Colchester 5 Flog It!


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Colchester 5

Paul Martin takes the Flog It! team to Colchester, joined by experts Kate Bateman and David Barby. David nets a high-value pair of fish paintings.


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We've got a massive queue outside the town hall

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here to ask our experts that all-important question. Here's an expert.

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Mr David Barby.

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If you follow me, we have another one, the gorgeous Kate Bateman.

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Hello!

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This is said to be one of Britain's oldest towns.

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It's been a military base for the last 2,000 years. So where are we?

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-Colchester!

-And what are we here for?

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Flog It!

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This Baroque-style building is Colchester town hall,

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our magnificent venue for today.

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All these people have come to meet our experts

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to ask that all-important question, "What's it worth?"

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When they've found out, it's off to auction.

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Today's experts, Kate Bateman and David Barby are trawling the crowd.

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Kate's got antiques in her blood

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and runs an auction house with her father.

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Exciting!

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What have you got there?

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While David is the daddy when it comes to spotting a thing of beauty.

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-You look like Barbara Windsor in her younger days.

-I know!

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-Remember that camping scene?

-No, I don't do that! Too cold!

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The charmer's pretty good at antiques, too!

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And as this crowd find their seats,

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they have no idea what the day might have in store.

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Trust me, one owner is in for a really big surprise.

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At my age, you know, it's shocking, this sort of thing.

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-Oh, do stop, this is awful!

-No, no!

-No, don't stop.

-Keep going!

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SHE LAUGHS They're still at it!

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SQUEALS AND LAUGHTER

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That's all to come. So let's get down to the valuations.

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Here's Kate with Joe.

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Joe, you've brought this fantastic centrepiece. What can you tell me about it?

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Right. It was bought in 1965.

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My mother bought it. There was a fantastic three-day auction

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at an old house in Burnham on Crouch.

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It belonged to a sea captain who'd brought back things, filled the house, from all over the world.

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-Right.

-Absolutely marvellous.

-OK.

-My mother really loved it.

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She always had it on the mantelpiece.

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We had it out at Christmas on the table with a bunch of grapes hanging from here.

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And tangerines and things down the bottom.

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It's a really unusual shape. We've got all this crazy decoration.

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-It's quite ornate. All these sea scrolls. It's a bit Rococo.

-Yes.

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If we look on the bottom to see who the maker is.

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As we suspected, Doulton Burslem.

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A registration number, 142326.

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If we look that up in a book, that will tell us it was made in 1890.

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That's the year this registration number was put in the book.

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It was retailed by Phillips of Oxford Street in London.

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Quite a high-class retailer. Do you like it?

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-I do.

-Yes?

-I love it when it's got the grapes and the fruit.

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-Very festive, I imagine.

-It is. It brings it all together.

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It looks so empty like that.

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When I see things like this, I expect to see bits broken off.

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I've looked really carefully for bits of glue! But it seems to be perfect.

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-It's amazing it's survived this well.

-Yes.

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-You've taken good care of it.

-As good as I could.

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That's one very good reason for selling it.

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-Because it is in perfect condition.

-OK.

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Either it's a question of putting it in the loft to keep it safe

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or putting it on the mantelpiece and it gets chipped or broken.

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I'd think, "Why on earth didn't I bring it to Flog It before it got broken?"

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That's probably a good thing. Pass it on to somebody who'll enjoy it.

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-Price-wise, 100 to £150.

-Mm-hmm.

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I wouldn't be surprised if it made a bit more on the day. It's a strange thing.

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-Would you be happy with that sort of figure?

-Yes, yes.

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-What about a reserve of £80?

-Yes.

-And estimate of 100 to 150.

-Sounds fine.

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-What have you got there? I'm intrigued.

-That's actually the original catalogue.

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-Where your mother bought it?

-Yes.

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-We went there, my mother and I.

-And this is it, Lot 162.

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-Yes. Old Doulton china fruit bowl and a Staffordshire figure.

-A Staffordshire figure.

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-How much did you pay?

-Seven pounds, five shillings.

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-So that's our aim, seven pounds, five shillings.

-Yes!

-Let's hope we can improve on that.

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I think Kate's on safe ground, there.

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As she says, it shouldn't be hard to make that £7 target ten times over.

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Here's David Barby.

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Who does this belong to?

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It came from my mother's father. That's where it started.

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You know what it is, don't you?

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-Yes.

-This is a lovely example of a combined propelling pencil which is there.

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And it's retractable.

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And then do you see those little flower heads? Beautiful.

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Lovely detail.

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Then on the other one, if I push it down,

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a provision for putting a nib.

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You dip that into the inkwell and start writing.

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-So this would have been ideal for a lady.

-Yes.

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Who had a purse or a little vanity case

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which had a writing set as well.

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This, I think, is quite, quite adorable.

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What I love is the engine-turned decoration on this solid silver case.

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On the silver case you can see the hallmark just there.

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And even the name of the manufacturer.

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"R.M. Mosley, London."

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The major manufacturer for these was Mordan & Co.

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This is very much in their manner, but Mosley & Co.

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The date letter there is a Gothic F

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so we're looking at about 1841.

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Produced in London, 1841.

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But that's not the only attraction,

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the case and those little flower-head pushes,

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it's this at the end here which is a cairngorm engraved, which is lovely.

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-Do you know what that was for?

-I imagine it was something for stamping.

-Right.

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So after you'd written your letter, you'd put it in the envelope

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and this was then used to seal it

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whilst the wax was still molten.

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And if I can see with my eyes,

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there's an engraved name which I think says, back-to-front, Miriam.

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Miriam.

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And just into the capital letter M,

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there's traces of wax.

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So this actually has been used.

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-Oh!

-Of course, the name is back-to-front as you put it in the wax, it would appear normal.

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A very good collectors' item.

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When it goes up at auction,

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I'd like to see it probably 50 to £80.

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That sort of price range.

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Would you be happy at parting with this family heirloom at that sort of level?

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As long as there's a fixed reserve on it. I wouldn't want it to go for a few pounds.

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-I'd like to make sure...

-Very sensible. A reserve of £50? Would you be happy?

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-That's fine.

-OK.

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Sheila, thank you. I shall be at the auction watching the price go up.

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-Look forward to seeing you, Nigel.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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We're staying with small and beautiful for our next item.

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Wendy and Peter, thanks so much for coming in.

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We're having a wonderful time. Everyone's in high spirits.

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I love what you're holding. I think it's absolutely charming.

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Tell me about its history.

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Well, it belonged to my father.

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He died at 91 and I've had it ever since.

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It's spent most of its life in a sideboard drawer.

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-Have you used it much at all?

-No.

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-You don't have the odd tipple?

-He's had a restful life!

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Let me have a look. He's made from a nut.

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Look, it's exquisite!

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-Yes.

-He can almost speak to you, can't he?

-He hasn't yet!

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-The children don't want him, unfortunately.

-I really can't believe that.

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They've got so many other funny things.

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It's so usable, as well. It's a practical piece of kit.

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I've seen a lot of corkscrews in my time

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and I know a lot of collectors would like to own this one.

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It's a novelty piece. It's late Victorian.

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But it's in great condition. The glass eyes are a little bit scratched.

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I think if you put this into auction, we'd put a value of 80 to £120 on it.

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-Is that right?

-And a reserve of 70. I'm pretty sure you'll get the top end.

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-Is that right?

-Yes.

-That's amazing.

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If two collectors are there on the day, it'll go even higher.

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If he was a real parrot, he'd be very pleased.

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-Exceptionally pleased.

-Having laid in a drawer for years!

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If you're going to own a parrot, Peter, this is the type to own.

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They don't answer back.

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No.

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Now, what's Kate found? She's with Debbie.

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-Are you a Clarice Cliff collector?

-Not really, no.

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I liked it a few years ago. We went to look around at Clarice Cliff,

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-but not really, no. I've only got these two.

-Did you inherit these?

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No, I bought them six to eight years ago. We used to go to antiques fairs.

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We just bought them then.

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Which do you like best?

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-This one.

-I'm with you on that.

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This one, I call it the fried eggs pattern, but officially it's Orange Chintz.

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It's supposed to be flowers. All hand-painted

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but it's a really cool shape, and the shape is going to excite collectors.

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It's funky and unusual. It looks like a spaceship!

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In the 1930s that was so cool and new.

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This fabulous cross-section on the base.

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It's marked up Bizarre, Clarice Cliff. Hand-painted.

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Condition's quite good. There are a few nibbles on the rim.

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But that was before it was actually painted, so the factory let it out with those irregularities.

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The shape is called Stamford.

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So that's from that style range.

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This one is Rhodanthe

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and the shape is Biarritz,

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this very square... I suppose they were thinking of the south of France.

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This one comes in different colourways. Brown is my least favourite.

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There's one called Aurora, which is pink and grey and quite pretty.

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They're nice together, the same colour take, so they'll sell well together as one lot.

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-You want to put them to auction?

-Yes.

-You want to get rid of them?

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-Is that so you can buy other things?

-Yes, I'm moving house in March

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and I want to buy bits for that. This doesn't go with a new house

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-so out with the old, in with the new!

-Right.

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A spring clean! Right.

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In terms of price, I think probably 300 to 400 is where I'm thinking.

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Mainly for this one. This one is £50-ish on its own,

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but you would put them together in one lot

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because it'll appeal to a Clarice Cliff collector.

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-Is that a figure you'd be happy with?

-Um...

-Did you pay more than that?

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A little bit more, but it was a long time ago, so...

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-Perhaps a little bit more.

-So maybe 350 reserve?

-Yes, 350 would be fair.

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We'll make it a firm reserve. 350 to 400 as an estimate for the two together.

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Hopefully this one will sell it and they get a freebie with it as well.

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-OK.

-Fingers crossed.

-Hope so.

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Hope our fried eggs go well!

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-They do look like fried eggs!

-They do!

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Of course, a precise and colourful description is the auctioneer's art.

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Erm, Kate...

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We meet a lot of collectors on this programme,

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people with shelves full of Clarice Cliff and display cabinets full of Royal Doulton.

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But what if your budget is a lot bigger and your display shelves are the size of two big barns?

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I'm at Bonnard's Farm in Essex to meet a man who's taking collecting to the next level.

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It starts here through this rather unassuming door. Let's have a look.

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There's always been a certain romance about the early days of motoring.

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Cars have been with us now for over 120 years.

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So are they mechanical artworks, technical wonders or just a necessity of modern life?

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Either way, the nostalgia of those pioneering days

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is still being fuelled by vintage rallies, museums

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and more unusually, private collections like this one.

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Bernard Holmes used to be an executive at the Ford Motor Company.

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So when his own business ventures provided enough money for an expensive hobby,

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it's not surprising his collection led here.

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This is where it all started for you?

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Yes, this was the first car we restored

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and it was a nuts to bolts restoration. Body off, down to the chassis.

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Incredible job you've done.

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It was very enjoyable doing it.

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What do you look for in a practical classic like these lovely old cars

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-when you go to buy one.

-If I come across a car and I fall in love with it, I'll buy it.

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I then add it to the collection.

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So this one was bought. I knew nothing about the car.

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I've learned about it as I've restored it and I've learned to love it.

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We've travelled a number of miles in it.

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All these cars get used.

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-They're all roadworthy.

-It's after using them that you get an affinity with them.

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-But you would buy a wreck, would you?

-Yes, this one was a wreck.

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A very expensive wreck! But it was a wreck when I bought it.

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You couldn't have used it.

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You get the parts hand-made now in this country?

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Yes, what you try and do is use the original part and repair it

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by re-sleeving or putting bushes in or whatever.

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That's the first way to go.

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If you can't do that, you're forced into copying the part and remaking it.

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You try and do that as little as possible.

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You do a lot of the work yourself, which keeps the costs down.

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Yes. Although I say I do the restoration myself,

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obviously I use a team of people. So I subcontract the paint out.

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I subcontract the upholstery out.

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A friend of mine, Barry, did the wickerwork.

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Somebody else does the woodwork for me.

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But there's a lot of time and money spent in disassembling the car,

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doing all the running around, getting the parts plated, that's what I do.

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Bernard has 26 cars and dozens of motorbikes

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all restored to an incredible condition.

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If we're going to talk about these wonderful vintage cars, you have to include a Rolls Royce!

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-You ought to, I guess!

-And there's one right here!

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This is a 1913 Silver Ghost

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with a particularly light bodywork on it.

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-It's called a London to Edinburgh.

-It was built as a Grand Tourer.

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Yes. And this is capable of 70 miles an hour.

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Last year we did a tour via Paris down to the Cotes D'Azur

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-back to Monaco and back through the Alps.

-Your wife told me you took this to Durban.

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Yes, we did 4,500 kilometres around South Africa.

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Durban, Swaziland, and down out through Cape Town.

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-Wonderful.

-What did the people from the townships think about this?

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I always think people are very generous.

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Actually, we did take this into a township.

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And it just caused the same sort of stir that it would in England!

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They must have thought you were royalty! It's incredible!

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You don't get envy. People just admire the car for what it is.

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-Clap and cheer!

-It's very generous of people, really.

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What would one of these cost in this condition today?

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-Half a million, I guess.

-Incredible.

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Absolutely incredible.

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But they're not all that price. The entry level would be a Model T Ford.

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There are thousands still on the road. You can get one for £10,000.

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All that nostalgia is kept alive by events like the annual London to Brighton Veteran Car Run.

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It started in 1927 and every year, 500 old cars make the 54-mile journey south.

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The only rule is they have to have been built before 1905.

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It's an enthusiast's dream, and some of them really go!

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Bernard's cars are regulars on the various historic rallies.

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His engineering background means he has his favourites.

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I'm particularly interested in De Dion Bouton.

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I have single cylinders, twins, four cylinders, an eight-cylinder.

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-So I can follow the De Dion.

-What's the fascination with them?

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I like the engineering.

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And at the turn of the last century,

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Darroch and De Dion supplied more than 60% of all motor cars.

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-Right.

-In the world. So they were the leaders in their industry.

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Let's look at another. I know you have a favourite down there.

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It's a particularly exciting car.

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It's a twin-cylinder De Dion dating from 1904.

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Let's have closer look. Is it easy to drive?

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It's particularly easy, this one,

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because you just move this lever into that position,

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push that forward, and you're in first gear.

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-Right.

-Push it back and you're into second gear.

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-Then move that back to that position and that's into third gear.

-Right.

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-So it's a bit like rubbing your tummy and patting your head.

-Yes!

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But once you're used to it, there's no possibility of mucking the gear change up.

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-You need good co-ordination.

-Yes. And it's got a good turn of speed.

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35 miles an hour, nearly 40 miles an hour.

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You don't go any faster or it vibrates itself to death!

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What a wonderful collection. The good news is, Bernard opens to the public on selected days of the year.

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We've got our first four items, now we're taking them off to the sale.

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Let's hope the bidders will want to snap them up.

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For our auction we're staying in Colchester

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and we're at Reeman Dansie Auction Rooms.

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We're starting our sale with Nigel and Sheila's propelling pencil,

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valued at 50 to £80.

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Surely you could make use of this? Don't you do doodles? Don't you want to use it?

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-No...

-You can still buy the lead.

0:19:320:19:34

-Not with that.

-Not with that?

-No.

0:19:340:19:38

-It's a nice thing.

-It is.

-It's a really nice thing.

0:19:380:19:41

I think now, you can't use it. You have to buy separate nibs.

0:19:410:19:44

It's very difficult to get the inks and everything to go with it.

0:19:440:19:48

It makes your handwriting look good! I still use an ink pen.

0:19:480:19:51

So do I. But something like that is very difficult.

0:19:510:19:54

It's more for a cabinet or a collectors' item.

0:19:540:19:57

Silver's very high in value at the moment, so that's good.

0:19:570:20:00

It's got everything going for it.

0:20:000:20:02

Let's find out what the bidders think. This is the test.

0:20:020:20:06

Let's find out what it's worth.

0:20:060:20:08

The Victorian silver combination propelling pencil and pen.

0:20:090:20:14

What do you say? £50 to start me? £50 start for this one?

0:20:140:20:19

£50 to start me?

0:20:190:20:21

-40, then? 40 I have down here.

-OK.

0:20:210:20:24

44. 46. 48.

0:20:240:20:27

50. 55.

0:20:270:20:28

60. £60 seated down here now. 60. At £60.

0:20:280:20:33

Any advance?

0:20:330:20:35

-All done now? 65 on the internet.

-Good.

-65.

0:20:350:20:38

On the internet now. Sure, sir?

0:20:380:20:40

At £65 on the internet. One more?

0:20:400:20:42

-70.

-Excellent.

-£70 bid now in the room. £70.

0:20:420:20:46

-We're doing it.

-370. 75.

0:20:460:20:49

At £75 on the internet now.

0:20:490:20:52

80. At £80. Back in the room at 80.

0:20:520:20:56

£80 bid. 85 on the internet? At £80 in the room. I'm selling. All done.

0:20:560:21:02

That was a battle, but we did it!

0:21:020:21:04

The pen is mightier than the sword!

0:21:040:21:06

For sure!

0:21:060:21:07

Next up, Joe with his 120-year-old fruit dish.

0:21:090:21:13

Doulton is a great name. We're looking at 100 to £150.

0:21:130:21:17

-You got this in auction, didn't you?

-Yes, 1965.

0:21:170:21:21

-Have you spotted anything here you'd like to buy?

-Some beautiful furniture.

0:21:210:21:26

-Yes.

-Georgian furniture.

-It's a good time to invest in antiques.

0:21:260:21:29

-There's never been a better time.

-Yeah.

-And it doesn't get greener.

0:21:290:21:33

-Their carbon footprint is zero because they get recycled.

-It's the ultimate recycling.

0:21:330:21:38

-Good stuff.

-Have you seen anything you'd like to buy?

-Loads of things.

0:21:380:21:42

-If you were allowed!

-Yes. There's a box there I'd take home with me.

0:21:420:21:47

But sadly not. Not today.

0:21:470:21:49

Good luck. Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:21:490:21:53

We want £150 at the top end. Here we go.

0:21:530:21:55

The unusual Victorian Doulton Burslem fruit dish.

0:21:570:22:00

Complete with a grape suspender. There we are.

0:22:000:22:04

Very splendid thing. What do you say? 80?

0:22:040:22:06

£80 to start me. £80 to start me.

0:22:080:22:11

£80 for it. 60, then?

0:22:110:22:13

£60 start. 60 is bid on there. At 60.

0:22:130:22:15

At £60 bid now. At 60. Do I hear 65?

0:22:150:22:18

£60 is bid.

0:22:180:22:20

-It's struggling.

-Struggling.

-£60 is bid.

0:22:200:22:23

-And advance? All done now?

-He's not selling.

-All done?

0:22:230:22:27

65 on the internet.

0:22:270:22:29

70. At £70 bid now.

0:22:290:22:31

At 70. At £70 bid.

0:22:310:22:34

At £70.

0:22:340:22:35

75. At 75.

0:22:350:22:37

-80. At £80 bid now. 80.

-Gosh, it's done it.

0:22:370:22:40

At £80 bid now. At 80. At £80.

0:22:400:22:42

-£80 is bid.

-Well done, internet bidders!

0:22:420:22:44

It's going to be sold. Against you on the internet. One more? £80 is bid.

0:22:440:22:50

Are you all done?

0:22:500:22:51

-Fabulous.

-Phew!

0:22:510:22:53

Internet bidding does slow it up, but it does put the prices up,

0:22:530:22:57

-that's for sure.

-It's worth the wait.

0:22:570:22:59

Somebody sitting at home on their computer bidding at the very last minute.

0:22:590:23:03

-Are you happy with that?

-Yeah, absolutely.

-Well done.

0:23:030:23:07

-Good.

-Thank you.

-Thank you. That was great.

0:23:070:23:09

-Just, wasn't it just? I didn't think it was going to sell.

-I thought it was stuck at 70. It's good.

0:23:090:23:15

If this next lot doesn't sell, it'll drive me round the twist!

0:23:180:23:21

Peter and Wendy's corkscrew. I love it.

0:23:210:23:24

Those bright glass blue eyes get me on the old parrot.

0:23:240:23:28

Absolutely wonderful. Good luck, both of you.

0:23:280:23:31

I know there are plenty of corkscrew collectors that will love this.

0:23:310:23:35

Hopefully, top end of the estimate. Here we go.

0:23:350:23:38

A late Victorian novelty carved nutshell corkscrew

0:23:390:23:42

in the form of a parrot head.

0:23:420:23:44

What do you say? £50 to start me?

0:23:440:23:47

50? 50 to start me?

0:23:470:23:49

50's bid on there. At 50. At £50.

0:23:490:23:51

55.

0:23:510:23:53

60 with you, sir. 65.

0:23:530:23:55

-At 65. 70. £70 bid.

-Come on!

-At 70.

0:23:550:23:59

£70 bid.

0:23:590:24:01

Any advance? All done now? At 75 on the internet. Against you.

0:24:010:24:04

80. At £80 in the room. At £80 in the room.

0:24:040:24:07

Against you on the internet. At £80. 85.

0:24:070:24:11

90. At £90 back in the room now.

0:24:110:24:13

At 90. At £90 in the room.

0:24:130:24:16

Against you on the internet. 95. 100.

0:24:160:24:18

-100.

-Interest now.

0:24:180:24:20

110. At 110 on the internet now.

0:24:200:24:23

Against you all. All done? £110.

0:24:230:24:25

-Well done.

-Not bad, is it?

0:24:250:24:28

-£110. Hammer's gone down.

-Amazing!

0:24:280:24:31

-That was great, wasn't it?

-Yes!

0:24:310:24:33

-It went to somebody bidding online, on the internet.

-Yes.

0:24:330:24:37

-Gone to a collector?

-I think so, yes. Definitely. Yes.

0:24:370:24:41

Sold to another online bidder.

0:24:410:24:43

It just shows how local auction rooms are reaching out to all over the world.

0:24:430:24:47

Debbie's Clarice Cliff piece is valued at 350 to £400.

0:24:490:24:53

I had a chat to James, the auctioneer, just before the sale.

0:24:550:24:59

-I asked him if he would separate them.

-OK.

0:24:590:25:03

And he said no, purely because the smaller bowl is the one that just might sell.

0:25:030:25:08

-That's the cool shape.

-Yes. And the other one will really struggle.

-OK.

0:25:080:25:13

You wouldn't get your money back. By putting the two together,

0:25:130:25:16

-someone's going to buy them and they'll have the problem of splitting them up.

-OK.

0:25:160:25:21

-But he thinks they're going to struggle.

-OK.

0:25:210:25:25

But you never know. We've got internet bidding, phone bidding. It's not all in the room.

0:25:250:25:30

-Somebody like you might get carried away...

-And spend their money!

0:25:300:25:35

-Spend all their money on this.

-Spend £350 on Clarice Cliff instead of a pair of shoes!

0:25:350:25:40

-What would you do?

-I'd veer on the side of shoes, myself!

0:25:400:25:44

-Handbags, if it was me! Handbags.

-That's girls for you!

0:25:440:25:49

1930s Clarice Cliff Bizarre Stamford bowl

0:25:510:25:54

and the Clarice Cliff Rhodanthe pattern dish.

0:25:540:25:57

Two items of Clarice Cliff here. Start me.

0:25:570:26:00

£300 to start me?

0:26:000:26:03

£300 to start me, ladies and gentlemen. 300 I have.

0:26:030:26:06

£300 bid now. 320. 340.

0:26:060:26:10

350 I have. 350 is bid here now.

0:26:100:26:13

At 350. 350. 360 I'll take.

0:26:130:26:16

360 behind you. 360 is bid now. 360.

0:26:160:26:19

360 is bid here now.

0:26:190:26:21

At 360. 380, anywhere?

0:26:210:26:23

At £360. It's going to be sold. All done at 360.

0:26:230:26:27

Well done. Just scraped it in there, didn't we? There's commission to pay.

0:26:270:26:33

-Yeah.

-You wouldn't have lost much money. Maybe £20 at the end of the day.

0:26:330:26:37

-But you've had the joy out of them.

-Yeah, I want to buy something new now.

0:26:370:26:41

-What are you going to buy? Not shoes.

-No, not shoes, handbags. I've bought a new house

0:26:410:26:46

so it'll go for bits in there.

0:26:460:26:48

-And that haemorrhages money. Curtains, cushions, carpets.

-Yes.

0:26:480:26:53

-I know the feeling. Enjoy the new house.

-Thank you.

0:26:530:26:56

Well done. Spot on.

0:26:560:26:58

-Yeah. I thought they might struggle.

-Yeah, so did James. He'll be surprised.

0:26:580:27:03

The M25. Mile after miles of cars, lorries and road works.

0:27:120:27:18

But look carefully and there are some real treasures nearby.

0:27:190:27:22

Sometimes you might glimpse something special out of the corner of your eye

0:27:220:27:27

and there never seems to be time to stop and take a closer look.

0:27:270:27:31

Well, today, I am going to stop.

0:27:310:27:35

Just 600 yards off the M25, Europe's busiest motorway -

0:27:370:27:42

you can hear it, just over there, with the lorries bombing along -

0:27:420:27:47

is this wonderful Georgian mansion, Copped Hall.

0:27:470:27:49

It's survived a fire, road construction, obviously,

0:27:490:27:52

and land-hungry developers.

0:27:520:27:55

It was a grand country mansion, once surrounded by thousands of acres of hunting parks and farmland.

0:27:560:28:02

But one Sunday morning in 1917, most of Copped Hall was burnt out

0:28:040:28:07

in a disastrous fire.

0:28:070:28:10

It fell into ruin. Over the years, it was stripped of doors, fireplaces,

0:28:100:28:15

even the roof.

0:28:150:28:17

When the M25 cut through the grounds in the 1980s,

0:28:170:28:20

Copped Hall once more came to wider attention

0:28:200:28:22

and developers tried to move in.

0:28:220:28:25

It was down to local campaigners to save the hall and start a long, slow job of rebuilding it.

0:28:250:28:30

Architect Alan Cox, who played in the ruins as a boy,

0:28:300:28:34

is one of those campaigners.

0:28:340:28:37

-Why did you get involved?

-I knew it since I was a teenager. I've studied architecture

0:28:370:28:42

and by various coincidences I got involved and joined in with local people

0:28:420:28:49

and we set up a campaign to save it. And we got support for that.

0:28:490:28:52

Everywhere. Powerful people supported us. It took nine years

0:28:520:28:56

and eventually we won.

0:28:560:28:58

-Did you have to raise much money?

-Yes. We had to borrow money.

0:28:580:29:02

But we found two people to lend us the money.

0:29:020:29:04

So that was it. We set up a charitable trust quite near the end

0:29:040:29:09

before we bought it, and then raised the money.

0:29:090:29:11

-Exciting!

-And then we paid the money back.

-Paid it back.

-Which took five years.

0:29:110:29:16

So we had no mortgage and it's just putting it back together again.

0:29:160:29:20

-It's an ongoing project.

-Yes. The budget to do it all is a lot of money.

0:29:200:29:23

Probably ten million. But we don't think like that.

0:29:230:29:26

The process of doing it is part of the attraction.

0:29:260:29:29

-It's evolving all the time.

-Yes.

0:29:290:29:31

The point about this is it's a work in progress.

0:29:310:29:34

People come here. They go and look at buildings that are complete,

0:29:340:29:38

but this is half-way done and they see it gradually restored.

0:29:380:29:42

-As an architect, are you overseeing this project?

-Yes.

0:29:420:29:46

-Is it running on schedule?

-There's no schedule.

0:29:460:29:49

-No budget?

-We own it. No budget, no schedule,

0:29:490:29:52

we just move on and we share what we do with the public who come in their hundreds.

0:29:520:29:56

What's the most exciting part of the build so far for you?

0:29:560:30:00

I think finishing the saloon - not finishing it, but getting it usable.

0:30:000:30:04

When we get a bit of floor or roof on, we use it for a concert or play

0:30:040:30:10

so it's used regardless of the fact it's only half-done or quarter-done.

0:30:100:30:15

-You're putting heart and soul back into the building already.

-It's not only about the building,

0:30:150:30:20

it's about the people here. Without the people, it wouldn't happen.

0:30:200:30:24

It's two things.

0:30:240:30:27

It might be a mess now, but when Copped Hall was built in 1758,

0:30:270:30:31

it was a grand residence.

0:30:310:30:33

The huge landscaped gardens were tended by an army of 31 gardeners.

0:30:330:30:37

It had style and character.

0:30:370:30:40

Ghostly reminders of those glorious days are still scattered around the grounds.

0:30:400:30:44

It would have been a perfect setting for a lavish garden party.

0:30:440:30:48

The inside was spectacular, too.

0:30:540:30:56

I'm off to see the work the Trust has done so far.

0:30:560:30:59

The fire in 1917 and subsequent demolitions

0:31:010:31:04

have left this incredible building without any roof and 90% of its floor joists,

0:31:040:31:10

the two key elements that hold this grand building together.

0:31:100:31:14

They stop the walls from imploding inwards and falling outwards.

0:31:140:31:17

So that was the first thing to be tackled,

0:31:170:31:19

to get the shell, the superstructure, solid.

0:31:190:31:22

And also get it watertight so work can carry on.

0:31:220:31:26

Interestingly, Alan's discovered in the cellar, right below me,

0:31:280:31:32

there are four supporting columns.

0:31:320:31:35

One here, one here,

0:31:350:31:38

there and there.

0:31:380:31:40

If he finds there's evidence that these columns come up through this floor which has been re-screeded,

0:31:400:31:47

if there's evidence they poke through, that means there's four classical columns

0:31:470:31:52

that would have sat on them holding these joists up. The big oak joists that were here.

0:31:520:31:58

This is what Alan thinks the entrance hall might have looked like.

0:31:590:32:02

This is a great space, the saloon, a very important room in the house

0:32:060:32:10

where all the entertaining was done. The ceilings here are a lot higher than the other rooms.

0:32:100:32:16

The cornice would have been incredibly deep. See where it starts.

0:32:160:32:21

See these holes in the wall which are there to support great big chunks of plaster

0:32:210:32:27

moulded in great big sections going around here.

0:32:270:32:30

This photo of the saloon taken in about 1900

0:32:300:32:34

shows just how that plasterwork would have looked

0:32:340:32:37

and how it fitted into the opulent surroundings of this mansion.

0:32:370:32:40

The ornate and ostentatious look is simply stunning.

0:32:400:32:43

The Trust is bringing it all back slowly but surely.

0:32:430:32:47

Eventually, all this will be wood-panelled and will look stunning.

0:32:490:32:54

I can't wait to see this finished!

0:32:540:32:57

These holes here in the wall

0:33:040:33:06

are where the original stone stringers and risers of the staircase were tied in.

0:33:060:33:12

Winding all the way around this great big stairwell.

0:33:120:33:17

Sadly, in the 1950s, somebody demolished it.

0:33:190:33:23

They started at the top and pulled out these stone treads and risers and newel posts

0:33:230:33:28

and dropped them from up there down to there on this lovely flagstone floor.

0:33:280:33:33

So you get an idea of just how much work there is still to do.

0:33:330:33:38

If you want to see the mountain that's left to climb, follow me.

0:33:380:33:41

Look at this!

0:33:460:33:48

I should have brought my tool kit!

0:33:480:33:50

The Trust has had some grants in the past and they've used that money wisely and sensibly.

0:33:500:33:55

But they've now run out of money. You can see the amount of work they've still got to do.

0:33:550:34:01

This is the next project. That's the first floor dining room up there.

0:34:010:34:05

There's still no roof. One thing that does happen in big stately piles like this

0:34:050:34:10

when they need to raise money, and Alan's adopted the scheme here,

0:34:100:34:15

anybody can pay to have a Georgian window, a lovely sash window reinstated

0:34:150:34:20

into the original apertures. These cost £2,000 a window.

0:34:200:34:24

It would be really nice to see these horrible steel shutters and doors removed from this building.

0:34:240:34:30

I just hope they raise the money.

0:34:300:34:33

Wow! Restoring one great big antique!

0:34:510:34:56

The main aim of the Trust is to permanently protect Copped Hall,

0:34:560:35:00

restore it to its former glory so it can be used for educational purposes

0:35:000:35:04

and the local community can really benefit.

0:35:040:35:06

Future generations can come here and appreciate it. That's the good thing.

0:35:060:35:11

I just wish them luck!

0:35:110:35:13

Back at Colchester town hall, everyone's in good spirits

0:35:210:35:24

and Kate is ready with our next owner, Mariette.

0:35:240:35:27

Mariette, hello. Welcome to Flog It! You've brought something small and beautiful!

0:35:270:35:32

-Yes.

-Tell me about it.

0:35:320:35:34

I can't tell you very much. I brought it on behalf of my mother.

0:35:340:35:38

She inherited it when my father's mother died, my paternal grandmother.

0:35:380:35:44

It's lived in the box ever since. That's all I know about it.

0:35:440:35:47

-In a box? You don't show it at all?

-No!

-Aw!

0:35:470:35:50

-I know!

-It's come from quite far away.

0:35:500:35:54

-Ah.

-What he have here is a 19th-century Chinese celadon jade scent bottle.

0:35:540:36:00

If we pick it up here, it's so small and tactile,

0:36:000:36:03

it's got this lovely little brass and turquoise, but faded, lid.

0:36:030:36:08

And then you've got what's probably a bone or possibly ivory scoop.

0:36:080:36:13

I guess you'd dip it in and dab it behind your ears or dab your perfume inside your wrists

0:36:130:36:18

and put it back in.

0:36:180:36:21

It's really sweet.

0:36:210:36:22

The only other thing I can think it might be used for is snuff or something like that.

0:36:220:36:27

It could be that instead of perfume a snuff scoop that you'd put a pinch of snuff on and sniff it up!

0:36:270:36:33

But it's quite a lovely thing, irrespective of what its use is.

0:36:330:36:37

We'll stick with scent bottle at the moment.

0:36:370:36:41

It's a lobed, we call it lobed form decoration.

0:36:410:36:44

-But otherwise very plain.

-Yes.

0:36:440:36:46

Often we see them with intricate carvings, dragons, all kinds of stuff on it.

0:36:460:36:50

But I love the simplicity of this. It's so tactile.

0:36:500:36:53

-You want to pick it up...

-And stroke it, yes.

0:36:530:36:56

It's a lovely thing.

0:36:560:36:58

It sits in a box!

0:36:580:37:00

-Yes!

-So you wouldn't be gutted if we sold it, I suppose?

0:37:000:37:03

-No, she wouldn't be, no.

-It's your mother's.

-It is.

0:37:030:37:06

Price-wise, there are lots of collectors out there.

0:37:060:37:09

Obviously the earlier stuff is higher prices.

0:37:090:37:12

But Jade is quite high at the moment.

0:37:120:37:14

Chinese collectors are buying stuff like this back again.

0:37:140:37:17

-Right.

-I would have thought conservatively it's 50 to £80, something like that.

0:37:170:37:23

-But I would certainly put a reserve on it of £50 just to protect it.

-Yes.

0:37:230:37:27

You could maybe give it a bit of auctioneer's discretion, so maybe they'd let it go at 45.

0:37:270:37:32

-But I think it's worth £50 every day of the week.

-It's lovely,

0:37:320:37:36

but it sits in a box and my mother doesn't want it,

0:37:360:37:38

so sell it. Flog it!

0:37:380:37:40

Flog It! That's the name of the game and why we're here!

0:37:400:37:43

-We'll give it a go at the sale room.

-OK.

-Hopefully they'll have other Oriental bits to help it sell.

0:37:430:37:49

-Attract other bidders, yes.

-I'm scenting victory at the sale room!

0:37:490:37:54

Wonderful. Thank you very much. Thank you.

0:37:540:37:57

Over to David Barby for our next item.

0:37:590:38:02

Sandra, I'm fascinated by anybody that owns Troika.

0:38:020:38:06

-Good!

-Did you acquire this from a car boot sale

0:38:060:38:10

or did you actually buy it from a shop many years ago?

0:38:100:38:14

No, we bought it from a shop in Tintagel in Cornwall.

0:38:140:38:18

Wonderful. What was the appeal?

0:38:180:38:20

Just the look of it and the feel of it.

0:38:200:38:23

And the Aztec part of it, I've always liked it.

0:38:230:38:27

So you bought this in the late '70s, early '80s, that sort of period.

0:38:270:38:32

-Yes.

-Right.

-Yes.

-Right.

0:38:320:38:34

This freestanding sculpture here, which I think is superb,

0:38:340:38:38

is known as the Aztec mask.

0:38:380:38:40

So we have the Aztec features there and a stylised mask on the other side.

0:38:400:38:45

-I love the colouring and the rough woven feel to it. It's very tactile.

-It is, yes.

0:38:450:38:53

It gives the impression of being so modernistic.

0:38:530:38:56

How much did you pay for that?

0:38:560:38:58

-I think it would have been 15 to £17.

-15 to £17.

-Yes.

0:38:580:39:05

It's going to be worth considerably more now.

0:39:050:39:09

-Yes.

-If that goes up for auction, I think the price is going to be round about

0:39:090:39:14

250 to £500.

0:39:140:39:17

With reservation because we have one little bit of damage there.

0:39:170:39:23

-It's chipped.

-Yes. I didn't know that.

0:39:230:39:26

-Where's this been in your home?

-It has been wrapped, in a box, in the shed.

0:39:260:39:32

-In the shed?!

-Yes!

0:39:320:39:35

Why did you put it in the shed?

0:39:350:39:38

I didn't have anywhere nice to put it to show it off.

0:39:380:39:41

"I'll put those away for now." And you forget about them.

0:39:410:39:44

-The shed's hardly the best place to put them.

-It was wrapped, though!

0:39:440:39:48

This piece here, which I particularly like, this little roundel,

0:39:480:39:53

that's more sort of Ben Nicholson designs. I think that's an attractive piece.

0:39:530:39:58

But that's more of a common shape and form to this one.

0:39:580:40:02

So we're probably looking 40 to £50.

0:40:020:40:04

I was never quite sure what it was classed as. A vase, or...

0:40:040:40:11

I think it would look ridiculous with flowers coming out.

0:40:110:40:14

-It's had bits in it.

-It stands in its own right.

0:40:140:40:17

Look, you're parting with family memories, aren't you?

0:40:170:40:20

-Yes.

-What do your children think about this? Do they like them?

0:40:200:40:25

I've never asked them, to be honest.

0:40:250:40:27

-They won't be angry with you if you sold?

-No, they've probably forgotten that they're there.

0:40:270:40:32

-They've never gone into the garden shed!

-No!

0:40:320:40:35

Too many spiders!

0:40:350:40:37

So what would you do. Let's say this one goes in at top end of the estimate at 500.

0:40:370:40:41

And this one goes for round about 60?

0:40:410:40:45

What would you do? Reinvest in art?

0:40:450:40:47

-I have a daughter who has a birthday coming up.

-Right.

0:40:470:40:50

-She'll be coming 21?

-(40!)

0:40:500:40:53

-(40?) Well, life begins at 40!

-Yes.

0:40:530:40:56

I've yet to experience that!

0:40:560:40:58

I believe you!

0:40:580:41:00

Thousands wouldn't! But I believe Kate's found another item for us.

0:41:020:41:06

-Bobby, hello. Welcome to Flog It!

-Thank you.

0:41:090:41:12

You've brought some books in today. Tell me about them.

0:41:120:41:15

They were my great-uncle's.

0:41:150:41:18

When he passed away, some time ago, about 20 years ago,

0:41:180:41:23

they were some of the things that we thought looked interesting

0:41:230:41:27

and that we collected from his house.

0:41:270:41:29

-Looked old and caught your eye.

-They certainly did.

0:41:290:41:32

They've certainly got age. We'll start with this which caught my eye.

0:41:320:41:36

Quite a plain leather binding. But when we open it up,

0:41:360:41:39

it's incredibly old.

0:41:390:41:40

"The Saints Treasury, being sundry sermons preached in London

0:41:400:41:44

"by the late Reverend and painful minister of the Gospel."

0:41:440:41:48

Not quite sure what that means! "Jeremiah Burroughs, 1654."

0:41:480:41:52

So we're talking just after Shakespeare, Cromwellian times.

0:41:520:41:58

Commonwealth. We'd got rid of the monarchy, basically, instated a parliament.

0:41:580:42:03

This is exciting times. Not a particularly exciting text, sermons.

0:42:030:42:10

-Parliamentarian sermons!

-Exactly.

0:42:100:42:12

Just having a flick through,

0:42:120:42:14

it's not the most fun thing to sit through on a Sunday, I must say!

0:42:140:42:18

-No.

-But it's ridiculous, it's 350 years old

0:42:180:42:21

and in incredibly good condition considering how old it is.

0:42:210:42:25

In terms of book collectors, age does not in itself make it exciting.

0:42:250:42:30

If it was a very early atlas or something else,

0:42:300:42:35

or Shakespeare text, something of that age.

0:42:350:42:37

Someone somewhere might like it.

0:42:370:42:39

But it brings us on to the other book from your uncle.

0:42:390:42:42

Which is, looking at the cover, County Maps.

0:42:420:42:46

Now, what I see all the time coming into our sale room

0:42:460:42:51

is these maps, framed up, hand-coloured,

0:42:510:42:55

either contemporary with when they were done or later.

0:42:550:42:58

And just frames of single counties.

0:42:580:43:00

What you have is the whole book. I assume it's complete with every county in.

0:43:000:43:04

There's no front page, so it's not saying who did it,

0:43:040:43:07

but I think it's by a chap called Greenwood.

0:43:070:43:09

-And we're talking early to mid-Victorian so about 1840.

-OK.

0:43:090:43:15

We have got railways on here, so that should help date it.

0:43:150:43:18

Although it's not brilliant condition with the binding,

0:43:180:43:22

you have got a bit of the spine gone, it's not what we'd call a breaker

0:43:220:43:26

in that's it's not broken and ripped to pieces...

0:43:260:43:29

-OK.

-..and sold off separately.

0:43:290:43:31

It's got a bit of water damage here. It's got damp at some point.

0:43:310:43:34

Weren't you tempted to rip it out?

0:43:340:43:36

No. I'd rather see it go in one piece.

0:43:360:43:40

-And hope that somebody would keep it in one piece.

-Yeah.

0:43:400:43:45

-Because the condition's good...

-I know they say this is the price per page because they'll rip it up.

0:43:450:43:51

But hopefully because it's in one piece, they won't.

0:43:510:43:55

-Here we are in Essex. Colchester. There it is.

-Yep.

0:43:550:43:59

The Roman town of Colchester. They have a vignette here of Chelmsford and Southend.

0:43:590:44:05

They're very beautiful things. Price-wise,

0:44:050:44:08

-conservatively 150 to £200.

-Really? As much as that?

0:44:080:44:13

There are a lot of prints. At least 20 to 30.

0:44:130:44:16

-I'm surprised.

-They'll get at least £30 each.

-Yes.

0:44:160:44:19

-Yes, I think that's about right. Is that a price you'd be happy to sell for?

-Absolutely.

0:44:190:44:26

I didn't think it would be that much.

0:44:260:44:28

Maybe put a reserve of £100?

0:44:280:44:30

-Try 150 to £200 as the estimate for the catalogue.

-Yes. OK.

0:44:300:44:35

-See how they go.

-Sure.

-All right?

0:44:350:44:37

We'll hope that somebody wants a preaching sermon as well on the side!

0:44:370:44:42

Beryl, these are quite exciting pictures.

0:44:470:44:51

They look as though they've been either stuck in an attic

0:44:510:44:55

or neglected, because they've never been restored.

0:44:550:44:59

-No.

-The frames have never been cleaned.

0:44:590:45:02

-Where do they come from?

-They're from my friend's cottage.

0:45:020:45:05

-They were on the wall. I don't think they were loved very much by her.

-Right.

0:45:050:45:12

When she died and I got them down, they were really, really dirty.

0:45:120:45:17

I've wiped them over, but I don't think they were loved very much.

0:45:170:45:22

Do you like fishy subjects?

0:45:220:45:24

Um, not really!

0:45:240:45:27

-Not really. They're more masculine, aren't they?

-Yes.

0:45:270:45:30

If you think in terms of the period when these were painted,

0:45:300:45:33

late 19th century, early 20th century,

0:45:330:45:37

the hobby of the very wealthy was hunting, shooting, fishing.

0:45:370:45:42

These would have been in a gentleman's residence,

0:45:420:45:47

maybe in his library, or his sporting room!

0:45:470:45:50

On the wall, you'd have cased pike that he'd caught, stuffed,

0:45:500:45:55

or heads of animals that he'd shot, things like that.

0:45:550:45:58

These pictures were painted by an artist called Roland Knight.

0:45:580:46:03

His signature is there. And he painted exclusively fish

0:46:030:46:07

for that middle-class market.

0:46:070:46:09

These are oil paint onto canvas.

0:46:090:46:12

And they're slightly dirty.

0:46:120:46:14

Even here where the gap has gone into the pike's side,

0:46:140:46:19

that should be a brilliant red.

0:46:190:46:22

When they were up in your friend's house, did she have open fires?

0:46:220:46:25

-Yes, she did, yes.

-So the smoke from the open fires has discoloured the paint.

0:46:250:46:31

That can be taken off to reveal some depths of blue and red on the fins

0:46:310:46:36

and they will look entirely different.

0:46:360:46:39

But these are sought-after pictures.

0:46:390:46:41

To have a pair is wonderful. They can be put in each recess of the fireplace.

0:46:410:46:46

In a symmetrical room. So these are quite nice.

0:46:460:46:49

He does achieve good prices.

0:46:490:46:52

I'm going to project a price for the pair

0:46:520:46:55

of about 200 to £400.

0:46:550:46:57

That sort of price range. If you get up to £500, I'll jump with joy!

0:46:570:47:03

For a reserve, we need to put £200 on them.

0:47:030:47:05

-OK.

-I'd hate to see them go for less.

0:47:050:47:08

-Are you agreeable to that?

-Yes, that's fine.

0:47:080:47:11

-They belonged to a friend. No regrets about parting with them?

-No. She wanted me to sell them.

0:47:110:47:16

Well, I'll be there at the auction, batting for you. So fingers crossed!

0:47:160:47:21

Thank you!

0:47:210:47:22

And this is what we're taking with us.

0:47:270:47:29

What a wonderful collection!

0:47:310:47:33

We're selling our items at Reeman Dansie in Colchester,

0:47:350:47:38

and our auctioneer today is James Grinter.

0:47:380:47:40

First up are Sandra's two Troika pieces.

0:47:420:47:44

David gave them a total value of £290 to £560.

0:47:440:47:46

On closer inspection of damage, our auctioneers advised reducing that to £250 to £350.

0:47:490:47:56

-You paid what, £15 for these?

-About £15 to £17.

0:47:560:47:59

Hopefully we can turn it into 300 quid and you can go back to Cornwall!

0:47:590:48:03

-Turkey!

-Yeah!

-Turkey?! Cornwall! Cornwall!

0:48:030:48:08

-You won't get that tan in Cornwall!

-You will! Oh, you will!

0:48:080:48:12

-If it isn't raining.

-If it's not raining!

0:48:120:48:14

The Troika Aztec mask pottery ornament.

0:48:160:48:20

And the Troika roundel vase.

0:48:200:48:22

Two vases. What do you say for these?

0:48:220:48:24

£200 to start me? £200 start me for the Troika.

0:48:240:48:27

Two is bid on there. At £200 bid now. At 200.

0:48:280:48:32

£200. 210. 220.

0:48:320:48:35

There we are, look!

0:48:350:48:36

220. 230. 240.

0:48:360:48:39

At 240 down here now. 250.

0:48:390:48:41

260. 260 is bid now. At 260.

0:48:410:48:45

-Come on!

-260 is bid.

0:48:450:48:46

270. 280.

0:48:460:48:48

At 280 in the room now. At 280. 290.

0:48:480:48:51

-300.

-That's good, Sandra.

0:48:510:48:53

£300 in the room now. 300. 320.

0:48:530:48:55

340.

0:48:550:48:56

At 340 in the room now. At 340.

0:48:560:48:59

At 340 in the room. 360.

0:48:590:49:01

380. At 380.

0:49:010:49:03

Back in the room now at 380.

0:49:030:49:06

380 back in the room. Against you on the internet. 400. £400.

0:49:060:49:11

-Excellent!

-On the internet now. 420 another place.

0:49:110:49:13

James, well done. He's doing a proper job!

0:49:130:49:17

Against you on the internet. At £420 in the room. Final warning now.

0:49:170:49:21

I'm going to sell it. All done now at 420.

0:49:210:49:24

Come on, my 'andsome! £420! Brilliant. Well done!

0:49:240:49:28

That is a holiday if you want to go to Cornwall for a weekend.

0:49:280:49:32

I think it's more a day out with the grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

0:49:320:49:37

OK. How many grandchildren?

0:49:370:49:39

-Three grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

-Wow!

0:49:390:49:43

Well, even with all that lot, the Troikas pulled in enough to go round the whole family!

0:49:430:49:48

We might need a prayer for this next item. Bobby's sermon book and the county maps.

0:49:480:49:55

I wondered if the auctioneer might split them, but he's kept them together.

0:49:550:49:59

-One will help sell the other.

-Yes.

-150 to £200.

0:49:590:50:02

Why are you selling now?

0:50:020:50:05

-We came to Flog It for the valuation and thought, "Yes..."

-Got carried away!

0:50:050:50:11

-I pounced on you!

-Got swept up in the moment!

-Flog it!

0:50:110:50:15

That's what it's all about. We're here to flog it! Here it is.

0:50:150:50:19

The parliamentary sermon book, The Saints Treasury, 1654.

0:50:210:50:28

And another one, County Maps, as well.

0:50:280:50:30

Quite a lot of interest. I start the bidding with me at £220 with me.

0:50:300:50:35

At £220 with me now. 220.

0:50:350:50:39

230?

0:50:390:50:40

At £220 with me now. At 220. Do I see 230 anywhere?

0:50:400:50:45

At £220. A maiden bid. All done?

0:50:450:50:48

The road to success were the maps.

0:50:480:50:50

-Brilliant.

-Well done.

-Thank you.

0:50:500:50:53

-There's commission to pay, but enjoy that money.

-Yes!

0:50:530:50:56

-Thanks for bringing it in. Well done.

-That was a great result!

-Straight in!

-Great!

0:50:560:51:00

-I thought we might be stuck, but we weren't.

-There was a bit of damage, but it didn't apply.

0:51:000:51:07

-It was fine.

-Enjoy the money!

-I will do. Thank you very much.

0:51:070:51:11

What a good result!

0:51:110:51:12

Up next, Beryl's pair of Roland Knight fish paintings.

0:51:120:51:17

-Beryl, good to see you. These came from a little cottage.

-Yes.

0:51:190:51:23

They do have that country house look, don't they?

0:51:230:51:26

A perch and a pike.

0:51:260:51:28

200 to £400. Why are you selling these?

0:51:280:51:31

-I don't really like them.

-No.

0:51:310:51:34

-My friend who gave them to me asked me to sell them.

-Sell them.

0:51:340:51:38

-"Get a bit of money for yourself."

-It's that nasty pike!

0:51:380:51:42

I don't mind the perch. I've caught perch but never pike.

0:51:420:51:45

-They have a nice naive quality about them.

-They do.

0:51:450:51:48

-I can see these all cleaned up in a study.

-They need a clean. They're dull.

0:51:480:51:53

Good luck. It's a pair. £200. That's no money, is it?

0:51:530:51:58

Let's see what the bidders think.

0:51:580:52:00

The Roland Knight, a pair of oils.

0:52:030:52:05

Fishing catches here.

0:52:050:52:07

I have two commissions with me and I start the bidding

0:52:070:52:10

-at £220.

-That's great!

-230.

0:52:100:52:14

240. 250. 260. 270.

0:52:140:52:17

280. 290. 300. 320.

0:52:170:52:22

320 in the room, now. £320 bid. 340.

0:52:240:52:28

360. 380. 400.

0:52:280:52:30

420. 440.

0:52:300:52:32

460. 480. 500.

0:52:320:52:35

At £500. Back of the room.

0:52:360:52:39

£500. 520 on the internet.

0:52:390:52:41

-520!

-540.

0:52:410:52:43

-540 in the room.

-540, Beryl!

0:52:430:52:46

560.

0:52:460:52:47

580.

0:52:470:52:48

At 580 still in the room.

0:52:480:52:50

-600.

-600!

-£600.

0:52:500:52:53

On the internet, against you all.

0:52:530:52:55

All done now at £600.

0:52:550:52:58

-What a big catch! Hey! £600.

-That was good!

-What a surprise!

0:52:580:53:03

Wasn't that a surprise! I was expecting around 250. Something like that.

0:53:030:53:07

-You've got to be over the moon.

-Absolutely thrilled.

0:53:070:53:10

-Commission here is 15% plus VAT.

-OK, that's fine.

0:53:100:53:14

-Brilliant!

-What will you put that money towards?

0:53:140:53:17

A flight to Thailand.

0:53:170:53:19

-Thailand? Why?

-My son lives there.

0:53:190:53:22

-Right. OK. Oh, bless you!

-I'll go and see him. Brilliant.

0:53:220:53:26

-When was the last time you saw him?

-In the summer.

-Oh, great.

0:53:260:53:30

-Thank you for bringing them in.

-Thank you!

0:53:300:53:33

Thank you so much.

0:53:330:53:36

Now we're going all girly and delicate

0:53:380:53:40

with this lovely 19th-century Chinese jade scent bottle.

0:53:400:53:44

We're looking at 50 to £80. It belongs to Mariette. This is Mum.

0:53:440:53:48

-It is actually mine!

-It's yours, isn't it! What's your name?

0:53:480:53:52

-Rosemary.

-Pleased to meet you.

0:53:520:53:54

Why have you decided to sell this?

0:53:540:53:56

-Because I don't collect scent bottles.

-You don't.

-No.

0:53:560:53:59

It's a lovely little thing.

0:53:590:54:01

It was a present to my husband from a grateful patient.

0:54:010:54:04

-OK. Happy with the valuation?

-Completely.

0:54:040:54:08

It should do the top end, shouldn't it?

0:54:080:54:10

-Jade and Chinese things are doing really well. So I'm hoping.

-Time to sell.

0:54:100:54:14

Good.

0:54:140:54:16

We'll find out what the bidders think. Good luck, Kate. Good luck both of you.

0:54:160:54:21

Thank you very much, Paul.

0:54:210:54:22

A late 19th-century Chinese green jade snuff bottle.

0:54:220:54:27

A snuff bottle here.

0:54:270:54:29

Two commissions with me.

0:54:290:54:31

Start the bidding at £320.

0:54:310:54:34

-£320 with me now. 320.

-Good heavens!

0:54:360:54:38

320. Do I hear 340?

0:54:380:54:41

At 320. 340 on the internet. 360.

0:54:410:54:44

At 360 with me on the book. 380.

0:54:440:54:47

400. At £400 with me.

0:54:470:54:50

420. 440.

0:54:500:54:51

440 with me.

0:54:510:54:53

440. 460. 480.

0:54:530:54:56

-Kate!

-480 is bid now. 500.

-A shocker!

0:54:560:54:58

£500 I'm at. 520. Another place on the internet. 540. 540 on the internet.

0:54:580:55:04

560. 580.

0:55:040:55:06

-600.

-At my age, it's shocking, this sort of thing!

0:55:060:55:10

£600. 620?

0:55:100:55:13

620 on the internet now. 640.

0:55:130:55:16

640 is bid now. 640.

0:55:160:55:18

At 640. 660? At 660.

0:55:180:55:22

660 is bid now.

0:55:220:55:24

680.

0:55:240:55:25

-700.

-I've gone all clammy.

-I don't believe it!

0:55:250:55:28

720?

0:55:280:55:30

720. 740.

0:55:300:55:32

-This is ridiculous!

-Oh, gosh!

0:55:320:55:35

740 is bid. 760?

0:55:350:55:37

-760.

-We missed something, didn't we, Kate?

0:55:370:55:39

-Somebody's gone mad.

-Somebody has!

0:55:390:55:42

At £800 now. 820? 820.

0:55:420:55:45

-£820!

-820 is bid.

0:55:450:55:47

820. 840? On the internet

0:55:470:55:49

at 840.

0:55:490:55:51

840. 860.

0:55:510:55:52

-Oh, do stop! This is awful!

-No, don't stop!

0:55:520:55:56

At £860.

0:55:560:55:58

All done now? Fair warning.

0:55:580:56:01

All done at 86... 880.

0:56:010:56:03

880. Back in the UK now.

0:56:030:56:06

900 in China!

0:56:060:56:07

At £900 in China.

0:56:070:56:11

Mr UK, will you make it 920?

0:56:110:56:13

Come on, UK!

0:56:130:56:14

920!

0:56:140:56:16

-Yes!

-At 920 now. 940 back in China.

0:56:160:56:19

-940 in China.

-Let's round it up!

0:56:190:56:21

940. All done at £940.

0:56:210:56:25

-940.

-960.

0:56:250:56:26

-No!

-Back in the UK! 960.

0:56:260:56:29

I like your style, sir. 980.

0:56:290:56:32

Back in China.

0:56:320:56:33

In China!

0:56:330:56:35

Round it up to £1,000. Come on.

0:56:350:56:37

It's only money! At £980.

0:56:370:56:40

Make it £1,000?

0:56:400:56:43

Last chance. £980. Sold!

0:56:430:56:47

-£980!

-Wonderful!

0:56:470:56:49

-What a lovely surprise!

-I can't believe it.

-Wow!

0:56:490:56:52

Tingling! Hope you're on the edge of your seats at home! Enjoying it as much as we are.

0:56:520:56:58

Absolutely wonderful. And it will all go to charity.

0:56:580:57:01

-Fabulous!

-I've made up my mind.

-Which charity?

-Medecins Sans Frontieres.

0:57:010:57:06

-OK.

-Excellent.

-My favourite charity.

0:57:060:57:08

My heart is really going. That rarely happens to an auctioneer!

0:57:080:57:12

What a rollercoaster ride!

0:57:120:57:15

We said somebody was going home with a lot of money and it's you!

0:57:150:57:18

I can't believe it. Thank you very much.

0:57:180:57:21

Thank you for bringing it in.

0:57:210:57:23

We're out of time here. Hope you've enjoyed the day as much as we have.

0:57:230:57:27

Join us again for more surprises. Until then, cheerio from us.

0:57:270:57:31

Thank you very much indeed.

0:57:310:57:33

It was a wonderful experience!

0:57:330:57:35

Paul Martin takes the Flog It! team to Colchester in Essex, joined by experts Kate Bateman and David Barby.

David nets a high-value pair of fish paintings, while Kate finds two Clarice Cliff items - but which is her favourite, and which will be worth the most at auction? Paul visits a stately home that's being brought back to life after 90 years of neglect thanks to a group of local campaigners.