Boys Toys - Part 2 Flog It: Trade Secrets


Boys Toys - Part 2

Paul Martin and experts offer tips on antiques and collectibles. Paul test-drives a classic car made by the Alvis Car Company in Coventry.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Boys Toys - Part 2. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Over the last 11 years on Flog It!

0:00:040:00:06

we've helped you sell thousands of antiques and collectables

0:00:060:00:10

and, over the years, we've seen a variety of astonishing things.

0:00:100:00:14

It is the most amazing object.

0:00:140:00:17

You have made my day.

0:00:170:00:19

Are we all done?

0:00:190:00:21

Yes!

0:00:210:00:22

But, as you know, it's not easy to put a value on all of them,

0:00:220:00:25

but there are some things that are always guaranteed to find a market.

0:00:250:00:29

Welcome to Flog It! Trade Secrets.

0:00:290:00:32

Toy cars, train sets, Airfix models.

0:01:070:01:10

I can speak for the rest of the chaps on Flog It!

0:01:100:01:12

and say we're always delighted to see items like this being unwrapped

0:01:120:01:16

at a valuation day, something to do with bringing out the child in us.

0:01:160:01:19

They certainly put a smile on our faces.

0:01:190:01:22

But when do they stop being fun and start to be worth serious money?

0:01:220:01:26

Coming up in this programme,

0:01:280:01:30

we'll be finding out why boys' toys sell so well...

0:01:300:01:34

People collect what reminds them of their childhood.

0:01:340:01:38

Boys' toys, you know, grown-up men play with trains.

0:01:380:01:41

£800!

0:01:410:01:44

Yes!

0:01:440:01:45

Philip Serrell explains why he's never grown up.

0:01:450:01:48

On Christmas morning, 1961 or '62,

0:01:480:01:51

this appeared in my Father Christmas sack.

0:01:510:01:55

And I'll be having heaps of fun

0:01:550:01:57

with a fab collection of vintage cars.

0:01:570:01:59

We always get excited when people bring in die-cast toys to the valuation days.

0:02:100:02:15

Not only do they give everyone a warm glow of nostalgia,

0:02:150:02:18

but they also make excellent money, as Charlie Ross found out.

0:02:180:02:21

What a blaze of colour!

0:02:210:02:25

Seldom have I seen so many toys that haven't been played with!

0:02:250:02:29

It's a real treat.

0:02:290:02:31

You've got a boxful.

0:02:310:02:33

And although these are the better ones,

0:02:330:02:35

-we've got some others that we couldn't get on camera.

-Yes, we have.

0:02:350:02:39

This fantastic collection of Dinky Toys was valued by Charlie

0:02:390:02:42

at £400 to £600.

0:02:420:02:45

It's one of the best Flog It! collections I've seen of Dinky Toys,

0:02:450:02:49

-particularly the condition. Marvellous!

-Thank you.

0:02:490:02:52

A very large and a very good collection of Dinkies, some boxed.

0:02:560:03:02

There is loads of interest.

0:03:020:03:04

-£850...

-But it sold at auction for a staggering sum.

0:03:040:03:09

-Yes!

-The hammer's gone down, Daniel! £1,350.

0:03:090:03:14

How fantastic is that?

0:03:140:03:16

That was wonderful, wasn't it, Daniel?

0:03:160:03:19

Die-cast toys get their name

0:03:210:03:23

from the process of injecting molten metal

0:03:230:03:26

into reusable steel moulds called dies.

0:03:260:03:30

They started to be made in the early 20th century by companies like Meccano,

0:03:300:03:35

producers of Dinky Cars in the UK.

0:03:350:03:37

The first models were basic -

0:03:370:03:39

small cars or van bodies with no interior.

0:03:390:03:43

Matchbox toys were introduced in 1947,

0:03:430:03:47

with each vehicle packed into a small box

0:03:470:03:50

designed to look like those used for matches.

0:03:500:03:53

These toys became so popular

0:03:530:03:55

that Matchbox was widely used as a generic term for any die-cast toy,

0:03:550:04:00

regardless of who the actual manufacturer was.

0:04:000:04:03

The popularity of die-cast toys increased

0:04:030:04:05

and more companies entered the field, including the Corgi brand,

0:04:050:04:09

which appeared in the 1950s and pioneered the use of interiors.

0:04:090:04:14

It soon became apparent that many die-cast vehicles were being bought by adults as collectables,

0:04:140:04:20

not as toys for children.

0:04:200:04:22

But in the 1980s, Dinky, Matchbox and Corgi all struggled,

0:04:240:04:29

and production was either broken up or shifted overseas.

0:04:290:04:34

Today, a pre-war Dinky Toy bearing an advertising sign

0:04:340:04:38

can make £2,000 to £3,000.

0:04:380:04:40

If it has its original box, its value can double.

0:04:400:04:43

If, like me, you're a big fan of form and shape,

0:04:490:04:52

here's something that will set your heart racing...

0:04:520:04:55

MUSIC: "Sunny Afternoon" by The Kinks

0:04:580:05:01

The TD21, built from 1958 to 1963 in Coventry...

0:05:060:05:11

With 120 horsepower and 2,993CC engine capacity,

0:05:110:05:15

this is just one of thousands of cars

0:05:150:05:18

that put the city on the road map of motoring.

0:05:180:05:22

From Daimler to Hillman and Rover to Triumph,

0:05:230:05:25

from the very first £100 car,

0:05:250:05:29

and this beautifully hand-crafted Alvis TD21 Drophead Coupe,

0:05:290:05:35

Coventry built them all.

0:05:350:05:37

MUSIC: "Lust for Life" by Iggy Pop

0:05:370:05:40

Some engineers were sceptical of the future of the motor trade,

0:05:430:05:46

but when the first Coventry Daimler emerged from the Motor Mills factory in 1886

0:05:460:05:52

Britain's motoring industry was born.

0:05:520:05:54

And what an industry it was, producing some of the first cars of the day.

0:05:540:05:59

Driven by a king, but at the cost of ten times that of a house,

0:05:590:06:02

not yet by country.

0:06:020:06:04

The early cars were made by master craftsmen, unique in their skills,

0:06:040:06:08

pushing boundaries of design.

0:06:080:06:10

One such company made my favourite car,

0:06:100:06:13

and you may be surprised to know they are still making them today.

0:06:130:06:18

This car's incredible,

0:06:190:06:20

I'd like to sell all my antiques to buy this! I really would!

0:06:200:06:25

And to tell me more about these beautiful vehicles,

0:06:290:06:32

owner of Alvis, Alan Stote.

0:06:320:06:36

How long would it have taken to make a car like this?

0:06:380:06:41

Well, a few thousand hours, because everything was handmade.

0:06:410:06:45

Alvis had to make patterns to make the castings,

0:06:450:06:47

they had to design everything, they had to hand-fettle everything, everything was put together by hand.

0:06:470:06:53

-The whole thing was crafted by hand.

-I can see an ash work frame.

0:06:530:06:56

Well, that's the skeleton of the body skin.

0:06:560:06:59

All of that would've had to have been made by the coach builder.

0:06:590:07:02

We've got records showing that you could have exactly what you wanted on the car.

0:07:020:07:06

It was absolutely hand-crafted.

0:07:060:07:08

-What made you fall in love with the Alvis car?

-I think it's the individuality.

0:07:080:07:12

They were made to order. Customers could have exactly what they wanted on the car.

0:07:120:07:16

The records we have, 22,000 of them, show what each car was,

0:07:160:07:20

and I think that there are no two the same.

0:07:200:07:23

Alvis cars were made by highly skilled craftsmen.

0:07:230:07:27

But as the middle classes took to motoring, demand grew

0:07:270:07:31

and mass-scale production was the only option.

0:07:310:07:35

Production lines started to replace the craft-based skilled workforce

0:07:350:07:39

and Coventry's motoring industry sped into a new age of mass production.

0:07:390:07:46

Throughout the '40s, '50s and '60s,

0:07:460:07:49

Coventry's factories provided 23% of the UK output.

0:07:490:07:53

People came from all over the world to work here

0:07:530:07:57

and the city benefitted, with a thriving economy.

0:07:570:08:01

And like most booms, a bust was soon to follow.

0:08:040:08:07

Companies like Alvis and Triumph were taken over by giants British Leyland,

0:08:070:08:12

and the 1970s saw relationships between trade unions and management breaking down.

0:08:120:08:17

There were many strikes and productions lines came to a halt.

0:08:170:08:20

Now, add that to the pressure of cheaper cars being imported from abroad

0:08:200:08:24

and you can see why time was running out

0:08:240:08:27

for the British car industry.

0:08:270:08:30

From the 1970s onwards,

0:08:320:08:34

the term "British car manufacturing" became a complicated combination of words.

0:08:340:08:39

Rolls-Royce was sold to BMW, Mini was made by British Leyland,

0:08:390:08:44

and when Jaguar and Land Rover were sold to Tata in 2008,

0:08:440:08:48

it seemed mass production of British cars had bitten the dust.

0:08:480:08:52

But what remains of the Halcyon days of car manufacturing

0:08:520:08:56

should not be resigned to the scrapheap.

0:08:560:08:59

You could buy a new sports car or a mass-produced car today,

0:08:590:09:03

and three years later it's depreciated by - let's say - 50% of its value.

0:09:030:09:08

Hopefully, in three or four years, these will go up a great deal.

0:09:080:09:12

As an example, that TD21 Drophead over there...

0:09:120:09:15

-The black one?

-..that sold in 1994 for £22,500.

0:09:150:09:19

In 2007, we sold it for 40,000,

0:09:190:09:24

and it's now for sale, five years later, at 80,000.

0:09:240:09:28

It's doubled its money! Wow.

0:09:280:09:31

And the car I took out on the road earlier,

0:09:310:09:34

that is my favourite car, do you know that?

0:09:340:09:36

I'm ever so pleased I had the honour of driving one.

0:09:360:09:41

# Life in the fast lane... #

0:09:410:09:44

The British motorcar was born in Coventry,

0:09:480:09:50

it grew up in Coventry

0:09:500:09:52

and it lives on in Coventry.

0:09:520:09:55

Vintage cars have a keen following among collectors

0:10:020:10:06

and can sell for massive amounts of money.

0:10:060:10:08

But if you don't have the funds to buy a car,

0:10:080:10:11

what about buying part of one?

0:10:110:10:14

A Rolls-Royce "Spirit of Ecstasy" figure

0:10:140:10:16

can be bought for about £150

0:10:160:10:19

and could be a good investment,

0:10:190:10:21

as there are plenty of collectors of car memorabilia out there.

0:10:210:10:25

And it's not just car memorabilia which is collectable.

0:10:250:10:28

Here's Catherine Southon's tip on what to buy today

0:10:280:10:32

which could make you money in the future.

0:10:320:10:35

One of the questions that I always get asked is,

0:10:350:10:39

"What's really going to make money in the future?"

0:10:390:10:43

It's actually a really hard question to answer

0:10:430:10:46

because we don't really know, we can't predict.

0:10:460:10:49

But my feeling is that people should go out

0:10:490:10:53

and start collecting Concorde memorabilia.

0:10:530:10:56

Because a bit like Titanic,

0:10:560:10:59

it's something that could, in years to come,

0:10:590:11:02

really be worth something.

0:11:020:11:04

But the most important thing is when you go out to buy something,

0:11:040:11:08

buy something because you love it,

0:11:080:11:10

not because you think it will be worth something in the future.

0:11:100:11:13

Buy it because you love it, and if it makes money in the future

0:11:130:11:16

that's a bonus.

0:11:160:11:18

Over the years, we've seen some fantastic boys' toys on Flog It!

0:11:220:11:26

and Philip has a theory about why they do so well.

0:11:260:11:31

I'm a great believer that men collect toys from their boyhood.

0:11:310:11:36

And I think that people, it's a little bit now like...

0:11:360:11:39

..perhaps men of 70 or 80 might collect Hornby train sets,

0:11:390:11:44

perhaps people who are 30 or 40 might collect Star Wars figures.

0:11:440:11:47

And I really do believe that people collect

0:11:470:11:52

what reminds them of their childhood.

0:11:520:11:55

Wow! Look at that! Isn't that absolutely stunning?

0:11:550:12:00

It's a Hornby train set.

0:12:000:12:03

It's quite simple, really. Hornby is Rolls-Royce.

0:12:030:12:06

Princess Elizabeth...

0:12:060:12:07

-When did she come to the throne? About 1951, wasn't it?

-Something like that.

0:12:070:12:11

So I think this is possibly late '40s, early '50s.

0:12:110:12:14

It belonged to my father-in-law.

0:12:140:12:16

It is the iconic model.

0:12:160:12:18

It would've been massively expensive in its day.

0:12:180:12:21

I seem to remember, around the time of the auction of the one that we sold,

0:12:210:12:26

the original was being restored.

0:12:260:12:28

So all of those things add to the value.

0:12:280:12:30

How much are we going to get for it, do you think?

0:12:300:12:33

-I was thinking about 100, 150 maybe.

-Yes. Right.

0:12:330:12:36

-Well, I'm thinking more like £300 to £500.

-Bloody hell!

0:12:360:12:40

Easy! This is a family programme, John.

0:12:400:12:43

You can't use that sort of language!

0:12:430:12:45

Let's watch it go loco!

0:12:470:12:50

The Hornby Train - Princess Elizabeth.

0:12:500:12:54

400. 420.

0:12:540:12:56

450. 480.

0:12:560:12:58

500. 520. 550.

0:12:580:13:00

580. 600. 620.

0:13:000:13:03

650. 680.

0:13:030:13:05

700. 720. 740 on the phone.

0:13:050:13:09

760. 800.

0:13:090:13:10

840. 860.

0:13:100:13:13

880. 900.

0:13:130:13:15

920. 940.

0:13:150:13:17

940 bid. 960. 960 bid. 960.

0:13:170:13:21

-980. 980.

-Flipping hell!

-Stopped short of the four figures.

0:13:210:13:25

On the phone at 980.

0:13:250:13:27

-GAVEL BANGS

-Yes! £980!

0:13:270:13:31

-Delighted.

-Oh, gosh!

-Well done!

0:13:310:13:34

£980 - not bad for an old toy!

0:13:340:13:39

The value was clearly boosted by nostalgia.

0:13:390:13:42

You get these almost obsessive collectors of toys.

0:13:420:13:45

And I'm pretty sure it is that connection with their childhood.

0:13:450:13:48

Boys' toys, you know? Grown-up men playing with trains.

0:13:480:13:51

What have you brought in for us today to have a look at?

0:13:510:13:54

-I've got two Battle of Britain Dinky Toys...

-Yes.

0:13:540:13:58

..and two Schuco motorcars.

0:13:580:14:00

Michael's mum had sent him in.

0:14:000:14:02

As is the case with a lot of these old vintage toys,

0:14:020:14:05

they end up in Mum or Dad's loft.

0:14:050:14:08

And then, of course, they've got to downsize,

0:14:080:14:10

they come across this box and they tell the kids -

0:14:100:14:13

and this is kids who are probably 40-50 years old -

0:14:130:14:16

"What am I doing with your old toys in my loft?"

0:14:160:14:18

My mother's had them for ages and she more or less ordered me to sell them!

0:14:180:14:24

We've got two Dinky aeroplanes here,

0:14:240:14:27

obviously - by the box - Battle of Britain.

0:14:270:14:29

These were produced in 1969,

0:14:290:14:32

erm, shortly before Dinky were taken over by Airfix

0:14:320:14:36

and the quality somewhat slumped.

0:14:360:14:38

So these are still nice quality.

0:14:380:14:40

You've got some nice crisp moulding and some good colours.

0:14:400:14:44

And we've got the English Spitfire, obviously for the Battle of Britain,

0:14:440:14:49

the most important plane that we had involved.

0:14:490:14:51

And then we've got the German aeroplane,

0:14:510:14:53

which I think a nice little touch is the addition...

0:14:530:14:57

of the dropping bomb, which I think is a nice touch.

0:14:570:15:00

I think the main draw was the German aeroplane, which still had its bomb. Now, that's important.

0:15:000:15:05

Any of these toys which have detachable pieces or accessories,

0:15:050:15:09

as soon as they get lost it's incomplete, so the value drops considerably.

0:15:090:15:13

And then at the front here,

0:15:130:15:15

we've got the die-cast Schuco Micro racer,

0:15:150:15:18

probably dating from the 1960s when Schuco were producing.

0:15:180:15:22

And then we've got the late '50s Schuco car

0:15:220:15:25

with a rather nice touch, I think, with the...

0:15:250:15:27

HORN BEEPS ..little horn!

0:15:270:15:30

There are certain little details

0:15:300:15:32

that can make one Dinky Toy worth ten times what another one is worth.

0:15:320:15:35

And it can be down to the colour of the windscreen,

0:15:350:15:38

the colour of the hubcaps, the colour of the tyres.

0:15:380:15:42

Similar to porcelain, where you have things made in different colours, people want to collect them all.

0:15:420:15:47

In the present market, if you were going to sell them as a combined lot,

0:15:470:15:52

you should be putting a figure of £60 to £80 on them at auction.

0:15:520:15:56

Obviously, with collectable toys,

0:15:560:15:58

condition is of primary importance.

0:15:580:16:01

These are in reasonable condition, but I wouldn't say they were mint.

0:16:010:16:05

At the end of the day, these were produced to be toys for children.

0:16:050:16:09

The best advice I can give to people is if you want to collect toys,

0:16:090:16:12

buy two. Buy one to keep in the box and tuck away,

0:16:120:16:16

and play with the other one.

0:16:160:16:18

Did the damage put the bidders off?

0:16:180:16:21

They've been played with. The boxes are a little bit worn.

0:16:210:16:24

Mint and boxed, this is about £150, £200.

0:16:240:16:28

But, you know, we're talking 60 to 80.

0:16:280:16:30

-It's a bit sad you have them and not play with them.

-Exactly.

0:16:300:16:34

463 now, the Dinky Battle of Britain Spitfire

0:16:340:16:37

and various other toys.

0:16:370:16:39

50, I have down there now.

0:16:390:16:40

Straight in. He's a bidding man. He wants them.

0:16:400:16:43

-£60 I have down here.

-60 bid.

0:16:430:16:45

65. 70.

0:16:450:16:47

75. 80.

0:16:470:16:49

85. 90. 95.

0:16:490:16:52

At £95, I'm bid.

0:16:520:16:54

-All done at 95.

-That's good.

-I'm pleased.

-100.

-Oh!

-110.

0:16:540:16:58

120. 130.

0:16:580:17:00

130. In front of me now at 130. Are you all done?

0:17:000:17:04

£130. That was a surprise.

0:17:040:17:07

-And how confident were you they were going to sell?

-Not very!

-No!

0:17:070:17:11

The fact that the bomb had not been lost, I think, added to the value

0:17:110:17:15

and I think that's why they sold better than I thought.

0:17:150:17:19

But it's not just big-name model cars which can make big money.

0:17:200:17:24

All I can tell you is that this is a super piece,

0:17:240:17:27

something I would certainly love to own.

0:17:270:17:29

A lovely tin plate model of an Alfa Romeo.

0:17:290:17:33

I think it's a stunning piece.

0:17:330:17:35

I remember this toy car particularly well

0:17:350:17:39

and I remember the owner really well.

0:17:390:17:41

It was my father's and I suspect he got it new.

0:17:410:17:45

-He was born in 1913 and this is a 1924-25 car.

-Right.

0:17:450:17:50

So I suspect as a young teenager or 11, 12 year old,

0:17:500:17:53

-he was given it by my grandfather.

-Right.

0:17:530:17:56

And then I remember it as a child, being in the house.

0:17:560:17:59

The owner had so many tales to tell about this toy car.

0:17:590:18:04

He played with it extensively when he was a child

0:18:040:18:07

and that's really why it was in such a bad condition.

0:18:070:18:11

It is in a very poor state, that's quite clear,

0:18:110:18:14

but I actually quite like that.

0:18:140:18:16

It shows that somebody's loved this and really had a great time with it.

0:18:160:18:21

What I really like, as well, is some of this detail.

0:18:210:18:24

-I love this simulated leather seat with...

-A crinkle effect.

0:18:240:18:27

Exactly. That lovely crinkled, crackled finish.

0:18:270:18:30

In perfect condition with its original box,

0:18:300:18:33

-we'd probably be looking at a couple of thousand pounds.

-Mm.

0:18:330:18:37

Collectors always want these to be in perfect order.

0:18:370:18:41

But if we move away from toy collectors

0:18:410:18:43

and think about people who might be interested in it as a charming piece, as indeed I would be,

0:18:430:18:48

-I think we're probably looking at about £300 to £500.

-OK.

0:18:480:18:52

Catherine played down the car because of the condition. Was she right?

0:18:520:18:56

All of a sudden, when the item came up for sale,

0:18:560:18:59

all these men in their 40s suddenly came towards the rostrum

0:18:590:19:04

and you could see, "Yep! This is a real boys' toy

0:19:040:19:08

"and it's really getting the guys going."

0:19:080:19:11

There wasn't a lady in sight, that's for sure!

0:19:110:19:14

Lot 660.

0:19:140:19:17

I'll start the commission bids at £800.

0:19:170:19:20

Is there 50 in the room?

0:19:200:19:22

It's one of those moments where your jaw just drops

0:19:220:19:26

and you think, "Oh..."

0:19:260:19:28

And I remember this one was also on the front of a catalogue,

0:19:280:19:31

so when an item's on the front of a catalogue you always think,

0:19:310:19:34

"OK, I've got the valuation a little bit wrong here,

0:19:340:19:38

"but it's going to do extremely well."

0:19:380:19:41

At £1,100...

0:19:410:19:42

And 50. Commission bidder's out.

0:19:420:19:44

1,200.

0:19:440:19:47

And 50.

0:19:470:19:49

1,300. And 50.

0:19:490:19:51

1,400. And 50. 1,500.

0:19:510:19:55

And 60. 1,600. And 50. 1,700.

0:19:550:19:59

And 50. 1,800.

0:19:590:20:01

And 50. 1,900. And 50.

0:20:010:20:05

-Yes!

-2,000.

-Duncan!

-2,100.

0:20:050:20:09

-2-2. 2-3.

-Wow!

0:20:090:20:13

2-4.

0:20:130:20:15

2-5.

0:20:150:20:17

2-6.

0:20:170:20:19

-£2,500. To the telephone at £2,500...

-Wow!

0:20:190:20:24

-Sold.

-Wow!

-£2,500!

0:20:240:20:28

-I'm pleased for you.

-Thank you for bringing an item like that in.

0:20:280:20:32

It shows the condition doesn't count for everything in something like this.

0:20:320:20:37

That car did brilliantly because of its rarity and age

0:20:370:20:40

and because it was made to celebrate the launch of the Alfa Romeo P2,

0:20:400:20:44

a supercar.

0:20:440:20:46

There's so much to think about when buying boys' toys.

0:20:470:20:52

Here are my top tips...

0:20:520:20:54

Collectors of old toy transport are still willing to pay good prices for the right pieces.

0:20:540:20:59

This could be a great time to sell.

0:20:590:21:02

If you don't want something, someone else might.

0:21:020:21:05

Have your old toys valued at your local auction house

0:21:050:21:08

or at a Flog It! valuation day.

0:21:080:21:10

Poor condition doesn't have to mean a low price at auction,

0:21:100:21:14

as we've seen.

0:21:140:21:15

And if you have the original box, even better.

0:21:150:21:19

We know lots of you Flog It! viewers are youngsters at heart,

0:21:240:21:28

like Philip Serrell, who is no doubt about one of his most prized possessions.

0:21:280:21:33

Without going into all the gory details about when I was born,

0:21:330:21:38

in the early 1960s Corgi Toys produced this,

0:21:380:21:43

which was an Ecurie Ecosse Car Transporter.

0:21:430:21:46

The Ecurie Ecosse was a Scottish motor racing team that raced at Le Mans.

0:21:460:21:50

This is a coach-built racing car transporter.

0:21:500:21:55

It was used for transporting racing cars around the world

0:21:550:21:59

and you used to drive the cars up there.

0:21:590:22:01

This was something I absolutely coveted as a kid

0:22:010:22:04

and, lo and behold, on Christmas morning,

0:22:040:22:07

and I can't remember when, but I guess it would've been 1961 or '62,

0:22:070:22:11

this appeared in my Father Christmas sack.

0:22:110:22:14

I was so pleased with it and I loved it and I played with it.

0:22:140:22:17

It's something that I've always kept.

0:22:170:22:19

And the thing that makes it a little bit special for me, and this is down to doing TV,

0:22:190:22:25

if you look very closely at this,

0:22:250:22:31

you can just see there the motor racing transporter,

0:22:310:22:35

and through doing television, I got to go and sit in and see the real thing

0:22:350:22:40

about three years ago.

0:22:400:22:42

I mean, this is really, really sad but it was a real magic moment for me

0:22:420:22:46

because it was like so many boyhood, childhood memories,

0:22:460:22:49

because I really wanted to be a racing driver.

0:22:490:22:51

Jimmy Clarke, Phil Hill and Stirling Moss,

0:22:510:22:54

all these great names of that period, that was what I wanted to do.

0:22:540:22:58

And to be able to go and see this,

0:22:580:23:01

it was really special.

0:23:010:23:02

And it all started with that.

0:23:020:23:06

At most auctions, there's often one sale which takes everybody's breath away.

0:23:130:23:18

Like you, I want to find out more

0:23:180:23:20

about how one object can change life for its owner.

0:23:200:23:24

Here's one that really stands out for me.

0:23:240:23:27

Sometimes, people who turn up on Flog It! have rather unexpected passions.

0:23:270:23:32

-Hi.

-Hello!

-Now, what can I say?

-Well...

0:23:320:23:35

Take Kenneth, for example, what would you expect him to collect?

0:23:350:23:39

I'd have thought maybe motorbikes.

0:23:390:23:42

# God save the queen... #

0:23:420:23:44

I've got a bit of a mix -

0:23:440:23:46

the Sex Pistols,

0:23:460:23:50

Dennis the Menace

0:23:500:23:52

and Poole Pottery -

0:23:520:23:53

but I like it.

0:23:530:23:55

Poole Pottery? It's a bit, well, unblokey!

0:23:570:24:01

We first met him in 2006,

0:24:020:24:04

when he brought a really weird item into a valuation day.

0:24:040:24:08

My father won it in a cribbage game many moons ago.

0:24:080:24:11

-I inherited it when he died some years ago.

-Right.

0:24:110:24:14

It's a lobster claw, as you can see,

0:24:140:24:17

and it's been made into a brandy flask.

0:24:170:24:20

And I think it's a charming, quirky object.

0:24:200:24:23

That's what I was thinking. I thought you'd like it.

0:24:230:24:26

It's really bitten me, excuse the pun!

0:24:260:24:28

But it's just great fun.

0:24:280:24:30

-Somebody's taken what was obviously a massive lobster...

-It must've been huge.

0:24:300:24:35

-Much wider than the table.

-Oh, yes, much bigger.

0:24:350:24:38

It would've made a lovely meal!

0:24:380:24:39

It would've done, although I'm not a great lover of seafood.

0:24:390:24:43

But I think there will be people who would find it

0:24:430:24:47

a unique object, which it is.

0:24:470:24:49

My dad told me years ago that it was worth a lot of money,

0:24:490:24:53

but what's a lot of money? You don't know.

0:24:530:24:56

I thought maybe £100, somebody would give me that.

0:24:560:24:59

I don't think it's a huge value.

0:24:590:25:01

-No.

-I would've put maybe 70 to 100 on it.

0:25:010:25:05

-That's not bad!

-Not bad, is it?

0:25:050:25:07

Maybe we'll keep the reserve a little bit lower than that

0:25:070:25:12

to give it a fighting chance.

0:25:120:25:14

50 or 60?

0:25:140:25:16

-Yes, 50 quid. That's a deal.

-All right, then.

0:25:160:25:18

-We'll put a reserve of 50 and let's see what happens.

-Right.

0:25:180:25:23

So, what did happen?

0:25:230:25:25

-I love it.

-I do, as well.

-A bit of folk art.

0:25:250:25:27

-I mean, it was a huge lobster, wasn't it?

-Massive lobster!

0:25:270:25:32

-I hope it claws in the money!

-Ahh!

0:25:320:25:34

Boom-boom! This is it. Good luck, Kenneth.

0:25:340:25:37

Lot 37, which is an amusing lot.

0:25:370:25:40

One of the highlights of the sale, this lobster-claw brandy flask.

0:25:400:25:44

30. Five.

0:25:440:25:46

40. Five.

0:25:460:25:48

50. Five. 60. Five.

0:25:480:25:51

70. No?

0:25:510:25:54

Add 65, but thank you. 70. Five...

0:25:540:25:58

-It's still going.

-Fresh legs. Or should we say claws?!

-Claws!

0:25:580:26:01

..100. And ten?

0:26:010:26:04

120. 130. 140. 150.

0:26:040:26:06

160. 170.

0:26:060:26:09

170, sir? 180.

0:26:090:26:11

190. 190?

0:26:110:26:13

200. And 20.

0:26:130:26:16

220. 240. 260.

0:26:160:26:19

260. 280? 280.

0:26:190:26:21

300? 300. And 20. Fresh bidder.

0:26:210:26:24

320. 340.

0:26:240:26:26

340, sir?

0:26:260:26:27

At £320 on the back row, going...

0:26:270:26:31

-The hammer's gone down.

-£320!

-£320!

0:26:310:26:35

Pfft! Who'd have thought it, eh?

0:26:350:26:39

-Kenneth, what are you going to put that towards?

-I might get a Poole pot or something.

0:26:390:26:44

Sometimes it's not how much an item makes, but how you reinvest.

0:26:440:26:49

Pretty much every spare penny Kenneth has, he puts into Poole.

0:26:490:26:53

I have quite an addiction to collecting Poole.

0:26:530:26:56

I probably need help!

0:26:560:26:59

Help packing it up!

0:26:590:27:01

The record at auction for one piece is £13,000,

0:27:010:27:05

and for a collection, 250,000.

0:27:050:27:09

I think there's about 300 pieces downstairs in this room,

0:27:090:27:13

there's a further 50 or 60 pieces in the bedroom

0:27:130:27:17

and in the attic, the last count was 50 boxes full,

0:27:170:27:21

and each box has got...

0:27:210:27:24

..at least nine or ten items in it.

0:27:240:27:27

Erm... One day, maybe the attic will fall down.

0:27:270:27:30

The Poole Pottery Factory was established in 1873

0:27:320:27:36

and is still open and making ceramic-wares today.

0:27:360:27:39

Over the decades, it's become known for its bright colours and bold designs.

0:27:390:27:45

They did a lot of tableware and cups, saucers, eggcups, blah, blah, blah...

0:27:450:27:50

How many teapots, I don't know.

0:27:500:27:52

I must have at least 12 teapots and I don't even drink tea!

0:27:520:27:56

I thought I'd get a logo tattooed on my leg.

0:27:580:28:02

I had to get that done, really.

0:28:020:28:06

That goes to show, you shouldn't always judge the collector by his cover.

0:28:060:28:11

So, go on, search your home. You could be sitting on a treasure and now even know it.

0:28:140:28:19

Well, that's it for today's show. I hope you've been inspired.

0:28:190:28:23

And remember, never underestimate the frivolous,

0:28:230:28:26

the naughty and the childish.

0:28:260:28:28

If it makes you smile, it's a fair bet somebody else will want it.

0:28:280:28:32

See you next time for more trade secrets.

0:28:320:28:36

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS