Instruments Flog It: Trade Secrets


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Instruments

Antiques series. The Flog It! team take a look at which antique musical instruments make sweet music in the saleroom.


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Transcript


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It's been well over ten years

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since you first started coming to our "Flog It!" valuation days,

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and during that time we've seen, valued and sold

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thousands of your unwanted antiques and collectibles.

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-Are you all having a good time?

-Yes.

-Of course we are.

-Yes!

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It's worth £300 to £500.

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Wow!

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Done.

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I've discovered there's so much more to learn

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about the world of fine art and antiques that we all love.

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So if you want to know more, you've come to the right place.

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Welcome to Trade Secrets.

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In today's programme, we're taking a close interest in instruments.

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THEY PLAY A LIVELY TUNE

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It really is a thrill when they make an appearance at our valuation days.

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But it's a market that's fraught with danger

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for the wannabe collectors.

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It's just really important to...

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just do that research.

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£280.

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So today we'll be showing you how to spot a hit

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amongst the myriad musical misses.

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At 300 I'm selling, here...

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That was short and sweet, wasn't it?

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-Yes!

-Yes!

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Thank you!

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That's superb!

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Our lyrical line-up includes a serenade for Philip...

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SHE PLAYS "CONGRATULATIONS"

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-At least you recognised it!

-I'll name that tune in one!

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..a blast from the past for Charlie...

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-He's being rude, can you put him off?

-Yeah.

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We can't have him on "Flog It!"

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..and a star turn for our very own musical maestro.

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SQUEAKY VIOLIN/CELLO SOUND

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Do you recognise that?

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It's my attempt at a bit of the "Flog It" theme on a phonofiddle.

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Whenever I see a musical instrument

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at a valuation day, I can't help but smile.

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I absolutely love them.

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Not only do they represent a pinnacle of human achievement,

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but they also reflect a nation's culture, language,

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art, politics, religion.

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So if music's your thing, what do you need to know?

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My tip would be vintage guitars.

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I've seen from some of the rock and pop sales that we've put on,

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prices and interest have rocketed.

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If you look at some of the Gibsons, Fender, Hofner,

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these things are just going up and up in value.

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If you've got a guitar that was John Lennon's,

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suddenly, it adds massive value.

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There is also a very strong market in concertinas.

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Some people call them squeeze-boxes.

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Those are the sort of things that you might be able to find

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in car boots and bric-a-brac shops where they've been discarded

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and some of them can be worth hundreds,

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even thousands of pounds, depending on which model you find.

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Some of these instruments are valuable

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because people want to play them,

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so if they're not in a playable condition,

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you really have to be a specialist in the area, I think. Ask Adam.

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Yes, Adam shares my passion for music, and we view him

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as our resident musical instrument authority here on "Flog It!"

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Our valuation day's instruments, from the run-of-the-mill

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to the weird and the wacky, gravitate towards his table.

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Wow, that was nearly good.

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But there's one musical instrument above all others

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which regular "Flog It!" viewers will associate Adam with.

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HE PLAYS HUNGARIAN DANCE NO. 5 BY JOHANNES BRAHMS

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'I come from a violin-playing family.'

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Both my parents were professional violinists, I grew up around it.

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From being a baby, I thought that everybody did that

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and once I was five, I picked one up and started learning it.

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You're lucky that you haven't got

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all the strings on it, or I'd be playing it

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and we'd clear that hall pretty quickly.

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It's got a one-piece back, there.

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Sometimes you have a two-piece back or a one-piece back.

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This is a one-piece back made from maple.

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On the front, there, we call that the table, violin people,

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rather than the front. That's made from pine.

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Try to avoid cracks on the front, the table, or on the back,

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because a crack will affect the resonance and therefore,

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when you get it set up and you spend your £100 getting your bridge

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and your strings put on, you'll hear this buzzing where the crack is

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and the sound quality's not very good.

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Now, we always check the bows, as well,

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because sometimes the bow can be worth more than the instrument.

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-Oh, right.

-Let's have a quick look at that one.

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-Horsehair.

-Horsehair, yeah.

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Bows, of course, are a separate art form on their own.

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They're made from pernambuco, a valuable Brazilian hardwood,

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they're often mounted in silver and ivory,

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they're often stamped with a maker's name.

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We've had bows make many thousands of pounds

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that have come in with violins that are worth 200 quid.

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You haven't got any special individual value with the bows.

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So this is in pretty good condition.

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People looking at this will think, "Oh, it's no good,

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"it's got no strings", but it doesn't matter.

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You can pick up a violin pretty cheaply, really,

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and even if it hasn't got the strings and the bridge

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and everything on it, people say,

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"Oh, it's no good, it's got no strings on it." Just not the case.

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It's going to cost you £80-£100 or something to get it all set up.

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Inside, there's a label.

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I can just glimpse a label there and it says "M Costelli, Paris."

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"Luthier Artistique, 1895."

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-So it's French?

-It's French.

-Oh, right.

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-She's smart, isn't she?

-Yeah. Oh, yeah.

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-Now, this Costelli sounds like an Italian name.

-It does.

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And the Italians are very well known for the finest violins.

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French violins are also quite highly regarded

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and then usually another step down to the German violins,

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which are more mass-produced.

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Never really believe a violin label.

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95% will say Stradivarius in any way

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and they'll be a German factory-made violin

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on the lines and the models of the Stradivarius shape.

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Costelli of Paris, I think, was just a name

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to make it sound more glamorous than saying

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"Made in Markneukirchen factory in Germany",

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which is where I think this was made.

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It was a slightly better quality German factory copy

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than any others, but I don't think...

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My violin books show no record of an M Costelli in Paris.

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This Costelli isn't a very well-known or highly regarded maker.

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-No.

-So I'd go on the cautious end and I'd put 100-200 estimate.

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-Right.

-And put a reserve of 100. It's definitely worth £100.

-Is it?

-Yeah.

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But did the bidders agree with Adam's estimate?

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400 on the phone.

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I'd like to be going 50s now.

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425 online...

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425, 450.

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475 online.

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-475?!

-500 on the phone.

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At £500.

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525.

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525 online.

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Final call.

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-At £525...

-Slow down!

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All done?

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No second thoughts?

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£525! That ended in a crescendo, didn't it?

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In my view, it's worth maybe £200-£300

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and I think it made a bit more

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because you've got speculators online and in the room -

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"Oh, a French violin's better than a German.

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"It's got an Italian-sounding name, Costelli, goodness me.

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"This might be something really exciting,"

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and, in fact, it wasn't that exciting at all.

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So...it was a good price.

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The label may not have fooled Adam,

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but the bidders were obviously wooed

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by the Italian-sounding maker's name, Costelli.

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If you ARE considering buying a musical instrument as an investment,

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then please do take care.

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A large proportion of violins, for example, purport to be made

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by celebrated makers, but they are, in fact, fakes.

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If you want the real thing, it will cost you dearly.

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There's only around 600 violins that survive today

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that were made by the great Antonio Stradivari.

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Now, one of those sold recently in auction in 2011

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for a staggering £9.8 million.

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Now, Philip was in for a treat when he met Amanda,

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who knew what to do with HER musical instrument.

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So are you an accomplished saxophonist?

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-Is that the term?

-Not really, I can get a tune out of it sometimes...

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-You can get a tune?

-Well, sometimes.

-Sometimes?

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Is this going to be a "sometimes"?

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-Sometimes I make it squeak.

-Go on, girl, go for it.

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SHE PLAYS "CONGRATULATIONS"

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That's a bit of Harry Rodger Webb, isn't it?

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-That's the one!

-Is that Congratulations?

-It was!

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-I'll name that tune in one!

-At least you recognised it.

-Absolutely!

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People bring in the strangest things,

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so I wasn't overly surprised to see a saxophone there,

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but I must admit, it is different from the usual massed ranks

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of Beatrix Potter figures

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and Clarice Cliff and all that sort of stuff.

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-Did YOU buy this?

-I did, yes.

-And did you save up?

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-No, I had to sell my bike.

-You sold your bike?! Oh, that's sad.

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-You sold your bike?

-I sold my bike and I bought the saxophone.

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So you've had it all this time and now you want to get rid of it?

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-Was it a phase that passed?

-It hasn't passed, it's still there.

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I just need the right saxophone so I can do it properly.

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-That's not the right saxophone?

-The fingering's different.

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They improved it?

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They improved it to make it easier to play.

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Which now means that somebody who is used to teaching a new instrument

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finds it very, very difficult to teach you to play the old one?

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I didn't realise this when I bought it -

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not that it would have made a difference,

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because it's just beautiful to look at.

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I put what I thought was a fairly low estimate on it,

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because I felt that if she thought

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that it wasn't suitable as an instrument,

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other people would think the same.

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I think an auction estimate for this is about £80-£120.

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Right.

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Fingers crossed we get the top end.

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It's going under the hammer now, this is it.

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200, 220, 240...

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-260, 280, 300...

-They absolutely love this.

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-320, 380...

-We're hitting all the high notes right now.

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440, 460, 480,

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£500, to my left at £500. Are we all done?

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Yes! Hammer's gone down. £500!

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What are you going to put the £500 towards?

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I'll probably get another saxophone, a tenor saxophone,

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and lessons to play it.

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The proceeds of sale meant that she could go

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and buy an instrument that suited her and she could learn to play it,

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so what a great result that is.

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Here's hoping Amanda's sax-playing skills

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have gone from strength to strength.

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Now, over the years we've seen all manner of

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musical instruments on the show.

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But you've haven't just brought us your instruments

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which make sweet music.

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Singin' the blues there.

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We've also seen fantastic examples

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of instruments which play BACK music too.

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In 2009, Charlie Ross was fortunate enough

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to stumble across one of the earliest prototypes.

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-Shall we dance?

-We shall.

-Put the music on.

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Hooray.

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I love your phonograph. How long have you had it?

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-About 55 years.

-55 years?!

-Yeah, it was in the family.

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It was my father's, originally.

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-You inherited it, did you?

-From Father, yeah.

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-You know who made it, don't you?

-Yeah, Edison.

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Edison, it's the Edison Gem,

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which was his standard model, if you like.

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-It was.

-First patented in about 1900.

-Yeah.

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And this, I would think, dates from about 1910.

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It was completely revolutionary

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to have something that could reproduce...

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A, record and B, reproduce sound,

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whether it be the spoken word or music.

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Thomas Edison really had come across something

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that's been dictating our lives ever since.

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What I really like about it -

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not only obviously is the carrying case here,

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but that is the original sound box.

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It's a delight to see either a phonograph

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or a record player with its original tin trumpet

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and particularly with the original patination.

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Sometimes they've been repainted,

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more often than not they've been lost,

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damaged and thrown away and then you get a replacement one

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and that knocks the value.

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The absolutely marvellous, quirky thing I like about this

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is the original cord that held it up

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from the stanchion I see someone has replaced with a chain,

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which looks distinctly like a gold watch chain to me.

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Are you guilty of that?

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-I am fully guilty.

-Well, may I say congratulations?

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You've considerably added to the value of it.

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'The horn had been held up by an old piece of wire.'

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His wife had said to him,

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"You can't take it to "Flog It!" with that old bit of wire on there!

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"Put something else on there!"

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What did he put on?

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A gold chain!

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I think that's charming. How many cylinders have you got?

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We've got about nine or ten four-minute cylinders.

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Yes. Could we have a quick go?

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The three I've got left are all chipped and scratched.

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'When I was going up the stair last nicht, the...'

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Harry Lauder.

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' "..Is that you, John?" I said, "Aye, it's me"...'

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-He's being rude, can you put him off?

-Yeah.

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We can't have him on "Flog It!"

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I thought it was going to be a nice old Scottish ballad.

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-No, I'm sorry.

-You naughty man, David.

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-How much do you think it's worth?

-Oh, £200-£300.

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£200-£300?

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Do you know, I think it would have been 200-300 a few years ago,

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possibly a bit more.

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I think it's now 150-200.

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Two types of collector, really -

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the really academic collector who's always looking for the rarity...

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the one that he hasn't got in his collection.

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The other collector is someone like you and me who actually likes it

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as an object and it's really quite good fun

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to have at a party to put it on.

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"Look what I've got." It's a fun object.

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Sounds like it's a "Come and buy me."

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It's going under the hammer right now.

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Edison Gem phonograph, straight in, 100.

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100 bid, 100, 110.

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120, 130.

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140, 150.

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160, 170.

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-Yes.

-180, 190.

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200, 210.

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220, 230. 240, 250.

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260, 270.

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280, 290.

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-300, 310.

-Fantastic.

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-320, 330...

-We're making sweet music now.

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360, 370.

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At 370.

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You in on the phones?

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At 370. 380.

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Back at 380.

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At £380, I sell at the very back.

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-Wonderful.

-380, you're all out down here...

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-Yes!

-Yes!

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Thank you!

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-That's superb!

-Yes, thank you very much.

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Great pleasure.

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There are two reasons why it sold well.

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One is, it had its original horn. Secondly, obviously,

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the price reflected the fact that the horn was held up

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by a gold chain, and I'm sure whoever bought the object

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would have done something else with the gold chain,

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probably sold the gold chain

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or wore the gold chain and put another wire on it.

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So, there's a top tip for you -

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if you want to bump up the auction value of your antique instrument,

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offer the bidders a buy one, get one free deal.

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Now, seemingly, James Lewis had an easier job when he valued

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David's concertina, as it didn't come with any hidden extras.

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Let's have a look at this.

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"C Wheatstone and Co, inventors, patentees and manufacturers

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"of concertinas, aeolas." Based in London.

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Now, I'm not a specialist in the concertinas,

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so I've phoned a few friends

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and I looked it up on the internet before coming to the table here,

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and Wheatstone's first concertinas are listed between 1842 and 1847.

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This one is slightly later than that,

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probably made between 1860 and 1890.

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You take something in on a valuation day, and at the end of the day

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we can see anything from a Roman coin

0:16:380:16:40

through to a 1960s lamp base

0:16:400:16:43

and it can be anything in between,

0:16:430:16:45

and we can't know everything about everything.

0:16:450:16:47

It's just really important to... just do that research.

0:16:470:16:52

The value really depends so much on how many keys

0:16:520:16:57

and the quality of the materials.

0:16:570:16:58

This one is ebonised rather than rosewood,

0:16:580:17:01

and the front and the back plates are pierced chrome

0:17:010:17:04

rather than pierced silver,

0:17:040:17:06

but it's still a very good model.

0:17:060:17:08

'There is a huge following for musical instruments.'

0:17:080:17:11

You tend to find that the buyers of the antique instruments

0:17:110:17:14

also have an interest in modern music

0:17:140:17:16

and they often play them themselves.

0:17:160:17:18

Whatever I get for it will go to restore an old guitar that I've got.

0:17:180:17:22

-Restore one?

-Yeah.

-Why not buy a new guitar?

0:17:220:17:24

Cos I like the one I've got.

0:17:240:17:25

It's from the '60s and it's a wee bit damaged.

0:17:250:17:28

I think it's going to make between £150 and £250.

0:17:280:17:33

Right. That'd be quite good.

0:17:330:17:35

How much do you think it's going to cost to have your guitars restored?

0:17:350:17:38

I reckon about £100, £150 to get them restored.

0:17:380:17:41

Fingers crossed that'll pay for it.

0:17:410:17:43

James admits he isn't an authority on concertinas,

0:17:430:17:47

so did his auction estimate prove to be on the money?

0:17:470:17:50

Anita Manning was the lady whose job it was to wield the gavel.

0:17:500:17:53

So what did SHE make of the concertina?

0:17:530:17:56

These concertinas come up on a fairly regular basis,

0:17:560:18:00

and when you see that name Wheatstone,

0:18:000:18:02

you know that's it's good.

0:18:020:18:06

Wheatstone is the Rolls-Royce...

0:18:060:18:10

of concertinas.

0:18:100:18:12

I don't know if James had been talking to Anita,

0:18:120:18:14

but when it came to the auction,

0:18:140:18:16

he had second thoughts about his estimate.

0:18:160:18:19

On the valuation, I looked at it and thought, "Is it a good one,

0:18:190:18:22

-"or isn't it a good one?"

-It's a great make, it's the best.

0:18:220:18:25

Great make, but I didn't know if it was a really good one,

0:18:250:18:27

so we checked up on the internet. We thought, "Fabulous."

0:18:270:18:30

Yes? "Found that one, that one, they've all sold around £200.

0:18:300:18:33

"Let's put 150-250 on it." A week last Friday...

0:18:330:18:36

A week last Thursday, I was taking a sale

0:18:360:18:37

where I'd put exactly that estimate.

0:18:370:18:39

-I'm not going to tell you. I've written on here what it made.

-OK.

0:18:390:18:42

We're going to have a grand reveal later on.

0:18:420:18:44

So what was the final outcome?

0:18:440:18:46

Had James under or overvalued David's Wheatstone concertina?

0:18:460:18:51

900.

0:18:510:18:54

920.

0:18:540:18:55

940.

0:18:550:18:57

960.

0:18:570:18:58

980.

0:19:000:19:01

1,000.

0:19:020:19:05

1,050.

0:19:050:19:07

1,100.

0:19:080:19:10

1,100 with Lara on the phone.

0:19:100:19:14

1,100.

0:19:140:19:15

Any advance on 1,100? All done at 1,100. 1,100.

0:19:150:19:20

-Yes!

-£1,100!

0:19:200:19:23

Why didn't you say that on the day?

0:19:230:19:24

Because it was only a week last Thursday.

0:19:240:19:27

By the end of it, I think he had enough money to buy a new guitar!

0:19:270:19:31

He didn't need to restore the old one.

0:19:310:19:33

It was a lovely story, that he had an old musical instrument

0:19:330:19:36

that meant something to him, that he was going to get restored,

0:19:360:19:39

and yeah, I hope he knows more about guitars

0:19:390:19:42

than I know about concertinas!

0:19:420:19:45

To be fair to James, it's easy to get things wrong

0:19:450:19:48

when it comes to musical instruments.

0:19:480:19:50

Prices ARE unpredictable.

0:19:500:19:52

There are many things to be aware of.

0:19:520:19:54

Always check condition. Concertina bellows are prone to splitting.

0:19:540:19:58

You've got a little bit of damage, obviously, on the actual pull-outs.

0:19:580:20:01

The other thing you have to look for is the number of keys.

0:20:010:20:04

They can be as low as 14 for quite poor-quality ones

0:20:040:20:08

and over 30-something for the very high-quality machines.

0:20:080:20:12

This one is mid-range.

0:20:120:20:14

-There's 25, I think, here.

-Yeah.

0:20:140:20:16

Only the finest concertinas make big money,

0:20:160:20:20

because any inadequacies will affect the sale price.

0:20:200:20:23

300 standing. Any further bids? All done?

0:20:230:20:25

At 300 I'm selling, here.

0:20:250:20:28

That was short and sweet, wasn't it? £300.

0:20:280:20:31

But what other things do you need to be mindful of

0:20:310:20:34

when investing in different types of musical instruments?

0:20:340:20:37

If you want to play the saxophone and are buying at auction,

0:20:370:20:41

check out the fingering on the instrument,

0:20:410:20:43

which varies on models of different ages.

0:20:430:20:46

David demonstrates a nifty trick to increase the value of your antique.

0:20:470:20:51

Add a second valuable collectible to the lot.

0:20:510:20:54

If you're in the market for a violin, there's a lot to consider.

0:20:540:20:57

Check the table for cracks, which will affect the sound quality.

0:20:570:21:01

Be wary of labels.

0:21:010:21:03

Violins can purport to be something they are not.

0:21:030:21:07

Examine the bow, as it can be worth more than the violin.

0:21:070:21:09

And don't fret if the strings or bridge are missing.

0:21:090:21:12

These are easily replaced.

0:21:120:21:15

The 18th century was dominated with a new spirit of curiosity.

0:21:190:21:23

This was the Age of Enlightenment,

0:21:230:21:27

when serious thinkers believed in shedding the light of science

0:21:270:21:30

and reason over the world, questioning old ideas

0:21:300:21:34

and ways of doing things, pushing the boundaries of new technology.

0:21:340:21:39

Many great inventions took place during this period.

0:21:390:21:43

The first mercury thermometer, for instance, the diving bell -

0:21:430:21:46

there are many, many more.

0:21:460:21:48

And lots of fun things too, like a clock, that's in this room.

0:21:480:21:52

Let's go now.

0:21:520:21:53

And here it is, albeit a clock hanging from the ceiling,

0:21:580:22:02

obviously designed to put a smile on your face,

0:22:020:22:05

exactly what this little room does, as well, designed to titillate.

0:22:050:22:09

But let's take a closer look at the clock.

0:22:090:22:11

It's got a 4½" enamel dial with Roman numerals.

0:22:110:22:15

Now, clocks weren't new in the 18th century -

0:22:150:22:18

they go back a lot further - but this is a first

0:22:180:22:20

because the timepiece has a mechanical singing bird.

0:22:200:22:25

MELODIC WHISTLING

0:22:250:22:28

This enchanting type of antique is known as an automaton.

0:22:280:22:32

The term refers to an object which is self-operating

0:22:320:22:35

and works mechanically.

0:22:350:22:37

Automata can be split into two broad categories -

0:22:370:22:40

functional objects, such as clocks,

0:22:400:22:43

or collectables which are decorative

0:22:430:22:45

or entertaining, like the bird-cage clock.

0:22:450:22:48

Many of the automata we've seen on the show

0:22:480:22:51

have had a musical component.

0:22:510:22:53

These are singing bird boxes and they...

0:22:530:22:56

they are part of the sort of automaton tradition.

0:22:560:23:00

So it sort of flips up

0:23:000:23:01

and then you've got this pretty songbird

0:23:010:23:04

-which actually should be moving and flapping its wings.

-Yes.

0:23:040:23:07

-My estimate for this would be £500-£700.

-Yes.

0:23:070:23:13

At £1,100, I'm selling in the room,

0:23:130:23:15

it's going to be sold in the room at £1,100.

0:23:150:23:18

Yes! £1,100. Carol, fantastic.

0:23:180:23:23

Not all automata play a tune, though.

0:23:250:23:27

Those that don't can be just as captivating.

0:23:270:23:30

Most of the automata made in recent centuries

0:23:330:23:35

operate by clockwork, but automata have been around since ancient times

0:23:350:23:39

and some of the earliest examples were set in motion by water,

0:23:390:23:43

falling weights or steam.

0:23:430:23:46

Today, there is a massive worldwide market for all types of automata -

0:23:470:23:51

musical or otherwise.

0:23:510:23:53

MUSICAL TINKLING

0:23:530:23:55

Delightful objects from the period 1860 to 1910

0:23:570:24:01

are especially sought after,

0:24:010:24:04

as this was really the golden age of automata.

0:24:040:24:07

But be wary - our experts have a word of warning.

0:24:080:24:13

I think if you're going to look into collecting automata,

0:24:130:24:15

you want to go for the very best French makers

0:24:150:24:18

from the mid-to-late 19th century,

0:24:180:24:21

although they WILL be incredibly expensive.

0:24:210:24:24

Some of the finest ones can be £30,000, £40,000, £50,000 plus.

0:24:240:24:29

As a starter piece,

0:24:290:24:30

why not have a look at one of those birdcage automata

0:24:300:24:33

where you can pick up even a later, a 1950s one,

0:24:330:24:37

mechanical movement, clockwork bird in a cage,

0:24:370:24:40

you wind it and it tweets and it moves about,

0:24:400:24:42

and you can probably get one of those for between £100 and £300.

0:24:420:24:47

The number one thing is that it is working correctly,

0:24:470:24:52

and that the musical movement is in really perfect working order.

0:24:520:24:57

They are very, very expensive to have restored,

0:24:570:25:00

so get one in as good condition as you can find.

0:25:000:25:03

That WILL mean spending a bit more, but it's usually worth it.

0:25:030:25:06

I would recommend choosing an automaton

0:25:090:25:11

which will leave you spellbound.

0:25:110:25:13

TINKLING

0:25:130:25:15

Adam Partridge is firmly established as our resident musician.

0:25:200:25:26

So he's bound to have something intriguing in his own collection.

0:25:260:25:30

Well, I've always had an interest in musical instruments of all sorts,

0:25:300:25:33

specifically violins and stringed instruments,

0:25:330:25:36

and I couldn't resist it

0:25:360:25:37

when I saw this coming up quite cheaply for sale, because it is

0:25:370:25:41

quite a rare thing, it's an early 20th-century phonofiddle.

0:25:410:25:45

These were invented when the age of the gramophone started kicking in

0:25:450:25:49

and people were recording music onto records for playing in the home.

0:25:490:25:53

And recording techniques weren't that strong

0:25:530:25:55

so they decided that they'd make a violin with a horn on the end of it.

0:25:550:26:00

It was a novelty item, as well, and I think they were quite cheap

0:26:000:26:04

to produce and to buy, and they were used in music halls

0:26:040:26:07

and on the streets and busking and everything else.

0:26:070:26:10

Now, I've never really played it before, so, er...

0:26:100:26:14

it doesn't make a very nice sound,

0:26:140:26:16

I will warn you, it doesn't sound good. How about this?

0:26:160:26:20

SQUEAKY VIOLIN/CELLO SOUND

0:26:200:26:28

Do you recognise that?

0:26:330:26:35

It's my attempt at a bit of the "Flog It!" tune on a phonofiddle.

0:26:350:26:39

The main maker was Howson of London,

0:26:390:26:43

and there on the side of this one here

0:26:430:26:45

you can see the circular brass disc that shows his name.

0:26:450:26:50

There were a range of models and this was the basic one-string model.

0:26:500:26:54

But they did do a four-string model

0:26:540:26:56

which would have been a lot easier to play,

0:26:560:26:58

and it would have been a lot more helpful

0:26:580:27:00

if it was under the chin as well

0:27:000:27:02

because that's more what I'm used to -

0:27:020:27:04

I'm not used to this between-the-legs business -

0:27:040:27:06

very tricky indeed.

0:27:060:27:08

But quite a curiosity.

0:27:080:27:10

I think I paid about £50 for this one,

0:27:100:27:12

but I've seen them make £100 to £150 at auction before.

0:27:120:27:16

So hopefully one day there'll be a small profit for me,

0:27:160:27:19

although I don't plan on selling it any time soon.

0:27:190:27:22

Yes, £1,100!

0:27:280:27:31

-Yes! Hammer's gone down.

-Wow...

-£500.

-I can't believe it.

0:27:310:27:35

We all love music,

0:27:350:27:36

and antique instruments are understandably attractive

0:27:360:27:40

to fledgeling collectors.

0:27:400:27:42

But anyone who's interested should proceed with caution.

0:27:450:27:50

It really is a specialist field,

0:27:500:27:51

with many pitfalls for the unsuspecting enthusiast.

0:27:510:27:55

As with any area of collecting, it is vitally important to research

0:27:550:28:00

any potential purchase thoroughly -

0:28:000:28:01

and, if necessary, do seek out expert advice.

0:28:010:28:05

Well, that's it for today's show.

0:28:070:28:10

Do join us again soon for more Trade Secrets.

0:28:100:28:13

The Flog It! team take a look at which antique musical instruments make sweet music in the saleroom.