Play Time Flog It: Trade Secrets


Play Time

Tips on antiques and collectibles. Paul Martin discusses snuff boxes with expert James Lewis.


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Transcript


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I want to share some of the knowledge that we've picked up

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over the last 11 years of filming "Flog It!"

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That's hundreds of programmes under our belt and many

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thousands of your antiques and collectables sold under the hammer.

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-150.

-Oh!

-Good Lord!

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There is a whole world of trade secrets out there for you to know.

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Over the years on "Flog It!", we've come to realise that sometimes,

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the most fascinating antiques can emerge from the most

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inauspicious looking containers, so today, we're looking at boxes.

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That is quite special, isn't it?

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Wow!

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And lifting the lid on some items to which

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there is more than meets the eye.

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On today's programme, we'll be unwrapping some useful lessons.

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Firstly, always take a good look inside the box.

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"First pair of boots.

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"Too small for her little feet."

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That's dated 1873.

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He hadn't even looked in the boots!

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And secondly, never be surprised by what you might find there.

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This is kind of a mechanical version of a leech, I guess.

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On "Flog It!", we've had over 900 valuation days,

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and during that time, we've seen all kinds of antiques and collectables.

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But there's one thing that still gets me very excited when I see it.

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And that's boxes!

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Yes, you bring them in, boxes of all shapes and sizes.

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Boxes made of wood, boxes made of antique ivory and leather.

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And there's something quite satisfying about opening up a box

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and peering in and seeing the treasures that lie there.

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So if you've got an old box gathering dust in your house,

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it may be worth getting its contents valued.

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Here are a few of the surprises we've found

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when lifting the lid.

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You often find that a very tatty exterior

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can be protecting a jewel of an interior.

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When I first saw this in the box,

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I thought we'd have half an hour while you set it up.

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-But you've put it together like an expert. You've done that a few times!

-Two or three!

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It was towards the end of the valuation day

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and he almost didn't bother bringing it along.

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Whenever we're looking at optical instruments,

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and in particular, microscopes or telescopes,

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there's one name that really does ring out above all the others.

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And that's Dollond of London.

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Dollond of London are one of the most important optical instrument makers

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of all time in Britain.

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They're now Dollond & Aitchison, spectacle makers.

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If we look at this box that this microscope came in,

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we see these wonderful flush brass handles on the sides.

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And that indicates that it was made to be packed away for travelling.

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Look at that box. Wonderfully fitted.

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'The more you looked at this microscope,'

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the eye pieces were there, the slides were there...

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You often find the most gruesome things. What's that?

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A leg of something, by the looks of it!

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But they're contemporary with the microscope.

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So it's what we call a monocular microscope, for obvious reasons.

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It has one lens. Binocular or monocular.

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And this alters a rack and pinion. There we go.

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-But we've got a couple of bits missing.

-Yeah.

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-Yes.

-Tell me how you came to have it.

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-It came out of a skip.

-Who on earth would put this in a skip?

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My son!

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-Your son put it in a skip?

-When they cleared the house.

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-No!

-And then he took it back out and looked in it and said, "My dad would like that."

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So he said, "Here's part of your Christmas present."

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Really, it is the most fantastic quality thing.

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You've saved it, and I'm so pleased.

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But it is the best of makers. In its original box.

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OK, we've got a few bits missing.

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But you've got a lot left, too.

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So I think we ought to put an estimate of 400 to 600.

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I've seen them sell before, complete, at £1,000 to £1,500.

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Thanks very much for bringing it in.

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Been nice being here. I love it.

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But that was a classic example of putting a low estimate

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to try and get the best end result.

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I don't ever like to get people's hopes up.

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But come on, just stick your neck out!

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-Well...

-You're with friends!

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I think it should make 1,200-1,500.

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-Right.

-Really?

-Dave, are you shaking?

-Yeah!

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Early 19th-century monocular compound brass microscope.

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Lots of interest here.

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I have to start at £380.

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380. 400 now. 420.

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440.

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Telephone bids on it, internet bidding, absentee bidding.

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600.

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And 50.

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700.

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-And 50.

-Yeah, keep going!

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-800.

-It's making a good, steady climb.

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900. And 50.

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1,000.

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1,100. 1,200.

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1,300. 1,300 in the room.

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At £1,300. We have £1,300.

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Yes! £1,300!

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That's auctions for you!

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Fantastic! And to find it in a skip!

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Why don't I ever find those in skips?

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Not every box is full of delights,

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as Elizabeth was to discover with this macabre medical instrument.

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This is a very unusual item, Lynne. What can you tell me about it?

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Well, as far as I'm aware, it's a cupping set.

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And it's for blood-letting.

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It actually belonged to my great-grandmother,

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who used to assist with births.

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-So this was hers, was it?

-Definitely, yes.

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So it will have seen a certain degree of hard work in its time.

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-You've never seen it actually used?

-No, no. No.

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It had served a cause and had a few stories to tell probably.

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I'm sure whoever saw this being put together would have been daunted!

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Victorians loved the concept of blood-letting.

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Letting out badness from the body by cutting and drawing off blood.

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They used leeches a lot.

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This is a mechanical version of a leech, I guess.

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We draw back the little knives by this lever here

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which primes it, a bit like priming a flintlock pistol.

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You hold it onto the skin, and by releasing the button,

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the little knives shoot through

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and score the skin.

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At which point you rush up with this

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and put it onto the skin and draw back to pull out the blood you require.

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In some cases, they would take dangerous amounts of blood out.

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They were so carried away with forever attaching leeches or sucking out the blood

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that actually it was making the patient too weak.

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Not for the faint-hearted, is it?

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So you've inherited it, have you?

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No, it still belongs to my mother, but she's happy to sell it.

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She wants to sell it. OK.

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-Has it been pride of place...

-No, not at all.

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It was, unfortunately, until very recently,

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it was down the chicken shed!

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It had been carefully passed down the generations

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until the recent ten years when it was in the chicken shed!

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Well, you've obviously got a very clean and dry chicken shed,

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because it's in surprisingly good order.

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Value, I think, will be limited to around about...

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I'd think on a bad day £40.

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On a good day, it might make £80.

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OK.

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I based my estimate on not enough knowledge, as it turned out!

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You can play the game properly at home now.

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Doctors and nurses!

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40 quid? 20 I'm bid. 20.

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Five. 30. 35. 40.

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45. 50. 55. 60.

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65. 70. 75. 80.

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-At 80 now.

-80.

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85. 90.

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95. 100.

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-100!

-110. 120.

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130. 140.

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150. 160.

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170.

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180. 190. 200.

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210. This side at 210.

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The auctioneer did very well.

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He kept encouraging people to bid that little bit more

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and that's the sign of a good auctioneer.

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290.

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300.

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Going to burst a blood vessel in a minute!

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330.

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340. At 340 now.

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-350.

-It wasn't even named.

-360.

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370.

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I did think that to find a name

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would have given it quite a significant uplift in value. I couldn't find a name.

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So kept the estimate very modest at £40 to £80.

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410.

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-410!

-It's a lucky charm.

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£420. Finished and done at 420.

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If one's going to be caught out,

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it's better to be too pessimistic than over optimistic,

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and have a positive result rather than a terrible flop.

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Your last chance at 420. Who have I missed?

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Oh, and it's all down to Great-Gran there.

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She brought you luck today.

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Absolutely. Mum will be over the moon.

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There you go. Live and learn!

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But sometimes there are clues to what might lie within.

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As Catherine found out in Plymouth.

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I remember this gentleman coming up to me

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with this rather rugged tin box.

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And he plunked it on the table.

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It was a little bit rusty.

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But it had the name painted on the top, of a naval officer.

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So I thought, "Hmm. This is going to be something quite exciting."

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Chris, what's inside this rusty box of tricks?

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It's a naval bicorn hat, or a cocked hat.

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Oh, this is quite special, isn't it?

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Wow!

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It really got me going. Very exciting!

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And I just remember the epaulettes, a sort of golden colour.

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And they were really shining through.

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So when you opened this box,

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it was just like you were looking at treasure!

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A-ha!

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There are two of these epaulettes.

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Just in the most fabulous condition.

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-This pops out like that.

-That's beautiful.

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-What a great colour, as well.

-Beautiful.

-Wonderful amber colour.

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The braid coming down here and the lovely buttons with the anchor on.

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And as you say, the epaulettes, which were obviously worn on the shoulder.

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How did you come about this? Was it passed down through your family?

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No. I was doing a house clearance with a friend of mine,

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and this was part of what was being thrown out.

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I think we should give it a conservative estimate of probably 150 to 250.

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Let's hope that it attracts a lot more interest and really surges up.

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'And Chris has unearthed some useful information about the name on the box.'

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Did you do any research to find where he was, where he was stationed?

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Yes. He served on lots of ships during his time.

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-One of them was the Hood.

-The Hood!

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HMS Hood, which was an important ship during the Second World War

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which had been sunk by the Bismarck.

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This is it. This is your lot now.

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I'm bid £160. Against you all at 160.

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Five if you like. 165. 170.

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Five. 180. Five. At 185.

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190. 200.

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Wow! This is exciting!

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And ten. 220. 230. 240.

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250. 260. 270.

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280. 290.

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At £290 there.

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-Yes.

-At 290, then.

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All done at 290?

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-Brilliant.

-Excellent.

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-Bang on top. 290 quid.

-Good.

-Fantastic.

-Very good.

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That's what was nice about this box.

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It had the name of the naval officer on.

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So you could research it. I think that's what people really picked up on.

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There are boxes for tea, boxes for snuff and boxes to carry clothes.

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But it's not always about what's inside.

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Sometimes, the beauty is the box.

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You've been standing in the queue holding this very heavy box for rather a long time.

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It's always thrilling to see a box. You automatically think there must

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be something rather special in there.

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-It used to belong to my grandmother.

-Right.

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And it was handed to my mother when she died in about 1970-ish.

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-My mother handed it on to my daughter.

-Yes.

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-So it's the fourth generation in the family.

-Right.

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-Your daughter's instructed you to bring it along?

-Yes.

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-To sell it?

-She's getting married next year

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and it would be useful towards the honeymoon.

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-Does it come with any story?

-All I know is it must be something like 110 years old.

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That's pretty accurate. It's late 19th century.

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-But where does it come from?

-I don't know.

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-Put your hand over it. It's Indian.

-Oh. Right.

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-Do you know what it's made of?

-No.

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It's very black. I thought initially it was probably ebony.

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But I can see a bit of flecking in there.

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I think it's a wood called coromandel.

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Coromandel has this wonderful flecking of brown through it

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which gives it a particular charm.

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It's not easy to carve because it is so hard.

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But if you can do it well,

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it then has this wonderful patination.

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It's exotic to look at.

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Wow!

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Look at that fantastic workmanship.

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It's got the most wonderful ivory inlay.

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When I say wonderful, it's not Japanese quality.

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And then it has different woods laid into it.

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There's some probably tiger wood in there.

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There's some rosewood, I think.

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'And it was complete.'

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I think every lid to every compartment was still there.

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Which is a rare thing in itself.

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There should be a compartment in the bottom.

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Oh, my gosh. It's full, isn't it?

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-Um...

-I don't know anything about them.

-You don't know anything about them?

-No.

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Well, lo and behold, inside one of the bootees

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was a name.

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"Dear Rosa". Does that ring a bell?

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-There was an Aunt Rosa, yes.

-Aunt Rosa?

-My mother's Aunt Rosa.

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"First pair of boots. Two small for her little feet."

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And that's dated 1873.

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He hadn't even looked in the boots to see that piece of paper himself.

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I find that quite extraordinary.

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No wonder he wanted to sell it. He had no interest in it at all.

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Well, coming back to the box,

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did your daughter say, "If it's worth more than ten quid, sell it"?

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-Or 500 quid or...

-She just said, "Take it and sell it. I have no use for it."

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-Right.

-I suggested it might be worth in excess of 100.

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-Well, I think it's worth about £100.

-Really?

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-How does that sound?

-Reasonable.

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Reasonable? Were you hoping for more?

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Well, always!

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Let's hope the bidders are excited about the box and its contents.

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Next up, the embroidery box with a value of £100 to £150.

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It belongs to Michael. He's brought his daughter Heidi along.

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-Hello.

-Hiya.

-I love the hair! What does Dad think?

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I had a shock when I saw it!

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It's going under the hammer now.

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Numerous commission bids here. Start me straight in at...

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Come on.

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..£160. 160 I have to start.

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I think when I got to the saleroom

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I really had thought to myself,

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"Charlie, you've undervalued this lot."

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170. 180.

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190. 200.

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210. 220. 230. 240.

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-Heidi, it's because you're here!

-270. 280.

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290. 300. 310 takes me out.

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Because it's a rare wood, it's particularly collectable.

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340.

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-350.

-Oh, they like this.

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360. 370.

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380. 390.

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-400. 410.

-Charlie, what did we miss?

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I know nothing!

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£410. Back of the room at £410.

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At £410. Are we all done, then?

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At £410.

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How exciting was that?

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-Oh, my word.

-That'll go a long way towards your honeymoon.

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Yeah. I can eat, now!

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So when it comes to boxes, what are the key points to look out for?

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The box, although it was a beautiful object in its own right,

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it was actually made to protect what's inside.

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People often say, "Oh, dear, the box isn't in very good condition."

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That doesn't matter. If it's done its job,

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what's inside has survived really well.

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Just because it's tatty doesn't mean it's worthless.

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We often call it "country house condition" if it's a bit shabby.

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I like to have a really good look at it and think about the material that it's made from.

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So if you've got something that's made from quite a rich material,

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I think that's going to tell you you've got something special inside.

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Always look inside your boxes - no matter how fabulous,

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there could be even more valuable treasure hidden within.

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-I don't know anything about them.

-You don't?

-No.

0:17:200:17:22

Whatever your item, look for a name.

0:17:220:17:25

A known maker will always attract the collectors.

0:17:250:17:27

It just goes to show, there's a market for almost everything.

0:17:290:17:32

So think before you bin!

0:17:320:17:35

As you know, provenance is key in antiques.

0:17:350:17:37

So if your trunk or suitcase has a name or monogram,

0:17:370:17:41

as they often do, check it out.

0:17:410:17:43

The previous owner could be very significant.

0:17:430:17:46

But sometimes it's just the box itself which is of interest.

0:17:460:17:50

Something I learned more about in 2008 when I visited an old snuff factory.

0:17:500:17:55

I've come here to Wilsons & Co,

0:17:550:17:58

one of the last remaining independent snuff manufacturers left in the country.

0:17:580:18:03

The family-run business, here at Sharrow Mills in Sheffield,

0:18:030:18:07

has been producing snuff from a secret recipe

0:18:070:18:10

which dates back as far as 1737.

0:18:100:18:14

The original machinery used to grind the tobacco to make snuff still survives.

0:18:160:18:20

It's left as a testament to a bygone age.

0:18:200:18:24

Although snuff-taking isn't as popular as it used to be,

0:18:260:18:29

one aspect of it still is very popular and extremely collectable.

0:18:290:18:33

And that's snuff boxes.

0:18:330:18:35

And to tell us a bit more about it

0:18:350:18:36

is a familiar "Flog It!" face and good friend of mine, James Lewis.

0:18:360:18:40

James, thanks very much for bringing a small part of your collection.

0:18:400:18:44

-I know it's massive.

-It is.

0:18:440:18:46

I think I've got about 300-500, 400-600 altogether. Something like that.

0:18:460:18:52

-I'm not sure exactly.

-When did you start to collect snuff boxes?

0:18:520:18:56

Well, when I was younger, I had a passion for wood, just like you.

0:18:560:19:00

And the problem is, when you're a schoolboy or just about to go to university,

0:19:000:19:05

you've got nowhere to put furniture.

0:19:050:19:07

If you're going to collect wood, or treen, or anything like that,

0:19:070:19:10

you have to collect things that are small.

0:19:100:19:11

I thought, "What better than snuff boxes?"

0:19:110:19:14

So I had an interest back as a teenager.

0:19:140:19:17

But the passion for snuff boxes

0:19:170:19:21

really came from one of my first ever visits I made as an auctioneer.

0:19:210:19:24

I went to see a lady in a little tiny cottage

0:19:240:19:27

and halfway through the valuation, I heard this...

0:19:270:19:29

SNORTS

0:19:290:19:31

I turned round to see this lady

0:19:340:19:36

with snuff dribbling down the nostrils!

0:19:360:19:39

All over herself.

0:19:390:19:41

And she went, "Want some, lad?"

0:19:410:19:43

-And did you?

-No, I didn't.

0:19:430:19:46

I didn't. Today I probably would have done.

0:19:460:19:48

But back then, I was too shy and I said, "No, thank you."

0:19:480:19:51

And I left her to it.

0:19:510:19:54

But it started a strange sort of fascination.

0:19:540:19:57

Gosh. Let's talk about some of the varieties.

0:19:570:20:00

-Maybe pick on half a dozen.

-OK.

0:20:000:20:02

There are two types, really. You get the pocket snuff.

0:20:020:20:05

It always has a very tight fitting cover, for obvious reasons.

0:20:050:20:08

And then you have the table snuff.

0:20:080:20:10

Table snuff is normally bigger and sometimes has a loose cover.

0:20:100:20:14

These three at the front are all table snuff boxes.

0:20:140:20:18

They're by one of the most important snuff box makers

0:20:180:20:22

of the early 18th century,

0:20:220:20:24

a chap called Jean Obrisset.

0:20:240:20:26

He was the son of a Huguenot silversmith

0:20:260:20:29

and he specialised in working in horn and tortoiseshell.

0:20:290:20:33

He was snuff box maker to Queen Anne.

0:20:330:20:36

Really? So that's a name to look out for.

0:20:360:20:38

Queen Anne herself was a snuff-taker.

0:20:380:20:41

Can we have a look at one of those?

0:20:410:20:43

Wonderful detail.

0:20:440:20:46

-That's nice, isn't it? Hold it up to the light.

-Yeah.

0:20:460:20:50

You can see right through it. Look at the detail.

0:20:500:20:53

Great quality.

0:20:530:20:54

Just as we find today that smoking is a really controversial subject,

0:20:540:20:58

snuff-taking itself was controversial throughout the ages.

0:20:580:21:02

And although Queen Anne was a snuff-taker,

0:21:020:21:05

100 years earlier, King James, he despised it with a passion.

0:21:050:21:10

So if you were caught taking snuff in the presence of King James,

0:21:100:21:13

-you'd end up in the Tower.

-Really?

0:21:130:21:16

Oh, he loathed it.

0:21:160:21:17

In its heyday during the 18th century,

0:21:190:21:21

snuff-taking developed into an important social grace.

0:21:210:21:25

It remained popular well into the 20th century.

0:21:250:21:27

It was said you could tell a lot about a man's social status

0:21:270:21:31

by the way he took his snuff.

0:21:310:21:33

Open the lid and take a pinch between the finger and thumb.

0:21:370:21:42

Hold it there for a moment

0:21:420:21:43

so the warmth of the finger brings out the bouquet of the snuff.

0:21:430:21:47

So you get the benefit of the flavour. And inhale it.

0:21:470:21:51

Close the snuff box.

0:21:530:21:54

And then, if you like, just a little flourish with your handkerchief.

0:21:540:21:58

I'm not a snuff box snob.

0:22:000:22:02

I know a lot of these people say, "It's a silver gilt",

0:22:020:22:05

"It's solid gold", it's this, it's that.

0:22:050:22:06

"It's encrusted with rubies."

0:22:060:22:08

To be honest, that actually leaves me quite cold.

0:22:080:22:12

-You like the tactile items.

-I do.

-The working man's snuff box.

-Absolutely.

0:22:120:22:15

I've seen a few of those. That's the poor man's pinch, isn't it?

0:22:150:22:18

Yeah. You generally call these Scottish snuffs.

0:22:180:22:22

I'm pleased YOU said that!

0:22:220:22:23

I can get away with it because I'm 100% Scot!

0:22:230:22:27

-I can get away with it.

-A mean pinch.

-That's what they're called.

0:22:270:22:30

A mean pinch. They were made in brass and horn and treen.

0:22:300:22:34

The idea was that you would close the gap in the centre

0:22:340:22:36

so that when you take the pinch of snuff, you can't take too much.

0:22:360:22:39

Very eye-catching. I love the rams' horns.

0:22:390:22:43

They're brilliant.

0:22:430:22:44

A classic Scottish ram's horn snuff mulls, they were called.

0:22:440:22:50

With a lovely silver mount.

0:22:500:22:51

That's quality, isn't it, all the way through.

0:22:510:22:53

I think I've got about 30 of those, altogether!

0:22:530:22:56

They come in different shapes and sizes.

0:22:560:22:59

Interesting - somebody has attached a silver watch chain to that.

0:22:590:23:03

So they can carry it and put it over their arm.

0:23:030:23:05

Because that one doubles as a snuff box on the top there,

0:23:050:23:09

but also the end screws off and you can fill it with whisky!

0:23:090:23:12

That's a good idea, isn't it?

0:23:120:23:14

A lot of these are English and continental. Where else in the world were they made?

0:23:140:23:18

They were made almost everywhere.

0:23:180:23:20

The interesting thing is that in China they don't have snuff boxes,

0:23:200:23:23

they have snuff bottles.

0:23:230:23:25

Simply because a sign of status in China was to have wonderful, long, decorative fingernails.

0:23:250:23:31

If you have massively long fingernails, you can't take snuff from a snuff box.

0:23:310:23:35

-You can't pick the box up.

-No. You have a little shovel and straight up!

0:23:350:23:39

Now you're talking about that,

0:23:390:23:41

we're in the best location possible

0:23:410:23:45

to show this sort of thing.

0:23:450:23:47

This is obviously ground down tobacco. Should we try some?

0:23:470:23:51

-I didn't know you were a nosologist!

-Is that what it's known as?

0:23:510:23:55

A snuff-taker in the 18th century was known as a nosologist.

0:23:550:23:58

-I don't fancy trying any of this stuff.

-Go on.

0:23:580:24:01

No, no, no. I think we should try some fresh stuff when we get outside.

0:24:010:24:05

-Otherwise we'll sneeze our heads off.

-We're antiques people. We should try the old stuff!

0:24:050:24:09

-Gosh.

-Go on.

0:24:090:24:10

I don't rate that at all!

0:24:160:24:18

No. Whatever you do,

0:24:190:24:22

don't try that at home!

0:24:220:24:24

The great thing about boxes, like other small items,

0:24:280:24:30

is they're a perfect starting point for a budding collector.

0:24:300:24:34

And it doesn't have to be expensive

0:24:340:24:36

if you know what you're looking for.

0:24:360:24:38

If that's inspired you, here are some tips on collecting the small and the beautifully formed.

0:24:380:24:44

Look for an area you find interesting.

0:24:440:24:46

It could be nutmeg graters.

0:24:460:24:48

It could be Vesta cases.

0:24:480:24:51

But don't be narrow-minded

0:24:510:24:53

and look for a year.

0:24:530:24:55

Look at that whole section of nutmeg graters or Vesta cases.

0:24:550:24:59

The key word when collecting treen

0:24:590:25:01

is the patina, the colour of a piece.

0:25:010:25:04

That's really what buyers of this kind of thing are looking for.

0:25:040:25:06

Serious collectors are a special breed.

0:25:100:25:12

We tracked down a few to get their take on the art of collecting.

0:25:120:25:17

Douglas came to our Stroud valuation day in 2009

0:25:180:25:21

with a beautiful print and an extraordinary story.

0:25:210:25:24

Doug, I'm a big fan of Paul Nash.

0:25:240:25:26

Tell me how you came by this Shell poster.

0:25:260:25:29

Many years ago, in the late 1970s,

0:25:290:25:32

we were on holiday with some ruralists, Graham Ovenden and so on.

0:25:320:25:36

And he brought a friend along.

0:25:360:25:38

And this friend went into the sea. A bit daft, cos it's a very dangerous coastline.

0:25:380:25:43

And my wife looked out and said, "This guy is in trouble. He's drowning!"

0:25:430:25:48

So we clambered over the rocks, the tide was coming in.

0:25:480:25:51

I held on to his legs, and he grabbed this guy by the hair

0:25:510:25:55

-and we both pulled him out.

-Wow.

0:25:550:25:57

This poster came from him as a thank you present for having

0:25:570:26:02

rescued him from drowning.

0:26:020:26:04

And to me, it was a great joy.

0:26:040:26:07

What can I say? Paul Nash was a war artist in the First World War.

0:26:070:26:11

He worked for the Air Ministry in the Second World War.

0:26:110:26:13

He was a great advocate of British Modernism.

0:26:130:26:16

He really pioneered the surrealist thing in the 1920s. Pushed it to the forefront.

0:26:160:26:21

-Yep.

-It's rather a large furnishing picture.

0:26:210:26:23

I could see this in a big studio.

0:26:230:26:25

Right. That's why we're going to sell it, cos our sitting room wall is too small for it.

0:26:250:26:29

-If we put this into auction, I'd like to put it in at £1,000 to £1,500.

-Right.

0:26:290:26:34

Lot 312 is the Paul Nash.

0:26:340:26:38

900. 920 there.

0:26:380:26:40

940. At 940. 960, if you like. 960.

0:26:400:26:45

-Getting there.

-980.

0:26:450:26:46

1,000 and 50 now. Sure now.

0:26:460:26:49

At 1,000.

0:26:490:26:51

He sold it at 1,000. We got it just at the bottom end.

0:26:510:26:55

-That's all right.

-We're happy.

-Absolutely fine. Absolutely fine.

0:26:550:26:58

It was a success for me. It was a telephone bid. Obviously a collector

0:26:580:27:02

who'd seen it on the internet and wanted it.

0:27:020:27:05

So with the cash, Douglas was on the hunt for smaller Paul Nash works.

0:27:050:27:10

I keep a lookout all the time for stuff to do with Paul Nash.

0:27:100:27:14

But it's hard to come by these days.

0:27:140:27:17

What I've focused on is getting graphic work of his.

0:27:170:27:21

Limited edition books, limited edition pamphlets and so on

0:27:210:27:24

which contain his work, contain his writing.

0:27:240:27:27

The money we earned from "Flog It!" went partly towards getting this.

0:27:270:27:32

In its time, this must have been absolutely extraordinary,

0:27:320:27:38

because it was before abstract art,

0:27:380:27:40

it was before people painted canvases black and white.

0:27:400:27:44

It's really unlike most of his work,

0:27:440:27:46

which is surrealist in places

0:27:460:27:48

but also representational.

0:27:480:27:50

So he obviously just took out the feeling of Genesis,

0:27:500:27:55

the feeling of what he read

0:27:550:27:58

and then translated it into very, very simple, powerful images.

0:27:580:28:02

It's one of the most extraordinary books ever published, I think, by an artist.

0:28:020:28:06

Certainly in that era.

0:28:060:28:09

Now, that's a truly passionate collector for you,

0:28:090:28:12

trading in one piece to expand the overall collection.

0:28:120:28:15

That's it for today's show. I hope we've given you some food for thought.

0:28:170:28:21

Join me again soon for more inside information and surprising sales.

0:28:210:28:25

But until then, it's goodbye.

0:28:250:28:27

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