Zoe Ball and Ian Waite Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Zoe Ball and Ian Waite

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. Strictly Come Dancing's Zoe Ball and Ian Waite are quickstepping their way to an auction in Hampshire.


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Transcript


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The nation's favourite celebrities...

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-Ooh, I like that.

-..paired up with an expert...

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-Oh, we've had some fun, haven't we?

-..and a classic car.

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It feels as if it could go quite fast.

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Their mission - to scour Britain for antiques.

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-SQUEEZE-BOX HONKS

-Yes!

-Fantastic.

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I'll do that in slow-mo.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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-Come on, boys!

-But it's no easy ride.

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-Da-daa!

-Who will find a hidden gem?

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-"Don't sell me!"

-Who will take the biggest risks?

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Go away, darling!

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Will anybody follow expert advice?

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I'm trying to spend money, here.

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-There will be worthy winners...

-Yes!

-..and valiant losers.

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Put your pedal to the metal. This is the Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Today, we're gliding through the countryside

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with a graceful pair of Strictly pals.

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There is something about it,

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that nostalgic feeling of driving through the countryside

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in a lovely old vintage car, don't you think?

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I know. With a beautiful woman at your side.

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Sadly, she couldn't make it today, so you're stuck with me! Sorry.

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Yes, it's top dancer Ian Waite and broadcaster Zoe Ball.

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Right now, it's time for Blobby.

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Zoe burst onto our screens in the mid-'90s

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as an energetic and exciting new TV children's presenter

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on shows like SMart and Live & Kicking.

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Line one this morning, who's on line one?

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She was an icon of late '90s culture,

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and was unveiled as the first solo female host

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of the Radio 1 Breakfast Show in 1998,

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before going on to become one of television's most trusted presenters.

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In 2005, she took part in Strictly Come Dancing,

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where she wowed the judges...

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10!

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..and made a lifelong friend in dance partner Ian Waite.

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Do you think you and I will still be friends at the end of today?

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Um, I doubt it. Unless you let me win!

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Professional competitor Ian started dancing aged ten.

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He has had an illustrious career as a professional dancer,

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representing England at European and World Championships,

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before joining the Strictly Come Dancing team.

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He now shares the screen with his pal Zoe,

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bringing his own inimitable personality

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to a spin-off show, It Takes Two.

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-It's a bit like this.

-Oh, my Lord! Look at him go!

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Ha! But today's talk is strictly about antiques.

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What do you know about antiques, Ian Waite?

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Well, I know absolutely nothing.

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That's OK, then, because today's experts,

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auctioneer Paul Laidlaw and dealer Margie Cooper,

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seem keen for a bit of a turn.

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Do you ballroom dance?

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Actually, Scottish national champion, 1980...

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-You...?

-No. No.

-Doing what, the Gay Gordons?

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Yeah...!

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I know where you're going with this! How very dare you?!

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Fancy being thrown round a few antique shops by Ian?

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I'd smash a few pots!

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I think it's only natural that Zoe and I pair up,

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-given that we've got the same dad.

-Yep...

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-Why's that?

-Because, frankly,

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in the 1980s, Johnny Ball, Think Of A Number...

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He was amazing!

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Well, there may be some family rivalry there, Paul.

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I'm not saying the Balls are competitive,

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but whatever happens today, I have to beat my dad.

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He came on this, he was up against John Craven,

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he managed to lose £105.

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And he's the one who's good with maths!

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-Johnny, are you there?

-Yep, things didn't go too well for TV legend

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Johnny Ball on his Road Trip.

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-It was great fun.

-Smashing, Charlie.

-Thank you.

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I've never enjoyed wasting money so much.

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So, if I can beat my dad today, that would be a turnout.

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Ha! There's a lot riding on this one, then.

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Our celebrities and experts will have £400 per pair

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and will be sashaying around the country

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in a pre-seatbelt era 1965 Lotus Elan

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and a 1965 E-Type Jag.

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Very nice.

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Can I just say, Ian Waite, this is one of my dreams come true.

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It's one of my worst nightmares!

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E-Type Jag, how can that be a nightmare for you, though?

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-Look, it's beautiful!

-Well, my legs are up near my ears, darling.

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Time to get things moving, then.

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Here they are!

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I want the car. I don't care about this, I want the car!

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That's to be decided!

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Good morning!

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I'm never going in a car with him again!

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-Why, has he frightened you?

-No, I'm joking. He was amazing!

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I don't know how to get out!

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We can't get him out cos his knees are round his neck.

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-Here he goes.

-God!

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LAUGHTER

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Oh-ho!

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-Good morning.

-It wasn't so bad getting in!

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-Morning.

-Lovely to see you.

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-How are you?

-Yeah, really good.

-How are you?

-Good to see you.

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-You and me together?

-Yes!

-Come on!

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-MARGIE:

-It's us.

-Amazing.

-Promise you'll teach me how to dance.

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You're a good height for me to dance with.

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-I'll wear my heels.

-ZOE:

-I'm going to get jealous now.

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He's started already!

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Come on, we can do that, we can do that. Come on.

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So, which car are we having?

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-You've got to drive it.

-How do you decide who drives?

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-Can I do this?

-It's got to be you.

-Do you trust me with your life?

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-I'm getting in. Good luck, darlings.

-And you. Enjoy!

-Have fun, folks.

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With everyone squeezed into their vehicles,

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let's set off into the countryside.

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Our hopefuls start their journey in Dulverton in Somerset.

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They'll wind and twist through the countryside of the south-west,

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clocking up over 250 miles

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as they head through Devon and Dorset

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en route to an auction at Selborne in Hampshire.

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Now, time to get acquainted.

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-Had you danced before?

-I think I did a bit of ballet when I was five,

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but I was a giant child, and there's one photograph of me doing ballet

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where there's a little line of all these pretty little ballerinas,

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and then this huge lump on the end.

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It didn't suit me, so I gave that up pretty quickly.

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Have you thought about doing Strictly yourself, Paul?

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Behave yourself!

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So, what are your tastes, then?

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Well, do you know what? I love Art Deco, and paintings as well.

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I mean, I sort of, you know, grew up painting a lot.

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-Did you?

-Yeah, so I'll definitely be looking at the paintings.

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Well, let's see what we can do, then, Ian.

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Amongst Exmoor's woods, valleys and wild moorland

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lies the village of Dulverton,

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and the first shopping stop of this trip.

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Acorn Antiques.

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-Hi. You're...?

-Peter.

-Peter. This is Ian.

-Hi, Peter.

-I'm Margie.

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And I'm Tim.

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This antique shop has been around for nearly 30 years,

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and the offerings look a little on the classy side to me.

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-What's that?

-The old pawnbroker's sign, isn't it?

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-Oh, is it?

-That's what would be hanging outside pawnbrokers' shops.

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3,200. Yeah. I think we're a bit short for that.

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Yeah, I think we are.

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These dummy boards - really lovely, those, aren't they?

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-850. They're expensive, aren't they?

-Yeah.

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-BOTH:

-Brass bowl.

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£290.

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OK, it's out of our budget for now.

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Well, all we need is a bit more money in here.

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-Yeah.

-And then we'd be fine, wouldn't we?

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Never mind, Margie. I'm sure you'll find something.

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You know those little lazy Susans that whizz round?

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Ian does not look convinced.

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Quite sweet, isn't it? I'm assuming...

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-£45.

-£45.

-Yeah.

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I think it's quite...

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-What's the word?

-Yeah?

-You can use it a lot - what's that word?

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Yeah, useful!

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Blimey! Well, at least it's in your price range.

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Oblivious to their opponents' woes,

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Zoe and Paul are 30 minutes further north in Watchet,

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home to Smuggler's Cave.

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-Watch it!

-Hello, sir.

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-Hello.

-I'm Zoe.

-I'm Simon.

-Simon, nice to meet you.

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-Hi, Simon, I'm Paul.

-Who's this lovely chap?

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-This is Barney.

-Hello, Barney.

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Barney, I was just wondering if you could give me a few tips.

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When I stand next to an object, if it's good, if it's worth the money,

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if you could give two yaps, that would help.

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Hm.

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He doesn't look keen. You'll have to settle for a yap from Paul.

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-Shall we divide and conquer, Zoe?

-OK. Yes. OK, we're stronger.

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You do what you're doing. I'm going to recce over here.

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Come back to me. Good luck.

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Oh, do you know what? Backgammon - my favourite game.

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-BELL DINGS

-Dinner!

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What the dickens is that?

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Now, I wonder if that might be some kind of shaving mug,

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where you put your soap in and your brush and go...

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It's probably a gravy boat!

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No, you were right the first time.

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You're looking at me like I'm an absolute lunatic.

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Really?

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Oh, do you know what? I love an old tap.

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Yeah, so do I.

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See, normally when I go shopping, I'm very quick.

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I know what I want, go into a shop. I'm sort of known for my speed.

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So this is quite interesting,

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cos I'm having to take my time and really have a good old think.

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OK, we'll leave you to ponder

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and see how your competitors are getting on back in Dulverton.

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-Do you like that?

-Yeah. It's quite nice, isn't it?

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-It's just like a painted artist's...

-Board.

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-Hm.

-Yeah. If it had an attribution, it would be fine.

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£75.

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It's like a painting, isn't it, on the wall?

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Yeah. I mean, I do wonder...

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-You're a bit of an artist, aren't you?

-I AM a bit of an artist.

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-What do you paint?

-I like modern art, or abstract art.

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So, big pieces of just colourful...

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-Right.

-That's what I like in paintings, actually,

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-when you can see the texture of the paint.

-Right.

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-I love that.

-Yeah.

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Yeah, it is nice. It is nice.

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-But will it sell? That's the thing.

-Yeah, this is it. Ohh!

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-That's the billion-dollar question.

-Mm.

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Hey, it's £75 rather than 1 billion, but still,

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time to speak with Peter, perhaps.

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What sort of price would the palette be?

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-It could be 65.

-Mm.

-Could you do it for 60?

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Possibly?

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I'll come down to 60.

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MARGIE CHUCKLES

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-Well, it's up to you now.

-I'm happy to go for that as our first item.

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I think it's a nice item, and it's an unusual item.

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-Yes.

-Shake the man's hand.

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-£60.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

-Thanks.

-Well done, chaps.

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First item of the Road Trip bought.

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Let's take that.

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-I'd quite like it for my house, actually.

-Really?

-Yeah.

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Now, what have Zoe and Paul got their eye on?

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-What do you make of that?

-What is that?

-And what does it say to you?

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-That says to me, "Huh?"

-You know what I think it is?

-Yeah?

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I think it's a lightning conductor.

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Wow. I don't think I've ever seen anything like it in my life.

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-It's the second I've seen.

-Really?

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-The point...

-Yeah.

-..attracts the lightning strike,

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-channels it down a big copper rod, to earth.

-OK.

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The cage is counterintuitive to me. I don't understand the cage.

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-Because that cries out what's called a Faraday cage...

-Mm-hm.

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..which, if anything, would protect the spike from the electricity.

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But, hey, look, we're getting way too serious.

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-I know!

-There's someone out there for that.

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-There is someone out there for that.

-Not just me.

-I know.

-What do you think?

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Just the fact that you've got so excited about a lightning conductor

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and given me a miniature science lesson as well,

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so I feel that that, like you say, it's a great talking point.

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Something to think about. Anything else?

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-The last thing you want to take to auction...

-Mm-hm.

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..is someone else's manky old hairbrush, OK?

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I needn't explain that.

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-Gentleman's...

-Yeah.

-..hairbrushes - never seen a head, these.

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-But here's the biggie.

-Yeah.

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That's not nickel or chrome. That's sterling silver.

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-ZOE GASPS

-£28. Can you believe that?

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I think that's rather a smart gentleman's grooming set,

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very much good to go.

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Sounds like Paul's keen.

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Simon's got dealer Alan on the phone.

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-Hang on, I'll put her on.

-Good luck, Zoe!

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Hello, gorgeous Alan.

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Tell me about gentleman's hairbrushes.

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INDISTINCT REPLY

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£20-ish.

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Yeah, that sounds better than £28-ish.

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I thought you were going to say, "As it's you, I'll do it for 15."

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But, no, we're sticking with 20!

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£18.

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Alan, you're amazing. Thank you so much.

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And they're beautiful brushes.

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I'll hand you back to the boss. Thank you, darling.

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-Result!

-"I'm no good at negotiating"! What?!

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Well done, Zoe. A £10 discount on the brushes.

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The problem is, Alan has set a very high benchmark in niceness.

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Back to the lightning conductor!

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Oh, yeah, right, Paul. It had an original price of £55.

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-Come on, then, show me how this is done.

-30.

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This is like Federer and Murray.

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That is... That is a giveaway price for such an unusual item.

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25.

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Well...

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Just clipped the net, just clipped the net. It's in, it's in. It's good.

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28.

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-Still 25.

-Oh!

-Ohh!

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-Have another look.

-Let's have another look at that.

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You see, that's... That says, you know...

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20, at least, you know...

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I'd say possibly £26.

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-Oh, you've moved, you've moved.

-Hang on!

-26, sold!

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-26.

-£26.

-That was more than you were going to pay, Paul.

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Not sure you meant that, but that's the deal done.

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-That's not bad - two things, one shop.

-I know!

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Two things. I'm really excited about both of them.

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-This is good.

-Yes, this is good.

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Beg your indulgence...

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Oh, hang on a minute. I thought we were done in here.

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Well, either Paul's hidden something he found earlier,

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or he's about to do some magic.

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A pair of 19... I would say '60s cufflinks.

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Do you recognise the device, the badge?

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No.

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North Atlantic Treaty Organisation - Nato.

0:13:460:13:48

Ooh, Nato. Tell me more, then.

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-I'm just going to tell you they're a fiver.

-OK.

-Let me buy them.

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-OK.

-Are we buying them?

-Are you going to surprise me?

0:13:540:13:57

I am putting my trust in you.

0:13:570:13:59

Come on, Paul. What do you know?

0:13:590:14:01

EVIL LAUGHTER

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-The evil laughter!

-These are quite good.

-Are they really?

0:14:030:14:07

-That there says "Ole Bent Petersen".

-Ohhh!

0:14:070:14:13

Oh, good find, Paul.

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Ole Bent Petersen, a well-regarded silversmith,

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worked alongside the greatest names in Danish jewellery,

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and, if you didn't know, this kind of thing floats Paul's boat.

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-Seriously?!

-Look how excited you are.

-These are fantastic!

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There's virtually steam coming off the top of your head.

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-These are awesome.

-Are they really?

-Laidlaw strikes again.

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-I'm not haggling, OK?

-Yeah.

-Fiver.

-They're yours.

0:14:350:14:38

-Fantastic. Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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That's £49 spent, three items bought,

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and one very happy expert.

0:14:440:14:46

That was magic. What a start!

0:14:480:14:50

I know, what a great start. It was only the first shop.

0:14:500:14:52

Several miles away from all the cufflink-induced excitement...

0:14:530:14:57

When you were a little boy did you say, "I want to learn to dance,"

0:14:570:15:00

or did your parents say...?

0:15:000:15:01

No, do you know what? I was ten years old

0:15:010:15:04

and my parents got divorced.

0:15:040:15:05

It's a great story!

0:15:050:15:07

And my father was told there were lots of single women

0:15:070:15:10

at the dancing school.

0:15:100:15:11

So he went along and loved it so much he thought,

0:15:120:15:15

"Oh, well, why don't you go, Ian, and your brother?"

0:15:150:15:18

-What a story.

-Actually, my dad married my dance teacher, yeah.

0:15:180:15:21

So she encouraged you?

0:15:210:15:23

-Yeah.

-So the whole thing worked really well.

0:15:230:15:25

It was cheap lessons after that!

0:15:250:15:27

Margie and Ian have travelled 14 miles down the road to Tiverton.

0:15:270:15:31

They're here to discover just how these gentle waterways and horses

0:15:310:15:35

combined to play a crucial role in developing Britain as an industrial powerhouse.

0:15:350:15:40

We're here, darling. We are.

0:15:400:15:42

Barge owner Phil Brind is here to tell them all about it.

0:15:420:15:46

-What a beautiful day.

-It is. Isn't it great?

-Lovely to see you.

0:15:460:15:49

And here's the barge.

0:15:490:15:51

Indeed, this is the last horse-drawn barge in the south-west of England.

0:15:510:15:55

-Right.

-They're very, very rare now.

0:15:550:15:57

And there is your horse.

0:15:570:15:59

-Ah, he looks stunning.

-His name is Ross. Would you like to meet him?

0:15:590:16:03

We'd love to.

0:16:030:16:04

Horse-drawn barges were Britain's answer to a problem caused by the

0:16:060:16:09

first flourishes of the Industrial Revolution.

0:16:090:16:13

The latter part of the 18th century was bristling with commercial

0:16:130:16:17

endeavour, as cottage industry moved towards large-scale manufacture.

0:16:170:16:21

To help meet this demand for these new industries,

0:16:210:16:24

a familiar source of power needed to be harnessed in a new way.

0:16:240:16:27

The horses actually played a massive part in the beginning of our

0:16:270:16:32

Industrial Revolution, because long before steam or diesel was ever even

0:16:320:16:36

invented, horses had the job of pulling our loads

0:16:360:16:39

around Great Britain.

0:16:390:16:41

-Yeah.

-Whilst they pulled small loads along on wheels on land,

0:16:410:16:46

canals were built, and with canals, you could actually pull 30-40 tonnes

0:16:460:16:51

of weight along and you only needed one horse to do it.

0:16:510:16:54

-Good gracious.

-I suppose once they've got it moving,

0:16:540:16:57

it's actually not as difficult.

0:16:570:16:59

That is absolutely correct.

0:16:590:17:01

There is actually about a 40:1 ratio approximately, land to water,

0:17:010:17:06

which means to say that one tonne on land

0:17:060:17:09

is equal to pulling 40 tonnes on water.

0:17:090:17:13

Horsepower was certainly more efficient at pulling cargo on water,

0:17:130:17:17

but few waterways went where the commerce needed them to go.

0:17:170:17:21

Mines near Worsley used pack horses to carry coal the eight miles

0:17:210:17:26

over land to industrial Manchester, a slow and inefficient process.

0:17:260:17:30

That was until 1761, when England's first canal opened.

0:17:300:17:35

Horse-drawn barges working the new Bridgewater Canal meant the price of

0:17:350:17:40

coal halved overnight.

0:17:400:17:41

This success sparked the fever of canal building that resulted in over

0:17:410:17:45

4,500 miles of inland waterways being constructed.

0:17:450:17:50

In a time before engines,

0:17:500:17:52

horse-pulled barges became a familiar sight across the country.

0:17:520:17:57

Horses that actually pulled barges along are pulling at an angle,

0:17:570:18:01

because, of course, they're on the towpath and that rope goes on a

0:18:010:18:05

slight angle out to the middle of the canal,

0:18:050:18:07

and is pulling the barge along.

0:18:070:18:09

So, the horse has got to be used to this angle.

0:18:090:18:12

The term "towpath", does it actually come from towing a barge?

0:18:120:18:17

I'm glad you brought that up,

0:18:170:18:18

because most people actually believe that the towpath is T-O-E,

0:18:180:18:23

but, of course, on canals in Great Britain it's T-O-W,

0:18:230:18:28

because, of course, the phrase comes from "towing path", and that's what we

0:18:280:18:32

-have on all our canals in Great Britain.

-So it does come from that?

0:18:320:18:34

It does indeed.

0:18:340:18:36

In the 19th century it was generally donkeys or small breed horses that

0:18:360:18:40

pulled their way along the towpaths,

0:18:400:18:43

with larger breeds being left to work on farms.

0:18:430:18:46

Here, on this branch of the Great Western Canal,

0:18:460:18:49

each horse pulled up to 30 tonnes of lime and coal in each trip to the

0:18:490:18:54

lime kilns near Tiverton.

0:18:540:18:56

-What do you think?

-I think it's absolutely unbelievable.

0:18:560:18:59

-It's so peaceful, as well.

-It's gorgeous, isn't it?

0:18:590:19:02

We're controlling now. We're in charge.

0:19:020:19:04

You're controlling it, yes, you're controlling it.

0:19:040:19:06

That's a bit scary.

0:19:060:19:08

Canals had become the arteries of the Industrial Revolution,

0:19:080:19:12

allowing quick and economic transport of goods.

0:19:120:19:15

But as new technology developed, their days were numbered.

0:19:150:19:19

Phil, what brought on the demise of the horse-drawn barge in the end?

0:19:190:19:24

Well, first of all it was steam.

0:19:240:19:26

So they started building railways and they started to take the loads

0:19:260:19:30

that the canals took.

0:19:300:19:31

That really was the start of the end of the canals.

0:19:310:19:35

But really it wasn't until the diesel engine came along that the

0:19:350:19:39

canals really took a dive.

0:19:390:19:41

We started taking a lot more by road and, of course,

0:19:410:19:44

by diesel boats as well.

0:19:440:19:46

We had diesel boats like this,

0:19:460:19:48

and instead of actually only having one horse and one boat with a load,

0:19:480:19:52

one diesel boat took twice the amount of payload.

0:19:520:19:56

The ceaseless drive of progress that ushered in the golden age of canals

0:19:560:20:01

was the same force that made horse-drawn barges outdated.

0:20:010:20:06

The Tiverton Canal is now a country park and the last horse-drawn barge

0:20:060:20:10

on its waters takes visitors along the canal as a reminder of its once

0:20:100:20:15

crucial role in Britain's industrial history.

0:20:150:20:18

It's been an absolute privilege, hasn't it, Ian?

0:20:180:20:20

-It has.

-To step back in time and be on one of the last horse-drawn barges.

0:20:200:20:24

-Thank you very much for coming today.

-Thank you.

-Pleasure.

0:20:240:20:27

While their counterparts have been messing about on the river,

0:20:300:20:32

Zoe and Paul have been quickstepping their way

0:20:320:20:36

to Carhampton to squeeze in some shopping at Chris's Crackers.

0:20:360:20:40

-Here we go.

-So we've a wee bit of interest in this one.

0:20:400:20:44

I know. I'm quite excited by this.

0:20:440:20:46

Right.

0:20:460:20:47

Hello.

0:20:510:20:52

-Hi, nice to meet you. Zoe.

-How are you doing?

0:20:520:20:54

-Who's this?

-Little Frankie.

0:20:540:20:56

-Hello, Frankie.

-Frankie is being carried by Peter,

0:20:560:21:00

who also happens to be in charge.

0:21:000:21:02

Time for the guided tour.

0:21:020:21:04

-This is our main junkyard.

-Yeah.

-Did he say junkyard?

0:21:040:21:07

The antique barn over there with the garden stuff,

0:21:070:21:10

mostly furniture inside, there's more out the back.

0:21:100:21:13

-Off we go.

-Everywhere you want to look.

0:21:130:21:15

This place specialises in reclamation and salvage.

0:21:150:21:19

And there's plenty of it. Time for a good rummage, eh?

0:21:190:21:22

What do you think's going to be in there?

0:21:220:21:24

There's going to be nothing but silver-plated cutlery, if anything.

0:21:240:21:27

-Yes.

-There you go, fish knives. Is that fish knives and forks?

-Yes.

0:21:290:21:33

Work ethic, that's the problem, worth ethic.

0:21:330:21:35

I'm just going to read this...

0:21:350:21:36

Oh, hello. I do love me a casserole, I have to say.

0:21:390:21:43

-Anyway, where did they go? Sorry!

-Do keep up, Zoe.

0:21:430:21:45

Oh, hello, Peter has something he wants to show.

0:21:450:21:49

Look at that!

0:21:490:21:51

Look.

0:21:540:21:55

-They're big, aren't they?

-Balls. Look at those.

0:21:550:21:58

Lignum woods, by FH Ayres.

0:22:010:22:05

One of the bigger names in garden toys.

0:22:050:22:09

They're great. When would they date back to, then, a set like that?

0:22:090:22:13

They're going to be early 20th century, aren't they?

0:22:130:22:16

-Right.

-They're decoration for your gardens, your sunroom.

0:22:160:22:21

I mean, come on, evocative.

0:22:210:22:24

Or you could put your empties up after a few shandies

0:22:250:22:28

and play skittles, you know?

0:22:280:22:31

Very good. No, you're right, very good.

0:22:310:22:34

Yeah, yeah. What's your price on those, then?

0:22:340:22:36

25 quid, something like that.

0:22:360:22:38

-25 quid.

-I wouldn't even haggle at that price.

0:22:380:22:41

I think when you get given a fair price...

0:22:410:22:43

-The box is worth that.

-..don't be silly.

0:22:430:22:45

Do you know what? If it doesn't sell at auction, maybe I'll buy it.

0:22:450:22:49

That's not really how it works.

0:22:500:22:52

But it's still a good deal.

0:22:520:22:54

£25 for a set of vintage bowls wraps up shopping for the day with

0:22:540:22:59

plenty of time for our experts and celebs to be reunited.

0:22:590:23:03

I've never won anything, so I've not got high expectations.

0:23:030:23:06

I was a European Champion, but that will...

0:23:060:23:09

-Of course.

-Just forget that.

0:23:090:23:11

Have you ever won Strictly Come Dancing?

0:23:110:23:13

-All right, don't rub it in!

-I feel partly responsible.

0:23:130:23:17

Nighty night.

0:23:170:23:19

Another day dawns in the glorious south-west scenery.

0:23:210:23:26

These high hedgerows are something to do with this part of the world,

0:23:260:23:30

-aren't they?

-Don't know.

0:23:300:23:31

I'd rather be able to see the field, personally, wouldn't you?

0:23:310:23:34

Should we write a letter?

0:23:340:23:37

On the other side of another hedgerow...

0:23:370:23:39

I have no clue what I'm doing,

0:23:390:23:42

because the stuff I would buy is basically bric-a-brac which is worthless.

0:23:420:23:46

It did make me laugh, actually, because I kept realising all those

0:23:460:23:49

things I'd bought in the past were complete junk.

0:23:490:23:52

Now you know what we feel like when you buy us presents!

0:23:520:23:56

I'm sure it's not as bad as all that.

0:23:560:23:58

Yesterday, Zoe and Paul's thrifty spending bagged them a pair of

0:23:590:24:03

silver cufflinks, a set of gentleman's hairbrushes,

0:24:030:24:06

a lightning conductor and a set of vintage lawn bowls...

0:24:060:24:10

-Result!

-..leaving them with £326 in their pocket.

0:24:100:24:15

Margie and Ian, meanwhile,

0:24:160:24:18

only picked up the painter's palette and still have a sizeable £340 to

0:24:180:24:23

-spend today.

-I'd quite like it for my house, actually.

0:24:230:24:26

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:24:260:24:27

Time for round two.

0:24:280:24:30

Morning, campers. It's never easy getting out of these things.

0:24:310:24:36

-I'm very well.

-How are you doing? Good to see you.

0:24:360:24:39

-Are you all right?

-Yeah, I'm fine.

-Good.

0:24:390:24:43

-Another day.

-Are we going to do this again?

0:24:430:24:44

Yeah. We're off again.

0:24:440:24:46

He has promised he's going to teach you some moves today.

0:24:460:24:48

Right. I'm ready.

0:24:480:24:50

We'll have a little competition at the end of the day.

0:24:500:24:53

I'm going to let you drive, is that all right?

0:24:530:24:54

Paul, do you want to drive today?

0:24:540:24:56

-Shall I?

-Yeah!

-Oh, can I?

0:24:560:24:57

It'd probably be safer.

0:24:570:24:59

Off we go, then. Good luck. Have a lovely day.

0:24:590:25:02

Bye, gorgeous.

0:25:020:25:03

But how is everyone feeling about the day ahead?

0:25:050:25:08

-Are we chilled this morning?

-I feel very chilled.

0:25:080:25:10

It's interesting talking to Ian and I'm feeling quietly sort of...

0:25:100:25:13

Not smug, because I love and adore him and I want him to do well,

0:25:130:25:16

but sort of thinking, "Yeah, we could, actually,

0:25:160:25:19

"have quite a nice day today."

0:25:190:25:20

Like that. Oh!

0:25:210:25:23

I have to say all thanks to you, Paul, and your incredible eagle eyes.

0:25:230:25:27

Did Paul tell you what they found yesterday?

0:25:270:25:30

-What they bought?

-He didn't have a lot to say but he knows how to wind

0:25:300:25:34

me up. Did Zoe say anything to you?

0:25:340:25:36

No, she just said that she was rubbish.

0:25:360:25:40

-She does want to do well...

-Yeah.

-..so she will want to win.

0:25:400:25:45

She'll be gracious when she gets beaten.

0:25:450:25:48

-Yeah.

-Blimey, things have got competitive all of a sudden.

0:25:480:25:52

Time to get a move on, and Ian and Margie are meandering south to the

0:25:520:25:55

Dorset coast and Lyme Regis,

0:25:550:25:57

where they'll kick-start another day shopping.

0:25:570:26:01

-Are you Colin?

-I am.

-Margie and Ian.

0:26:010:26:03

-Hello, Colin.

-Ian.

0:26:030:26:05

-Nice to meet you.

-Right, so a lovely day in Lyme Regis.

0:26:050:26:08

It always is, even when it's raining.

0:26:080:26:10

But will the sun be shining in their hearts after a rummage around the

0:26:120:26:15

shelves of the Lyme Regis Antiques Centre?

0:26:150:26:18

Just have a look here.

0:26:180:26:20

Look at that old chicken up there.

0:26:220:26:23

Look. He's actually so awful, it might be worth something.

0:26:230:26:26

We're in Paul Laidlaw land now.

0:26:270:26:29

-Are we?

-I am not going to blow it, because...

0:26:290:26:33

Quite a few people have had their lips around that.

0:26:330:26:35

I wouldn't, if I was you.

0:26:350:26:39

Rings. Maybe we've got a chance here, because some of these have got

0:26:390:26:43

a bit of age to them.

0:26:430:26:46

That's quite nice. Very similar to your ring. It is.

0:26:460:26:49

-Amethyst.

-Yes.

0:26:490:26:50

-Gosh, that's a small finger.

-That's my birthstone.

-Is it?

-Yeah.

0:26:500:26:54

-January.

-January the 29th.

0:26:540:26:57

Don't give away all your secrets, Ian.

0:26:580:27:00

-We'll get letters.

-Gosh, that's for a small finger, isn't it?

0:27:000:27:02

-Yes.

-They're better a bit bigger.

0:27:020:27:05

You can always have them altered, can't you?

0:27:050:27:07

You've got to have a bit of thickness in them.

0:27:070:27:10

The ticket price is £140.

0:27:100:27:13

-It's quite expensive, though.

-It is, yeah.

0:27:130:27:15

Well, we can have a word with him.

0:27:150:27:16

-One to think about.

-I like this vase up here.

0:27:170:27:21

-Is that you?

-It looks sort of retro.

0:27:210:27:23

-Is it retro?

-Is that the sort of thing you would buy?

0:27:230:27:26

1940s/50s. It's not the sort of thing I'd buy for my house,

0:27:260:27:30

but if I was looking for a piece to sell...

0:27:300:27:33

-It's pretty.

-£90.

0:27:330:27:34

-Yeah.

-1940s to '50s.

0:27:340:27:37

I reckon it's worth about 45-50.

0:27:370:27:41

Is that all we'd get in auction?

0:27:410:27:42

I think so.

0:27:420:27:44

It's time to turn on the charm, Ian.

0:27:440:27:47

Does he remind you of anybody?

0:27:470:27:48

-He does.

-He looks like Frankie Howerd, doesn't he?

0:27:480:27:51

Not what I had in mind.

0:27:530:27:55

Colin gets the vendor on the phone to get a best price.

0:27:560:27:59

Unfortunately, he said he overpaid a little for that, as we all do,

0:28:000:28:04

and it's £70.

0:28:040:28:05

-Gosh.

-Sorry. I can't do any more.

0:28:050:28:08

Out of the corner of my eye,

0:28:080:28:10

I spotted that colourful little tea set down there.

0:28:100:28:13

Oh, yes. It's very nice. Derby-esque, isn't it?

0:28:130:28:16

-That's very sweet, isn't it?

-Well...

0:28:160:28:19

-It's Imari-ish.

-Yes.

-Imari's a pattern.

-Is it?

0:28:210:28:24

-The blue...

-How about 55 for the lot?

0:28:240:28:27

-I haven't said I want it yet.

-Go on.

0:28:270:28:29

How about not 55 for the lot?

0:28:290:28:31

What about 35?

0:28:310:28:33

We've got to make a profit on this, Colin.

0:28:350:28:37

I'll tell you what, I'll go in the middle for you. 45.

0:28:370:28:40

How many pieces, Colin?

0:28:400:28:42

Have a count.

0:28:430:28:45

One, two, three, four, five, six. Six cups.

0:28:450:28:48

Maybe more than that. Eight cups. Yes, there's eight cups there.

0:28:480:28:51

I think we've got to go for that, Colin.

0:28:510:28:53

-Do you like it?

-Like it? Has he even seen it?

0:28:530:28:57

Well, it's not my taste, but you like it, so let's go for it.

0:28:570:29:00

-Oh, gosh, he's not keen.

-No, no, it's all right. It's good.

0:29:000:29:04

If you think we can make a profit from it, let's do it.

0:29:040:29:06

-I do.

-We've only got one item so far.

0:29:060:29:08

40, Colin. Come on!

0:29:080:29:10

-Right, 40 because I'm nice.

-Thank you very much!

-40!

0:29:100:29:12

Yes! I love you, Colin.

0:29:130:29:15

-I hope you do.

-That's one deal done.

0:29:150:29:19

Since they're on a roll,

0:29:210:29:22

Margie wants to know what that £140 ring could be.

0:29:220:29:26

You know the worry about that, Col. There's always some worry.

0:29:260:29:29

It's very small. It's for a very small finger.

0:29:290:29:31

I sell lots of them.

0:29:310:29:33

-Big, small...

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

0:29:330:29:35

So not everybody has big fingers and not everybody has small.

0:29:350:29:38

-I know.

-So that's it. So you're going to ask me now...

0:29:380:29:41

That's got to be really, really cheap, because I'm worried about it.

0:29:410:29:44

-Cheap?!

-75.

0:29:440:29:45

Why don't we say 50?

0:29:460:29:49

-It's worrying me.

-60 and I'm done.

0:29:500:29:53

I like it because it's my birth stone, isn't it?

0:29:530:29:56

If we buy the two items...

0:29:560:29:57

Do we get a little chip for two?

0:29:570:29:59

No, 100. 100. That's it.

0:30:010:30:03

-95.

-Only if you'll dance with me.

0:30:030:30:06

-Come on.

-Not now.

-Come on.

-Not now.

0:30:070:30:11

No, my feet are hurting.

0:30:110:30:12

95.

0:30:140:30:15

-Thank you.

-Yes, we'll do that deal and we'll do that dance.

0:30:160:30:20

That's two items for £95.

0:30:200:30:23

Well done, folks.

0:30:230:30:24

Elsewhere, Zoe and Paul are enjoying their jaunt in the countryside.

0:30:260:30:29

Oh, look at this!

0:30:310:30:33

Have we just entered Middle Earth?

0:30:330:30:35

That's an incredible gorge that we've just gone through.

0:30:350:30:38

Now, I'd love to be able to tell you about what was going on there and

0:30:380:30:41

-how that was formed.

-I'd love to tell you what county I was in.

0:30:410:30:44

Yeah! Where are we?

0:30:440:30:46

You're on your way into Devon, as it happens,

0:30:460:30:49

heading for the village of Honiton.

0:30:490:30:51

This beautiful village is home to one of the most intricately

0:30:510:30:55

patterned materials.

0:30:550:30:57

Since Zoe's time on Strictly means she's no stranger to a

0:30:570:31:00

glamorous costume,

0:31:000:31:02

she's here to discover how this area of the south-west became one of the

0:31:020:31:05

most important lace producers in the world.

0:31:050:31:09

They're at the town's museum to meet lacemaker Pat Perryman.

0:31:090:31:13

I was always a bit of a tomboy, I have to say, Pat,

0:31:130:31:15

but doing Strictly Come Dancing really opened my eyes to costumes...

0:31:150:31:18

-Fabrics.

-Yeah, fabrics. This piece, here, what can you tell us about this piece?

0:31:180:31:22

This piece is very early, about 1630, 1640.

0:31:220:31:26

It's made of linen and it was most likely worn by a man rather than a

0:31:260:31:30

lady. So maybe Paul might have worn something like this in those days.

0:31:300:31:34

Can you imagine yourself in lace, Paul?

0:31:340:31:37

In the 16th century, a new type of material was taking Europe by storm.

0:31:370:31:41

Lace was the new process of looping and twisting cotton or silk threads

0:31:410:31:46

to make intricate, open fabric patterns.

0:31:460:31:49

It wasn't until the late 19th century that ladies wore lace.

0:31:490:31:53

This is a rather large actual triangular shawl.

0:31:530:31:56

Maybe you'd like to wear it.

0:31:560:31:58

-I'd love to.

-Maybe Paul would like to help.

0:31:580:32:00

-Where Zoe's hand is should go at the back of her neck.

-Shall I turn?

0:32:000:32:02

-That's the way. Excellent.

-No Miss Havisham comments.

0:32:030:32:07

Lacemaking was a painstaking process.

0:32:080:32:11

One square centimetre could take five hours to weave.

0:32:110:32:14

Lace instantly assumed an almost priceless value,

0:32:150:32:19

ensuring it was the perfect status symbol.

0:32:190:32:22

It's only the upper echelons of society that can wear it.

0:32:220:32:25

Absolutely. You showed your wealth by the quality of your wife's lace

0:32:250:32:29

in those days. The posher you were, the more expensive your lace was.

0:32:290:32:34

Honiton lace was particularly intricate and was unique in manufacture.

0:32:340:32:38

Complex patterns were sewn together, with each specialist weaver

0:32:380:32:42

concentrating on a single motif.

0:32:420:32:44

Honiton's elaborate patterns became unrivalled across Europe.

0:32:450:32:51

Honiton lace is motive lace.

0:32:510:32:52

In other words, we make it all in separate motives and join together.

0:32:520:32:55

So these are patchworks, in a sense?

0:32:550:32:57

Yeah. The more experienced ladies made the edge pieces.

0:32:570:33:01

The boss would have said, "I want 40 of those."

0:33:010:33:03

They would repeat, repeat, repeat.

0:33:030:33:05

The more often they did it, the quicker they did it so the more

0:33:050:33:08

pence they earned.

0:33:080:33:09

The less experienced made the plainer pieces and the children did

0:33:090:33:13

the small bits that filled in.

0:33:130:33:14

How old would the children have been?

0:33:140:33:16

They started at five years old for 12 hours a day.

0:33:160:33:18

-Goodness me.

-When you tell that to children these days,

0:33:180:33:21

they don't get it.

0:33:210:33:22

I know! I must have a word with my children, actually.

0:33:220:33:25

The intricate designs from Honiton gained a great reputation and by the

0:33:250:33:29

end of the 17th century,

0:33:290:33:30

a quarter of east Devon's population was employed in lacemaking.

0:33:300:33:35

Children were crucial to the industry, and when an education act

0:33:350:33:39

was passed requiring them to attend school, the town defied the Government.

0:33:390:33:43

Local boys and girls continued to work.

0:33:430:33:46

The lace industry around Honiton was the heart of the community for generations.

0:33:460:33:51

When a factory was opened bringing new lace machines down

0:33:510:33:55

from Nottingham, it struck a heavy blow.

0:33:550:33:57

Does mechanisation harm this industry in any way?

0:33:570:34:02

Absolutely, it did and a great deal.

0:34:020:34:04

In 1810, when the machines were invented,

0:34:040:34:07

the handmade-lace industry almost died.

0:34:070:34:11

Then in 1839, when Queen Victoria wanted her wedding dress made of

0:34:110:34:16

lace, she wanted Honiton lace, a veil and a dress,

0:34:160:34:20

and that brought back the industry.

0:34:200:34:23

At the time of Victoria's reign,

0:34:240:34:26

wedding dresses were often brightly coloured.

0:34:260:34:29

Queen Victoria's desire to have a white Honiton lace dress cemented

0:34:290:34:33

wedding tradition in this country and saved the handmade-lace industry.

0:34:330:34:38

Victoria's wedding to Prince Albert was the first marriage of a reigning

0:34:380:34:42

monarch in Britain for 300 years and attracted huge attention.

0:34:420:34:47

The lace dress she wore,

0:34:470:34:49

including a train that required 12 bridesmaids to carry it,

0:34:490:34:53

became an iconic fashion statement.

0:34:530:34:55

Victoria had reinstated handmade lace as a must-have garment.

0:34:550:35:01

Her support of the British industry continued throughout her life.

0:35:010:35:04

Of course, much later, when Prince Albert died in 1861,

0:35:050:35:09

she wanted black lace.

0:35:090:35:11

She wore black for the rest of her life.

0:35:110:35:13

If she wore black, all the smart ladies wanted black, of course.

0:35:130:35:16

The success of Honiton lace survived long after Queen Victoria but the

0:35:160:35:20

austerity of wartime Britain and new fashions saw lacemaking in the town

0:35:200:35:25

decline once again.

0:35:250:35:26

But Honiton lace is still taught and handmade by dedicated individuals,

0:35:270:35:31

like Pat, and soon Zoe Ball.

0:35:310:35:34

Thank you, Pat, for lending me your readers, because I wouldn't be able

0:35:340:35:38

to see this otherwise. You've got to have such incredible eyesight to

0:35:380:35:42

-do lacemaking. So, Pat, where do we start?

-Think about weaving.

0:35:420:35:45

Think about what the threads do...

0:35:450:35:46

-When they're passing over each other.

-Absolutely.

0:35:460:35:49

The yarn for Honiton lace is wound on bobbins,

0:35:490:35:51

which is then twisted and crossed over each other to form a pattern.

0:35:510:35:54

-Simple.

-There you go.

0:35:540:35:56

-Good.

-I'm quite heavy-handed.

0:35:560:35:58

Now you're going to twist each pair three times.

0:35:580:36:00

Right bobbin over left or towards....

0:36:000:36:03

Right bobbin over left? So one, two, three.

0:36:030:36:06

And also the other pair.

0:36:060:36:07

I hope you're taking note here, Paul.

0:36:070:36:09

Three. You're next. How am I doing, Pat?

0:36:090:36:11

-Fine. Absolutely.

-For a beginner, I'm all right.

0:36:110:36:14

-Perfectly correct.

-We haven't looked too closely at the lace yet.

0:36:140:36:17

There is little Honiton lace made commercially nowadays but the town

0:36:170:36:20

fiercely guards its history as a humble cottage industry that gained

0:36:200:36:23

worldwide popularity and the support of the royal family.

0:36:230:36:28

How long will I be here, do you think, to finish this piece?

0:36:280:36:31

Well, if you got a little bit faster I think you'd probably be here for

0:36:310:36:35

-about four days.

-OK, that's all right.

0:36:350:36:37

For about ten hours a day for about four days.

0:36:370:36:40

That's fine. My husband can feed the children.

0:36:410:36:43

Let's leave them to it, then.

0:36:430:36:44

While Zoe and Paul finish up their handiwork,

0:36:470:36:50

Ian and Margie are in Axminster, where they're going for a gander in

0:36:500:36:54

the Old Chapel Antiques Centre.

0:36:540:36:56

-Hello.

-Good afternoon.

0:36:570:36:59

-I'm Richard.

-Margie.

0:36:590:37:00

-Hi, Richard. I'm Ian.

-Hi, Ian.

0:37:000:37:03

Richard is overseeing three floors crammed with antiques.

0:37:030:37:07

Right, here we go.

0:37:070:37:08

Plenty to keep everyone happy, which is just as well, really.

0:37:090:37:12

Look, they're here already!

0:37:130:37:15

Play nice, everyone.

0:37:150:37:16

Drat.

0:37:160:37:17

-Found them.

-I know. No time to waste.

0:37:210:37:23

Thankfully, neither of them would know a bargain if they saw one.

0:37:230:37:25

That's harsh, Paul.

0:37:270:37:29

Ian and Margie are taking this very seriously.

0:37:290:37:31

Rock, back, side to side.

0:37:310:37:34

Rock, forward, side, close, side.

0:37:340:37:37

Rock... Side, close, side.

0:37:370:37:39

Rock, rock, side, close, side.

0:37:390:37:41

I wonder if we can get Ken Bruce on this.

0:37:410:37:46

-Come in, Ken Bruce.

-Anyone planning to do any shopping today?

0:37:470:37:50

Back, forward, cha-cha-cha. Forward, back, cha-cha-cha.

0:37:500:37:55

Oh, do concentrate, Margie.

0:37:560:37:58

-That's not good news.

-What's not?

-The back.

0:38:040:38:08

-Oh, that taping.

-That tape, yeah.

0:38:080:38:10

What does it say?

0:38:100:38:11

-So, do I have to put it back down again?

-Cheeky.

0:38:150:38:18

Am I picking it up?

0:38:180:38:21

There's some people over there.

0:38:210:38:23

I think we're going to put it back, aren't we?

0:38:230:38:25

Yes, we are.

0:38:250:38:26

-Paul.

-Hello.

-What can you tell me about this?

0:38:280:38:32

Studioware, surely 1960s.

0:38:320:38:34

Lava glaze refers to this very fluid-looking, intense acid colour.

0:38:340:38:42

-Funky.

-Groovy.

0:38:420:38:45

Ticket price is £68 for the bowl and £48 for the dish.

0:38:450:38:49

Would you take that home? If I bought you that for Christmas, is

0:38:490:38:51

it going in the charity shop at New Year?

0:38:510:38:54

Do you know what? No, I probably would use that.

0:38:540:38:56

I mean, I love the bright colours. They really appeal to me but, yes,

0:38:560:39:00

it's quite a narrow market.

0:39:000:39:02

-It's niche.

-Yeah, that's the word.

0:39:030:39:05

Niche. OK, I'll walk on.

0:39:050:39:06

-I shall follow.

-Quite the pair now, aren't they?

0:39:070:39:10

How are things going upstairs?

0:39:100:39:12

Let's look at these.

0:39:120:39:13

Railway armour, they call it.

0:39:150:39:16

Would they be on the actual trains?

0:39:160:39:19

Yeah. No, that would be on the track here.

0:39:190:39:22

These, I'm not sure what these are.

0:39:220:39:23

Not being an ex-railway worker.

0:39:250:39:27

-Right, what does it say there?

-Bridge number...

0:39:300:39:32

Bridge number 15.

0:39:320:39:34

-Feel that.

-Whoa. Wow. I haven't been to the gym today.

0:39:340:39:38

-Lovely.

-They're quite good fun.

-I've worked my triceps out.

0:39:400:39:43

I've worked my quads out getting out of the car and now I've worked my

0:39:430:39:46

triceps out with that.

0:39:460:39:49

Look who's here. Hiya.

0:39:490:39:50

-Oh, hello! How are you?

-Very well, how are you?

0:39:500:39:53

How's it going?

0:39:540:39:56

Very, very well, isn't it?

0:39:560:39:57

-Excellent.

-She hesitated.

-She did hesitate there.

0:39:570:40:01

Is she bluffing? You know her better than I do.

0:40:010:40:03

-Brilliant!

-Come on.

0:40:030:40:04

There's plenty of space for everyone.

0:40:040:40:06

Well, they're about 30-odd pounds each, aren't they?

0:40:060:40:10

-God, it's heavy.

-Cast iron, aren't they?

0:40:120:40:14

I like this one because it's nice and big.

0:40:140:40:16

And with the three collated numbers.

0:40:160:40:18

One, two, two. One, two, three and one, two, four.

0:40:180:40:20

-What do you think?

-Yeah.

-Shall we try and get them for 80 quid?

0:40:200:40:24

-I think you'll be fine.

-Shall we start at 60?

0:40:240:40:27

-You're getting it.

-Do we take them with us?

0:40:290:40:32

Start at 65. That just sounds a bit easier.

0:40:320:40:35

Then he might say 70.

0:40:350:40:36

Those four signs have a combined ticket price of £134.

0:40:360:40:40

But it's worth a try.

0:40:400:40:42

Richard, we've found something.

0:40:420:40:44

Oh, well done.

0:40:440:40:45

-Let's have a little look.

-We've got these wonderful bridge plates.

0:40:450:40:49

-Wow! They're heavy.

-We're thinking of a one-off price.

0:40:490:40:52

-A one-off for the lot.

-Yes.

0:40:520:40:54

-For the whole lot.

-For the whole lot.

0:40:540:40:56

I'm thinking sort of £65.

0:40:560:40:58

-For the whole lot?

-Yeah.

0:40:580:41:00

Ian has asked for around a 50% discount.

0:41:000:41:03

So Richard is off to speak to the dealer.

0:41:030:41:05

You did well. Let's see if you've pulled it off.

0:41:050:41:08

-It's good news.

-Oh, it's good news.

0:41:080:41:10

So £65 the lot.

0:41:100:41:12

-Yes!

-There you go.

0:41:120:41:14

-Good.

-Thank you very much and thanks to the dealer.

0:41:160:41:18

I was going to high-five you.

0:41:180:41:20

-Don't worry, that's great.

-I'm old-fashioned, you see?

0:41:200:41:22

Yes, I struggle with that sometimes. I'm scared I'm going to miss them.

0:41:220:41:26

I'm with you, Richard. Either way, that's a cracking £69 discount.

0:41:260:41:30

How's it going, Zoe?

0:41:320:41:34

I hope I remember all these things that I'm learning from Paul.

0:41:340:41:37

It's quite interesting, because coming into a shop now having

0:41:370:41:40

heard a few of the things, I'm now scanning and looking for...

0:41:400:41:43

I'm never going to find the treasures that he finds

0:41:430:41:46

but I hope I remember all that information, because it's...

0:41:460:41:50

You know, it's priceless.

0:41:500:41:52

Yes, he's quite the chap.

0:41:520:41:53

Now, anyone found anything else?

0:41:530:41:56

Margie, come and have a look at these.

0:41:560:41:58

-They look familiar.

-Don't you think the poppies are lovely on there?

0:41:580:42:02

They are. Nice and bright. They are.

0:42:020:42:04

-Big, colourful dishes.

-What would you put in there?

0:42:040:42:07

-Salad.

-A fruit bowl. I would have that.

0:42:070:42:09

-Would you bid for that?

-Yes, I would bid for that.

0:42:090:42:12

Do you want to speak to the man, then?

0:42:120:42:14

Well, yeah. I mean, yeah.

0:42:140:42:17

For both pieces?

0:42:170:42:18

I think so. I think both would be nice and sell them as a job lot.

0:42:180:42:24

The ticket price is still £116.

0:42:240:42:26

What's the best price Richard could do on behalf of the dealer?

0:42:260:42:30

For those two pieces the very best would be £80.

0:42:300:42:34

Yeah, I quite like those for £80.

0:42:340:42:36

-Let's do it.

-They might not make anything but they look nice.

0:42:360:42:40

Well done, folks.

0:42:400:42:41

£145 gets you the two 1960s dishes and the railway signs.

0:42:410:42:47

Like that, your shopping is done.

0:42:470:42:48

Which leaves Zoe and Paul the run of the shop.

0:42:500:42:53

I'll tell you what I am interested in...

0:42:550:42:57

If it's what I think it is... And it is!

0:42:570:43:01

Miss former presenter on Radio 1 and still a big thing.

0:43:010:43:06

So is this an early radio system?

0:43:060:43:08

-Yes, it is.

-It's wonderful.

0:43:080:43:10

This is a crystal receiver.

0:43:100:43:12

It uses a little galena, which is lead oxide crystal,

0:43:120:43:15

which is in here, and this little wire, here, termed the cat's whisker

0:43:150:43:22

makes contact with our galena crystal.

0:43:220:43:24

It makes the circuit...

0:43:260:43:27

Don't ask me to explain the science behind it.

0:43:270:43:30

That's how you tune the thing in,

0:43:300:43:32

fiddling about like that.

0:43:320:43:34

It dates to... This is the early years of radio broadcasting.

0:43:340:43:37

1920s.

0:43:370:43:39

So Pa is in the front parlour.

0:43:390:43:43

With this on your ear, they're quite heavy.

0:43:430:43:46

This is the World Service calling with a very strange accent.

0:43:460:43:50

Nobody ever spoke like that, did they?

0:43:510:43:53

They did. Their lips didn't move.

0:43:530:43:55

Hello, Westminster 321.

0:43:550:43:57

Do hurry, Harry. I'm not receiving you.

0:43:570:44:00

-That's where it all began.

-Didn't it?

0:44:020:44:03

-I know.

-The price tag says £60.

0:44:030:44:07

I think, to a collector, that's a good buy.

0:44:070:44:11

From our point of view, it's the high-end of where it could end up

0:44:110:44:15

and that's before auctioneer's costs.

0:44:150:44:17

So, some work to do on the price.

0:44:180:44:20

We haven't seen Richard for a while.

0:44:200:44:21

So he's got £60 on it at the moment.

0:44:210:44:25

-Again, I can speak for him and I know he'd do it for 45.

-45.

0:44:260:44:32

-Confer, confer.

-Do you know that is the bottom line or do you just know

0:44:320:44:37

that's where you can go at the moment without making a call?

0:44:370:44:40

I know that's where I can go at the moment.

0:44:400:44:43

What sort of price were you thinking?

0:44:430:44:46

I'd be happier at 35 than 45.

0:44:460:44:49

That's OK. I'll take the risk.

0:44:490:44:51

He must be a dear friend.

0:44:510:44:53

Well, also, I want you to win, anyway, don't I?

0:44:530:44:56

Richard, I knew I liked you.

0:44:560:45:00

No taking sides, Richard.

0:45:000:45:02

The 1920s radio hails the end of shopping for this Road Trip.

0:45:020:45:06

Time to own up to what you bought.

0:45:060:45:10

Ta-da!

0:45:100:45:12

This looks very Laidlaw, this.

0:45:120:45:15

Has he been influencing you?

0:45:150:45:17

This is like a Laidlaw...

0:45:170:45:19

It doesn't look like you picked any of these, Zoe.

0:45:190:45:22

-What do you want to know about first?

-That.

0:45:220:45:24

-This? Open the box...

-Is it a shoebox?

-..and see.

0:45:240:45:28

Bowls! That's nice, isn't it?

0:45:290:45:31

That is quite cute.

0:45:310:45:32

They make good doorstops.

0:45:320:45:34

They do, they make great doorstops.

0:45:350:45:37

-How much did you pay?

-How much do you think we paid?

0:45:370:45:40

25 quid.

0:45:400:45:42

Spot-on. Spot-on.

0:45:420:45:43

Right, next.

0:45:430:45:44

Cufflinks, there.

0:45:450:45:47

Here we go, he's building everything up.

0:45:480:45:50

Who made them?

0:45:500:45:52

-Ole Bent Petersen, major artisan.

-Well done.

0:45:520:45:58

Those are nice. Very nice. Very special.

0:45:580:46:01

-A fiver.

-Wow!

0:46:020:46:04

My dad lost so much money when he did this that we thought maybe it's

0:46:040:46:07

better to... With the Balls, you know, maybe we should spend a little less.

0:46:070:46:10

You're not really playing the game, are you?

0:46:100:46:13

The whole game is to spend as much money as possible.

0:46:130:46:15

-Come on, then.

-Come this way. Show us what you've got.

0:46:150:46:18

We were looking at £80 per item.

0:46:180:46:20

-One, two, three.

-Chuck it.

0:46:200:46:23

-Wow!

-We've got an array of things.

0:46:230:46:26

Very colourful, don't you think?

0:46:260:46:28

-Interesting.

-That caught our eye earlier today.

0:46:280:46:32

-We got it for £80 for the two.

-What did he want originally?

0:46:320:46:35

Just over 100.

0:46:350:46:37

-Yeah.

-Not a bad price.

0:46:370:46:39

-Cool.

-That's attractive.

0:46:390:46:40

This is my first purchase that we made.

0:46:400:46:43

It's a 19th-century palette.

0:46:430:46:45

An artist's palette.

0:46:450:46:46

-Did it belong to Turner?

-What did you pay for that?

0:46:480:46:50

It could...

0:46:520:46:53

-Hit me with it.

-How much did we pay?

-I'm going to enjoy this.

0:46:530:46:55

Six quid. That's too much.

0:46:550:46:57

-No, no, no, no.

-60 quid?

0:46:570:46:59

-60 quid?

-60 quid?

-Did it come with his ear?

0:46:590:47:01

Seriously, I like what you've bought. I like your offering.

0:47:020:47:06

You sound surprised.

0:47:060:47:08

This will be an interesting auction.

0:47:080:47:11

-Yes.

-Haven't we had fun?

-Yes, we've had great fun

0:47:110:47:14

and you've learnt to dance.

0:47:140:47:15

-What more could you want?

-It wasn't long enough.

0:47:150:47:17

-No.

-I could do with another hour.

0:47:170:47:19

Come on, then. We'll give you another hour's lesson.

0:47:190:47:22

Time to stop dancing around the subject, what did they really think?

0:47:220:47:27

They had a lot of masculine items, didn't they?

0:47:270:47:29

-He led her on.

-They didn't spend very much, really.

0:47:290:47:32

That's the way, you can't spend money for the sake of it, can you?

0:47:320:47:35

-Well...

-I think the cufflinks will definitely make a profit.

0:47:350:47:39

They bought the lava ceramics.

0:47:390:47:42

You weren't keen.

0:47:420:47:43

You're not worried about those at all.

0:47:430:47:45

What did they pay? £80 at the end of the day?

0:47:450:47:47

-Yeah.

-I am not remotely worried about the lava wares.

0:47:470:47:53

There's one or two things of ours that I'm worrying about already.

0:47:530:47:56

Like the palette.

0:47:560:47:59

-The palette?! What the...? The palette?!

-I know.

0:47:590:48:02

-I'm quite happy. We've had a great time.

-Yeah, I'm very happy.

0:48:020:48:04

I think we had a fantastic time.

0:48:040:48:06

It's anyone's to win, this.

0:48:060:48:08

It's going to be interesting. But we're winning.

0:48:080:48:10

Well, it won't be long until we find out.

0:48:110:48:14

After a delightful leap and bound across the south-west, our pairs are

0:48:140:48:18

heading east to the auction in the Hampshire village of Selborne.

0:48:180:48:21

But are they still feeling confident about the lots they've bought?

0:48:210:48:27

Do we have to accept now that our items may not fetch very much money at all?

0:48:270:48:33

Well, I am fully prepared for that.

0:48:330:48:35

Without Paul, it might have been quite interesting

0:48:350:48:38

to see what I would've bought.

0:48:380:48:40

A Miss Marple cape and a matching bag is where I was looking.

0:48:400:48:43

-I don't think...

-I wish you'd bought that.

0:48:430:48:47

Today's sale is taking place at Hannam's auctioneers.

0:48:470:48:50

Fingers crossed the people of Hampshire are ready for our

0:48:500:48:53

celebrities and their lots. Finally, here they are.

0:48:530:48:56

-Good morning.

-Good morning. Wow!

-It is a gorgeous day, isn't it? It is.

0:48:560:49:01

-Your partner.

-How are you doing?

0:49:010:49:03

Look, we've got the sun with us.

0:49:030:49:04

It's gorgeous.

0:49:070:49:08

Fingers crossed. Come on, then.

0:49:080:49:10

Let's go.

0:49:100:49:11

Let's remind ourselves of what they bought.

0:49:110:49:14

Zoe and Paul picked up five auction lots,

0:49:140:49:17

parting with a meagre £109 from their budget.

0:49:170:49:20

Ian and Margie threw caution to the wind,

0:49:220:49:25

spending £300 on their five auction lots.

0:49:250:49:27

What does auctioneer Harry Hannam make of it all?

0:49:270:49:31

The tea and coffee set might be a struggle.

0:49:310:49:33

Made in the Derby style but made on the Continent in the late part of

0:49:330:49:36

the 19th century and really a little unfashionable.

0:49:360:49:39

20 to £40 maybe.

0:49:390:49:41

My favourite lot are the cufflinks.

0:49:410:49:43

I think they are very stylish and commercial.

0:49:430:49:45

He's a good maker.

0:49:450:49:47

They should do well.

0:49:470:49:49

With an expectant online audience and a full saleroom,

0:49:490:49:52

it's time to get things under way.

0:49:520:49:54

It feels like we're just about to go on the dance floor, doesn't it?

0:49:540:49:57

-It really does. I think we should all hold hands.

-Let's hold hands.

0:49:570:50:01

Come on.

0:50:010:50:03

Right, our opening lot was Ian's first purchase,

0:50:030:50:06

the painter's palette.

0:50:060:50:07

£35 is bid on commission.

0:50:070:50:10

40, five, 50, five.

0:50:100:50:14

60, your bid and I'm out at £60.

0:50:140:50:17

Really happy. Really.

0:50:170:50:19

£60. On my right, £60. Five, anywhere?

0:50:190:50:21

Out online. Commissions are out. Fair warning.

0:50:210:50:24

£60, and selling at 60.

0:50:240:50:26

-What we paid for it?

-Yeah.

0:50:270:50:29

You didn't lose any money.

0:50:290:50:30

Not a flying start but better than they might have expected.

0:50:300:50:35

-Well done.

-I'm shocked.

-I'm shocked.

-It looked gorgeous.

0:50:350:50:38

Concentrate on your own quirky purchases.

0:50:390:50:42

Zoe and Paul's lightning conductor is up next.

0:50:420:50:45

-A nice little novelty piece here.

-Novelty.

-Five, ten, 15, 20.

0:50:450:50:50

£5 is bid. At £25. 30. £30.

0:50:500:50:54

35. £38.

0:50:540:50:57

Your bid. Commission is out.

0:50:570:50:59

-More profit.

-That's fine.

-Selling on the right at £38.

0:50:590:51:04

-We started well.

-We started well. We started well.

0:51:070:51:10

Oh, it's such a thrill.

0:51:100:51:12

Zoe and Paul are off to a great start as they strike a cracking

0:51:130:51:17

-little profit.

-You're furious, aren't you?

0:51:170:51:19

-You're furious.

-No, I'm fine.

0:51:190:51:20

-We've got more...

-There's more to come.

-..stuff in our back pocket.

0:51:210:51:26

Time for Ian and Margie's dress ring.

0:51:260:51:29

£55 is bid.

0:51:290:51:31

-Making profit already.

-At £55.

0:51:310:51:33

For the dress ring. At £55.

0:51:330:51:37

60, five, 70, your bid.

0:51:370:51:39

Commissions out at 70.

0:51:390:51:41

It's your bid at £70.

0:51:410:51:43

Third row selling.

0:51:430:51:44

-Profit. We haven't had that yet.

-£70.

0:51:440:51:48

That's a rather good profit for the ring.

0:51:480:51:50

-Well done.

-A small profit.

0:51:500:51:52

Well done.

0:51:540:51:55

Looks like Margie's mastered the high five.

0:51:560:51:59

Time to see if Zoe's haggling will pay off.

0:51:590:52:01

It's the gentleman's hair brushes.

0:52:010:52:03

Five, ten, 15, £20.

0:52:030:52:05

20. 25 on the phone.

0:52:050:52:08

-It's not one of your dealers, is it?

-25!

-30.

0:52:090:52:12

35. 40.

0:52:140:52:16

-I can't sell these.

-£40 in the room.

0:52:170:52:20

-Your bid.

-Good profit.

0:52:200:52:23

Selling at 40.

0:52:230:52:24

-A very lucky escape.

-Double your money and some.

0:52:260:52:29

It feels good. That feels good.

0:52:290:52:31

I'm glad you feel good because that's a very nice return.

0:52:330:52:36

It could be your biggest profit.

0:52:360:52:38

It could be. But at least it's a profit.

0:52:380:52:41

Well done.

0:52:410:52:42

The auctioneer wasn't convinced by Ian and Margie's next lot, but will

0:52:430:52:47

-it come good?

-£15. 20, now.

0:52:470:52:50

-Oh, no!

-£15.

0:52:500:52:52

18 at the back.

0:52:520:52:53

£20. 22.

0:52:550:52:56

Are you sure? 25.

0:52:580:52:59

-Did he say, "Are you sure?"?

-Oh, crikey.

-Get there.

0:53:010:53:04

30 on the net. I'll take two. 35 on the net.

0:53:040:53:08

-It's getting there.

-Oh!

-Now, now!

-£40.

0:53:080:53:12

42. 45.

0:53:130:53:16

Thank you, anyway. £45, net bidder.

0:53:160:53:19

At 45.

0:53:190:53:20

Well, they got there in the end.

0:53:230:53:25

A small profit keeps them in the race.

0:53:250:53:27

I'm not sure if I'm livid, if I'm relieved for him.

0:53:280:53:31

I'm so confused. I don't know if I can handle this.

0:53:310:53:34

Pull yourself together, Ball.

0:53:340:53:36

Paul's cufflinks next.

0:53:360:53:38

-How exciting.

-I think they're going to do well.

0:53:380:53:41

Do you know something?

0:53:410:53:43

I'm not even going to wish you good luck, because you don't need it.

0:53:430:53:46

You don't need it.

0:53:460:53:48

I've got a bit of interest in these and I have three commissions.

0:53:480:53:50

-Three commissions.

-That's good.

-30, 40, £50 is bid.

0:53:500:53:54

On commission at £50.

0:53:540:53:56

60 on the net. 65 with me.

0:53:580:53:59

People are on the net bidding and everything.

0:53:590:54:02

75.

0:54:020:54:03

85.

0:54:050:54:06

-It's going to hit a ton.

-90, I'm out.

0:54:060:54:09

£90 and selling. Fair warning.

0:54:090:54:11

-£90.

-You've only made 85 quid.

0:54:110:54:14

-That's 85 quid. Yes!

-Very good.

0:54:150:54:19

-Laidlaw, you beauty.

-Shall we applaud?

0:54:190:54:24

A round of applause. A great find and a stunning profit.

0:54:240:54:28

I'm not worried. I've always been the bridesmaid, never the bride.

0:54:280:54:33

Don't give up hope just yet, Ian.

0:54:330:54:35

Everyone saw them, the colourful dishes

0:54:350:54:37

are Ian and Margie's next lot.

0:54:370:54:39

30 bid for the two lots.

0:54:390:54:41

35, 40. 45.

0:54:410:54:45

At £45. 50 anywhere?

0:54:450:54:47

Commissions out.

0:54:470:54:49

Selling. Fair warning at £45.

0:54:490:54:52

Last chance at 45.

0:54:520:54:53

That is a tough one to take.

0:54:550:54:57

Someone got a real deal for those dishes.

0:54:570:55:00

-I'd have bought it.

-Mean.

0:55:000:55:04

-We're the mean girls. We're the mean girls.

-Bad.

0:55:040:55:07

Can the vintage radio broadcast a victory for Zoe and Paul?

0:55:070:55:11

Ten, 15, £20 is bid.

0:55:110:55:15

-Five, I'll take. At £20. Five, anywhere?

-Oh, no!

0:55:150:55:18

35. 38. 40 is your bid.

0:55:180:55:21

A profit. Not expensive but a profit.

0:55:210:55:25

Commissions out at £40.

0:55:250:55:28

A small profit for the radio

0:55:280:55:30

gives Ian and Margie a chance for the comeback.

0:55:300:55:32

That's a disappointing profit for you, isn't it?

0:55:320:55:34

-Well...

-Don't rub it in, Margie.

0:55:340:55:37

Now, Ian secured a great discount but will it be a sign of a profit?

0:55:370:55:41

We've had interest in these, and 40, 50, 60.

0:55:410:55:46

£70 is bid.

0:55:460:55:47

-Five, I'll take.

-Mock you not.

-I'm just going to laugh on the other

0:55:470:55:51

-side of my face.

-Five, 90.

0:55:510:55:53

One more. 95 is your bid.

0:55:530:55:55

At £95. 100 now.

0:55:550:55:58

-Go on!

-95. At 95.

0:55:580:56:00

Selling at 95.

0:56:000:56:02

The hammer comes down at £95.

0:56:040:56:06

-Well done.

-Hey, that was all right.

-Thank you very much. Goodbye.

0:56:060:56:09

-Quick, let's get out of here.

-Not just yet, Ian.

0:56:100:56:13

There's one final lot to go and it's Zoe and Paul's lawn bowls.

0:56:130:56:17

And we have two bids and coming in at 110.

0:56:170:56:22

120. £130 is bid.

0:56:220:56:26

At £130. 40 now.

0:56:260:56:29

-At £130.

-That's it.

0:56:290:56:31

Fair warning. Best of two and selling.

0:56:310:56:34

-That's ridiculous!

-At £130.

0:56:340:56:38

That was a good deal.

0:56:380:56:39

-Well done.

-This is so exciting!

0:56:390:56:42

An incredible profit leaves Zoe jumping for joy.

0:56:420:56:45

Is there such thing as steward's inquiry?

0:56:460:56:49

-I would like to have it.

-A recount.

-Come on.

0:56:490:56:52

I'm the steward round here, Ian.

0:56:520:56:54

It's time to find out just how it all went.

0:56:540:56:57

Margie and Ian began the Road Trip with £400.

0:57:000:57:03

After auction costs, they made a small loss of £41.70,

0:57:040:57:08

giving them a final total of £358.30.

0:57:080:57:13

Zoe and Paul also started with £400.

0:57:140:57:17

After costs, they clocked up an impressive profit of 168.16,

0:57:170:57:23

giving them a final total of £568.16, making them the winners.

0:57:230:57:29

Well done. All profits go to Children in Need.

0:57:290:57:33

Brilliant. Well done. Will I still get a Christmas card?

0:57:370:57:41

-Maybe.

-Farewell.

0:57:410:57:43

It's been lovely. I've loved it.

0:57:430:57:45

-Thank you.

-It's the end of your antiques experience.

0:57:450:57:49

I know, but not necessarily the end of your dance experience.

0:57:490:57:52

-Cha-cha-cha.

-Are you going to drive me home, then?

0:57:520:57:55

Let's go. Cha-cha-cha.

0:57:550:57:58

I'm not dancing with you!

0:57:580:57:59

Time to hotfoot it off into the sunset.

0:57:590:58:02

-OK, bye!

-Bye.

0:58:040:58:06

But first, a quick phone call home.

0:58:060:58:09

Johnny, are you there?

0:58:090:58:10

Dad, it's Zoe.

0:58:100:58:13

I've beaten Ian Waite and we got...

0:58:130:58:15

Wait for it, £168 profit.

0:58:150:58:18

Am I still allowed to come home for Christmas?

0:58:190:58:22

I love you, Dad. Bye.

0:58:240:58:27

-He took it. He took it really well.

-Thank goodness for that.

0:58:280:58:32

Cheerio.

0:58:320:58:34

Strictly Come Dancing's Zoe Ball and Ian Waite are quickstepping their way across the south west of England in a bid to turn a profit at auction in Hampshire. Experts Margie Cooper and Paul Laidlaw are on hand to guide them.

Paul shares a secret with Zoe about buying antique hair brushes. Ian, though, offers dancing lessons to dealers to secure a discount.

Zoe also hears how one village became world-famous for lace production while Ian ends up meeting a giant horse with its own boat.