Henley Flog It!


Henley

Henley-on-Thames plays host to Paul Martin and our team of antiques experts, lead by Catherine Southon and Mark Stacey. Catherine gets excited about a medical item.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to a very picturesque Henley on Thames in Oxfordshire,

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a place renowned for its links with rowing.

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But there's no time for playing around with boats or feeding the ducks.

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I've got an appointment at the Town Hall and it's in that direction.

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And this is it - our magnificent venue for today, Henley Town Hall.

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We've got a magnificent queue of people,

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all wanting to sell their antiques and collectables.

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They've come to see our experts,

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our wonderful team headed up by Mark Stacey and Catherine Southon,

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-who adore antiques when they're not rowing and revelling.

-Oh, we do.

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-What have you found?

-It's a bit of Lalique.

-It's beautiful.

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It's 9.30, let's get the doors open and get everybody inside.

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-Are we ready, everyone?

-Yes!

-Let's go inside.

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Coming up in today's programme,

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I burst in on Mark's valuation with some rather shocking news.

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-We've got a pair of them now.

-What have I found?

-You've devalued ours.

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There's some guy making them

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-just down the road as I'm speaking...

-You rotter!

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And over at the auction house, we make Marjorie's day.

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-That's put a big smile on your face.

-That's wonderful! Yes!

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As our owners settle into their seats,

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we're all eagerly delving among the boxes and bags

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to see what they've brought in.

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Remember, at every valuation day, there's not just me and two experts.

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We have a whole team of off-screen valuers,

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who sift through your items to spot the best ones to send to auction.

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And that's already bearing fruit, a fruit stand, to be exact,

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and Mark's about to give owner Marjorie the benefit of his expert knowledge.

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Now, tell me - where did you get such an exciting fruit stand from?

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My father had an aunt, an elderly aunt,

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who I think had seen better days,

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-and she wanted something to give him and she gave him that.

-Oh, lovely.

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And so it... I always used to see it on the sideboard at home

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and my mother kept fruit in it

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and then eventually she said, "It's yours now."

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And for a long time I used it, I used it for fruit,

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-always with a tissue in the bottom.

-Yes, that's right.

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And then it gradually found its way into the bottom of the wardrobe.

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-It hasn't seen the light of day for a while, has it?

-It hasn't.

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-It could do with a jolly good clean-up.

-It could.

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It could do with something specialised that gets into all the cracks and crevices.

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Well, even before looking at the marks,

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which we will do in a moment,

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the shape and the style of this screams Victorian.

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It's got this wonderful pierced border and trailing vine design,

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-so you can imagine luscious grapes.

-With a bloom on them.

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And this carrying handle.

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We're very lucky because it hasn't been cleaned a lot.

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-If we turn it upside down...

-Yes.

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..we can see a nice set of hallmarks there for Sheffield.

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-It's Sheffield?

-Sheffield. Hallmarked in Sheffield.

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And 1861.

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We've also got a maker's mark for Thomas Bradbury,

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-who was quite a well-known and prolific maker.

-Yes.

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-So we've got a nice full set of marks.

-Good.

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-It looks really quite heavy, doesn't it?

-It does

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and actually, in a way, it surprises me...

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It surprised me when I picked it up again...

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-How light it is.

-Well, not really, no.

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Well, I think it's quite light. I was expecting it to be heavier.

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-Well, all this upper part is very delicate.

-Yes, very pierced.

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But the bottom bit is the heavier bit. It stabilises it, of course.

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It's lovely. It's a nice honest piece of silver, Victorian silver.

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-How much is it worth?

-I've no idea at all.

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Well, I think we should put an estimate of something like £180-£200 on it.

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-Fine.

-And we'll put the reserve at 160.

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-Yes, yes.

-Is that all right? A fixed reserve.

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That is very... That's absolutely fine with me.

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You've had it all these years. Why do you want to get rid of it now?

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Because I don't expect I shall be using it again

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and I think somebody ought to have pleasure from it.

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Wonderful. A very good reason for selling.

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-It's a pleasurable piece of silver.

-Absolutely.

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-Yes.

-Good idea.

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I have a feeling Marjorie and Mark are onto a winner, there.

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Now, what's Catherine found?

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Something special that comes in a small box and it belongs to John.

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As soon as I saw this box, I knew it would hold something of quality.

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Now, let's just open it up and have a look what we've got inside.

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What we have is a nice little set of scales.

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I see sets of scales pretty much every day

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and they're not really worth an awful lot of money.

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They're normally postal scales or coin scales

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and perhaps worth about £30-£50.

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Now, what I like about this is really the quality.

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We can see all the weights contained in there.

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Where did you get this delightful box from?

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-It was given to me by a friend.

-Mm-hm?

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-Her step-father had passed away...

-Right.

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..and she asked me if I could do her a couple of favours

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-moving some of his things out of his flat.

-Right.

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And then there was this lovely little box

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and I opened it up and she said, "Do you like it?"

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and I said, "Very much."

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So she said, "Would you like it?" and I said yes.

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What we've got is a lovely little set of tweezers

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to put the weights in the pans when you're weighing them.

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-Imagine!

-It just gives it that quality.

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I love seeing things like this. It really is wonderful.

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It's just interesting to see what they were actually for

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because the pans are bowls, really, rather than pans.

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I don't think they were postal scales or coins

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because of the shape.

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Perhaps they were for gems or something like that

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-but you've got no idea where they came from?

-No. I'd love to know.

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I would say they're perhaps for stones, for gems,

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I would have thought.

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I think these are really quite early,

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maybe early Victorian or even sort of 1840, that sort of date.

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But they are lovely. Really nice quality.

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I don't really know how to gauge these

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but I might put an estimate on of perhaps £60-£80.

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-Would you be happy with that?

-Yes.

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I want to fix the reserve at £60

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-because I don't want to go below that.

-Very good.

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But I really hope they make more because they are something special.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Yes. Very good.

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Will you be sorry to see them go, though?

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I will but I shall give the money to her charity anyway.

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-Oh, that's lovely.

-Yes.

-Oh, that's very nice.

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What a lovely ending. That would be great if we make some money.

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Let's keep our fingers crossed and hope they do well.

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-Good.

-You've made my day. Thanks, John. Lovely.

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We're staying with small and delicate right now,

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as Mark spotted Frances and an interesting silver item.

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I have to be honest with you, I've never seen one of these before.

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-Do you know anything about it?

-No, nothing at all.

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Well, I've had a word with a colleague

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who has recognised what this is

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and apparently it's Russian and they are known as throne salts,

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-I guess because it looks like a little throne.

-Ah, yes.

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You open the lid here and you keep your table salt in there.

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So you have a number of these on a table

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-and then you spoon over salt.

-Spoon it out.

-Yes.

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And it's a very charming item. It's pre-Revolution, made before 1917.

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-Yes.

-It's a very interesting little object

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-but one that's quite difficult to value.

-Is it?

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-The Russian market is quite buoyant.

-Yes.

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There's a lot of people who collect Russian items.

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The condition looks very good to me, and this lovely pierced back here.

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It's a very elegant item. Have you had it for a long time?

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Yes, I have. My husband's aunt came to stay with us for the weekend

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and she said, "Oh, I've brought something for you and you enjoy it."

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I said, "Oh, thank you very much." And that was it.

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-So we don't know how it came into her possession?

-Not at all.

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It's an interesting object and I think we ought to have a little look

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-because all the back is decorated and pierced.

-And it's all marked.

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-It's quite a nice little quality item, isn't it?

-It is. It's unusual.

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But in terms of value, we've been pondering about it

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and we thought it ought to be worth round about £200-£300,

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-with maybe a £180 reserve, something like that.

-Yes.

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What are your feelings on that?

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I didn't expect it to be in that region.

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Let's just see what happens. It's a very interesting object.

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I can honestly say I've never handled one before,

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-so I'm in the dark here.

-Yes.

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-So if it doesn't sell, you won't shout at me, will you?

-Not at all!

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Everyone is having such a marvellous time here.

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There's an excitement in the air.

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Everybody's hoping to get picked to go through to the auction room

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and we've found some cracking items so far.

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It may not be rowing memorabilia but what we have found

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is going to make waves when we put it into Cameo auction rooms.

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Our experts have found their choices

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and here's a reminder of what we're selling.

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This is a classic, Victorian pedestal fruit stand in silver.

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Not really my cup of tea

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but I'm sure it would grace anybody's fine dining room.

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This is a lovely little box, a magic box.

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It doesn't just hold a normal set of postal scales

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but a quality set of scales.

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Sadly, John's not going to make it to the auction

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but I'll make sure they make their money.

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This exquisite Russian throne salt

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is a little bit out of my league.

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It's a treasure from the East.

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I just hope we get the right Russians at the sale.

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'We're selling our items just down the road in Midgham

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'and it looks like the bidders are already having a good look around.'

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Remember, if you're buying or selling at auction there is commission to pay.

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That's how the auctioneers pay their wages and pay for this place.

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Here at the Cameo auction rooms it's 20% plus VAT,

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so do factor those costs into whatever you're selling.

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Our auctioneer is John King and on the preview day,

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I asked him what he made of our first lot,

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that Russian silver salt.

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-I like this and I've not seen anything like this before...

-No.

-..a little Russian salt.

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It was given to Frances by her husband's aunt

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but it's been in the cupboard ever since.

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-It should really be out somewhere and viewed.

-Agreed.

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-We've got £200-£300 on this.

-Absolutely.

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You know, my feeling is, it's a pretty little thing.

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-The feet let it down a little bit.

-Architecturally, they do.

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-Yeah, in terms of the rest of it.

-Especially with that pierced back.

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-That's really quite unusual, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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My favourite expression is, "Go and find another one."

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Well, I've not seen another one, so it's hard to do a price comparison.

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That's why it's great to be at an auction rather than in an antiques shop

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because it's hard to put a fixed price on this.

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-I've got people that are going to be here bidding.

-Really?

-Yeah.

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-And hopefully, some internet bidding.

-Oh, there's no question.

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So what is your gut feeling?

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Erm... Top end of the estimate. 350-ish. That sort of price range.

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He's not giving anything away, so don't go away, watch this space.

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The bidders are taking their places, John's on the rostrum,

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so let's get underway with our first item.

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If you'd like to take part and you've got some unwanted antiques,

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then dust them down and bring them along.

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-That's what Frances did, right here, didn't you?

-I did indeed.

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You dusted it down, it had been in a cupboard for years and years...

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-That's right.

-You showed it to Mark and hey presto, it's that silver Russian salt.

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-Lovely object.

-An unwanted antique and what a find.

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-We didn't know it was an antique.

-I didn't know what it was.

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-One of the off-screen experts said it was a throne salt.

-Yes.

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And you can see it straight away but I've never seen one before.

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It's an important little thing, isn't it?

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It's saying, "Look at me! Look how proud I am. Phwoar!"

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Very nice Russian silver throne salt,

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filigree back, decorated with swirls and flowers.

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There it is there. Nice little thing. What am I bid for it, please?

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£100 to start it, somebody.

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-£100 to start it.

-Come on.

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110, 120, 130, 140, 150.

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150 I'm bid. 160 anywhere?

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At £150. 160, 170.

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180. 180 I'm bid.

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At £180. 190.

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190 I'm bid. 200 anywhere?

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200 I'm bid here. At £200 here.

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210 anywhere? At £200 here.

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At £200 and away.

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Seems cheap to me at £200 and away.

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Are you all done at 200?

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Yes. It's just, just £200.

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-That was close.

-It was close. That's a fair price.

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-That was a close shave.

-£200.

-Yes.

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-Happy, though?

-Oh, yes.

-Good.

-Quite happy.

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-Better than it being in the cupboard.

-Indeed.

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Go on, open your cupboards. Dust down those unwanted antiques.

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Who knows? You could make £200 as well.

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Next we have the set of scales belonging to John

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and valued by Catherine at £60-£80.

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The reason I chose this is because it's slightly different.

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Early 19th century.

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But it's got that nice little bit inside that you lift up

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-and it's got the weights inside and the tweezers.

-OK.

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So it's a nice little piece.

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And I've protected this with a 60 reserve.

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-And John was happy with that?

-Yeah.

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-John can't be with us today.

-No.

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We'll phone and give him the good news or the bad news.

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-Hopefully good news.

-If it's good news, who's going to do it?

-Me.

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-If it's bad, you.

-You.

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It's a nice little mahogany boxed case of scales,

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complete with weights and a small brash dish pan, there.

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I can start the bidding here at £50 for them.

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£50 I'm bid for them. 55 anywhere?

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-At £50 I'm bid for them. 55 anywhere?

-A little bit more.

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-Are you all done?

-Oh, come on.

-At £50 for the scales and weights.

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50 I'm bid. New bidding. 55, then. At £55 and away. Are you all done?

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-At £55 and away.

-One more.

-All done at 55?

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60. At £60. Against you now.

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At £60 and away. Are you all done at 60?

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With a nod at £60 and away.

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-Well done! He was struggling.

-That was close.

-He pulled that bid out of that guy.

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-That was close.

-That was close, wasn't it?

-Yeah.

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-But well done, though.

-I'm going to go and call him.

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It is a roller coaster ride. It's not easy. It's not an exact science.

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As we keep saying, anything can happen.

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Well, the auctioneer is really having to work the crowd hard today.

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I hope the buyers are more eager to put their hands up

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for Marjorie's silver fruit stand.

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So why are you selling it now?

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Because there's nobody really to enjoy it

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and I haven't used it for so long

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and I just think there must be somebody, with a rather beautiful thing like that,

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who would want to have it out and on display.

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I know Mark would put his fruit in it.

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I would put my fruit in it, Paul. It's a quality item.

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-And it's a good time to sell silver.

-So they say.

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Well, good luck. It's going under the hammer right now.

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Fingers crossed.

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This is the silver hallmarked filigree fruit dish,

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decorated with embossed grapes and vines.

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I can start the bidding at £250.

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-Oh, 250.

-Straight in at £250.

-Good gracious.

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At £250. 260, 270.

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280, 290.

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300, 310.

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-320, 330.

-Wow!

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£330 with me. 340 anywhere?

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At £330 with me.

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Are you all done at 330?

0:17:040:17:06

-Hammer's gone down. £330.

-£330.

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-That's put a big smile on your face.

-That's wonderful. Yes, rather.

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-£330.

-Double the estimate, virtually, Paul.

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-We like that, don't we?

-Yes.

-So it is a good time to sell silver.

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Absolutely. I trust you.

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-I shall enjoy your programmes even more now.

-Oh!

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Thanks, Marjorie. You can always trust Flog It!

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We'll be back at the auction house a little bit later

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and one of our owners will be making even more money than that

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but for now, stay tuned, as I've got a hidden gem to show you.

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This is the story of one of the 20th century's greatest artists, Stanley Spencer.

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He was a man with enduring religious beliefs,

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who saw beauty and the spiritual in everyday things.

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His main inspiration was the ordinary working life

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of his village, Cookham in Berkshire,

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which he thought of as heaven on earth.

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Cookham is a kind of newspaper to me,

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through the pages of which I am anxiously glancing

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in hope of finding something about myself in it.

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On the whole, it's rather satisfactory.

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He'd set up a studio in the village and was painting prolifically.

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His work was just beginning to be recognised.

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It was being accepted. Everything was falling into place.

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He'd found his subject and he was happy with his technique.

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He felt he was on the right spiritual and artistic path

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but then the First World War came along.

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By 1915, Spencer could ignore it no longer and volunteered.

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He was only five foot two inches tall,

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so he wasn't selected for the front line

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but found himself working as a hospital orderly

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in the 1,600 bed Beaufort War Hospital in Bristol.

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With no time for painting, Spencer set aside his obsession with art,

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to turn instead to the search for godliness in his mundane duties.

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So how did Spencer feel about this?

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Well, judging by this extract from his diary, he had mixed emotions.

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It reads, "When I'm seeking the kingdom of heaven,

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"I shall tell God to take into consideration

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"the number of men I have cleaned

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"and the number of floors that I have scrubbed,

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"as well as the excellence of my pictures, so as to let me in."

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Running short of soldiers in 1916,

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the army accepted Spencer for service overseas.

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After a spell in the ambulance service in Macedonia,

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he found himself fighting on the front line.

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More soldiers died from malaria during that campaign

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than they did from fighting in combat.

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Spencer himself was invalided home in 1918 to recover from it

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and it was at home that he threw himself back into his art work.

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But it was his experiences from the war

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that actually motivated him to plan a memorial chapel.

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He took as his role model for this important work

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Giotto's chapel in Padua.

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In it, he wanted to remember the ordinary soldier.

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All he needed were the patrons

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and he found them in Mr and Mrs Behrend.

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Mrs Behrend's brother died of an illness he contracted during the Macedonian campaign

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and Spencer's chapel was commissioned as a private memorial for him, here at Burghclere.

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And this is the chapel.

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On the outside, it's pretty much of its time

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but inside, it is absolutely timeless.

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It's breathtaking.

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MUSIC: RENAISSANCE CHORAL MUSIC

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Well, it is absolutely incredible

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and it just goes to show how prolific Spencer was.

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And it all starts here, with this oil on canvas.

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This is the start of the journey

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that joins all the pictures together.

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It's a convoy of wounded soldiers

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arriving at the gates of Beaufort War Hospital in Bristol.

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Or could they be arriving at the gates of hell?

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Look - the sun's shining

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but on the inside, it gets darker and darker in the foreground.

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So it really could be hell, couldn't it?

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The whole meaning is multi-layered.

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Look how you can see their slings, look.

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It's almost like the wings of an angel.

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Showing the human companionship of war,

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not the killing and the fighting and that's what it's all about.

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This is the journey that it takes you on.

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'There are 19 paintings in the chapel

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'but this wonderful resurrection scene is the masterpiece,

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'which literally towers above the rest

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'and makes sense of all of them.'

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It took Spencer six years to complete the works in the chapel

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and virtually a year alone on this resurrection scene.

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He wanted it to be a happy painting

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and it depicts the men rising from their graves

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and handing their crosses to Jesus,

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in the same way that the troops that were demobbed

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would hand their weapons back when the fighting had finished.

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The painting is a celebration of the resurrection or the homecoming,

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something that would have been dear in the hearts of all of these men

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fighting in Macedonia.

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And the whole composition, the whole structure of this work

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actually hangs on the crosses

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and as you can see, they come in three waves -

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one at the top, one in the middle and one here,

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right in front of the altar,

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very much like the sea flowing towards the shore.

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The position a cross would be in would in many cases be brought about

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through the behaviour of the men, their affection for it

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and their gratitude towards it and so on.

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Just above where the men are shaking hands

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you see a man caressing it, like he would caress a baby in his arms.

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The crosses also break up the picture as a total

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into smaller little portraits

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and you can see that quite cleverly by the frames that the crosses make.

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I wonder who they were? Spencer painted people he knew,

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people in his village.

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All over this wonderful scene,

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there's different little vignettes to look at. It's very clever.

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There's something else to point out.

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Look how Spencer has depicted Jesus,

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a figure virtually the same size as everybody else.

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He's an equal, he's not sitting in judgement, looking down on them.

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But interestingly enough, the central motif

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is two massive, great big, white mules.

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That's sort of Spencer's religious belief

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in the humble at the heart of God's creation.

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Having seen this now, with all its irreverence and complexity,

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I now understand why it's considered

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to be one of the most important works of art of the 20th century.

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The man was a genius.

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Henley Town Hall is our valuation day venue

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and we're checking through the antiques and collectables being unpacked.

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Let's now join up with Mark Stacey, who's with Jean and Dennis

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and a large reminder of a particular time in British history.

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My mother-in-law gave me this about 15 years ago.

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I don't know why she gave it to me then

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and that's really all I can tell you. I don't know anything else about it.

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And has it been on display on your kitchen dresser or...?

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-No.

-Not at all? Just in a cupboard?

-Yes.

-Exactly right.

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-Yes.

-It's a shame, isn't it?

-Yes.

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I mean, first of all, it's Sunderland,

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because whenever you see this pink lustre

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it's always going to be from the Northeast - Sunderland lustre.

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What confirms that is the view of the bridge at Tyneside,

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when it was opened in 1793,

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transfer printed and all coloured in hand.

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The thing that makes it slightly more interesting from our point of view

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is the fact that we've got these soldiers here,

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one holding a British flag, one holding a French flag,

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with a little motto there, "May they ever be united."

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Now, we're not often united with the French, are we?

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No! That's what I was thinking.

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Now we come to this lovely plaque.

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We've got the royal crest there and the lion and the unicorn

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and we've got Napoleon here, the Third,

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and Queen Victoria, actually, believe it or not.

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And I think it relates to the Crimean War.

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Unfortunately, we've got a nasty crack

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-where somebody's clanked it at some point...

-Yes.

-..and has broken it.

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Hello. Paul's found another one. You haven't found another one?

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-This is so strange!

-We've got a pair of them.

-What have I found?

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-You've devalued ours!

-Good heavens.

-The Crimea - well I never.

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There's some guy making them just down the road as I'm speaking.

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-You rotter!

-£40-£60 he's charging.

-You rotter!

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-Ours is better.

-Yeah.

-Yours is bigger.

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Ours is damaged but it is better. That's lovely, isn't it?

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-How strange is that?

-Isn't that strange?

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Is that a good or a bad sign for our jug?

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I think the value is going to be affected by the damage.

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-Had you ever thought of the value?

-Not really, no.

-No.

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We don't look at it. It's been in the cupboard.

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-So you just want to get rid of it, really.

-In a way, yes.

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You want it to go to a collector who'd appreciate it.

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-It's a bit silly, keeping it in the dark.

-It is.

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Well, I think, had it been in perfect condition,

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we probably would have been looking at £300-£400,

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-in good condition.

-Mm.

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Bearing in mind the damage, we're looking at about a third of that,

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-so maybe £80-£120.

-Yes.

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I think we ought to protect it with an £80 reserve.

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-I don't think you want to give it away.

-No, no.

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-If it doesn't sell this sale, you can try it in another.

-Yes.

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-Are you happy to go along with that?

-Yes.

-That's fine.

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Give it a bash? Well, it's already had a bash.

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-Let's not give it another bash.

-No.

-We'll try it at auction.

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Now, while that jug's being carefully wrapped up for auction,

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I'm kept busy seeing what else has been brought in.

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-What's your name, Pat?

-Pat.

-Pat.

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-You know I like my wood, don't you?

-I do.

-I do like my trees.

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-That's bur walnut. Can I have a quick peep inside?

-You can.

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-It's a writing slope.

-It's a writing slope.

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The condition is superb.

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-What's this?

-It's a letter about the box itself.

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-You've done some research, have you?

-My nephew did.

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Oh, right, OK.

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So he's traced where this box was presented

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-to the national school in Derby.

-Derby.

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-Derby.

-Derby? I can't remember.

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So the inscription on the front is by Mr B Owen

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and it was presented to him in 1870 and the school dates back to 1762.

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-That's nice provenance, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Really nice provenance.

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Generally, these fetch around £200-£300.

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A good campaign writing slope, maybe £600

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but it's got to be a very early one in exceptional condition.

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This is a little later, this is a Victorian one,

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but nevertheless, it's bur walnut and the condition is outstanding.

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Is this something that you want to sell?

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-I'm giving it to my son.

-Keeping it in the family.

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-He's a journalist...

-Is he?

-..so I thought it was...

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Ah, so that's quite fitting, isn't it?

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He can do some writing on there.

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I think you're doing the right thing, do you know?

0:29:430:29:45

-Keep it.

-Thank you.

-Keep it.

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Some antiques aren't meant to be sold, let's face it.

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They really aren't. This one, sadly, isn't going to be flogged

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but the next one, that Catherine has just found, certainly is.

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Let's take a closer look at what she's spotted.

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Beryl and Les, thank you so much for coming along to Flog It!

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and thank you for bringing the most exciting thing

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I have seen for a very, very long time,

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this wonderful leech jar.

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Where did you get it from?

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It's been in the family for as long as I can remember.

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It's always lived on a shelf in the living room.

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I've no history on it at all.

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-So as a small boy, you saw this at home?

-At home, yes.

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-And it's survived...

-It's survived.

-..in this prefect condition.

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-Do you like it?

-Not particularly, no.

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-Is it because of the word leeches that is plastered across the front?

-Possibly! Possibly so.

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-What about you, Beryl?

-I like all the holes in the hearts on top.

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I wondered if someone had worked for a big house or something

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and maybe it was passed on down like that. I don't know.

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Well, once upon a time, these were actually in a shop.

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They were pharmaceutical jars.

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They would have been lined along with other apothecary jars.

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Now these, obviously, contained leeches

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and we can see here these little perforated holes for the leeches...

0:31:020:31:08

-I can see you squirming at it.

-I know!

0:31:080:31:10

For the leeches to be contained in here and to breathe.

0:31:100:31:14

These days, these leech jars are hugely collectable.

0:31:140:31:18

Lots of people collect these,

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especially when they've got the name leeches right across them.

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You have got a little bit of rubbing there to the decoration

0:31:240:31:27

but, to be honest, overall, it is in lovely condition,

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-although I can see there a tiny little chip on there.

-Yeah.

0:31:300:31:35

These were made in Staffordshire.

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It's difficult to say exactly which factory they come from

0:31:370:31:40

-but it's around 1820, around 1830, that date...

-Goodness.

-Wow.

0:31:400:31:44

..so it's got quite a bit of age to it.

0:31:440:31:46

I'm just amazed you've had it in your family

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on the shelf all this time and I don't...

0:31:480:31:51

-You know, as a young boy, you didn't kick a football or knock the lid off?

-No, no.

0:31:510:31:56

It's in great condition, so well done you for keeping it like that.

0:31:560:32:00

Now, because they are so collectable,

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we see quite a few reproductions of these.

0:32:020:32:05

A lot fakes come on the market.

0:32:050:32:07

And one of the ways to tell with these are that the holes are much bigger.

0:32:070:32:11

-Oh, right.

-So they haven't quite got it right

0:32:110:32:14

because the leeches could have crawled out of bigger holes.

0:32:140:32:18

-Now, estimate wise. Any ideas?

-No idea at all.

0:32:180:32:22

How does £2-3,000 sound?

0:32:220:32:24

LAUGHTER

0:32:240:32:25

No? £2-3,000?

0:32:250:32:27

£2-3,000? They are very collectable, very sought after

0:32:270:32:32

-and it is worth at least £2-3,000.

-Oh!

0:32:320:32:35

The only thing that people may worry about is that slight chip

0:32:350:32:39

but generally speaking it's just absolutely fantastic.

0:32:390:32:44

I would be so proud to own this. It's really lovely.

0:32:440:32:49

-You've just made my day bringing it in. Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

0:32:490:32:52

-You looked shocked!

-I'm shattered.

0:32:520:32:55

Don't fall down and knock this over.

0:32:550:32:57

You've looked after it all this time.

0:32:570:32:59

So that leech jar is off to the sale room

0:33:010:33:04

with a valuation of £2,000 to £3,000

0:33:040:33:07

and a reserve at £2,000.

0:33:070:33:09

Over to Mark now, who's found our final collectable of the programme.

0:33:090:33:12

He's with Paul and Celia, who have a fine military brooch.

0:33:120:33:16

-Now, a little military brooch.

-Indeed.

-Family history?

0:33:160:33:20

Yes, it was my father's and he gave it to my mother

0:33:200:33:24

when they were based in Germany

0:33:240:33:26

and it would be worn at cocktail parties and mess dos

0:33:260:33:29

and things like that.

0:33:290:33:31

-It's a sort of sweetheart brooch, really.

-I suppose so.

0:33:310:33:34

-And your father was serving in the Royal Artillery?

-He was.

0:33:340:33:37

-He was a captain and he left as a major.

-Oh, wow.

0:33:370:33:40

You don't go out to cocktail parties, I guess?

0:33:400:33:43

-Not military ones, no.

-Not military ones, so erm...

0:33:430:33:46

And it's just sitting there, not being appreciated, not being worn.

0:33:460:33:50

I'm scared stiff that if I did wear it I'd lose it, so I'd rather...

0:33:500:33:54

-Pass it on to a collector.

-Well, hopefully, yes.

0:33:540:33:57

-Or somebody who's serving.

-Exactly.

-It would be a lovely present for his wife.

-It would be.

0:33:570:34:03

Because the first thing to say is

0:34:030:34:04

regiments are collectable in their own right

0:34:040:34:08

and some are rarer than others.

0:34:080:34:09

Also, they come in different standards.

0:34:090:34:12

This one, obviously, is in gold

0:34:120:34:14

and not only do we have enamel work, we have different colour gold

0:34:140:34:18

and we have, of course, the wheel

0:34:180:34:20

and it's surrounded by little diamonds with a ruby in the centre.

0:34:200:34:25

-Are they real diamonds?

-They are. They're rose-cut diamonds.

0:34:250:34:28

-One is missing but you knew that.

-Yes, I did, yes.

0:34:280:34:32

It's a very, very nice lot.

0:34:320:34:34

-Have you any idea how old that would be?

-Erm...

0:34:340:34:37

Difficult to say. It's probably the beginning of the last century.

0:34:370:34:41

-Right.

-1920, '30, something like that.

0:34:410:34:44

And I think it would attract interest in the sale room.

0:34:440:34:47

If I was putting that in for sale,

0:34:470:34:49

I would probably put it in hopefully with a slightly cautious estimate

0:34:490:34:53

-of something like £250-£350.

-Right.

0:34:530:34:56

-I've spoken to my jewellery colleague about it.

-Yes.

0:34:560:34:59

He says... I suppose it's because your late father was captain

0:34:590:35:04

and ended up as a major, it's top end of the range,

0:35:040:35:07

rather than one of the ones which would have smaller

0:35:070:35:10

if it was lower down the ranks.

0:35:100:35:12

He says it should easily make that and maybe a little bit more.

0:35:120:35:15

-We'd have to protect it with a reserve, of course.

-Yes.

0:35:150:35:18

We don't want it to be given away.

0:35:180:35:20

I wouldn't really want it to go for less than that.

0:35:200:35:23

-I don't think it would be worth...

-No, I don't.

0:35:230:35:26

-We should put a reserve of £250 on it.

-OK.

0:35:260:35:28

-We won't sell it for a penny less than that.

-Right.

0:35:280:35:31

-And hopefully, we'll actually get 300, 350 for it.

-OK.

0:35:310:35:35

-If we can protect it with a 250 reserve...

-That would be lovely.

0:35:350:35:38

..and then if it doesn't go,

0:35:380:35:40

-you can try it in another sale after that.

-Yeah.

-Right.

0:35:400:35:43

-But it is a wonderful object.

-It's very pretty.

0:35:430:35:46

-Is that all right?

-That's wonderful. Thank you.

0:35:460:35:48

-I look forward to seeing you at the sale.

-You, too. Thank you.

0:35:480:35:52

And that's it. We're off to auction one more time

0:35:530:35:56

and here are Catherine and Mark to remind us what they've chosen.

0:35:560:35:59

Well, this Crimean Sunderland lustre jug is a real piece of history

0:35:590:36:03

and at the time, it was probably filled with entente cordial.

0:36:030:36:07

I don't know how it will do but I love it.

0:36:070:36:09

I absolutely love this piece.

0:36:100:36:12

It's a subject I'm passionate about,

0:36:120:36:15

medical and scientific instruments, and this fits right in.

0:36:150:36:19

This is a fabulous piece.

0:36:190:36:21

I'm beguiled by the quality of this Royal Artillery jewelled brooch.

0:36:220:36:26

I just hope the military collectors are at the sale to appreciate it.

0:36:260:36:29

We're selling our items at Cameo auctioneers in Midgham.

0:36:300:36:34

The bidders are ready and our auctioneer today is John King.

0:36:340:36:37

So no time to lose. The sale's underway and I'm joined by Mark.

0:36:370:36:41

We've got the brooch belonging to Paul and Celia

0:36:410:36:43

but they've got the flu, they can't be with us,

0:36:430:36:46

but hopefully, we can raise a bit of cash here.

0:36:460:36:49

-It's a lovely thing.

-£300 maybe?

-Hopefully. I think so.

0:36:490:36:52

These are collectable items.

0:36:520:36:54

We're going to find out right now. It's going under the hammer.

0:36:540:36:57

532 is a very nice Royal Artillery brooch,

0:36:580:37:03

set with diamonds and a centre ruby.

0:37:030:37:05

What am I bid for it, please? 200 for it, somebody?

0:37:060:37:10

I'm bid £200 for it. 210 anywhere?

0:37:120:37:14

At £200 I'm bid for it. 210, 220.

0:37:160:37:19

230, 240, 250.

0:37:190:37:21

260.

0:37:230:37:24

At £260 I'm bid for it.

0:37:270:37:29

At £260 I'm bid for it. Are you all done at £260?

0:37:310:37:36

-That's a good result, £260.

-They'll be happy with that, I'm sure.

0:37:380:37:41

-Short and sweet, wasn't it?

-Well, it got there.

0:37:410:37:44

-Over the reserve, as well.

-Yeah.

0:37:440:37:46

I just hope you get well soon and you enjoy this little moment

0:37:460:37:50

and enjoy the money when you get it.

0:37:500:37:52

Now to the Crimean War

0:37:540:37:56

and that jug featuring Queen Victoria and some military figures.

0:37:560:38:02

Jean and Dennis, it's good to see you.

0:38:020:38:04

The last time I saw you, you were at the valuation table with Mark

0:38:040:38:08

and that Sunderland lustreware jug

0:38:080:38:10

with the images of Queen Victoria and the Crimean War.

0:38:100:38:13

-And another one had turned up...

-Yes.

-..completely out of the blue.

0:38:130:38:17

-A baby one.

-A baby one. A smaller version. How unusual was that?

0:38:170:38:21

And you teased us. It was a complete fluke.

0:38:210:38:23

-You'd never expect to get that, would you?

-No.

0:38:230:38:26

-It has got a bit of damage on there.

-It's 80-120. That's why, isn't it?

0:38:260:38:30

-Exactly. Spot on.

-Yeah.

0:38:300:38:32

But you've got to look very closely at it.

0:38:320:38:34

Let's hope the buyers haven't.

0:38:340:38:37

There are a lot of people that collect Sunderland lustreware.

0:38:370:38:40

We have a 19th century lustre jug

0:38:410:38:43

depicting French and English soldiers,

0:38:430:38:45

an armorial crest with pictures of Napoleon and Queen Victoria.

0:38:450:38:49

I'm bid £60 for this.

0:38:510:38:53

£60 I'm bid for it. 65 anywhere?

0:38:540:38:57

65, 70. £70 I'm bid.

0:38:570:38:59

-Come on.

-75 over there. At £75 over there.

0:38:590:39:02

80 anywhere?

0:39:020:39:05

At £75 I'm bid for it.

0:39:050:39:08

80 anywhere?

0:39:080:39:09

At £75. Your last chance to bid, here. At £75 and away...

0:39:090:39:15

Not quite. One bid away. It had a fixed reserve at 80.

0:39:160:39:19

-That's auctions for you. It's a roller coaster ride.

-Never mind.

0:39:190:39:23

-Well, you know, we were just shy of that £80.

-£80, yes.

-So...

0:39:230:39:27

Have a word with the auctioneer, maybe leave it here, re-enter it and lower the reserve to suit that.

0:39:270:39:34

-OK.

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

0:39:340:39:36

'Auctioneers are in the perfect position

0:39:400:39:42

'to gauge the strength of the current market

0:39:420:39:45

'and that's why I asked John's advice on our next item.

0:39:450:39:48

'It's more china, the Staffordshire leech jar spotted by Catherine.

0:39:480:39:51

'She was very excited and valued it £2-3,000.'

0:39:510:39:56

Beryl and Les's Staffordshire leech jar.

0:39:560:39:58

It's early Victorian, 1840s, 1850s.

0:39:580:40:01

It's been in their living room on the mantelpiece

0:40:010:40:04

for as long as they can remember.

0:40:040:40:06

It's been up high because a lot of these don't survive intact.

0:40:060:40:09

-That's right.

-The lids go missing or they get chipped.

0:40:090:40:12

We're looking at around £2-3,000, put on by our expert Catherine.

0:40:120:40:16

I'm not surprised. I have to say, these are unusual.

0:40:160:40:20

You don't often see them in this condition.

0:40:200:40:23

-I'm not keen on pale blue. I'd like to see it in white.

-I would, too.

0:40:230:40:27

But the shape of it is nice. This top is a nice shape.

0:40:270:40:31

It stands out from the others

0:40:310:40:33

and I think these pharmaceutical jars are very, very collectable.

0:40:330:40:37

-They fetch good money.

-They do.

-Has there been a lot of interest?

0:40:370:40:40

-There has been. We've just got to turn the interest into money.

-Yeah.

0:40:400:40:44

And that's what an auctioneer's job is all about.

0:40:460:40:48

Come on, John - work your magic for Beryl and Les.

0:40:480:40:51

We've all been waiting for this one.

0:40:510:40:53

I'm standing next to two very nervous ladies.

0:40:530:40:55

-This is Beryl, this is Catherine. Where's Les?

-At work, I'm afraid.

0:40:550:40:59

He's missing this, isn't he? How did you come by this?

0:40:590:41:02

-It's an odd thing to have.

-It was in Les's mum's house when we cleared it.

0:41:020:41:05

-Was it?

-He remembers it when he was a boy.

0:41:050:41:08

-It's in very good condition. No-one played with it or used it.

-No, no.

0:41:080:41:11

Sometimes the lids are missing or they're damaged.

0:41:110:41:14

The finial, often, because it's exposed, that gets chopped off.

0:41:140:41:17

-It's an acorn shape, that finial.

-Yeah. It's lovely.

-It's quality.

0:41:170:41:21

Good.

0:41:210:41:23

Two to three. Ooh!

0:41:230:41:24

Lot 618 is a fine Staffordshire pedestal leeches jar,

0:41:260:41:30

circa 1840.

0:41:300:41:32

There is a small chip to the rim,

0:41:320:41:33

undetectable once you've put the lid on it.

0:41:330:41:36

Lots of interest in this, I have to say.

0:41:360:41:38

I'll start the bidding at £1,000 with me. At £1,000 with me.

0:41:400:41:45

-At £1,000 with me.

-Come on.

-At £1,000 with me.

0:41:470:41:51

1,100 I'm bid. 1,200 I'm bid.

0:41:510:41:53

-1,300 I'm bid.

-He's milking it.

0:41:530:41:56

-1,400 I'm bid.

-I hope you're right.

-1,500 I'm bid.

0:41:560:41:59

1,600 I'm bid.

0:41:590:42:01

1,700 I'm bid. 1,800 I'm bid.

0:42:010:42:04

1,900 I'm bid. £2,000 I'm bid.

0:42:080:42:11

-It's gone.

-£2,100 I'm bid.

0:42:110:42:15

At £2,100 I'm bid on the machine, here.

0:42:150:42:18

-At £2,100 I'm bid.

-Come on.

0:42:180:42:22

2,150. 2,200 I'm bid.

0:42:220:42:25

At 2,200. 2,250.

0:42:270:42:32

Beats me at £2,250 I'm bid.

0:42:320:42:35

At £2,250. Are you all done?

0:42:380:42:41

-Yes!

-Well done.

-Wow.

-Great valuation.

0:42:430:42:45

-At least you don't have to take it home.

-Take it home!

0:42:450:42:48

Can you imagine breaking it, now you knew what it was worth?

0:42:480:42:52

Wow! Wow!

0:42:520:42:55

-You're shaking.

-I know.

-You are, aren't you?

0:42:560:42:58

-And this is your first auction.

-Absolutely.

0:42:580:43:01

-It's your first time on telly, first auction.

-I know, I know.

0:43:010:43:04

Got rid of your leech jar!

0:43:040:43:06

You're going places!

0:43:060:43:08

Well, what a busy show.

0:43:110:43:12

We've had a great time at our valuation day in Henley

0:43:120:43:15

and here, too, at the auction room in Midgham

0:43:150:43:18

and most of our items sold.

0:43:180:43:20

I hope you've enjoyed the show.

0:43:200:43:22

Join me again soon for many more surprises

0:43:220:43:24

but for now, it's cheerio.

0:43:240:43:26

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:450:43:47

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:470:43:48

Henley-on-Thames plays host to Paul Martin and our team of antiques experts, lead by Catherine Southon and Mark Stacey.

Catherine gets excited about a medical item that's likely to be worth thousands, and Mark chooses a silver fruit stand that gives the owner a shock at auction. Meanwhile Paul visits a chapel which houses an extraordinary collection of paintings by one of the 20th century's greatest artists - Stanley Spencer.


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