Wellington Flog It!


Wellington

Paul Martin is joined by experts Philip Serrell and Elizabeth Talbot at Wellington College. Prize finds include a pair of binoculars and a Poole pottery collection.


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Transcript


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Queen Victoria laid the foundation stone in 1856 to this

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extraordinary 19th century Baroque-looking building,

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having agreed that a charitable educational establishment

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should be set up in memory of the man who defeated Napoleon

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at the Battle of Waterloo.

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The Duke of Wellington.

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Welcome to Flog It! from the magnificent Wellington College.

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Still going strong today,

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Wellington College aims to provide a transformative experience

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for all of its pupils, maximising their potential to the full.

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Let's hope we can transform a few people

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in this queue today off to the auction room. Who will it be?

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Well, stayed tuned and you'll find out.

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Our experts are here to make sure everyone gets the valuations they need.

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He's great! Does he growl?

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The team is headed by Elizabeth Talbot,

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all-round valuer, cataloguer and auctioneer.

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Oh, he does!

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Trust me, that's the best view.

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And Flog It! favourite, former PE teacher, Philip Serrell

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up to his old tricks.

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It's worth a fiver but at a push, I could give you a tenner for it.

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There'll be more high jinx from Philip a little bit later.

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As I explore the area, I'll be delighting you with some

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unusual artefacts, proving that antiques can be

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displayed in a variety of novel ways.

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-It's a timeless piece as well.

-Absolutely. Good gag!

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But for now, we join Elizabeth at the tables

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as she weighs up the worth of Margaret's Poole Pottery.

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I recognise that you've brought a couple of pieces of Poole but I'm sure there's a story behind them.

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They were given to me about 1980

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when a girl came from France and she wanted to improve her English.

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And I had two small children at the time,

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so it was a good idea for her to look after them and improve her English.

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And then she gave them to you?

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-As a little gift.

-How lovely.

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And do you like them?

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Not really. I've had them on display

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and then I remember her every time I see them,

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but they don't do anything for me. I much prefer wood carvings

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and I prefer to display a Japanese carving that I have.

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Well, I don't know how much you know about the Poole factory.

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The original factory was inherited in 1873

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and by 1921, Carter, Stabler and Adams had set up a firm

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making very versatile, usable products which went through

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several stages in its history.

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In the '20s and '30s, you would find that they made

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pastel-shaded painted objects which were quite delicate in their tone.

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By the time they got to the 1960s and 1970s,

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they produced what they called psychedelic ware,

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where they used bright, almost pop colours - Pop Art of that time -

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along with interesting shapes.

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I am more familiar with the red ground and also the blue ground.

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-The green ground, to my eye, is actually quite pleasant. I like that.

-Really?

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But they use these bright colours and several of their famous

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designers and decorators were working to a theme.

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A bit like the crazy stained glass look,

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with big thick black lines and very bright, bold colours.

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And they really produced this ware between about 1966 and about 1980,

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so this was probably towards the latter end of this ware.

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Now, you have two pieces here,

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complementary, but each by a different artist.

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I don't know the name of the artist here but this one is by

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a lady called Carol Cutler. She monograms it CC

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and she's one of the most famous designers and decorators

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that they employed.

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So that has a slight precedence over this piece in terms of the name.

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For collectors, the names of the artists are very important, too.

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As you also point out, this one has suffered a little bit of damage

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with a chip on the underside of the rim. So from that point of view,

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it's slightly hampered by that in terms of its value.

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I would have said that this piece, with its damage,

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would be roundabout £20 to £30.

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Really?

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And this piece, because of the name,

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-more likely to be around the £40-£45.

-Really?

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But if you're looking to sell and if you're happy at that value,

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-I'd advise you to sell them together as a lot.

-Yes.

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And put a combined estimate of around £60 to £80 on the two.

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Would you like a reserve on them

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or would you like to see how the market takes them?

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I don't know. What do you suggest?

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I tell you what, how about we put £60 to £80 as a combined estimate

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but we put a £40 reserve on, because you're protecting this one.

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-Is that all right? Then you've got a bit of leeway.

-Yes. That's fine.

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You've got peace of mind they're being looked after.

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Thank you for all that information.

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I didn't realise about the stained glass.

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It's just the influence that they were borrowing from

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and probably one of many.

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In the '60s and '70s, influences came from all sorts of places

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which we can't go into. But if they sell, and hopefully they will,

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will you be buying some more Japanese carvings with the proceeds?

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No, I think what I shall do is put it towards an orphanage

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we're building in Uganda.

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Who's we?

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There's some friends here who've brought some things.

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There's quite a group of us now, raising money.

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Really? That's a wonderful cause.

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-Fingers crossed we will do well for you.

-I hope so.

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We'll be back to find out whether Margaret's pottery makes a splash in the saleroom in a bit.

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But first, over to Phillip Serrell as he gets to grips with a couple of candlesticks

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that Maureen's brought in to sell.

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How long have you had these, then?

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50-odd years I've known of them.

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-So shall we try and debunk the antique world?

-Yes.

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-So these are candlesticks, aren't they?

-Yes.

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What sort of column is that?

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A bit like a Roman type...

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Yeah, but if you look at it, we've got a column there

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and then we've got one, two, three, four, five...

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It's made up of lots of little columns,

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-so it's called a cluster column.

-All right.

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So it's a cluster column candlestick.

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With wheat ears as the capitals, and the capitals are the top bit.

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Is it silver or is it plate?

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I don't know. There are some markings on it.

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Let's have a look. The first thing to do...

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-If you just take that off... This is called the sconce.

-Right.

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-Any difference in colour?

-Yes, quite a lot.

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That's silver and that isn't. Why?

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-Coated?

-No.

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Someone has cleaned all the silver off.

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Oh, right, well that would explain why I couldn't clean it.

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-Really? You've been trying to clean it?

-It wouldn't come off.

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This is simply silver-plated

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and if you polish it vigorously and vigorously,

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it's a bit like cleaning your face, when you rub some skin cells off.

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All you're doing is you're taking the silver off.

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So you've got a pair of silver plated cluster column candlesticks.

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These are by... I think this company is called...

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R and B is Roberts and Bell.

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Their mark is typified by that little Aladdin's lamp, got it?

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Oh, right, yes.

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A lot of manufacturers put marks onto silver plate

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that sort of made it possibly look like hallmarks, but they're not.

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I think they're decorative things.

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I think at auction, they're going to make... I think you could put

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-a £60 to £90 estimate on them all day long.

-Yeah?

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If you have a result, they might make £100, £150.

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But I think £60 to £90 as an estimate is fine.

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I think a reserve of £60 is fine.

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If you end up buying these or owning them...

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one of the questions that I get asked so many times is,

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should I get them repainted?

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You can buy a solution that's almost like a polish

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that you put on there and it leaves a fresh deposit on there.

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For me, I don't like that at all.

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I would much rather see something in its natural state, warts and all,

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rather than looking at something like it was made yesterday.

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Useful advice there, Phil. We'll return to see

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if those column candlesticks notch up a good price.

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For now, come with me as I introduce you to another set of columns

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that have caught my eye.

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I'm not quite sure what it is...

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but it's like the ruins of something.

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-That's quite nice.

-On a marble base.

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A little scale model of a column.

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Exactly. But there is more to this in the car. But it was so heavy.

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I've got a Christie's magazine as well that shows...

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-Can I have a look at that?

-Sure.

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And there's more in the car?

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There is more in the car, but it's dismantled and very heavy.

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These architectural models

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can sometimes fetch an awful lot of money, they really can.

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It shows you the different order of the Roman capitals.

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You have a Doric, you have an Ionic and a Corinthian

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-and then you can mix it altogether and you have a composite.

-Wow.

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-Yes, lovely fluted columns.

-Yes.

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-So this one you've got the broken bit of?

-Yes, all three columns...

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-And they'd be joined at the top?

-Yes.

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It might be worth you having them restored.

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That's OK, yep.

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Because I have a feeling that something like that

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-will be worth in the region of about £2,000.

-Really?!

-Yes.

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-Are you valuing it now for me?

-That's it, that is what I'm saying.

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-Wow.

-Wow.

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It's pointless to us at the moment.

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-I'm red! I'm matching the inside of my bag.

-Don't drop it!

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Go and see a professional restorer, tell them what you've got

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and let them give you a quote. This is the early 19th century.

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-Do some homework, do some research, OK?

-Thank you, I will.

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Have a look at what other architectural models have sold for.

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-OK. I will.

-You can check online quite easily.

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I thought because it looks so old and destroyed

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that it wouldn't be worth anything.

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-It's worth a lot of money.

-Ooh, wow.

-Thank you very much.

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-Someone's had a surprise today.

-Can I go home now? Is that it?

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Thank you so much. Very good news.

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-That's all right. I love things like that, I really do.

-Wonderful.

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But when it comes to eye-catching antiques, then you have to check out

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the item that Elizabeth has set her sights on.

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You've brought this wonderful leather case and inside

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this leather case is what?

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Some binoculars, or field glasses I think they were known as in those days.

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Oh, my goodness, look at these. How fantastic.

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Now, what is the history?

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They belonged to my uncle, who was a medical officer in the army,

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and in his later years he used them for watching birds

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and scenery as he was on his walks, he liked to walk.

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And he told us the history of them.

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-They were used on the Royal Navy ship at some stage.

-Right.

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We don't know quite when.

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Then he passed on and I inherited them

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and I've used them quite a bit

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for looking at scenery and on walks in the Lakes and the Peak District,

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but found they were just a little bit heavy for me.

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-They certainly are very heavy.

-They are, yeah.

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Well, I'm no expert on binoculars

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but I do think these are rather special.

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First thing to notice is that they were made by Barr and Stroud,

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which is a good name of equipment makers.

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I'm sure they are fantastic for ornithology and bird-watching

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and so on because they must be high powered

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for the original naval and military job.

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So they will certainly do a good job seeing landscapes and nature.

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That's correct.

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Now, I notice that they have these wonderful ends.

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-Would you like to demonstrate?

-I will, yes.

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They twist out, both of them.

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That, presumably, is for protecting the vision from spray on board ship

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and light coming in at angles, so you can get a good view.

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That's better, actually.

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I am seeing the crowd, the distant crowd, very well.

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I think they are superb.

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Now, although I'm not an expert on binoculars per se,

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I do know that military equipment is very collectible.

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There are some people who will buy them because they know they're buying quality binoculars

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that will do a good job, like yourself, who has enjoyed using them.

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Some people will enjoy the historical nature of them,

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the fact they're linked to the First World War and the servicemen

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and all the activities that went on.

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There'll be museums that will be interested in them.

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There will be people who collect scientific instruments.

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There are lots of categories of interest

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-in this one pair of binoculars.

-Right.

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I think for a pair as substantial and technical as this,

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a fair auction estimate, open market value, would be

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-between £80 and £120.

-Yes.

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-Would you be happy at that?

-I would be happy at that.

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I think that's fair to you, gives a good chance to sell but it's not too prohibitive

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and it may be that if two collectors found them, they could compete and they'd make a little bit more.

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So we'll put £80 to £120 on them and put a reserve on them of £80?

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Yes, I'd be happy with that.

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With discretion of the auctioneers.

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Just to tweak it. That'd be fine. Thank you very much.

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Thank you for bringing them in.

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We'll find out if Brian's binoculars do the business in just a moment.

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We are now halfway through our day. We've been working flat out.

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We've found some real gems. I think you've got your own opinions

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on what they're worth but let's find out what the bidders think.

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Let's go straight over to the auction room.

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And this is what we're taking with us.

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Margaret whetted Elizabeth's appetite with her colourful Poole Pottery

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and I hope it makes a good price for her charity.

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Philip had plenty to say about Maureen's candlesticks

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so let's see if they can attract any bidders.

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And will the saleroom share Elizabeth's point of view

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on Brian's unusual field binoculars?

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You have to pay commission in all salerooms.

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Here at Martin and Pole Auctioneers in Wokingham,

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they charge a seller's commission of 15% plus VAT.

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And first to go under auctioneer Garth Lewis's gavel

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are Brian's lovely binoculars.

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These have been in the family for a little while.

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They have.

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Good quality, great condition and we've got a classic £80 to £120 on these.

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-Why have you decided to sell them?

-They got a bit heavy.

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They're good binoculars but as you get older, they're a bit too heavy.

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-Have you got yourself a pair of lightweight ones?

-I have now.

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-You can keep them round your neck?

-That's right.

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Yeah, I don't blame you in a way. Nevertheless, quality always sells.

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Yes, unusual design. I was a bit taken aback by these

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on valuation day because I hadn't seen something like that before.

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Fingers crossed, it's all down to the bidders. Let's find out.

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A good pair of Barr and Stroud field glasses.

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I suspect naval glasses, actually.

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Nice lot.

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Interest here 48, 55 is bid.

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55. Is there any further?

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At £55? At 60, thank you.

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And five here.

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65 then, I can sell at 65.

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If you're all done. £65.

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£65, we've just scraped through that.

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I'm saying just literary scraped through. £65.

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-I'm happy with that.

-He used a lot of discretion there but they're gone. You're happy?

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-I'm happy.

-That's the main thing. The owner's happy.

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I'm disappointed on your behalf. But at least they've found a home.

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I'm a little bit disappointed but I'm still happy they've gone.

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Elizabeth hoped they'd do better

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but at least Brian seemed happy with the £65 his binoculars made.

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Next up, let's see if Margaret's Poole Pottery

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sinks or swims in the saleroom.

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I like it. I love the bright colours.

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Margaret likes it but unfortunately she can't be here today.

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-But we do have Elizabeth.

-Yes.

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Not a lot of money's going on these two things.

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We've got a vase and a plate. But there is a chip to the rim.

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-That's partly why I brought it down to what I thought was a realistic level.

-Around £60?

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Yes, and I hope it will make that because the 20th century market

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for bright colours, the modern look, is very strong at the moment.

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I hope that will carry it along.

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-Exactly, fashion dictates these mood swings.

-Increasingly.

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It puts the value up. We've got a reserve of £40. Hopefully we'll get there and above.

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It's going under the hammer right now.

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Delphis design, asymmetric shallow dish,

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slight chip to it, unfortunately.

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And a similar vase. Both with printed marks.

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I like this colouring, cos it's greenier rather than orange.

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Quite unusual that, actually. I prefer the green.

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Well, she says in a bright red jacket, but I prefer greens!

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Interest starts with me here at £30 against you. Is there further at 30?

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32, thank you. 35 here?

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35, 8, 40.

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Yes!

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Yes? 42.

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Well, they've gone.

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45.

0:17:350:17:37

It's my bid, 45, if you're all done?

0:17:370:17:41

Yes! Margaret will be pleased.

0:17:410:17:42

She will, she will, definitely.

0:17:420:17:44

-Shame she couldn't be here but they're gone.

-I am happy for her.

0:17:440:17:47

A nice mid estimate outcome for Margaret.

0:17:470:17:50

Now let's see how the candlesticks that Philip Serrell valued perform

0:17:500:17:53

as they're up next.

0:17:530:17:54

Candlesticks are always a nice thing to have on the table.

0:17:540:17:57

-Why are you selling them?

-Cleaning, really.

0:17:570:18:00

-The cleaning of them?

-Yes.

0:18:000:18:01

That's what all of our owners say.

0:18:010:18:03

That's why they're not owners any more.

0:18:030:18:06

-I thought these were attractive.

-So did I. They've got the look.

0:18:060:18:09

Yes, absolutely. I think they're great on anybody's table. Fingers crossed.

0:18:090:18:13

Let's find out what the bidders think. Good luck.

0:18:130:18:15

Nice pair of plated candlesticks, cluster columns

0:18:170:18:22

and stepped square plinths.

0:18:220:18:24

I have to start the bidding here at £65 against you. 70.

0:18:240:18:30

It's gone.

0:18:300:18:32

Thank you. And five? 75.

0:18:320:18:34

It's with me. Is there any further? 80. New place. And five?

0:18:340:18:38

Good, they're keen.

0:18:380:18:40

90. 95. Still here, 95.

0:18:400:18:43

100 now. And ten.

0:18:430:18:45

There's a commission, he's looking at the book.

0:18:450:18:48

20. 30. 130, then. It's with me, against you in the room, at 130.

0:18:480:18:55

-That's a good price, 130.

-Pleased with that.

0:18:550:18:57

A very good price.

0:18:570:18:58

Practical things, you see. Useful decorative items.

0:18:580:19:01

The thing is, OK, they're not real silver but they're a lot better

0:19:010:19:05

than spending 130 quid on something from a department store,

0:19:050:19:09

a pair of reproduction candlesticks.

0:19:090:19:11

Yes, that's good. I'm pleased.

0:19:110:19:13

-Well done.

-Thank you.

0:19:130:19:14

A great result for Maureen. I do hope she's pleased.

0:19:160:19:20

There you are. That concludes the end of our first visit to the saleroom today.

0:19:200:19:24

We are coming back here later on in the programme so don't go away,

0:19:240:19:27

because I can guarantee one or two surprises.

0:19:270:19:30

Put the kettle on and enjoy it. While we were here in the area,

0:19:300:19:33

I thought I'd go off and do a bit of exploring. Take a look at this.

0:19:330:19:36

Garden art is a fascinating subject

0:19:450:19:48

and I've come to Hungerford to find out more about it.

0:19:480:19:52

Collections can range from the historically elegant

0:19:520:19:55

to the truly bizarre and since they can do well at auction,

0:19:550:19:58

it's worth doing your homework.

0:19:580:20:01

Going back to classical times, the ancient Greeks and the Romans

0:20:020:20:06

graced their beautiful gardens with statues of the gods.

0:20:060:20:10

But back in England, gardening and garden ornamentation got off to a much later start,

0:20:100:20:15

possibly because we spend so much time indoors because the weather is so bad

0:20:150:20:20

but also, to appreciate and admire a good garden, you've got to have big enough windows

0:20:200:20:24

to actually see what you're looking at.

0:20:240:20:27

These pieces didn't really come to the fore

0:20:270:20:30

until the 16th century, in Tudor times.

0:20:300:20:33

Before that, large houses had to be fortified and of course,

0:20:330:20:36

arrow slits don't give you much of a view.

0:20:360:20:39

Over the next 100 years or so,

0:20:390:20:41

fashionable British gardens changed from being purely functional plots

0:20:410:20:46

where you would just grow your vegetables and herbs

0:20:460:20:49

to these wonderful, formal, elegant gardens with perfect symmetry all around,

0:20:490:20:54

influenced by the magnificent gardens of the Palace of Versailles in France

0:20:540:21:00

and the Vatican in Rome.

0:21:000:21:01

Classical statues and decorated urns made of lead

0:21:030:21:07

were hand-carved in stone became a must-have in the gardens of the wealthy.

0:21:070:21:12

Many of these were collected in Italy and France by the well-to-do,

0:21:120:21:16

completing their education on the grand tour of Europe.

0:21:160:21:20

Midway through the 18th century,

0:21:240:21:25

a more naturalistic landscape style of gardening took over,

0:21:250:21:28

especially on the big estates with works by designers

0:21:280:21:31

such as Capability Brown sweeping away the formality of those earlier years.

0:21:310:21:36

And by 1760, Arcadia in the shape of shepherds and shepherdesses was in

0:21:390:21:45

and classical gods were out.

0:21:450:21:48

By the Victorian times, the Industrial Revolution

0:21:510:21:54

was well underway, which meant the expansion of the middle classes and they had aspirations.

0:21:540:21:59

They wanted to and did own their own gardens, albeit more modest,

0:21:590:22:03

which meant the established Georgian landscape gardens

0:22:030:22:06

were sometimes superseded and upstaged by public parks

0:22:060:22:10

and smaller flower gardens, which were back in fashion.

0:22:100:22:13

This new breed of gardeners were eager for the mass-produced garden pieces

0:22:150:22:20

that were now being made in factories.

0:22:200:22:22

So, garden art began to be accessible to many more people,

0:22:250:22:29

as it is today.

0:22:290:22:30

'I've come to Hungerford to this centre to meet Travis Nettleton,

0:22:320:22:36

'a specialist in garden art, to get a few tips.'

0:22:360:22:40

-Have you made any mistakes? I've made loads.

-I have, I have.

0:22:420:22:46

I've raced into an auction, running late,

0:22:460:22:50

saw a pair of cast iron urns on the screen.

0:22:500:22:53

I leisurely put my hand up and kept putting my hand up till I got them

0:22:530:22:57

and it wasn't really until I went to collect them

0:22:570:23:00

I realised I'd made the fatal error of not looking at the size.

0:23:000:23:03

I was expecting them to be up to about here,

0:23:030:23:06

that is the standard urn on a plinth size.

0:23:060:23:11

-They turned out to be much smaller.

-Is that them? You're joking!

0:23:110:23:15

-They were in the photograph on the television. How funny is that?

-So...

0:23:150:23:21

-That's certainly one of my mistakes.

-Always check the dimensions.

0:23:210:23:25

Make sure they fit the space required. It makes you laugh though!

0:23:250:23:28

-We all make mistakes.

-Fashion in garden design has changed dramatically over the centuries.

0:23:280:23:34

Do you find there's something really hot people want at the moment, or is it across the board?

0:23:340:23:39

It's really down to the individual and down to the garden itself.

0:23:390:23:42

For a contemporary or minimalist garden you'd want something modern.

0:23:420:23:46

But if you still want the English country garden look,

0:23:460:23:49

maybe an 18th century Portland stone.

0:23:490:23:52

-That's very nice, isn't it?

-Absolutely.

0:23:520:23:55

For the 18th century pieces, you're paying maybe 4000 for that sundial.

0:23:550:23:59

-It's a beautiful thing.

-It's a timeless piece as well.

-Absolutely. Good gag!

0:23:590:24:05

We've just look at a bit of Portland stone.

0:24:050:24:08

Can we have a look at stone, say reconstituted 19th century stone

0:24:080:24:12

which could pass as that but obviously at a fraction of the price?

0:24:120:24:16

Absolutely. This was actually made by Austin & Seeley.

0:24:160:24:20

They were active from about 1828 to the late 19th century.

0:24:200:24:23

They were a very well-known maker and they used to make a lot of composition urns

0:24:230:24:28

and statues and fine urns.

0:24:280:24:32

What do you look for when you see a piece like this?

0:24:320:24:35

If you're looking for Austin and Seeley, you're looking for the chunks of limestone.

0:24:350:24:39

-Can you see they've raised out?

-Yes.

-They added this into their aggregate mix

0:24:390:24:44

and that's when you really spot an Austin & Seeley piece.

0:24:440:24:47

-Something like this, you're paying...?

-For the pair of urns, you'll be paying about £3,000.

-OK.

0:24:470:24:54

CLASSICAL MUSIC

0:24:540:24:56

Looking at these classical statues and garden art in general, it's very much on a par with antiques.

0:25:040:25:10

-You do have to be careful of forgeries.

-You have to know what you're buying.

0:25:100:25:14

There are a lot of forgeries on the market.

0:25:140:25:16

I've got a very good example here. This looks like a Coalbrookdale.

0:25:160:25:22

Fern with a blackberry bench, but in fact this is a fake that has come in from China.

0:25:220:25:27

You can tell because of the castings. It's not very crisp.

0:25:270:25:32

-It's not that defined.

-And Coalbrookdale were renowned for fine casting.

0:25:320:25:38

That behind you obviously is the real McCoy?

0:25:380:25:41

This one is a Nasturtium pattern, Coalbrookdale. Original, about 1860.

0:25:410:25:46

-What would that set you back?

-a bench like this, about £3,500.

0:25:460:25:51

A bench like this, 400, 500.

0:25:510:25:54

If it was original, 1,500 to 2,000.

0:25:540:25:56

-You've got to know what you're looking at, haven't you?

-Absolutely.

0:25:560:26:01

There really is something for everybody, isn't there?

0:26:040:26:08

Any tips for the future? Where's it going?

0:26:080:26:12

If you're looking to invest seriously in garden statues and garden art,

0:26:120:26:17

I would always pick something that's either signed

0:26:170:26:21

or something that's solid stone and something with some provenance and a bit of history.

0:26:210:26:26

-That way you will always do well.

-It's the same old thing, isn't it?

0:26:260:26:30

-Quality always sells.

-Absolutely.

0:26:300:26:33

Come on. Let's get a cup of tea.

0:26:330:26:34

Here at Wellington College, we've still plenty of unbeatable bygones to value.

0:26:430:26:47

It looks like Philip's having a fun time putting a price on Penny's Dinky toy.

0:26:470:26:53

-How are you, my love?

-I'm fine, thank you.

0:26:530:26:55

-Bit old for this sort of thing, aren't you?

-I am, yes.

0:26:550:26:58

-How did you come by this?

-This was donated to one of my charity shops

0:26:580:27:02

and we didn't want to sell it and not get enough for it.

0:27:020:27:06

I always think that when someone brings you a toy

0:27:060:27:10

-that's never been played with, there's like a sad story behind it.

-It is.

0:27:100:27:15

Let's just look at the nuts and bolts of this first.

0:27:150:27:19

It's a Dinky toy and if you look just there,

0:27:190:27:22

it's model number 955.

0:27:220:27:24

It's nice you've got the original box with it.

0:27:260:27:28

If I knew my lorries I could tell you,

0:27:280:27:31

but I think that's either a Bedford or a Commer.

0:27:310:27:34

I would guess this would date and it is a guess,

0:27:340:27:37

the lorry would date round about 1960, give or take three or four years either way.

0:27:370:27:43

It's great because you've got this extending ladder and up it comes.

0:27:430:27:48

But the thing about this, let's turn it over and have a look,

0:27:480:27:53

there we've got:

0:27:530:27:55

"Dinky Supertoys Fire Engine made in England, Meccano."

0:27:550:28:00

So Meccano owned Dinky toys. But you look at that,

0:28:000:28:06

-this has never, ever been played with, as it?

-No, it hasn't.

0:28:060:28:10

There isn't a scratch or a mark on it,

0:28:100:28:12

which is great from a collector's point of view

0:28:120:28:16

but I always think it's such a sad story, isn't it?

0:28:160:28:20

Was it bought as a present for someone who perhaps had an illness?

0:28:200:28:24

Perhaps they didn't even like it as a toy

0:28:240:28:26

and they put it in a cupboard and it never came out again.

0:28:260:28:30

The net result is you've got a toy now that's quite collectible.

0:28:300:28:33

-I think that this toy is worth 60 to £90 like that.

-Right.

0:28:330:28:40

Take that away and I think it's worth less.

0:28:400:28:42

-OK.

-I think you need to put a reserve on it of £50,

0:28:420:28:45

but such is the demand for these things in their entirety,

0:28:450:28:51

-you can buy brand new fake boxes...

-Right.

0:28:510:28:54

..to match up to your toy.

0:28:540:28:57

But I just think that's such a lovely thing.

0:28:570:29:00

You must get lots of toys brought into your shops?

0:29:000:29:03

We do get a lot of toys donated but not often this old

0:29:030:29:05

-and not often in this condition.

-Has anybody brought anything really valuable?

0:29:050:29:10

We did once find a letter from Florence Nightingale

0:29:100:29:16

-which we sold at auction.

-What did it make?

-£900.

0:29:160:29:20

-£900?

-Yes.

0:29:200:29:21

-Hold on, I'll have a look in here.

-LAUGHTER

0:29:230:29:26

Beautifully preserved. Let's hope it amuses the bidders when it comes up for sale.

0:29:270:29:31

First, I've spotted a hot item of my own, with Geoff's stunning Moorcroft vase.

0:29:310:29:36

It looks like your baby there, doesn't it?

0:29:360:29:39

-Hello.

-Is it very precious to you?

0:29:390:29:42

It is to me, yes, but it won't be for long.

0:29:420:29:44

-It's going to sale, I'm afraid.

-What do you do for a living, Geoff?

0:29:440:29:48

-I'm a driving instructor.

-You must have nerves of steel.

0:29:480:29:51

-Some would say.

-Well you'll enjoy the auction room.

0:29:510:29:54

-How long have you had this piece of Moorcroft?

-Only a few months.

0:29:540:29:57

It was left to me, it was given to me by my elderly neighbours, who died recently.

0:29:570:30:03

Oh, I'm sorry to hear that.

0:30:030:30:05

Yes, she was a lovely lady, I was doing odds jobs for her,

0:30:050:30:08

cutting the grass, defrosting the fridge, things like that.

0:30:080:30:11

Simple things, and she asked me to get rid of this.

0:30:110:30:14

I think she meant take to it the charity shop.

0:30:140:30:17

-Really?

-But I'm glad I didn't.

0:30:170:30:20

-Oh, gosh. Can I just have a look?

-Of course.

0:30:200:30:22

Well, you know what it is, don't you? It's a bit of Moorcroft.

0:30:220:30:26

William Moorcroft, a wonderful designer, not just a designer,

0:30:260:30:29

but let's say a chemist.

0:30:290:30:31

Credited for inventing the flambe glaze. You know, that lovely deep red.

0:30:310:30:36

-You know, that was his own personal touch.

-It's not to my taste.

0:30:360:30:39

I love it, actually.

0:30:390:30:40

I do like it.

0:30:400:30:42

Obviously started out life as McIntyre Moorcroft,

0:30:420:30:45

but by the time this piece was made, the factory was just known as Moorcroft.

0:30:450:30:49

-This is the pomegranate pattern.

-So I understand.

0:30:490:30:52

This lovely vase, and it was in production from 1913 to 1925.

0:30:520:30:57

And the condition is very, very good.

0:30:570:31:03

So is this something that you're intending to keep, it's not to your taste at all?

0:31:030:31:07

No. First of all, I wouldn't collect anything that's easily breakable.

0:31:070:31:10

Right, OK.

0:31:100:31:12

Secondly, the colours, I find them rather depressing.

0:31:120:31:16

If it had been a piece of Clarice Cliff, nice and bright, sunny colours.

0:31:160:31:20

-I might have liked it.

-Well, each to their own.

0:31:200:31:23

I prefer the softer muted, more bruised colours.

0:31:230:31:26

When you look at this, this looks like nature at work.

0:31:260:31:29

You know, when you see an apple on a tree and it starts to turn colour

0:31:290:31:32

and that red looks in harmony with the greens around it.

0:31:320:31:36

Nature has a way of working colours together,

0:31:360:31:39

whereas I think Clarice Cliff, that's more bizarre, more sort of in your face,

0:31:390:31:43

and for me, I don't like that, but I like stuff like this.

0:31:430:31:45

-As nature intended.

-Each to their own.

0:31:450:31:48

Yes. I'm sure the collectors will love this as well.

0:31:480:31:52

Any idea of value?

0:31:520:31:54

I saw a recent Flog It! and a similar size Moorcroft went for £2,000.

0:31:540:31:59

Yes, it wasn't the pomegranate pattern, though.

0:31:590:32:02

This is quite a popular pattern.

0:32:020:32:04

It was in production for a fair few years, hence it's not so desirable,

0:32:040:32:08

but nevertheless, something like this SHOULD fetch easily, £1,000-£1,200 as a starting point.

0:32:080:32:17

I'd like to think we'd get it somewhere near that £2,000, maybe £1,500 or £1,600.

0:32:170:32:21

-So would I.

-Happy?

0:32:210:32:23

Yes, indeed.

0:32:230:32:26

We'll be back to see how Geoff's vase fares when it goes under the hammer in just a minute.

0:32:260:32:30

But right now, it's time to put Elizabeth to the test with Julie's gold watches.

0:32:300:32:34

What is the story behind them?

0:32:340:32:36

My mum inherited them from her aunt, and my mother's Dutch.

0:32:360:32:40

-Right.

-So I know that they're not English in make.

0:32:400:32:44

And I know that one of them

0:32:440:32:47

was a wedding present to my great aunt, but I'm not sure which one.

0:32:470:32:51

-Right.

-The pendant watch, I know doesn't work.

0:32:510:32:56

The wristwatch, it's very small, and I'd never be able to wear it,

0:32:560:33:02

and in this digital age I'm not really one for a wind-up watch.

0:33:020:33:06

Now when was the wedding you referred to? Do you know when that was?

0:33:060:33:10

It would have been between 1930 and 1940. We're not sure of the exact date.

0:33:100:33:17

What we have is a continental watch here, a little fob watch, stamped 585.

0:33:170:33:23

It's very much in the sort of almost Victorian or Georgian style, in terms of the little circular watch.

0:33:230:33:29

It's enclosed by its case with a little hanging loop. And it's engraved with initials.

0:33:290:33:34

Now are these initials relevant to your...?

0:33:340:33:36

Yes, I believe the first letter is L, and my great auntie's name was Lily.

0:33:360:33:41

-Right.

-My mother's name is Lily. Which is why I think that she probably gave it to my mum.

0:33:410:33:48

If I can just open up the watch...

0:33:480:33:50

the face there again is very traditional in the sense of how you would find a Victorian pocket watch.

0:33:500:33:55

It has the Arabic numerals in black on the white enamelled dial, with a subsidiary seconds dial there.

0:33:550:34:01

Now you say it's never had a glass to your knowledge.

0:34:010:34:04

-No.

-It would have originally had a glass and it's an inconvenience that the glass is missing,

0:34:040:34:08

but the important thing is that the hands and more importantly still, the enamel is in such lovely condition.

0:34:080:34:15

Because that is difficult and costly to repair or replace. So I wouldn't worry about the lack of the glass.

0:34:150:34:20

The fact it doesn't work won't deflect too much from the value.

0:34:200:34:24

Watches tend to be sold as seen, with the expectation that they need

0:34:240:34:28

cleaning or a bit of tweaking any way at auction, so that's fine. That contrasts nicely with this elegant,

0:34:280:34:34

very svelte Connard watch, which is nice because it's manual,

0:34:340:34:38

and for some people the fact it's a manual wind is the advantage, because some people love to wear

0:34:380:34:43

and use proper wind up watches.

0:34:430:34:46

Good name, good make and the integral bracelet, which is a wonderful

0:34:460:34:51

sort of sinuous strap, mesh strap, I think is just gorgeous.

0:34:510:34:55

Very elegant watch. Again continental standard of gold.

0:34:550:34:58

I would think that we would put them to auction, if you wanted to sell them, as a group.

0:34:580:35:03

It would make sense to have a bit of competition.

0:35:030:35:06

Somebody might want the chain, or the wristwatch.

0:35:060:35:09

Put them in a little group, they complement each other, but if you had two people tussling to buy them

0:35:090:35:14

-the bidding might go up a bit more.

-OK.

0:35:140:35:16

But we will start it at a price of perhaps £120-£180.

0:35:160:35:19

-Are you happy with that?

-Yes.

0:35:210:35:23

Put a reserve on of £120.

0:35:230:35:25

-Yeah, that's fine.

-Superb.

0:35:250:35:27

-So thank you for bringing them in, they're really lovely.

-Thank you.

0:35:270:35:31

Here's hoping the watches clock up some serious cash for Julie.

0:35:310:35:37

OK, it's time to take our last three items over to the auction room,

0:35:370:35:40

but first here's a quick reminder of what they are.

0:35:400:35:44

Penny's pristine Dinky fire engine got Philip hot under the collar.

0:35:440:35:50

Jeff may not have liked it, but I thought this Moorcroft vase was a natural beauty.

0:35:500:35:56

And Elizabeth really struck gold with Julie's elegant fob and wristwatches.

0:35:560:36:01

So it's back to Martin & Pole's in Wokingham for the auction.

0:36:020:36:07

And there's just enough time for a quick chat with auctioneer Garth Lewis.

0:36:070:36:11

Well, time is definitely up for Julie's watches. I'm not sure about the wristwatch.

0:36:130:36:17

It's tiny and I'm sure women nowadays wouldn't wear a watch like that.

0:36:170:36:20

Most women wear sort of man-sized watches like this one, I think.

0:36:200:36:24

Nevertheless, we have £120-£180 on these.

0:36:240:36:27

Yes, and there has actually been a little bit of delay between the valuation day

0:36:270:36:31

and us speaking now, and that has been to the owner's great advantage.

0:36:310:36:35

Because it's gone up.

0:36:350:36:38

Gold is just sky rocketing, and I have taken it upon myself to up

0:36:380:36:42

the estimate a little bit on these, just to reflect the bullion price.

0:36:420:36:46

As you say, the watch is still a functioning watch

0:36:460:36:49

but there is a lot of gold in there, which might well end up being melted.

0:36:490:36:54

I think that would go to melt, that one, don't you.

0:36:540:36:56

Possibly not the other fob watch, it's very pretty. But it's the underlying bullion price.

0:36:560:37:01

So you have now adjusted the estimate to?

0:37:010:37:03

250-350 now.

0:37:030:37:06

That's sensible.

0:37:060:37:07

Absolutely, and very doable, too.

0:37:070:37:10

So let's get right on with it and see

0:37:100:37:13

if there are enough gold-diggers round to net Julie a good result.

0:37:130:37:18

Since the valuation day we've now got a revised valuation,

0:37:180:37:21

and the estimate's gone up to £250-£350

0:37:210:37:24

because the price of precious metals, gold and silver, for scrap value has gone through the roof.

0:37:240:37:30

Not that these are going to be scrap any way.

0:37:300:37:32

No, no, but it helps to set it.

0:37:320:37:35

Yes, helps the bottom level, to find a valuation.

0:37:350:37:39

And the auctioneer agreed with the new valuation, so we're all very happy.

0:37:390:37:42

We're going to find out what the bidders think right now, because they're going under the hammer.

0:37:420:37:47

Ladies 14-carat gold fob watch with engraved monogram,

0:37:490:37:54

and there's also a more modern Chopard 18-carat gold wristwatch

0:37:540:37:58

with mesh bracelet. We know what gold's been doing recently,

0:37:580:38:02

so where can I start with this?

0:38:020:38:03

150, may I say? 150, thank you.

0:38:030:38:07

It's bid 150, 160, 170, 180. 190.

0:38:070:38:13

200. 220, 220, all done at 220?

0:38:150:38:20

Yes! The hammer's gone down right on that new valuation.

0:38:220:38:26

-Spot on, yes.

-It pays to wait, it pays to be patient.

0:38:260:38:29

It's been three-and-a-half months since the valuation,

0:38:290:38:33

so that scrap metal price has gone through the roof.

0:38:330:38:36

-I'm very happy.

-Question is, is Mum going to be happy?

-I think so.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

0:38:360:38:41

'With the gold prices is at an all-time high,

0:38:410:38:44

'Julie couldn't have picked a better time to sell those watches.'

0:38:440:38:47

'It's Geoff's Moorcroft up next,

0:38:490:38:50

'so let's see if this stunning glaze catches anyone's gaze.'

0:38:500:38:55

I'm joined by Geoffrey and we're looking for £1,000,

0:38:570:39:00

hopefully £1,200, hopefully a bit more!

0:39:000:39:02

Hopefully a lot more.

0:39:020:39:04

That's what we like - an optimist.

0:39:040:39:05

We always like a bit more, don't we?

0:39:050:39:08

-Have you been looking forward to this?

-I have, yes.

0:39:080:39:11

Good. I had a chat to the auctioneer.

0:39:110:39:13

He agreed with the valuation and there's more Moorcroft in the sale. It's in good company.

0:39:130:39:18

-So, fingers crossed, the collectors will find this.

-Good.

-Good.

0:39:180:39:22

Right, let's put it to the test, shall we?

0:39:220:39:24

Now I'm getting frightened! This is it.

0:39:240:39:26

Here is a Moorcroft vase,

0:39:290:39:31

the renowned pomegranate pattern vase of significant proportions.

0:39:310:39:37

Good order. Waste no time, I need to start the bidding at £600, if I may.

0:39:370:39:43

Is there 600 for it, please?

0:39:430:39:45

500 if you like, I don't mind?

0:39:470:39:49

Is there no interest at £500?

0:39:490:39:52

On the right, thank you, 500 is bid.

0:39:520:39:55

Is there any further at £500 now?

0:39:550:39:59

550, thank you. 600. 650, 650.

0:39:590:40:05

If you're all done at 650, we'll have to move on.

0:40:050:40:09

650... 700, new place. 700 here. 750, now.

0:40:090:40:14

They're leaving it late, aren't they? Everyone wants a bargain here.

0:40:140:40:17

800, 850, 900, £900. I can sell at 900.

0:40:170:40:23

If you're all done at 900, I'm selling.

0:40:230:40:26

They sold at £900.

0:40:260:40:29

Do you know, we struggled, but we got it away.

0:40:290:40:32

It was trundling at £500.

0:40:320:40:34

Nobody wanted to put their hands up, they wanted it for nothing. God!

0:40:340:40:40

We're finding it tough here, having to lever their hands out of their pockets.

0:40:400:40:44

They're all sitting on their hands down at the front. It's gone.

0:40:440:40:47

Unfortunately, at the lower end, but there we go, it's sold.

0:40:470:40:50

'I wish it could have done better

0:40:500:40:52

'but at least someone took Geoff's unwanted vase off his hands.

0:40:520:40:56

'Now, let's see if that Dinky toy truck turns the bidders' heads in the sale room.'

0:40:560:41:00

Right, next up,

0:41:000:41:01

one of my favourite lots - not just of the programme but of the whole entire sale.

0:41:010:41:05

It's a Dinky toy. It's a little fire engine and it belongs to Penny.

0:41:050:41:09

Thank you so much for bringing this in.

0:41:090:41:11

Philip, our expert, beat me to this

0:41:110:41:13

but its boxed, the condition is fabulous, well looked after.

0:41:130:41:16

-It is.

-I would love to own this, because I know my little boy would love this little fire engine.

0:41:160:41:21

Why are you selling it?

0:41:210:41:23

I'm actually area manager for a charity and its one of a number

0:41:230:41:26

of items donated to our shop and we weren't sure of the value, so...

0:41:260:41:30

-You brought it along. And the money's going back to the charity.

-It is, yes.

-Fantastic.

0:41:300:41:35

-That's nice.

-That's what we like to hear, because we get lots of letters where people

0:41:350:41:39

buy things in a charity shop, bring them along to Flog It! and sell it,

0:41:390:41:42

then spend the money on shoes and really, the charity doesn't benefit,

0:41:420:41:46

-so hopefully this is a bit of payback, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:41:460:41:48

-Good luck.

-Thanks.

-It's going under the hammer now.

0:41:480:41:51

Scale model of a fire engine number 955,

0:41:520:41:56

in good original condition with the box.

0:41:560:41:58

This is a gem.

0:41:580:42:00

Try 50 to start, please. 40 if you like.

0:42:000:42:04

-Oh, come on!

-No interest at 40?

0:42:040:42:06

I'll go 30, then... Is bid, £30.

0:42:060:42:10

-Right, we're in.

-Just keep your hand up, sir.

0:42:100:42:12

32, 35, 38, 40.

0:42:120:42:15

£40, 42, a new place. 45, against you, sir.

0:42:150:42:21

-48, 50. £50, it's on the aisle. 55, if you like.

-Good.

0:42:210:42:27

-55, it's here at 55 if you're all done? 60, new place. 60.

-Fresh legs.

0:42:270:42:33

Against you, sir. 65? 70.

0:42:330:42:38

-Get in.

-75, 75, then.

0:42:380:42:42

Are you all done at 75?

0:42:420:42:44

-Look, that was pretty good, that was pretty good.

-Fantastic.

0:42:440:42:48

-I'm happy with that.

-Fantastic, thank you.

0:42:480:42:50

-Are you happy, Penny?

-Yeah.

-Thanks for bringing such a lovely thing in.

0:42:500:42:54

You're welcome.

0:42:540:42:56

'A great result, and I'm so glad the money is going to a good cause.'

0:42:560:42:59

Well, that's it. It's all over for our owners.

0:42:590:43:03

As you can see, the auction's still going on

0:43:030:43:05

but we've had a bit of a mixed day. You can't win 'em all!

0:43:050:43:08

It's not an exact science, putting values on things.

0:43:080:43:11

I wouldn't like to do it for a living, but we managed to send most people home happy.

0:43:110:43:15

I hope you've enjoyed the show.

0:43:150:43:16

Hopefully there'll be one or two more surprises in the future.

0:43:160:43:20

Until then, it's goodbye from Wokingham.

0:43:200:43:22

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:420:43:45

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:450:43:48

This edition of Flog It is set against the baroque backdrop of Wellington College where Paul Martin is joined by experts Philip Serrell and Elizabeth Talbot. With a good turnout, they come across an array of interesting items.

Prize finds include a pair of spectacular binoculars and a collection of colourful Poole pottery. Paul also heads off to nearby Hungerford to shed light on the fascinating subject of garden art, proving that antiques can be displayed in a variety of ways, not just on the mantelpiece.


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