiti in the cathedral and the churches is of enormous

0:43:050:43:10

academic and archaeological interest,

0:43:100:43:12

but what's more exciting is the physical connection to the past.

0:43:120:43:15

Music played an important part in medieval worship.

0:43:170:43:20

It's no coincidence that many choir schools can still be found in

0:43:200:43:24

major cathedrals where musical graffiti is being uncovered today.

0:43:240:43:28

-ORGAN PLAYS

-He's not bad, is he?

-He's all right.

0:43:280:43:31

Still in Norwich, it's time to visit Aladdin's Cave Antiques Centre,

0:43:370:43:41

with 16,000 square feet of collectibles.

0:43:410:43:44

No magic genie here, though, just Raj and Ian.

0:43:440:43:47

OK. Shall we put them down here?

0:43:470:43:48

-Yeah, stick them down here, shall we?

-Somebody might buy them.

0:43:480:43:51

Sales don't count unless they are at auction, Ian.

0:43:510:43:54

They're mine, they're mine! OK.

0:43:540:43:57

Better get browsing.

0:43:570:43:58

So much to look at.

0:44:030:44:04

How about a cabinet full of Oriental goodies?

0:44:050:44:07

Chinese at the moment is doing really well.

0:44:090:44:12

-That Chinese carved figure's quite nice.

-I think I know him.

0:44:120:44:16

Will he give you a good profit, though, Ian?

0:44:160:44:19

But what else is there here?

0:44:190:44:21

Look to your left.

0:44:210:44:22

-Oh, yes.

-What were we doing yesterday?

-Yes.

0:44:230:44:26

-The miniature... The model soldiers, I should say.

-Wow.

0:44:260:44:29

Yeah, look at those. The work that has gone into those.

0:44:290:44:31

Bonsai village people.

0:44:310:44:34

They need some prices, so it's time meet the owner, Graham.

0:44:340:44:37

Hi, Graham.

0:44:370:44:38

-Nice to meet you. How are you doing?

-Nice to meet you.

0:44:380:44:41

There's a few pieces I wouldn't mind...

0:44:410:44:42

Do you mind, if we can get them out and put them on the counter here?

0:44:420:44:45

-We can have a look.

-The lighting is a bit better here and I can have

0:44:450:44:48

-a really good look. Is that OK?

-Mm-hm, no problem.

-Brilliant.

0:44:480:44:50

Raj and Ian have their eyes on the model bonsai village people,

0:44:500:44:54

a handsome blue vase,

0:44:540:44:56

Ian's wooden friend and a lovely Chinese 19th-century Canton bowl.

0:44:560:45:01

Graham, we've got four items out here.

0:45:010:45:03

Can you could just give me the prices, first of all,

0:45:030:45:05

-so we can either rule them out or rule them in?

-OK.

0:45:050:45:08

-19th century.

-Yeah.

-Late 19th century.

-Yeah, yeah.

-Chinese.

-Yeah.

0:45:090:45:13

150.

0:45:130:45:15

-OK.

-Japanese, circa 1880.

0:45:150:45:19

Carved boxwood. 180.

0:45:190:45:23

-My favourite piece.

-Canton, family of royals.

-It's amazing.

0:45:240:45:28

1860. 1880.

0:45:280:45:31

That's going to be 250.

0:45:330:45:34

And the price on the village people?

0:45:340:45:36

It's 120 the set.

0:45:360:45:38

Decisions, decisions.

0:45:390:45:41

They've got £104 left.

0:45:410:45:43

I think we're going to have to eliminate that.

0:45:430:45:45

We just don't have the money for that and I don't want to,

0:45:450:45:47

you know, make such a low offer.

0:45:470:45:49

I love it.

0:45:490:45:50

How about the Japanese bloke?

0:45:500:45:53

The damage doesn't matter so much.

0:45:530:45:56

On carvings, it's not... I mean, this isn't quite so serious.

0:45:560:45:59

Ticketed at 180, Graham, what's your best?

0:45:590:46:03

100.

0:46:030:46:04

THEY GASP Time to make a decision.

0:46:040:46:07

-Shall we close our eyes and point at the one we want?

-OK, let's do it.

0:46:070:46:10

OK, on the count of three. One, two, three.

0:46:100:46:13

OK!

0:46:150:46:17

Professional as ever. But is there any wiggle room on the 100?

0:46:170:46:22

-Could we say 70, cash?

-You're getting close now.

-70 cash?

-75.

0:46:220:46:27

75 cash? I'm going to get Ian to shake your hand.

0:46:270:46:30

Wow. Thank you.

0:46:300:46:32

-Lovely.

-Thank you very much indeed, lovely. Gorgeous.

0:46:320:46:35

-We've got enough left.

-He carries the money.

0:46:350:46:39

Oh, he's letting me look at the money this time.

0:46:390:46:41

-Yes.

-We're running out.

0:46:410:46:44

Thank you so much. And we have change.

0:46:440:46:46

-And five is 80.

-Thank you.

-Graham, thank you ever so much.

-Thank you.

0:46:480:46:53

-Brilliant, we are very pleased with that. All the best to you.

-Bye now.

0:46:530:46:57

Good stuff, but a bag might help.

0:46:570:46:59

-Ian.

-Yes.

-Would you mind carrying those?

-All right.

0:46:590:47:01

-I've run out of hands.

-I shall drop these, not you.

0:47:010:47:04

# Hey, diddle-dee... #

0:47:060:47:08

Not a bad lot.

0:47:080:47:10

All shopped up, then, it's time to have a gander at one another's buys.

0:47:120:47:16

Truth be known, we thoroughly enjoyed ourselves.

0:47:160:47:19

-Well, I thoroughly enjoyed myself.

-I didn't, though.

0:47:190:47:22

It's been awful for me.

0:47:220:47:24

We went in for things that can either go incredibly well or

0:47:240:47:27

-incredibly badly.

-We have just gone for class, haven't we?

0:47:270:47:30

I think we have, to be honest.

0:47:300:47:32

Just amazing for a couple of people who don't have any.

0:47:320:47:34

THEY LAUGH

0:47:340:47:36

Time for the unveiling of Ian and Raj's goodies.

0:47:360:47:39

I have to tell you,

0:47:390:47:40

I'm not keen on this stuff, I never have been, but those I love.

0:47:400:47:44

I love the train set and the canes are fun.

0:47:440:47:46

Those two canes, which are silver-collared and silver-ended,

0:47:460:47:50

cost us £50.

0:47:500:47:52

I know that canes are very collectible. People do those.

0:47:520:47:54

The Lorna Bailey? The two teapots cost us 90, £90.

0:47:540:47:59

Overall, how much did you spend?

0:47:590:48:01

335.

0:48:010:48:03

-335. Oh, big spend, big spend.

-Three, two, one...

0:48:030:48:07

And now for David and Rick's.

0:48:070:48:08

RAJ: Mm! I like...

0:48:080:48:11

-I personally love the Ironstone.

-The Ironstone is gorgeous.

0:48:110:48:15

-Yeah, I like those.

-They are lovely. And they are a pair.

0:48:150:48:18

-Pair, yeah, absolutely.

-They are nice.

-Got a nice Victorian mirror.

0:48:180:48:21

-Love the frame.

-Nice Victorian mirror.

0:48:210:48:23

-Well, you're right...

-Original glass?

-No, no. Not at all.

0:48:230:48:26

No, the frame is. The frame is.

0:48:260:48:29

I think we've agreed that our favourite piece -

0:48:290:48:31

both of us absolutely adore this - our favourite item,

0:48:310:48:35

is the Art Deco walnut display cabinet.

0:48:350:48:38

Well, that is what is really in vogue at the moment. What did

0:48:380:48:40

-you pay for it?

-We paid the money.

0:48:400:48:42

-For that...

-How much did you pay?

-For that and the plates was 225.

0:48:420:48:48

-Yeah. So how much was your total spend?

-£370.

0:48:480:48:51

-Or thereabouts.

-That's not a bad array of items for £370.

0:48:510:48:56

For what it's worth, I would, at an auction,

0:48:560:48:58

-I'd bid on those all day. I love those.

-All right, guys...

0:48:580:49:02

-Talking of auction, we've got to get there. So shall we do it?

-Yep.

0:49:020:49:05

-Very best of luck, you guys.

-I think you have done brilliant, mate.

0:49:050:49:08

-Great.

-Fantastic.

0:49:080:49:10

-Well done, Raj.

-Fantastic.

0:49:100:49:11

Oh, terribly polite, but what do they really think?

0:49:110:49:15

If you had the opportunity to swap completely,

0:49:160:49:19

all of theirs for all of yours, what would you do?

0:49:190:49:23

-I would keep what we've got.

-Fantastic. So would I.

0:49:230:49:26

Like you, I think the one that could go silly is the Art Deco.

0:49:260:49:31

-Yeah.

-The cabinet.

-The display cabinet.

0:49:310:49:33

Shall we go and break a few of the...? The shelves?

0:49:330:49:35

Maybe we need to take the keys away with us when we go.

0:49:350:49:38

I love the little teapots, I think they're just absolutely gorgeous.

0:49:380:49:42

-Yeah, they are.

-I hope we both do well cos I think it is

0:49:420:49:44

-a lovely collection of stuff.

-It is.

0:49:440:49:46

There is no doubt about it, it's a great collection, and,

0:49:460:49:48

hey-ho, we'll see what happens.

0:49:480:49:50

Off to the auction in Nottingham,

0:49:530:49:54

and Ian and Rick's competitive streak is showing.

0:49:540:49:58

-I have actually brought something with me in case you win.

-Oh, no.

0:49:580:50:02

I have. Oh, there it is. I bought that.

0:50:020:50:06

-Do you know what that is?

-No.

0:50:060:50:08

It's my Christmas list,

0:50:080:50:09

and you're going to be crossed off it if you win.

0:50:090:50:12

No-one likes a bad loser.

0:50:120:50:13

We are at Mellors & Kirk Auctioneers this morning.

0:50:150:50:18

-Here they are.

-There they come.

0:50:180:50:20

Here they are.

0:50:200:50:21

-They look happy now.

-THEY LAUGH

0:50:210:50:24

How long for?

0:50:240:50:25

Go and get yours, I'll get mine.

0:50:250:50:27

-Good morning, chaps.

-How do you get out of this?

0:50:270:50:30

Let me... Shall I help, Ian?

0:50:300:50:32

He can't get out.

0:50:320:50:33

-Poor old soul.

-You two look happy at the moment.

0:50:330:50:36

Welcome.

0:50:360:50:38

Yeah, well, our confidence has waned on the journey. How are you, David?

0:50:380:50:43

Very well. Great to see you.

0:50:430:50:45

-I didn't have any confidence.

-Oh, well, thank you, Ian(!)

0:50:450:50:48

Ian and I have decided that if we make a loss, it's your fault.

0:50:480:50:52

-And if we make a profit?

-It's our fault.

0:50:530:50:56

-Excellent. Shall we go in?

-Yeah, brilliant.

-Oh, Lord.

0:50:560:50:59

Rick and David were our big spenders with £360 spent on five lots

0:51:020:51:07

while Raj and Ian parted with £335 also on five lots.

0:51:070:51:13

I wonder what gavel-basher Nigel Kirk makes of our

0:51:130:51:17

celebrities' little collections?

0:51:170:51:19

I would've said my favourite item was the Mouseman ashtray,

0:51:190:51:22

but anything to do with smoking is really not especially sought,

0:51:220:51:27

so I think although it is fine workmanship,

0:51:270:51:29

I would probably plump for the walnut china cabinet.

0:51:290:51:32

Take your seats, it's about to begin.

0:51:320:51:34

-Welcome.

-Thank you.

0:51:340:51:37

First up, Rick's Royal Doulton vases.

0:51:390:51:41

20. 20, I'm bid.

0:51:420:51:44

-And five. 30.

-Go on.

0:51:440:51:45

30, may I say? £25.

0:51:450:51:48

30. 35?

0:51:480:51:50

-On my left...

-Oh, no!

0:51:500:51:51

-..at £35. All done?

-Ouch!

0:51:510:51:55

But never mind, Rick, you've got four more lots still to come.

0:51:550:51:59

HE WHIMPERS

0:51:590:52:03

Give the man a tissue.

0:52:030:52:04

Next, Ian's two walking canes with silver collars.

0:52:060:52:09

£20. 25. 30?

0:52:090:52:11

Yeah, you've got it.

0:52:110:52:13

40. 40.

0:52:130:52:14

-45.

-Creeping up.

-50, madam.

0:52:140:52:17

£50. 60 for them.

0:52:170:52:19

-£50, the lady's bid. I shall sell at £50.

-No!

0:52:190:52:23

-RICK:

-More!

-Bad luck.

0:52:230:52:25

That's a loss apiece, but there is still plenty of time to make it up.

0:52:250:52:29

Could have been worse. It could have been a lot worse.

0:52:290:52:31

It could have been worse, Ian.

0:52:310:52:33

Don't worry, Ian. Don't worry!

0:52:330:52:35

It can only get better.

0:52:350:52:36

Onwards and upwards.

0:52:380:52:39

Hopefully, Rick's pair of Japanese style meat dishes will serve

0:52:390:52:43

up a good return.

0:52:430:52:44

£20, I'm bid. Five. 30. Five. 40. Five. Five.

0:52:440:52:48

50. 50? £50.

0:52:480:52:51

60. 70. 80. 90.

0:52:510:52:54

£90.

0:52:540:52:55

-RICK:

-Come on!

0:52:550:52:56

All done at £90 only. 100, I am bid.

0:52:560:52:58

An American bidder online. Selling at £100.

0:52:580:53:02

THEY CHEER

0:53:020:53:04

I can't believe it!

0:53:040:53:06

Believe it! That's the first profit of the day. Well done.

0:53:070:53:11

Checking the pulse here.

0:53:120:53:14

Next, Ian's Mouseman ashtray.

0:53:140:53:17

£40. Five.

0:53:170:53:18

50. 60. 70. 70? 70 now. 80?

0:53:180:53:21

Nope. £70 it is. I shall sell.

0:53:210:53:24

-Go on!

-All done. At £70.

0:53:240:53:27

That's brilliant.

0:53:270:53:29

Yes, it was. Well done, Ian. Puts you and Raj firmly in the lead.

0:53:290:53:33

We are coming back to Nottingham!

0:53:340:53:36

-They were thinking of going home.

-I'm beginning to like Nottingham.

0:53:360:53:39

Yeah.

0:53:390:53:40

Next up, Rick's gilt frame.

0:53:400:53:44

30. 25. 25, I'm bid, thank you. At 25.

0:53:440:53:48

-£30. 35.

-Go on. Yes, yes, yes.

0:53:480:53:52

-45.

-Go on.

0:53:520:53:53

-50.

-Yes.

-At 45 now on my left. £45.

0:53:530:53:58

Well done, Rick.

0:53:580:54:00

Well done, another profit in the old bag.

0:54:000:54:03

-Lucky.

-We're catching you boys up.

0:54:030:54:06

You are indeed. Now, Ian's Hornby train set with its original box.

0:54:070:54:12

£30. Is bid at 30.

0:54:120:54:14

35 for it? £30, the bid. 35. £40 here.

0:54:140:54:19

45. 50.

0:54:190:54:21

60. 70.

0:54:210:54:23

80. Nope. £70.

0:54:230:54:26

Here with me at £70.

0:54:260:54:28

That's a shame. Nice item. Rotten luck.

0:54:300:54:34

THEY GROAN

0:54:340:54:36

-That looked like it was going so well.

-It was going so well.

0:54:360:54:40

Slight loss.

0:54:400:54:41

Next, Rick and David's gamble buy.

0:54:410:54:44

They splashed £155 on this Art Deco cabinet.

0:54:440:54:48

Rick loved it, but will the auction goers of Nottingham?

0:54:480:54:52

£50 for this piece. 50 bid, thank you. At 50. 60 for it?

0:54:520:54:55

-Come on.

-50 only bid. 60. 70. 80.

0:54:550:54:59

90. 100. 110. 120. 130.

0:54:590:55:05

140. 150.

0:55:050:55:07

160. 170.

0:55:070:55:09

180? 170. £170. Fair warning.

0:55:090:55:15

Profit! Well done. Another profit, albeit a small one. They all count.

0:55:160:55:20

Good, that's all right.

0:55:200:55:22

Next, Ian's two Lorna Bailey teapots.

0:55:220:55:25

Antiques of the future they may be, but will they sell today?

0:55:250:55:29

£40 for those.

0:55:290:55:31

40, I'm bid. Thank you. 40. 45 I'll take for them. £40, the bid.

0:55:310:55:36

Five in the room. At 45. 50, do I see? At £45, in the room.

0:55:360:55:41

Selling at £45.

0:55:410:55:43

Some lucky bidders got a bargain today.

0:55:440:55:48

Double oucher, that one.

0:55:480:55:49

No!

0:55:490:55:51

That I don't get. I don't get that. I don't get that.

0:55:510:55:55

Rick's pole screen is next. This could do well.

0:55:550:56:00

£40 for it, please. 40 or 30. 30, I'm bid.

0:56:000:56:03

AT 30. 35 anywhere? Go on, 35.

0:56:030:56:06

40? 40. 45? 45? 45.

0:56:060:56:10

50. 60. 70.

0:56:100:56:12

80. 90.

0:56:120:56:14

-At £90.

-Come on.

0:56:140:56:16

On my right at 90. Selling.

0:56:160:56:18

-100.

-Good!

-110.

-Doubled our money.

0:56:180:56:20

-£100 it is. All done.

-They say brown furniture is on its way back!

0:56:200:56:24

-Yes.

-Well done.

0:56:240:56:27

Well done indeed. Rick and David have doubled their money.

0:56:270:56:30

You've ended on a high.

0:56:300:56:32

Well done, David.

0:56:320:56:34

Next, our teams' last lot - Ian and Raj's Oriental figure.

0:56:360:56:41

-They need a handsome profit to snatch victory.

-£50 for this.

0:56:410:56:45

I have 50. 60 anywhere? At £50.

0:56:450:56:49

60 online. 70. 80. 90. 100. 110.

0:56:490:56:52

120. 130. 140. At 140.

0:56:520:56:57

150 for them? Are you finished?

0:56:570:57:00

Selling. £140.

0:57:000:57:02

Brilliant lot. I told you!

0:57:020:57:04

Great result, but is it enough?

0:57:040:57:07

It's pretty close.

0:57:070:57:08

-But you've got it.

-Look at these two.

0:57:080:57:11

Shall we go for a cup of tea while these two work it out?

0:57:110:57:13

-Come on. See you later, boys.

-15 plus 75 is 90.

0:57:130:57:16

Hey! I've got a calculator. I can save you the trouble.

0:57:160:57:19

Isn't it great? They have just left us!

0:57:210:57:23

They've just left us.

0:57:230:57:24

It was a great auction all round, but there can only be one winner.

0:57:240:57:28

Ian and Raj started out with £400 and made,

0:57:300:57:33

after saleroom fees are deducted,

0:57:330:57:35

a small loss of £27.50,

0:57:350:57:38

leaving them with £372.50.

0:57:380:57:41

While Rick and David started with the same amount,

0:57:430:57:45

after costs are considered, they made

0:57:450:57:47

a profit of £9 exactly,

0:57:470:57:50

so they are victorious today.

0:57:500:57:52

All profits go to Children In Need.

0:57:520:57:55

-Ian, can I just say one thing to you?

-What is it, my friend?

0:57:550:57:59

I won!

0:57:590:58:01

It was very close, Ian. Thank you guys for a fantastic trip.

0:58:020:58:05

-I've got to sit all the way home with him.

-I know. I know.

0:58:050:58:08

It's been an amazing trip.

0:58:080:58:10

Thanks ever so much, champ!

0:58:100:58:11

Well, goodbye. Goodbye. Enjoy the journey, Ian.

0:58:110:58:14

I'd like to say, it's been lovely. I'd like to.

0:58:140:58:17

-Rick!

-Yes? Well done, sir.

0:58:170:58:19

Now, listen, listen, Ian, if you want any sort of advice on your

0:58:190:58:24

shopping things from now on, just let me know and I'll help you out.

0:58:240:58:28

It's not a problem, mate. Excuse me, pay attention.

0:58:280:58:31

Tatty-bye, then!

0:58:310:58:33

Prog rocker Rick Wakeman and best mate Ian Lavender, loved as Pike from Dad's Army, enjoy a jolly B-road ride around Norfolk. In the company of experts Raj Bisram and David Harper, the two antique-hunting celebrities scour the county for treasure to take to auction in Nottingham.

Rick also uncovers some hidden medieval graffiti in Norwich Cathedral, while Ian detours to north Norfolk to see the world's largest collection of model soldiers.

But will a wise old Japanese man help Ian win at auction?