Winchester 7 Flog It!


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Winchester 7

Antiques programme. Paul Martin is joined in Winchester by experts James Lewis and Christina Trevanion. Christina falls in love with a very old teddy bear.


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Today, we're in the tranquil city of Winchester.

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But it's not all peace and quiet.

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Just look at that, what a fabulous queue.

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Hundreds of people have turned up here outside the Guildhall

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all hoping to put their antiques and collectables into auction

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and go home with a small fortune.

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Welcome to "Flog It!"

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Winchester's Guildhall is playing host to "Flog It!" today.

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This is where the tension starts to build.

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Even if the weather is a little bit inclement,

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here are our experts already working.

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Christina Trevanion and James Lewis, a font of knowledge.

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Of course, they've all come here to ask that all important

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question which is, "What's it worth?" Exactly.

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And what are you going to do when you've found out?

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-ALL: Flog it!

-If our experts see an item

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they like, they put a sticker on the owner.

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And while Christina has found loads, James is still struggling.

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-Oh, that's going to take a bit of work.

-Can we get a sticker?

-Not yet.

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-Why?

-Because it is not something that we probably want to film.

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-Christina:

-Oh, nice.

-LAUGHTER

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-Hands off, James, play fair now.

-They've got a green sticker on.

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Yeah, I know. I know, I know, I know.

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Competition to find the best items is already mounting

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but they are friends really.

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It's now time to get the doors open

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and get the show on the road. Are you ready, everyone?

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-Yes!

-Come on, then.

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Look at that teddy.

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And on today's show, one of my idols makes an appearance.

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Hands up, Rolling Stones fans.

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-Unfortunately James... Well, he can't get no satisfaction.

-40.

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-Oh, come on.

-£40.

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£30.

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Christina is more than satisfied with this cute bear.

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I've rather taken to him, I have to say.

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I think he's absolutely wonderful.

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# If you go down to Itchen Stoke

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# You're sure to have a big surprise. #

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But how much will he fetch at auction?

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Oh! Fantastic! Wow.

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Well, there's certainly a buzz in the room.

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Everybody is now safely seated and we've got a full house.

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And it looks like James Lewis is our first expert to the table,

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so let's take a closer look at what he's spotted and he's over there.

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LAMB BAAS

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Ashley, Maureen, thank you

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so much for bringing in something that reminds me of home.

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Right down in the south of England and what have you brought to me?

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Something from Derbyshire. So how did they come into your house?

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Well, to the best of my knowledge,

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they were a wedding present to my parents.

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OK, when were they married?

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-1943.

-So, that would figure. OK.

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Well, what you're looking at are two of, probably, a set of three

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-lambs made at the Denby factory...

-Right.

-..just outside Derby.

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These were produced in the 1930s,

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they were made for children's nurseries, really.

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But a lot of them were put outside and used as garden ornaments

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because they, are at the end of the day, quite plain,

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quite robust, and people think, "Ah, I'll stick them outside." They look

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a little bit like lambs out of some sort of horror movie, don't they?

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-I don't like them.

-Black eyes, evil.

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But they are still very popular.

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Do they live in pride of place at home?

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-No.

-No.

-In the drawer?

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-In the drawer.

-Oh, no. You don't like them?

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-No, I don't like the eyes.

-Do you know, I think that's it.

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I think if they'd actually done something different for the eyes,

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they'd have been a lot better sellers.

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EVIL LAUGH THEY CHUCKLE

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Ooh, flames. So, childhood memories and things?

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Do you remember these and playing with them as a kid?

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Well, yes, I did play with them along with a few other things

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that tended to get broken but they survived.

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-Denby's good and solid.

-Yeah.

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And my mother always had them out on the sideboard, pride of place,

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she loved them. They've always been around as long as I can remember.

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So, why get rid of them with all those memories?

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Well, as we've said, they sit in the cupboard, Maureen doesn't

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particularly like them, I'm no, I'm not that keen on them, you know...

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We've gone for the minimalist look now so...

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You see, I'm a great one for mix and match.

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Mind you, maybe it's just because I have no style. I don't know.

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No, it's because you're an antique dealer.

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Yeah, but I think that sort of shape - because it's quite plain -

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goes well with a minimalist interior.

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Goes well with a Deco interior as well. They should certainly sell.

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I would put, say, 50 to 80 is an estimate.

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If it makes 100 then we've really done well.

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-If we get, sort of, 50 plus for them, I'd be...

-Yeah.

-..quite happy.

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-You just like them, do you?

-No, I don't.

-That's the real reason.

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Oh, poor little lambs. I'm sure someone out there will love them.

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Now, over at Christina's table,

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Ruth has brought in a gold watch for her to value.

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So, Ruth, they say that time flies,

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let's hope it does in this case.

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Tell me a little bit about this little watch that you've brought in.

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It just came into the possession of my husband

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-the year before we married.

-Right.

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And it's been sat in a drawer ever since.

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-Right.

-Just the occasional look at, put back.

-So you don't wear it?

-No.

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-Well, it started life, actually, as a little lady's fob watch...

-Oh.

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..rather than a wristwatch.

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Wristwatches were developed by a nanny, funnily enough,

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in the early 1900s.

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She was so fed up of having it down... Because they used to wear

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them on here. She was so fed up of the children grabbing for it,

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-she actually put some cord around it and worried as a wristwatch.

-Right.

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So, complete accident but that's how we get wristwatches today.

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We can actually see that on this one,

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these two little arms where the strap is attached to it

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have actually been soldered on at a later date.

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So we've got this really pretty face

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but it's got an equally as decorative back, hasn't it?

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Which would explain why it was a fob watch originally.

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Looking at the back, we've got this wonderful engraving

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and a vacant cartouche where usually you would have

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had your initials engraved but in this case it's vacant.

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If we open up the back, we've got

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the 18-carat gold hallmark in the back cover

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-and we've also got an inscription here to Emanuel, Southampton.

-Right.

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So, it's been here since 1917 in the Hampshire area, which is quite nice.

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Nice local watch.

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And then if we open up the inside back cover, again, we've got

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in here another 18-carat gold mark on there

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and we've also got this movement here which is quite

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a modern movement, so it ties in with the date of about 1915.

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Unfortunately, I'm slightly concerned that it's now

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-a wristwatch.

-Yes.

-Because it will put watch collectors off.

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There's no denying that, sadly.

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But I still think, at auction,

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-we might be looking somewhere in the region of £50 to £70.

-Oh.

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Maybe slightly more on a good day

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-because there's quite a lot of gold to it.

-Yes.

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-So, is that acceptable?

-Oh, I think so, yes.

-What do we think, ladies?

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-Yes.

-Should she flog it?

-Yes.

-Good.

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Well, I'm searching the queue looking for items that might

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catch MY eye.

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It's not marked but we've got an engraving of an elephant

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under a palm tree at the back.

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-Tests as 22 carat.

-Oh, beautiful!

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I think this is absolutely fascinating.

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-Have you come all the way up today?

-Yes.

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Oh, well, this could be your lucky day.

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Now, while I'm looking at this map, this is quite interesting,

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-can you see this little village called Chawton?

-Yes.

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-Later on, I'm going to go off and visit that little village.

-Right.

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-That's Jane Austen's village, isn't it?

-Yes.

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And I'm going to learn all about the history of women's literature.

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-Thank you very much for showing me that.

-OK.

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Janice and Mica next

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and they've brought in some Carlton Ware for James.

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Been in the family a long time?

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Yes, I inherited them about 40 years ago

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and they belonged to my late husband's parents.

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-They would have been not far off new at that point.

-Oh, right.

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And it's called the New Mikado Pattern.

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It's one of the most famous of all the lustrewares

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that Carlton Ware made.

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And this pagoda is classic with its orange, green and yellow

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and if we look at the gilding, it's just not rubbed at all

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and you can see inside, also, why they're called lustre.

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It almost looks as if you've tipped a can of petrol in there.

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Such a good colour.

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Great colour.

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The more ornate, the larger the object, the more valuable they are.

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A little pair of vases like this, they're not going to be

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-taking you on a cruise, I'm afraid, or anything like that.

-No.

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But they're good, saleable objects.

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So, if we put our estimate of £60 to £90, would that be OK for you?

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-Yes.

-That would be fine.

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And you never know, you might find something at the auction you want to buy.

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-I'm afraid I won't be able to be there on the day.

-You're kidding!

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-Why? What could possibly...

-I know, I'm really sad. It's a charity day.

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A charity...? Oh, are you a big charity worker?

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So I shall probably spend the money that day.

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-We like to do our bit and that's how my husband and I met.

-Go on.

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17, 18 years ago on a 21-seater bike in Ireland raising money

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-for Alzheimer's.

-Well, I have to say, that's certainly different.

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A 21-seater? I didn't even know such things existed!

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And I fell off a bar stool and... That was it.

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-I picked up and that was it. Took her home.

-It was the Guinness.

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I bet it was, I bet it was.

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-You're not on a 21-seater bike on the auction day, are you?

-No.

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Good, glad to hear it.

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-You never know, you might lose her to another husband.

-Yeah.

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-You never know.

-I'm kidding.

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Well done, enjoy your charity day and I'll see you when I see.

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Thank you very much.

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At Christina's table, Val's showing her some silver jewellery.

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Val... I've fallen in love.

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I really love these two pieces,

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-these are my favourite pieces from today.

-Oh, good.

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Tell me about them. Why are you selling them?

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I never wear them and I've had them

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since the '70s and I just thought I'd sell them.

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-So, where have you got them from?

-From Denmark.

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-You actually bought them in...?

-In Denmark, yes.

-Fantastic. OK.

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The first one we're going to talk about is the bangle here,

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which has got a really nice inscription on the back of it -

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facsimile signature of Hans Hansen.

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And it's actually stamped "Denmark 925S",

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which is symbolic for standard sterling silver.

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Now, Hans Hansen actually started off designing flatware.

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By flatware, I mean knives, forks, spoons, that sort of thing.

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And he was very much following in the footsteps of Georg Jensen,

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who was designing some pretty wonderfully wacky stylised

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things at the time.

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I love it! I really love it. I think it's wonderful! Do you ever wear it?

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No, I can't get on now.

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You can't? I just think it's fabulous.

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-And the brooch, almost birdlike, isn't it?

-Yes.

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-It's difficult to know what he was trying to portray.

-Exactly.

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And I think, on a black dress, it would look really quite stunning.

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Yes. You see, I think it's like a deer and that's the deer's head.

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-Do you think?

-I don't know what it is.

-With wings? I love it!

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And the bangle, although it is quite small, still...fits at a bit

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of a push, but I think it would still be quite wearable.

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Won't fall off.

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No, it's quite secure on there. Would you wear that?

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-It's lovely, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Really lovely. What about you?

-Definitely.

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It's nice, isn't it? Really nice.

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So, I still think they should do really quite well at auction.

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And I would hope that we would probably be looking

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somewhere in the region of about £100-200.

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-Oh, right.

-For the two.

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-For two, yes.

-How do you feel about that?

-That's fine.

-Yes?

-Yes, that's fine.

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-So, shall we go ahead and flog them?

-Lovely, thank you.

-Brilliant. Thank you.

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Now, to my first item of the day - some rock-and-roll memorabilia.

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Maureen, thank you so much for bringing these autographs in.

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Now, you were either a Beatles fan or a Rolling Stones fan

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and this applies to you at home as well.

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OK, hands up, Beatles fans.

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Quite a lot, most of you. Hands up, Rolling Stones fans.

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Yeah, we won!

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LAUGHTER

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Well, it's a nation divided,

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but both bands contribute so much to rock and pop history worldwide.

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Great rock-and-roll bands.

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-Were you lucky enough to see the Rolling Stones?

-No.

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-No?

-I didn't get to see them.

-How did you come by their autographs?

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My pen friend, Nicky, who lives in America.

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She sent them to me because she knew I liked the Rolling Stones.

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Wow! Pen friends! I mean, that was the thing, wasn't it?

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Yes, she was president of the Californian Rolling Stones branch.

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So, she would have access to the Stones whenever they toured there.

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-That's right.

-Absolutely love it to bits.

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I think Mick Jagger is a great looking guy. Don't you? He is, isn't he? Beautiful man.

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So, you've got Keith Richards' signature there, Bill Wyman,

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bass guitarist, Charlie Watts, Mick Jagger

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and Brian Jones on lead guitar, who tragically died.

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-Yes.

-The condition is not brilliant. The paper's getting a bit tatty.

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You could instantly double the value of these signatures

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if they were on a photograph, so you could see all of their faces, and even better, let's say,

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if it was a promotional poster with the date and the venue.

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But we've got something going on here because we've got the

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photographs from your pen friend, which I think's fabulous.

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I'm taking your word for it that these are genuine.

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And with the surrounding photographs, the whole thing

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looks presentable and genuine, so I'm confident they are.

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I'd like the auction room just to do a little bit of research themselves.

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If they're right, I think

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we're looking at a value of around...250 to £350.

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-Very nice.

-Is that all right?

-Yes. I wasn't expecting that much.

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-Happy?

-Yes, very happy.

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21st century Winchester is a peaceful, beautiful place,

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but it has a 2,000-year-old link with British military history -

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this incredible square is the Peninsula Barracks,

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once home to serving army regiments.

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Now, part of it is home to a museum dedicated to a very brave

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band of soldiers, the Gurkhas.

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Ghurkhas have been part of the British Army for almost 200 years,

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but who are these fearsome Nepalese fighters?

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"Better to die than be a coward" - the Ghurkha motto sets the tone

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that reflects their fearsome and valiant reputation.

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They've served with British soldiers all over the world, from World War I

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to World War II, to campaigns in the Falklands, Iraq and Afghanistan.

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And even a young Prince Harry lived with a Ghurkha

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regiment for his ten week tour of duty in Afghanistan.

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The Ghurkhas originate from the hill villages of Nepal,

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where they were a proud warrior nation.

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The British fought them

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at the height of the Empire building in the 1800s

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and realising their potential, put them in uniform,

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and eventually, made them part of the British Army.

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The Ghurkhas became renowned as tough, masculine soldiers,

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fearless in the face of the enemy.

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They own a reputation for front-line fighting all over the world.

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There are many legends about the Ghurkhas and their bravery

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and also about this - the kukri.

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The traditional knife is the symbol of the Ghurkha

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and the symbol of Nepal.

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It has a curved blade that averages around 14 to 16 inches long.

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There's a selection here, laid out in front of me.

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The one I've picked up here in the leather sheath was

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used during the First World War. That's razor sharp.

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These were made by blacksmiths in the hills of Nepal

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and throughout India.

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Can you see the size of the handle? That's rather small.

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That wouldn't fit my big fat hand.

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It would be no use to me, couldn't grip it, it wouldn't feel comfortable.

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Now, as every schoolboy knows, weapons of war have changed

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dramatically over 200 years, but the kukri has stayed the same.

0:16:090:16:14

One notable Ghurkha hero was Havildar Gaje Ghale,

0:16:380:16:41

a platoon sergeant in Burma in 1943.

0:16:410:16:45

The official battle log said, hurling hand grenades,

0:16:470:16:50

covered in blood from his own neglected wounds, he led assault

0:16:500:16:54

after assault, shouting the Gurkhas' battle cry,

0:16:540:16:58

"Glory be to the goddess of war, here come the Gurkhas!"

0:16:580:17:02

13 Victoria Crosses have been issued to the Gurkhas so far

0:17:020:17:06

and 13 to their British Army officers. That's a total of 26.

0:17:060:17:10

And they have three here in the museum.

0:17:100:17:12

The Victoria Cross is always issued with a purple ribbon.

0:17:120:17:16

It's cast from bronze, from melted down captured Russian cannons from the Crimean War.

0:17:160:17:21

On the face side, there's a high relief of a lion,

0:17:210:17:24

standing over the crown and underneath, it says - for valour.

0:17:240:17:28

On the reverse, it's quite plain,

0:17:280:17:30

but it's inscribed to the recipient with the date.

0:17:300:17:34

And they were only issued for conspicuous

0:17:340:17:38

bravery in the face of the enemy.

0:17:380:17:40

And as you can see, these one are behind glass for security reasons.

0:17:400:17:44

They're highly valuable.

0:17:440:17:46

When the Indian Army once challenged their toughness,

0:17:460:17:51

the Gurkhas threw the gauntlet down.

0:17:510:17:54

A treacherous hill race took place

0:17:540:17:56

and the Gurkhas won the first 33 places.

0:17:560:18:00

And an annual race was established and year after year,

0:18:000:18:03

the Gurkhas won this trophy.

0:18:030:18:05

It's a silver statue of a Gurkha in national costume

0:18:050:18:08

and it's commonly known as the "Little Man".

0:18:080:18:11

The training and the selection for Gurkhas is almost as harsh

0:18:110:18:14

as battle itself, but it's still the dream of many young Nepalese men.

0:18:140:18:19

Each year, 20,000 compete for around 200 places.

0:18:190:18:24

Modern day Gurkhas still face a gruelling selection procedure,

0:18:240:18:27

of which the concluding part of it is running 5km all uphill,

0:18:270:18:31

with a whicker basket on your back filled with rocks weighing 25kg.

0:18:310:18:36

And you have to achieve this in under 48 minutes,

0:18:360:18:40

otherwise you're not in.

0:18:400:18:42

One of the toughest battles for the Gurkhas in recent

0:18:440:18:48

years has been with British red tape.

0:18:480:18:51

Actress Joanna Lumley,

0:18:510:18:53

whose father served with the 6th Gurkha Rifles,

0:18:530:18:56

led a high-profile campaign which led to the Gurkhas

0:18:560:18:58

and their families being allowed to live in the UK.

0:18:580:19:01

For close on 200 years, Gurkhas have been a part of our armed forces,

0:19:080:19:13

proving themselves again and again with their character,

0:19:130:19:17

dedication and bravery.

0:19:170:19:18

One chief of staff in the Indian Army said of them, "If a man

0:19:210:19:25

"says he's not afraid of dying, he's either lying or he's a Gurkha."

0:19:250:19:29

So, how do you think our experts' valuations went?

0:19:340:19:37

There's only one way to find out. We're off to auction!

0:19:370:19:40

And here's a quick reminder.

0:19:400:19:43

Let's hope the bidders will want to snap them up.

0:19:430:19:46

Our sale today is just down the road from Winchester.

0:19:460:19:50

We're at Andrew Smith & Sons.

0:19:500:19:52

Well, I've certainly been looking forward to this moment.

0:19:530:19:56

It's auction time, where we put our valuations to the test,

0:19:560:19:59

and we're doing it here in this gorgeous saleroom. Just look at that.

0:19:590:20:02

What a wonderful setting, a perfect place to sell antiques.

0:20:020:20:05

We're in a village called Itchen Stoke and every time I say that, it puts a big smile on my face.

0:20:050:20:09

It's such a lovely name. We're got two auctioneers on the rostrum today -

0:20:090:20:13

Nick Jarrett and Andrew Smith.

0:20:130:20:15

Yesterday, I caught up with Andrew Smith

0:20:150:20:18

and this is what he said about one of our items.

0:20:180:20:21

It's that rocking collection of autographs and photos.

0:20:210:20:25

OK, who were you listening to,

0:20:250:20:26

as you were sort of growing up, or still listening to now?

0:20:260:20:29

It was either The Beatles or the Rolling Stones.

0:20:290:20:31

-Or Led Zepp or Genesis.

-It was The Beatles.

0:20:310:20:34

Do you know, I had a hunch it might be! I had a hunch.

0:20:340:20:37

I grew up listening to the Rolling Stones

0:20:370:20:39

and I'm still a big Stones fan and I've seen them many times live.

0:20:390:20:42

So I had to take these on the show. They belong to Maureen.

0:20:420:20:44

Her best friend, a pen friend in the States was a member of the Rolling Stones fan club.

0:20:440:20:48

In fact, she helped organise many events. She got behind the scenes and this is her there.

0:20:480:20:52

Provenance will make all the difference and in fact, it has.

0:20:520:20:55

We've got a lot of interest on the internet already on this.

0:20:550:20:58

Hopefully, a lot of satisfaction!

0:20:580:21:00

Boom-boom.

0:21:000:21:03

Well, enough of my bad jokes. On with the sale.

0:21:030:21:06

At £35, then. Any more?

0:21:060:21:08

And first up, those two ceramic lambs.

0:21:080:21:11

Going under the hammer right now, we've got two Denby lambs.

0:21:110:21:14

They belong to Maureen and Ashley here.

0:21:140:21:16

-They were your parents', weren't they?

-They were.

-Wedding present.

0:21:160:21:19

-They don't do a lot for you, do they?

-No.

0:21:190:21:21

-It's the eyes!

-That's right.

-Spooky.

-They are spooky. Do you like these?

0:21:210:21:25

Well, I have to say yes cos they're Denby and it's close to home.

0:21:250:21:29

Somebody's going to like them.

0:21:290:21:31

There's always a market for something.

0:21:310:21:33

-I'm going to buy a small tree with the money.

-Are you? Plant a tree.

0:21:330:21:37

-Much better. We're keen gardeners.

-A fruit tree.

0:21:370:21:40

-Yes.

-Fruit tree?

-Yes.

-Good for you.

0:21:400:21:42

Let's find out what the bidders think of these lambs.

0:21:420:21:45

They're going under the hammer now. This is it.

0:21:450:21:48

There's a set of two Bourne Derby pale green lambs.

0:21:480:21:52

Start me at £50 here. £50.

0:21:520:21:54

-£50. 40, then.

-Oh, come on!

0:21:540:21:57

30, to get it going. £30, surely. Thank you and two.

0:21:570:22:01

It's going the wrong way.

0:22:010:22:03

I can get a small tree!

0:22:030:22:05

-AUCTIONEER:

-At £37. Any more?

0:22:050:22:07

At 40. 42. 45.

0:22:070:22:10

47. 47 down here. 50.

0:22:100:22:14

And five. 60.

0:22:140:22:15

It's reached the reserve.

0:22:150:22:17

-55 at the front, here. Is there 60? At £55.

-Go on!

-One more!

0:22:170:22:21

Yes, there's fresh legs there.

0:22:210:22:23

70. Are you sure?

0:22:230:22:27

-One more, go on.

-At £65.

0:22:270:22:29

At £65 then, at the front and selling.

0:22:290:22:31

At £65 for the very last time.

0:22:310:22:34

That's good. That's good.

0:22:360:22:37

You'll get yourselves two decent, or three decent fruit trees for that.

0:22:370:22:41

-Yes, indeed.

-You will, won't you?

0:22:410:22:44

Cos we enjoy the garden more than the lambs.

0:22:440:22:47

Yes, I'm with you on that one!

0:22:470:22:50

Bye-bye, sheep!

0:22:500:22:52

Not a fortune, but enough for Maureen

0:22:520:22:55

and Ashley to buy a few trees.

0:22:550:22:56

Now, it's my favourite item of the show so far -

0:22:560:22:59

the Rolling Stones autographs.

0:22:590:23:00

I'm relying on Mick Jagger and all the boys to help me out right now.

0:23:000:23:04

Yeah, you've guessed it. You know what I'm talking about - the Rolling Stones autographs.

0:23:040:23:08

They belong to Maureen, who is right next to me.

0:23:080:23:10

We're looking for 250 to £350. I'm pretty sure we'll get the top end.

0:23:100:23:14

-Yes.

-Shame about the tatty paper!

0:23:140:23:16

But nevertheless, they're still great.

0:23:160:23:18

And Brian Jones' signature there, which is a nice touch.

0:23:180:23:23

-Yes.

-So, it's time to wave goodbye.

0:23:230:23:25

It could be a sentimental journey of rock and roll going on right now!

0:23:250:23:30

The Rolling Stones' autographs. Various here.

0:23:310:23:34

Now, I've got several bids here...

0:23:340:23:37

Hey, you! Get off of my cloud!

0:23:370:23:39

-At 320.

-Look, we're straight in at the top end.

0:23:390:23:44

At 320. 340, I'm looking for.

0:23:440:23:46

At 320 with me. Make no mistake, I'm selling it at that. At £320.

0:23:460:23:50

340, is it?

0:23:500:23:53

At £320.

0:23:530:23:55

All done. At 320, then.

0:23:550:23:57

-Straight in, straight out. Well, there you go, it's gone.

-Wow!

0:23:570:24:00

-That was quick!

-It was quick, wasn't it?

0:24:000:24:03

-It's all over and done with. Have you had a good time here?

-Yes.

0:24:030:24:06

-Lovely, thank you.

-Did you come by yourself?

0:24:060:24:08

-No, I came with my husband. He's over there.

-That's him over there.

0:24:080:24:11

-What's his name?

-Barry.

-He's got a big grin on his face. There he is.

0:24:110:24:15

-Yes.

-Enjoy the rest of the day.

-OK, thank you.

0:24:150:24:18

Well, don't we all wish we had pen friends like Maureen's?

0:24:180:24:22

From rockers to rock solid.

0:24:220:24:24

Our third lot today is Ruth's 18-carat gold watch

0:24:240:24:27

and she's selling it to pay for her hobby - sailing.

0:24:270:24:31

-So, you have a yacht somewhere, do you?

-Yes.

-Peace and tranquillity.

0:24:310:24:35

No road rage at sea. Nothing like that, is there?

0:24:350:24:38

Only my husband keeping me on the tiller.

0:24:380:24:40

-LAUGHTER

-With a gin and tonic in hand.

0:24:400:24:44

-Sounds great.

-Look, enjoy those sunny evenings.

0:24:440:24:46

They're coming up soon. Here we go. It's going under the hammer. Good luck.

0:24:460:24:50

The 18-carat wristwatch here.

0:24:500:24:53

Emanuel of Southampton. And...

0:24:530:24:55

-Well, I've got several bids, as you might imagine.

-Ooh, excellent!

0:24:550:24:58

I'm going to start at 140.

0:24:580:25:01

Oh, brilliant!

0:25:010:25:03

-£140. 150.

-It is a good time to sell gold.

0:25:030:25:05

170. 180. 190.

0:25:050:25:08

No? At 180 with me, then.

0:25:080:25:09

-Wow!

-That's a longer holiday than you expected, isn't it?

0:25:090:25:13

Selling at 180. 190, new bidder. 200. And 20?

0:25:130:25:15

At 220, then. Towards the back at 220.

0:25:150:25:18

Gentleman's bid at £220.

0:25:180:25:21

At £220, then. Anybody else? At 220. Last chance. £220.

0:25:210:25:27

-It's gone. Under the hammer. There we go.

-Well done!

0:25:270:25:30

I thought I'd be taking it home!

0:25:300:25:32

That's a good result, isn't it? That's a surprise.

0:25:320:25:34

A really good result, yes.

0:25:340:25:36

And I think definitely the sort of Southampton connection,

0:25:360:25:39

and that gold is so high...

0:25:390:25:41

No camera now, please! THEY LAUGH

0:25:410:25:45

-Brilliant news! Really pleased for you.

-Thank you very much.

0:25:450:25:49

-You're welcome.

-Great.

0:25:490:25:51

Get on that yacht!

0:25:510:25:53

Well over estimate! And that leaves Ruth sailing away with a tidy sum.

0:25:530:25:57

Going under the hammer next, two Carlton Ware vases.

0:25:570:25:59

We've got Mick, he's right next to me.

0:25:590:26:02

Unfortunately, Janice cannot be with us today.

0:26:020:26:04

-She's doing some charity work.

-That's right.

0:26:040:26:06

-She's doing her charity bridge day.

-Why are you flogging these today?

0:26:060:26:09

They've been in the loft for three years.

0:26:090:26:12

We thought, we'd come along and all of a sudden,

0:26:120:26:15

-you had us at the top table.

-Dig them out!

0:26:150:26:17

I like these, he said, with those big flared rims.

0:26:170:26:20

These are just the staple diet of auction houses up

0:26:200:26:24

and down the country.

0:26:240:26:25

You do not go to an everyday auction without finding

0:26:250:26:28

-a pair of Carlton Ware vases.

-You don't, actually.

-And really, these should sell.

0:26:280:26:32

-They should sell any day, anywhere, any place.

-Keep your fingers crossed.

0:26:320:26:35

-Good luck.

-Thank you.

-Good luck. And I gather, all the money is going to charity as well.

0:26:350:26:39

-That's correct, yeah.

-OK, good one. It's going under the hammer right now. This is exciting.

0:26:390:26:43

Here we go. Let's find out what it's worth.

0:26:430:26:45

The pair of Carlton Ware New Mikado vases. Start me at £70 on these.

0:26:450:26:50

£70.

0:26:500:26:51

£70. £50, then. £50. 50, I have. And five here. 60.

0:26:510:26:56

And five. 70. And five. 80.

0:26:560:26:58

-They're keen.

-That's good.

0:26:580:27:00

90. £85 at the front. And selling. Is there 90?

0:27:000:27:04

-90 right up at the top.

-Fresh legs.

-And five. At £90.

0:27:040:27:07

At £90 and selling. Is there five? At £90. Are you all done?

0:27:070:27:13

At £90 for the very last time, then.

0:27:130:27:15

-Hammer's gone down.

-Excellent.

0:27:150:27:17

-Good result?

-Good result. Very good result.

0:27:170:27:19

All the money's going to charity and the wife will be pleased, as well.

0:27:190:27:23

-Yes, she will.

-Are you going to clear the rest of the attic out now?

-We're still working on it.

-Still!

0:27:230:27:27

I've a feeling they'll be back on "Flog It!" soon with more goodies.

0:27:270:27:31

And now a pair of goodies.

0:27:310:27:33

The Hans Hansen brooch and bangle, belonging to Val.

0:27:330:27:36

Great little lot this. And you bought this in Denmark in the '70s.

0:27:360:27:39

-Way back, yes.

-Why are you selling it now?

0:27:390:27:42

-It's all the rage, this kind of thing.

-I know. I never wear it.

0:27:420:27:46

I have put it away in a chest for like 30 years.

0:27:460:27:48

And I don't wear silver now.

0:27:480:27:50

Someone who does love it is right next to me on this side.

0:27:500:27:53

-Christina, it's a nice thing, isn't it?

-It's beautiful, yeah.

0:27:530:27:56

And so wearable today. So, I really hope that it sells well for you.

0:27:560:27:59

-I hope so too.

-Let's hope we get the £200 top end of the estimate.

0:27:590:28:02

-Yeah, I hope so. Yeah.

-Be nice.

-Fingers crossed.

0:28:020:28:05

-two things together, we've got the brooch and...

-The bangle.

0:28:050:28:08

-And the bangle.

-Yeah, exactly.

-Good luck. Good luck.

0:28:080:28:11

Let's find out what the bidders think. Here we go.

0:28:110:28:14

The fish brooch.

0:28:140:28:17

Hans Hansen.

0:28:170:28:19

And um...I'm going to start you to clear all bids here at 110.

0:28:190:28:26

Brilliant. Straightaway.

0:28:260:28:28

Anybody in the room, 120?

0:28:280:28:30

110 with me. Anybody going on? At £110.

0:28:300:28:34

-Is that it, then?

-Gosh! Straight in and straight out!

0:28:340:28:38

110, are you in? At £110, all done.

0:28:380:28:42

-Aw.

-That was short and sharp.

0:28:420:28:44

-It was, wasn't it?

-Disappointed.

-Aw!

0:28:440:28:46

Had a commission bid. I bet the bid was a lot higher.

0:28:460:28:49

If someone was here to push that bid up... But anyway, look, it's gone.

0:28:490:28:52

It's gone within the estimate. We're all happy.

0:28:520:28:55

We weren't quite sure if that brooch was a fish, a bird or a deer,

0:28:550:28:59

but at least it sold.

0:28:590:29:01

OK, here's a question for you.

0:29:070:29:09

What connects one of Britain's most famous authors, Jane Austen,

0:29:090:29:12

from about 200 years ago, to the modern day, the present

0:29:120:29:16

phenomena of the internet, e-mails, computers, laptops...?

0:29:160:29:19

Well, I can tell you. It's this place, Chawton House.

0:29:190:29:23

Once her brother's home. Now, owned by a Silicon Valley millionairess.

0:29:230:29:29

You probably haven't heard of her, but American computer expert

0:29:290:29:33

and entrepreneur Sandy Lerner bought Chawton House in Hampshire in 1992.

0:29:330:29:38

Although she's never lived here, she's spent eight years

0:29:380:29:41

and £10 million turning this rundown shell...

0:29:410:29:45

..into this restored architectural delight.

0:29:470:29:52

Looking at the house today, it's a labour of love.

0:29:520:29:55

And love is how it started.

0:29:550:29:57

The legend is that Sandy Lerner made her money by inventing a new

0:29:570:30:01

computer system, so she could send her boyfriend romantic messages.

0:30:010:30:05

Now, that story was just clever PR really,

0:30:080:30:10

but the work was a huge leap forward in computer development

0:30:100:30:14

and it made Sandy Lerner a multimillionaire.

0:30:140:30:16

So, what's that got to do with Jane Austen?

0:30:160:30:19

Well, if you've got millions of pounds to spend,

0:30:190:30:22

disposable cash, you spend on your passion.

0:30:220:30:25

Sandy's passion is women's literature.

0:30:250:30:27

Just look at this incredible collection.

0:30:270:30:31

Many of them are first editions or early ones

0:30:310:30:33

and the condition is incredible.

0:30:330:30:36

Such a sense of history in this room.

0:30:360:30:38

Sandy Lerner donated her personal collection

0:30:410:30:44

and built an international study centre for women's literature,

0:30:440:30:47

from the 1600s to the 19th century.

0:30:470:30:51

And now, it numbers 9,000 books.

0:30:510:30:55

Jane Austen lived nearby in a cottage in the village, but she

0:30:550:31:00

often visited Chawton House because this was her brother Edward's home.

0:31:000:31:03

And while she was living in the village,

0:31:030:31:05

she finished Sense and Sensibility

0:31:050:31:08

and Pride and Prejudice and started Emma.

0:31:080:31:11

And here is a wonderful edition, printed in Philadelphia in 1833.

0:31:110:31:15

It just goes to show the worldwide appeal of her work.

0:31:150:31:18

What an accolade for an author, even by today's standards, to have

0:31:180:31:22

your work published overseas, around the globe, but back then in 1833.

0:31:220:31:26

Emma has descriptions which reflect Chawton House

0:31:320:31:36

and the landscape here is said to have inspired some of the passages.

0:31:360:31:40

Some of the characters may even have been

0:31:400:31:43

based on the owners of the house, the Knight family.

0:31:430:31:46

"Dear Diary, I tried not to think about Mr Knightley.

0:31:480:31:52

"I tried not to think about him when I discussed the menu with the cook.

0:31:520:31:56

"I tried not to think about him in the garden where I thrice plucked

0:31:560:31:59

"the petals of a daisy to ascertain his feelings for Harriet.

0:31:590:32:03

"I don't think we should keep daisies in the garden.

0:32:030:32:06

"They really are such a drab little flower.

0:32:060:32:09

"And I tried not to think about him when I went to bed.

0:32:090:32:13

"But something had to be done."

0:32:130:32:15

Now, we've all heard of Jane Austen, but even before her,

0:32:150:32:18

there were many women making their mark in a male-dominated

0:32:180:32:21

world through their writing.

0:32:210:32:23

This beautiful portrait is of Mary Robinson.

0:32:230:32:26

She was an actress who became the mistress to the Prince Regent in 1779.

0:32:260:32:30

He later went on to become George IV and Mary Robinson later

0:32:300:32:34

went on to champion the cause of women's rights.

0:32:340:32:37

Beautiful woman.

0:32:370:32:39

She led somewhat of a scandalous life,

0:32:390:32:41

yet wrote romantic poetry and here in the collection,

0:32:410:32:44

there's a wonderful first edition, first printed in 1791, of her works.

0:32:440:32:49

And there's a gorgeous steel engraving of her,

0:32:490:32:52

looking on a profile sideways, rather than straight on,

0:32:520:32:56

which is rather unusual.

0:32:560:32:57

Superb.

0:32:570:32:59

"Shedding soft lustre on the rosy hours

0:32:590:33:02

"When the dawn unfolds its purple splendours mid the dappled clouds.

0:33:020:33:07

"Of heaven's own radiance with one vast of light

0:33:070:33:10

"Thou smil'st triumphant."

0:33:100:33:12

Now, even earlier than that,

0:33:120:33:14

Aphra Benn was one of the first professional female writers

0:33:140:33:17

and this one's titled Love-Letters Between A Nobleman And His Sister.

0:33:170:33:21

It was an incestuous story.

0:33:210:33:23

A love story between a brother and a sister.

0:33:230:33:25

So it was incredibly scandalous in its day.

0:33:250:33:28

Aphra Benn was born in 1640, and like most women of her day,

0:33:280:33:31

she had no formal education. She travelled the globe.

0:33:310:33:34

Basically, she enjoyed life to the full. She did what she wanted to do.

0:33:340:33:38

So much romance in such a romantic setting

0:33:400:33:43

and it's all down to one free-spirited woman on a mission.

0:33:430:33:47

It's a great place. Jane Austen's village.

0:33:470:33:50

It's just such a wonderful place, I think, to come

0:33:500:33:52

and decompress and find kind of a quiet corner and immerse yourself.

0:33:520:33:56

My library needed a home and it's a wonderful home for the library.

0:33:560:33:59

It's a good thing to have done.

0:33:590:34:02

Sandy Lerner still comes here regularly.

0:34:020:34:05

She's a chairman of the trustees.

0:34:050:34:07

She's still passionate and dedicated about the place.

0:34:070:34:10

She's hands-on, very enthusiastic, and it's thanks to her dedication

0:34:100:34:14

and her passion that members of the general public can come here,

0:34:140:34:17

look at the collection, read the books

0:34:170:34:20

and learn more about early women's literature.

0:34:200:34:22

And if I had loads of money,

0:34:220:34:24

this would be something I would love to do, as well.

0:34:240:34:27

It's well worth a visit, so please do check it out.

0:34:270:34:30

We're in Winchester,

0:34:360:34:38

where we're hoping for some fairytale endings of our own.

0:34:380:34:42

# If you go down to the woods today, you're sure of a big surprise

0:34:420:34:45

# If you go down to the woods today, you'd better go in disguise

0:34:450:34:49

# For every bear there ever was will gather there for certain cause

0:34:490:34:52

# Today's the day the teddy bears have their picnic. #

0:34:520:34:56

Aw, teddy bear! Look at that! Teddy!

0:34:560:34:58

-Have you given your teddy bear a name?

-Yup, he's called Albert.

0:34:580:35:01

-Albert, aw! He's not for sale, is he?

-No.

0:35:010:35:04

No. You just want a valuation.

0:35:040:35:07

Albert's not for sale, but these two are.

0:35:070:35:10

They've been brought in by Kenneth and his daughter Gail.

0:35:100:35:13

They're with Christina Trevanion.

0:35:130:35:15

You've brought in today with you these wonderful bears.

0:35:150:35:19

Tell me where they've come from.

0:35:190:35:21

They've been passed down through my wife's side of the family.

0:35:210:35:24

As a child, she was allowed to play with them

0:35:240:35:26

at the bottom of the stairs because Granny didn't like noisy children!

0:35:260:35:30

-Oh, right! Should be seen and not heard.

-That's right.

-Indeed.

0:35:300:35:33

-And were you allowed to play with them?

-I wasn't.

0:35:330:35:35

I was allowed to hold them, but my brother and me

0:35:350:35:38

were never allowed to play with them cos my grandad just didn't...

0:35:380:35:41

I have to say that the fact you weren't allowed to play

0:35:410:35:43

with them, your wife was obviously very careful with them,

0:35:430:35:46

has meant that they are in excellent condition.

0:35:460:35:48

The wonderful thing about this one as well is he's actually still got his growler.

0:35:480:35:53

-Yes.

-Yes.

-Can you make him growl for me?

0:35:530:35:56

BEAR GROWLS QUIETLY

0:35:560:35:58

-BEAR GROWLS

-There we go.

0:35:580:36:00

It's very difficult to hear cos it's quite noisy here

0:36:000:36:03

and he's quite quiet, but it's definitely there.

0:36:030:36:06

-Oh, in a quiet room, it is, yeah.

-I imagine he's quite sort of...argh!

0:36:060:36:10

Oh, yeah! Run a mile!

0:36:100:36:12

-Terrifying! Wouldn't want to meet him in the woods, would you?

-Oh, no!

0:36:120:36:16

But I've rather taken to him, I have to say.

0:36:160:36:18

I think he's absolutely wonderful.

0:36:180:36:20

And he's got this lovely label on the bottom, which tells us

0:36:200:36:24

that he's actually a Farnell bear.

0:36:240:36:26

Now, Farnell's was basically the English equivalent of Steiff,

0:36:260:36:30

the German factory.

0:36:300:36:32

Farnell is really sought after as a British-made bear.

0:36:320:36:35

And he's quite an early chap. We've got these wonderful glass eyes.

0:36:350:36:39

Later, they were plastic.

0:36:390:36:41

And if we knock them against our teeth,

0:36:410:36:43

we can tell that they're glass.

0:36:430:36:45

Nice felt pad there. Original stitching.

0:36:450:36:48

So, I would date him to around the 1930s, 1940s.

0:36:480:36:51

-He's got the most wonderful expression on his face.

-Yeah.

0:36:510:36:55

It must have been so tempting to play with him

0:36:550:36:58

-when you were younger and not be allowed.

-Yeah.

0:36:580:37:01

-My grandma was always stood guard over Tony and me.

-Oh, was she?

-Yeah.

0:37:010:37:04

Oh! And then this little chappie, unfortunately,

0:37:040:37:08

we can't attribute him to any particular factory,

0:37:080:37:10

but he looks like he's around the same sort of date.

0:37:100:37:14

-So, he was Granny's bear, as well.

-Yeah. Granny's bear.

0:37:140:37:17

He's very much a sort of Winnie the Pooh looking bear, isn't he?

0:37:170:37:20

He's got the nice glass eyes, you would expect of an early bear.

0:37:200:37:23

And if we go down to the paws, we can see it looks as

0:37:230:37:26

if it's got the original linen this time, rather than felt.

0:37:260:37:30

Got the linen pads there.

0:37:300:37:32

With the stitching, which looks to be original.

0:37:320:37:35

And I think as a nice 1930s, 1940s bear,

0:37:350:37:38

we're looking somewhere probably in the region of about 100 to £150,

0:37:380:37:42

purely because unfortunately we can't attribute him

0:37:420:37:45

-to a particular factory.

-A label, yeah.

0:37:450:37:48

The Farnell's Alpha Bear, I think he is gorgeous.

0:37:480:37:51

We're probably looking somewhere in the region of maybe £300-500.

0:37:510:37:55

OK.

0:37:550:37:56

And I think with internet exposure and that Farnell name, we might

0:37:560:37:59

-do better, but I would like to think that the same buyer would buy both.

-Yes.

0:37:590:38:03

-Because it would be nice for them to go to the same home, wouldn't it?

-Yeah.

0:38:030:38:07

-But you never know.

-As long as they go to someone who looks after them.

0:38:070:38:11

Exactly. Yes. And I think that's the most important thing.

0:38:110:38:15

And I'm sure that we'll find a very, very keen home for them

0:38:150:38:18

-at the auction room.

-OK.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:38:180:38:21

Two bears ready to be sent off to auction.

0:38:210:38:24

James is with Trish now

0:38:240:38:26

and about to make a confession about his misspent youth.

0:38:260:38:30

Trish, I can just imagine you sitting at home in front

0:38:300:38:33

of the fire, rolling your roll ups...

0:38:330:38:35

Where's your pipe gone?

0:38:350:38:37

-Do you smoke a pipe?

-They're wonderful, aren't they?

0:38:370:38:40

No, they belonged to my father.

0:38:400:38:41

He died ten years ago and he spent his last days with me

0:38:410:38:45

and I was having a look the other day and found these

0:38:450:38:48

and I thought, "I will take them to 'Flog It!'"

0:38:480:38:51

Do you know? I've never seen one of those.

0:38:510:38:54

-A wonderful slide for cigarette papers.

-Yes.

-Little Rizlas.

0:38:540:39:00

-I had a cat called Rizla, you know?

-Did you?

-Yeah, I did.

0:39:000:39:03

Not very classy, me!

0:39:030:39:06

I was a rough student.

0:39:060:39:08

-And I actually used to use these.

-Did you?

0:39:080:39:11

Whoever had this could afford a silver case for his papers.

0:39:110:39:14

It's amazing. I'm surprised they ever made anything like that.

0:39:140:39:17

I've never seen one. Really unusual.

0:39:170:39:20

And then, the piece in the centre is a visiting card case.

0:39:200:39:23

-It's curved because it sits in the waistcoat pocket.

-Oh, lovely.

0:39:230:39:27

Sometimes, they have covers. Sometimes, they're open, like that.

0:39:270:39:30

But a very practical but very common piece of silver.

0:39:300:39:33

And the one at the end...

0:39:330:39:34

I mean, really, that is what you have

0:39:340:39:36

if you've got everything else that a pipe smoker needs. I've got one of those, got one of those,

0:39:360:39:41

but do you know, I haven't got a solid silver case for my pipe!

0:39:410:39:44

And really, just look at it.

0:39:440:39:46

Solid silver. Wonderful quality. A little suspension ring on the end.

0:39:460:39:50

Gilded interior, so the tobacco didn't attack the silver.

0:39:500:39:55

But you know, I don't think it's been used.

0:39:550:39:58

-It's not the most practical of things.

-No.

0:39:580:40:00

But again, wonderful little hallmark. Chester hallmark in there.

0:40:000:40:04

So, all together, we've got a successful businessman who

0:40:040:40:08

has his business cards, who likes roll ups and pipes.

0:40:080:40:11

And probably late Victorian. Can you imagine one of those great big curly moustached men

0:40:110:40:16

with their hair greased down, with their waistcoat on for that, and rolling up their own cigarettes.

0:40:160:40:21

I mean, you can imagine who used these.

0:40:210:40:24

-Yes.

-Value? We've got to have probably 80 to 120 for the three.

0:40:240:40:29

-Oh, lovely.

-Is that all right?

-Yes. Fine.

0:40:290:40:31

Have you got stacks more stuff?

0:40:310:40:34

-I've actually still got Pa's ashes in the wardrobe.

-Oh, no!

-Bless him!

0:40:340:40:38

-Yes, so...

-You sleep with your father's ashes in the wardrobe?

0:40:380:40:41

In your bedroom?

0:40:410:40:43

So, I did think that if this made any money,

0:40:430:40:46

that there'd be a family treat and we'd scatter his ashes at sea.

0:40:460:40:50

-Wonderful.

-So, that's what we're going to do with it.

0:40:500:40:53

It's funny, my grandfather always wanted that to happen

0:40:530:40:56

and it didn't for some reason.

0:40:560:40:57

-They buried his ashes with my grandmother.

-Yeah.

0:40:570:41:00

-But that would have been... Yeah.

-My father had asked me to do that.

0:41:000:41:04

It's my fault, I've never got round to doing it,

0:41:040:41:06

-so that's why he's still with me.

-It doesn't matter when, does it?

-No!

0:41:060:41:10

Well, really great story and I hope we raise a bit of money for you.

0:41:100:41:14

Thank you very much.

0:41:140:41:15

So, Stella, this rather wonderful book has some quite

0:41:190:41:23

-wonderful secrets inside, doesn't it?

-It does.

0:41:230:41:27

I'll open it up. We've got some wonderful sketches.

0:41:270:41:30

Can you tell me how it's come into your possession?

0:41:300:41:33

My grandfather purchased and he'd given it to my grandmother cos

0:41:330:41:37

she was herself an amateur artist and he thought she would like it.

0:41:370:41:41

Cos there are some wonderful pictures in here and this one,

0:41:410:41:44

in particular, I think is just charming.

0:41:440:41:47

Unfortunately, we can't actually attribute any of the pictures

0:41:470:41:51

-to any professional artist. They are all quite amateur.

-Amateur. Yeah.

0:41:510:41:55

But I think that's quite charming about it,

0:41:550:41:58

I like it that it's not somebody that we can trace overly.

0:41:580:42:02

There's a portrait there.

0:42:020:42:04

And those are gorgeous. That one's particularly touching.

0:42:040:42:08

They're mainly dating from around the 1850s through to the '60s,

0:42:080:42:13

1870s, so they do span quite a period of time.

0:42:130:42:16

I've seen some of them are dated. Taken little watercolour sketches...

0:42:160:42:21

And you've got the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence there.

0:42:210:42:24

And that's in the form of a sort of early postcard.

0:42:240:42:27

It's quite nice to have that one.

0:42:270:42:29

And obviously, went there aged 21,

0:42:290:42:32

whoever did this album, which is quite nice.

0:42:320:42:35

So, it really is a wonderful snapshot of somebody's travels

0:42:350:42:38

-and observations.

-Yeah. Where they've been...

-Yeah. Exactly.

0:42:380:42:43

It's wonderful.

0:42:430:42:46

Obviously, saw a sailing boat there!

0:42:460:42:49

-I wonder if that was on the Hamble!

-Probably.

0:42:490:42:52

It is quite a difficult thing to value

0:42:520:42:54

-because it is quite a selective little thing, isn't it?

-It is.

0:42:540:42:57

Very personal to the family who once had it.

0:42:570:43:00

But probably not many other people, sadly.

0:43:000:43:02

We would probably be looking somewhere in the region

0:43:020:43:05

-of maybe 80 to £120, maybe a £60 firm reserve.

-Yes, that's fine.

-OK.

0:43:050:43:10

-Hopefully, it'll go for slightly more.

-Yes, that would be nice.

0:43:100:43:14

-It would be, wouldn't it? Thanks so much for bringing it in today.

-Thank you.

0:43:140:43:18

-Reg, is that from the Isle of Wight?

-Yes.

0:43:200:43:23

Do you know, I had the pleasure of filming on the Isle of Wight.

0:43:230:43:27

I got to play on the sand in Alum Bay and I made one of these.

0:43:270:43:33

But nowhere as good as that. That is beautiful!

0:43:330:43:37

-There you go, there's the Needles.

-The Needles.

0:43:370:43:40

Aw, I thoroughly enjoyed that day.

0:43:400:43:42

The sun was shining, it was a bright, beautiful day.

0:43:420:43:45

-Is this a Victorian piece, do you think?

-Oh, yes.

0:43:450:43:48

-My father bought it before the Second World War.

-Did he?

0:43:480:43:51

On a little trip to the Isle of Wight?

0:43:510:43:53

-Brought it back as a souvenir.

-It's been in the family ever since.

-Let's get it in to auction.

0:43:530:43:57

We'll put an estimate of 90 to £120 on this.

0:43:570:44:00

Hopefully, it just might fly away. Can you trust us with that, Reg?

0:44:000:44:03

-Yes, course I can.

-Do you know what you should do with the money?

0:44:030:44:06

Take a trip back to the Isle of Wight. Get over there on the ferry.

0:44:060:44:10

-Yes.

-Good luck to Reg.

0:44:100:44:12

That one really will depend on the right people turning up on the day.

0:44:120:44:17

We've got time for one more item and Christina is with Bert.

0:44:170:44:20

-So, Bert, you've brought this in to me today.

-Yes.

-Did you carry it in?

0:44:200:44:24

-Yes.

-It's jolly heavy, isn't it?

-In a plastic bag.

-In a plastic bag?

0:44:240:44:28

The handle did break off eventually, so I had to carry it under my arm.

0:44:280:44:33

Well, thank you for struggling in with it,

0:44:330:44:35

because it really is the most wonderful jardiniere.

0:44:350:44:39

-What did you use it for?

-We kept kindling and coal in it.

0:44:390:44:43

-So, this has been your coal bin?

-Yes.

-Was it covered in dust?

-Um...

0:44:430:44:47

-It looks pretty clean to me.

-Well, I did it myself.

0:44:470:44:50

I cleaned it all up and each panel took me about four hours to clean.

0:44:500:44:53

Four hours to clean? So, it's been a complete labour of love for you.

0:44:530:44:56

-Oh, yes.

-Well, it's come up beautifully

0:44:560:44:59

and I'm really glad that you went to the effort of giving it a good clean

0:44:590:45:02

cos we can really see in detail exactly what we've got on here.

0:45:020:45:06

We've got some rather typical cranes here, which is

0:45:060:45:09

a very Japanese emblem, to use a water crane.

0:45:090:45:13

And some more birds and also some bamboo.

0:45:130:45:17

What would the flower...? What would the blossom be?

0:45:170:45:20

Well, this particular flower here is a chrysanthemum,

0:45:200:45:23

-which was considered to be one of the...

-National flowers.

-Yeah.

0:45:230:45:27

So, it really is all quite symbolic.

0:45:270:45:29

Will you be a gentleman and see if you can pick it up for me?

0:45:290:45:32

See if we can find a mark there.

0:45:320:45:34

Yes, we've got a nice clear mark on the bottom.

0:45:340:45:36

Unfortunately, we haven't been able to decipher it,

0:45:360:45:39

but I would imagine it would be a metalworker.

0:45:390:45:42

It is fairly crude, so I think possibly not an expert metalworker,

0:45:420:45:47

but I still think a very talented person in his own right. I don't know about you, Bert,

0:45:470:45:51

-but I can actually see daylight down there.

-Yes, I know.

0:45:510:45:54

I think it must be a fault in the casting.

0:45:540:45:56

-Nothing to do with you keeping it as a coal bin?

-No.

0:45:560:45:58

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

-OK.

0:45:580:46:00

Because of the damage and because it's quite large

0:46:000:46:02

and it's quite heavy, we might be looking at putting a sort of conservative estimate,

0:46:020:46:06

-£100-200, perhaps with a discretionary reserve of £100.

-Yup.

0:46:060:46:10

I would hope though that the Oriental market at the moment

0:46:100:46:12

is quite buoyant and it really is a beautiful piece

0:46:120:46:15

and fingers crossed, we'll find it a good new home.

0:46:150:46:19

-And it could make more.

-And it could make more, exactly. You never know.

0:46:190:46:25

-Thanks so much for bringing it in, Bert.

-That's all right.

0:46:250:46:29

Thank you very much.

0:46:290:46:31

Let's get that and our other items wrapped up and sent off to auction.

0:46:310:46:35

This is our auction house today, Andrew Smith & Sons in Itchen Stoke.

0:46:430:46:47

Yesterday was auction preview day. I had a quick chat with one of the auctioneers, Andrew Smith,

0:46:470:46:52

about one of our items and this is what he said.

0:46:520:46:55

And it's Kenneth and Gail's teddy bears up for discussion.

0:46:550:46:58

If you go down to Itchen Stoke, you're sure to have a big surprise!

0:46:580:47:02

Because there's teddy bears everywhere here, Andrew.

0:47:020:47:05

-What do you think of these fellas?

-I think they're great.

0:47:050:47:09

They're both in good condition and the Farnell,

0:47:090:47:11

the one on the far side, is a particularly good one.

0:47:110:47:14

Totally agree with you. That's the big money earner.

0:47:140:47:16

-But do you know which one I prefer?

-Probably the well-loved one.

0:47:160:47:19

Yes, I do, because he's got the character.

0:47:190:47:22

He's worn, he's slightly tatty and he's the one that you feel sorry for,

0:47:220:47:25

you fall in love with and say,

0:47:250:47:27

"I want to give him a home." He's got the look, hasn't he?

0:47:270:47:30

I'd still put the safe money on the Farnell.

0:47:300:47:32

Has there been much interest?

0:47:320:47:34

There has, both during the viewing and on the internet.

0:47:340:47:37

I can't wait to see these go under the hammer. Also, there's something sitting right above my head.

0:47:370:47:41

You haven't seen it yet, but if you look up there,

0:47:410:47:44

you'll have a big, big surprise! Look at that!

0:47:440:47:47

Before we takeoff with the bears,

0:47:500:47:52

we're selling a down-to-earth item spotted by Christina.

0:47:520:47:55

Andrew's colleague, Nick Jarrett, is on the rostrum.

0:47:550:47:58

Our next lot is a Japanese jardiniere,

0:47:580:48:01

just about to go under the hammer.

0:48:010:48:03

It belongs to Bert and I would think not for much longer because we

0:48:030:48:06

-talk about the Oriental market being so strong in the trade, don't we?

-Very buoyant, yeah.

0:48:060:48:10

I know you have spent a lot of time polishing this as well.

0:48:100:48:13

-It was really in a filthy state.

-I bet it was, yeah.

0:48:130:48:16

-Good luck with this. Good luck, both of you.

-Yeah.

-It's going under the hammer right now.

0:48:160:48:20

Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:48:200:48:22

The Japanese bronze jardiniere. There we are.

0:48:220:48:25

-Looks great, doesn't it?

-It does, in the photograph.

0:48:250:48:28

-Nice quality. I've got to start you, to clear all bids, at 110.

-Oh!

0:48:280:48:32

-120, can I say?

-It's gone, hasn't it?

-£110.

0:48:320:48:36

120, is it?

0:48:360:48:37

At £110, anybody in? No?

0:48:370:48:40

At £110, I'm selling.

0:48:400:48:43

All finished at 110.

0:48:430:48:45

Well, that was quick. It was straight in and straight out.

0:48:450:48:48

-That was quick!

-Nobody bidding against each other.

0:48:480:48:51

-A commission bid, you're right.

-Yeah.

-Bert, thank you very much.

0:48:510:48:54

I hope you're happy with that.

0:48:540:48:55

-Yes, yes, thank you.

-Bert, thanks so much for bringing it in.

0:48:550:48:58

Always glad to see a happy customer. Next, James is in position,

0:49:000:49:03

selling the trio of silver items brought in by Trisha.

0:49:030:49:07

Fingers crossed we get the top end of this next lot

0:49:070:49:10

and a little bit more because it's a great time to sell silver, Trisha.

0:49:100:49:14

Why are you selling all these items?

0:49:140:49:16

Well, I found them in the wardrobe when I was clearing out

0:49:160:49:20

and they belonged to my father and I assume his father actually.

0:49:200:49:23

-Right, been in the family a bit of time. But you're not really interested.

-No.

0:49:230:49:28

That little silver case for the papers, I like that. Never seen one.

0:49:280:49:32

So, hopefully, it'll do well.

0:49:320:49:34

-That's the novelty item amongst the three things, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:49:340:49:37

-Yes.

-Let's hope we get the top end. They're going under the hammer right now.

0:49:370:49:41

The unusual pipe case here in silver. It is unusual.

0:49:410:49:44

And the other bits there, some cigarette paper holder

0:49:440:49:48

and the visiting card slip. There we are.

0:49:480:49:50

Interesting little lot. Now, to clear bids, I'm starting you at £70.

0:49:500:49:54

I'll take five on it. 75. 80. Five. New bidder, 90.

0:49:540:49:59

Five. 100. And ten. 120. 130.

0:49:590:50:02

140. £140, gentleman's bid at 140.

0:50:020:50:05

Still not expensive. At 140. Anybody else in at 140?

0:50:050:50:09

All done at £140. Wincing slightly, you think it is expensive! 150.

0:50:090:50:13

160? 150, lady's bid now at £150. Any more?

0:50:130:50:18

At £150, you done. All done.

0:50:180:50:21

Such a good time to sell silver, isn't it,

0:50:210:50:24

because the scrap value, the melt value is so high.

0:50:240:50:27

-It's nearly £20 an ounce.

-Ooh, goodness!

0:50:270:50:29

-Yeah, but those won't be melted down.

-They made more.

0:50:290:50:33

Going under the hammer right now, we've got

0:50:330:50:36

this wonderful artist's sketch book. It really is divine.

0:50:360:50:40

It belongs to Stella and it's such a hard thing to put a valuation on.

0:50:400:50:42

-It is.

-Christina, I take my hat off to you. 80 to 120, I think that's sensible.

0:50:420:50:47

This could fly away, or it could just do the estimate, but there's a lot there, isn't there?

0:50:470:50:52

-Yes.

-It's a nice thing to muse over.

0:50:520:50:53

You can use your imagination. You can get carried away with that.

0:50:530:50:56

Let's hope this lot get carried away right now. It's going under the hammer. Here we go.

0:50:560:51:00

The watercolour album and sketchbook -

0:51:000:51:04

all sorts in there, with the landscapes, etc.

0:51:040:51:07

Um...now, where will you start with this? 40 for it, somewhere.

0:51:070:51:10

£40? Don't really want to come below that.

0:51:100:51:13

40, I have, thanks. And 2, can I say, now?

0:51:130:51:15

At £40, it is - and 2. 45.

0:51:150:51:19

48. 50.

0:51:190:51:21

5. 60.

0:51:210:51:22

That's 60, then, down here at 60.

0:51:220:51:24

-Are you going on?

-Yes.

0:51:240:51:26

65 on the net. And 70. 5.

0:51:260:51:28

-That's a net bidder.

-There's a lady bidding.

-Lady in the room.

0:51:280:51:31

80 now in here. And 5?

0:51:310:51:34

-This is good, Stella.

-Yeah.

0:51:340:51:35

I thought the internet might pick it up.

0:51:350:51:37

Yeah. It's creeping up, though.

0:51:370:51:39

100. And 10.

0:51:390:51:41

£100, the lady's bid. At £100, in the room,

0:51:430:51:46

make no mistake on the web.

0:51:460:51:48

At £100, you done?

0:51:480:51:51

Done. Well done.

0:51:510:51:52

There is so much sentimental value there for some family -

0:51:520:51:55

if we knew who, we'd be laughing.

0:51:550:51:57

-But it's gone.

-Yes.

-And it's made mid-estimate

0:51:570:52:00

and it's worth every penny of that, I'd say.

0:52:000:52:03

-I hope they enjoy it.

-They will.

-They are nice.

0:52:030:52:06

-Excellent.

-Well done.

0:52:060:52:07

This next item's not about the money - it's about nostalgia

0:52:080:52:12

and childhood memories.

0:52:120:52:13

It's the sand picture belonging to Reg.

0:52:130:52:16

I've had a few sleepless nights over this next lot.

0:52:160:52:18

The last time I saw it was at the valuation day

0:52:180:52:21

a few weeks ago and I was thinking,

0:52:210:52:22

"If this gets bubble wrapped and put in a bag where no-one can see it,

0:52:220:52:26

"it's going to get tipped upside-down."

0:52:260:52:28

The first thing I did on auction preview was ran straight to it to see if the picture was intact.

0:52:280:52:32

I bet you'll be sad to see this go, won't you?

0:52:320:52:35

I will, in a way, cos it was a family heirloom, really.

0:52:350:52:38

Let's find out what the bidders think, shall we?

0:52:390:52:42

Victorian sand-filled glass bell.

0:52:420:52:44

Alum Bay, Isle of Wight.

0:52:450:52:47

Start me at £100. £100?

0:52:470:52:49

£100. 80, then. £80, surely.

0:52:490:52:52

60, then, if you like.

0:52:520:52:54

£60? £60, thank you, and 5?

0:52:540:52:56

£60, 65, 70 and 5.

0:52:560:52:58

80, at £75. Any more?

0:52:580:53:01

At £75. No? At £75.

0:53:010:53:05

I'm afraid we're not quite there.

0:53:050:53:07

Tantalisingly close, but we can't sell it that low.

0:53:070:53:10

I'm quite surprised that didn't sell.

0:53:100:53:12

You know, it was there, "Come and buy me."

0:53:120:53:14

I guess nobody's into sand pictures, really.

0:53:140:53:16

-You know where you should go, don't you?

-Yeah.

0:53:160:53:18

Get your granddaughter to drive you to the Isle of Wight

0:53:180:53:21

and put it in an auction over there.

0:53:210:53:23

I can almost swim over there,

0:53:230:53:24

cos I'm only nine miles away from The Needles.

0:53:240:53:27

But you can't swim with a sand picture!

0:53:270:53:30

Well, Reg seems to have taken that one on the chin.

0:53:300:53:33

So, will our last sale of the day sink or swim?

0:53:330:53:36

It's those two teddy bears. Let's find out.

0:53:360:53:38

Kenneth and Gail - we've got two, haven't we? We've split the lot.

0:53:380:53:41

-We've got the Farnell's one...

-Yeah.

-..going under the hammer first.

0:53:410:53:44

300-500. And my favourite, the little 1940s one.

0:53:440:53:47

I think he's been duffed up a bit and he needs a lot of love.

0:53:470:53:49

-Aw!

-He's the cheaper of the two,

0:53:490:53:51

but I think...I think he looks more expensive, put it that way.

0:53:510:53:55

-That's just my opinion.

-They're just in such immaculate condition,

0:53:550:53:58

so hopefully, having not played with them for all your lifetimes,

0:53:580:54:02

it will pay off.

0:54:020:54:04

And we've seen on the show before,

0:54:040:54:06

there's plenty of collectors for teddy bears out there.

0:54:060:54:09

Hopefully they've spotted these two.

0:54:090:54:12

-Fingers crossed.

-I know, yeah.

0:54:120:54:13

Let's see who's going to put their paws up. Here we go.

0:54:130:54:16

The Alpha Toys teddy bear there, the Farnell's.

0:54:160:54:19

One, two, three, four telephone bids.

0:54:190:54:22

One, two, three, four.

0:54:220:54:24

This one's going to fly, isn't it?

0:54:240:54:26

Um...where will you start me, then?

0:54:260:54:28

Oh, I've got 320 on the net, so...

0:54:280:54:31

390...410.

0:54:310:54:33

430. 450. 470. 530.

0:54:330:54:37

550, now.

0:54:380:54:40

-It's eclipsed the top end.

-I've got 550 on the net.

0:54:400:54:42

I'll take 580 in the room.

0:54:420:54:43

-Brilliant.

-I've got 570, now,

0:54:430:54:45

on the net.

0:54:450:54:47

600, now.

0:54:470:54:48

-£600 in the room.

-It's gone to telephone bids.

0:54:480:54:51

20...650.

0:54:510:54:53

650 on Catherine's phone.

0:54:530:54:55

That's 650. 670. 700.

0:54:550:54:58

700, I have, on Adam's phone. 720 now on this phone.

0:54:580:55:02

At 720. 750.

0:55:020:55:04

780.

0:55:050:55:06

800.

0:55:070:55:09

And 820. 850.

0:55:100:55:13

-880.

-I can see you both willing this on.

0:55:140:55:16

Shaking - your heads, nodding with the bidders,

0:55:160:55:19

-going, "Yes, one more!"

-Yes, I agree.

0:55:190:55:21

980.

0:55:210:55:22

Oh, do you think we'll make 1,000?

0:55:220:55:23

-£1,000.

-Ooh!

0:55:230:55:25

1,050.

0:55:250:55:26

-1,110.

-Kenneth, this is very good, isn't it?

0:55:260:55:29

-It is.

-1,150.

-Yeah.

0:55:290:55:30

-1,200.

-What's going through your mind, Gail?

0:55:320:55:35

-Money?

-"Don't stop, don't stop!"

0:55:350:55:37

-A cheque!

-The cheque, yeah!

0:55:370:55:39

-1,300.

-Fantastic - wow!

0:55:390:55:42

-1,350.

-Gosh.

0:55:420:55:44

-It's a bit special.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:55:440:55:47

At 1,300...1,350, back in.

0:55:470:55:48

1,400.

0:55:480:55:51

1,400. 1,450.

0:55:510:55:54

One more. 1,450.

0:55:540:55:56

No? At 1,400, then, on the steps at 1,400.

0:55:560:55:59

Selling, then, at 1,400.

0:55:590:56:01

-Fantastic.

-That's one down.

-That's lovely.

-One more to go.

0:56:020:56:05

-My favourite, next.

-THEY LAUGH

0:56:050:56:07

Let's see if we can beat that.

0:56:070:56:09

-The mohair teddy bear.

-OK.

0:56:090:56:13

Someone's got good taste out there.

0:56:130:56:15

£65. 70, can I say, now?

0:56:150:56:18

65, with me. 70, is it?

0:56:180:56:19

At £65. 70, can I say, now?

0:56:190:56:22

£70. 75. 80.

0:56:220:56:25

And 5. 90. And 5. £100?

0:56:250:56:29

Got 100 on the net. 110, can I say?

0:56:290:56:31

At £100. And 10, anywhere?

0:56:310:56:33

£100. Finished?

0:56:330:56:35

Well, I still prefer that one.

0:56:370:56:38

That was the right money, though, £100.

0:56:380:56:40

That's a grand total of £1,500.

0:56:400:56:42

I think that is just marvellous -

0:56:420:56:43

more than what we expected. What a lovely surprise.

0:56:430:56:46

-Yeah.

-Happy? Got to be happy with that.

0:56:460:56:47

-Very happy, yes.

-What will you do with the money?

0:56:470:56:51

Take them on holiday, I think - the wife on holiday, her mum.

0:56:510:56:54

-Abroad somewhere?

-Yes, definitely.

0:56:540:56:56

- Yeah. - Yeah.

0:56:560:56:57

Get the sunshine, put your feet up. That's what it's all about.

0:56:570:57:00

Thank you so much for that.

0:57:000:57:01

OK. Thank you. Thank you for everything.

0:57:010:57:04

# For every bear that ever there was

0:57:040:57:06

# Will gather there for certain, because

0:57:060:57:09

# Today's the day the teddy bears have their picnic. #

0:57:090:57:13

Well, that is it - another day in another saleroom.

0:57:150:57:18

Our owners have gone home happy.

0:57:180:57:19

I've had a marvellous time here in Itchen Stoke, I have to say,

0:57:190:57:22

but the highlight for me had to be selling those two teddy bears

0:57:220:57:26

for a whopping £1,500, well above estimate.

0:57:260:57:29

I hope Kenneth and Gail are very, very happy.

0:57:290:57:32

I hope you've enjoyed the show, too.

0:57:320:57:33

Join me again for many more surprises.

0:57:330:57:35

Until the next time, from Itchen Stoke, it's goodbye.

0:57:350:57:38

Paul Martin is joined in Winchester by experts James Lewis and Christina Trevanion.

Paul gets excited about some Rolling Stones autographs, and Christina falls in love with a very old teddy bear. James finds himself herding some slightly disturbing ceramic sheep. So which will fetch the highest price at auction?

While he's in the area, Paul visits Chawton House to explore the link between the author Jane Austen and an American millionairess.