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Colchester

Presenter Paul Martin leads the team to to Colchester where expert David Barby nets a pair of fish paintings and Kate Bateman finds two Clarice Cliff items.


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We've got a massive queue outside the town hall

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here to ask our experts that all-important question. Here's an expert.

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Mr David Barby.

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If you follow me, we have another one, the gorgeous Kate Bateman.

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Hello!

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This is said to be one of Britain's oldest towns.

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It's been a military base for the last 2,000 years. So where are we?

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-Colchester!

-And what are we here for?

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Flog It!

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This Baroque-style building is Colchester town hall,

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our magnificent venue for today.

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All these people have come to meet our experts

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to ask that all-important question, "What's it worth?"

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When they've found out, it's off to auction.

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Today's experts, Kate Bateman and David Barby are trawling the crowd.

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Kate's got antiques in her blood

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and runs an auction house with her father.

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Exciting!

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What have you got there?

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While David is the daddy when it comes to spotting a thing of beauty.

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-You look like Barbara Windsor in her younger days.

-I know!

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-Remember that camping scene?

-No, I don't do that! Too cold!

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The charmer's pretty good at antiques, too!

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Coming up today, this chap grabs my attention.

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If you're going to own a parrot, this is the type to own!

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-They don't answer back!

-No.

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At the auction, there's debate about how to spend the cash.

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-What would you do?

-I'd veer on the side of shoes, myself!

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-Probably handbags if it was me.

-Handbags and shoes.

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That's girls for you!

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Quick, get a man!

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Here's David Barby.

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Well, Nigel, or Sheila, who does this belong to?

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It came from my mother's father. That's where it started.

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You know what it is, don't you?

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-Yes.

-This is a lovely example of a combined propelling pencil which is there.

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And it's retractable.

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And then do you see those little flower heads? Beautiful.

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Lovely detail.

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Then on the other one, if I push it down,

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a provision for putting a nib.

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You dip that into the inkwell and start writing.

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-So this would have been ideal for a lady.

-Yes.

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Who had a purse or a little vanity case

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which had a writing set as well.

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This, I think, is quite, quite adorable.

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What I love is the engine-turned decoration on this solid silver case.

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On the silver case you can see the hallmark just there.

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And even the name of the manufacturer.

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"R.M. Mosley, London."

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The major manufacturer for these was Mordan & Co.

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This is very much in their manner, but Mosley & Co.

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The date letter there is a Gothic F

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so we're looking at about 1841.

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Produced in London, 1841.

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But that's not the only attraction,

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the case and those little flower-head pushes,

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it's this at the end here which is a cairngorm engraved, which is lovely.

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-Do you know what that was for?

-I imagine it was something for stamping.

-Right.

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So after you'd written your letter, you'd put it in the envelope

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and this was then used to seal it

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whilst the wax was still molten.

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And if I can see with my eyes,

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there's an engraved name which I think says, back-to-front, Miriam.

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Miriam.

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And just into the capital letter M,

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there's traces of wax.

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So this actually has been used.

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-Oh!

-Of course, the name is back-to-front as you put it in the wax, it would appear normal.

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A very good collectors' item.

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When it goes up at auction,

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I'd like to see it probably 50 to £80.

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That sort of price range.

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Would you be happy at parting with this family heirloom at that sort of level?

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As long as there's a fixed reserve on it. I wouldn't want it to go for a few pounds.

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-I'd like to make sure...

-Very sensible. A reserve of £50? Would you be happy?

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-That's fine.

-OK.

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Sheila, thank you. I shall be at the auction watching the price go up.

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-Look forward to seeing you, Nigel.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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We're staying with small and beautiful for our next item.

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Wendy and Peter, thanks so much for coming in.

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We're having a wonderful time. Everyone's in high spirits.

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I love what you're holding. I think it's absolutely charming.

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Tell me about its history.

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Well, it belonged to my father.

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He died at 91 and I've had it ever since.

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It's spent most of its life in a sideboard drawer.

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-Have you used it much at all?

-No.

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-You don't have the odd tipple?

-He's had a restful life!

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Let me have a look. He's made from a nut.

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Look, it's exquisite!

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-Yes.

-He can almost speak to you, can't he?

-He hasn't yet!

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-The children don't want him, unfortunately.

-I really can't believe that.

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They've got so many other funny things.

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It's so usable, as well. It's a practical piece of kit.

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I've seen a lot of corkscrews in my time

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and I know a lot of collectors would like to own this one.

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It's a novelty piece. It's late Victorian.

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But it's in great condition. The glass eyes are a little bit scratched.

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I think if you put this into auction, we'd put a value of 80 to £120 on it.

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-Is that right?

-And a reserve of 70. I'm pretty sure you'll get the top end.

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-Is that right?

-Yes.

-That's amazing.

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If two collectors are there on the day, it'll go even higher.

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If he was a real parrot, he'd be very pleased.

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-Exceptionally pleased.

-Having laid in a drawer for years!

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If you're going to own a parrot, Peter, this is the type to own.

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They don't answer back.

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No.

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Now, what's Kate found? She's with Debbie.

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-Are you a Clarice Cliff collector?

-Not really, no.

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I liked it a few years ago. We went to look around at Clarice Cliff,

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-but not really, no. I've only got these two.

-Did you inherit these?

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No, I bought them six to eight years ago. We used to go to antiques fairs.

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We just bought them then.

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So was this bought from a shop, or fair or auction?

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-This one was bought from a fair, and this one from a shop.

-OK.

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Don't tell me how much you paid. I'll tell you more about them. Which do you like best?

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-This one.

-I'm with you on that.

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This one, I call it the fried eggs pattern, but officially it's Orange Chintz.

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It's supposed to be flowers. All hand-painted

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but it's a really cool shape, and the shape is going to excite collectors.

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It's funky and unusual. It looks like a spaceship!

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In the 1930s that was so cool and new.

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This fabulous cross-section on the base.

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It's marked up Bizarre, Clarice Cliff. Hand-painted.

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Condition's quite good. There are a few nibbles on the rim.

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But that was before it was actually painted, so the factory let it out with those irregularities.

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The shape is called Stamford.

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So that's from that style range.

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This one is Rhodanthe

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and the shape is Biarritz,

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this very square... I suppose they were thinking of the south of France.

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This one comes in different colourways. Brown is my least favourite.

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There's one called Aurora, which is pink and grey and quite pretty.

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They're nice together, the same colour take, so they'll sell well together as one lot.

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-You want to put them to auction?

-Yes.

-You want to get rid of them?

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-Is that so you can buy other things?

-Yes, I'm moving house in March

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and I want to buy bits for that. This doesn't go with a new house

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-so out with the old, in with the new!

-Right.

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A spring clean! Right.

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In terms of price, I think probably 300 to 400 is where I'm thinking.

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Mainly for this one. This one is £50-ish on its own,

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but you would put them together in one lot

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because it'll appeal to a Clarice Cliff collector.

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-Is that a figure you'd be happy with?

-Um...

-Did you pay more than that?

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A little bit more, but it was a long time ago, so...

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-Perhaps a little bit more.

-So maybe 350 reserve?

-Yes, 350 would be fair.

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We'll make it a firm reserve. 350 to 400 as an estimate for the two together.

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Hopefully this one will sell it and they get a freebie with it as well.

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-OK.

-Fingers crossed.

-Hope so.

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Hope our fried eggs go well!

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-They do look like fried eggs!

-They do!

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Of course, a precise and colourful description is the auctioneer's art.

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Erm, Kate...

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Time to wrap those three items up and send them to auction.

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Here's an expert view of what we're taking.

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This is such a desirable collectors' item.

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I'd love to own this.

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I'm sure there will be a lot of collectors at the auction that will have the same opinion.

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I'm putting this parrot into auction because it's a great novelty corkscrew

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from the Victorian era.

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I have a feeling he has the potential to fly away at auction!

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Two bits of Clarice Cliff going to the sale. But this is the star.

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This is what the bidders will go for.

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It's a Stamford shape, Chintz ware pattern.

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I think it'll be really exciting at the sale room.

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Now it's time for my favourite part of the show.

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It's auction time and anything can happen.

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This is where we put our valuations to the test, here at Reeman Dansie auction rooms in Colchester.

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We've got a full house here and the auction has already started.

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I had a chat to James Grinter, the man with local knowledge, the man on the rostrum.

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Here's what he said about one of our items.

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It's Debbie's two ceramic pieces.

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-I'm not a big Clarice fan. Are you?

-I'm afraid not, Paul. No.

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I appreciate it, but I wouldn't have it in my house.

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-What estimate have you put on them?

-We've got £350 to 400.

-Right.

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OK. Again, I think that's a bit toppy-endy, really.

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That bit there is very stylish, compared to that one.

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I don't like that, yes.

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That's why we put them together. I think that would struggle.

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I was going to ask you, you have the right and the authority

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to split the lot, use your discretion and sell them separately.

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-And that's answered my question.

-That would sell, that one wouldn't.

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We'll put them together and see what happens. They stand a chance.

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The condition of them both is good.

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If you like Clarice Cliff, they're both stylish bits.

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Yeah.

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I'm laughing, but a lot of people that watch this show love Clarice Cliff.

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And you know who you are!

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It just wouldn't suit my house.

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You've got to have the whole look for this.

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-You can't mix and match with Clarice Cliff. It doesn't work.

-They're stylish things of their period.

-Yes.

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Wait and see how they get on, because we're starting with the propelling pencil,

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valued at 50 to £80.

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Surely you could make use of this? Don't you do doodles? Don't you want to use it?

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-No...

-You can still buy the lead.

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-Not with that.

-Not with that?

-No.

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-It's a nice thing.

-It is.

-It's a really nice thing.

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I think now, you can't use it. You have to buy separate nibs.

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It's very difficult to get the inks and everything to go with it.

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It makes your handwriting look good! I still use an ink pen.

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So do I. But something like that is very difficult.

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It's more for a cabinet or a collectors' item.

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Silver's very high in value at the moment, so that's good.

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It's got everything going for it.

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Let's find out what the bidders think. This is the test.

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Let's find out what it's worth.

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The Victorian silver combination propelling pencil and pen.

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What do you say? £50 to start me? £50 start for this one?

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£50 to start me?

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-40, then? 40 I have down here.

-OK.

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44. 46. 48.

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50. 55.

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60. £60 seated down here now. 60. At £60.

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Any advance?

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-All done now? 65 on the internet.

-Good.

-65.

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On the internet now. Sure, sir?

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At £65 on the internet. One more?

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-70.

-Excellent.

-£70 bid now in the room. £70.

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-We're doing it.

-370. 75.

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At £75 on the internet now.

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80. At £80. Back in the room at 80.

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£80 bid. 85 on the internet? At £80 in the room. I'm selling. All done.

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That was a battle, but we did it!

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The pen is mightier than the sword!

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For sure!

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-Well done.

-That's good.

-Thank you for bringing it in. Quality always sells.

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Top end. And the pencil is propelled off to a new owner.

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It this next lot doesn't sell, it'll drive me round the twist!

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Peter and Wendy's corkscrew. I love it.

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Those bright glass blue eyes get me on the old parrot.

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Absolutely wonderful. Good luck, both of you.

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I know there are plenty of corkscrew collectors that will love this.

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Hopefully, top end of the estimate. Here we go.

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A late Victorian novelty carved nutshell corkscrew

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in the form of a parrot head.

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What do you say? £50 to start me?

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50? 50 to start me?

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50's bid on there. At 50. At £50.

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55.

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60 with you, sir. 65.

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-At 65. 70. £70 bid.

-Come on!

-At 70.

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£70 bid.

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Any advance? All done now? At 75 on the internet. Against you.

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80. At £80 in the room. At £80 in the room.

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Against you on the internet. At £80. 85.

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90. At £90 back in the room now.

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At 90. At £90 in the room.

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Against you on the internet. 95. 100.

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-100.

-Interest now.

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110. At 110 on the internet now.

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Against you all. All done? £110.

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-Well done.

-Not bad, is it?

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-£110. Hammer's gone down.

-Amazing!

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-That was great, wasn't it?

-Yes!

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-It went to somebody bidding online, on the internet.

-Yes.

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-Gone to a collector?

-I think so, yes. Definitely. Yes.

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Sold to another online bidder.

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It just shows how local auction rooms are reaching out to all over the world.

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Our third item is Debbie's Clarice Cliff items

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valued at 350 to £400.

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I had a chat to James, the auctioneer, just before the sale.

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-I asked him if he would separate them.

-OK.

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And he said no, purely because the smaller bowl is the one that just might sell.

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-That's the cool shape.

-Yes. And the other one will really struggle.

-OK.

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You wouldn't get your money back. By putting the two together,

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-someone's going to buy them and they'll have the problem of splitting them up.

-OK.

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-But he thinks they're going to struggle.

-OK.

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But you never know. We've got internet bidding, phone bidding. It's not all in the room.

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-Somebody like you might get carried away...

-And spend their money!

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-Spend all their money on this.

-Spend £350 on Clarice Cliff instead of a pair of shoes!

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-What would you do?

-I'd veer on the side of shoes, myself!

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-Handbags, if it was me! Handbags.

-That's girls for you!

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1930s Clarice Cliff Bizarre Stamford bowl

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and the Clarice Cliff Rhodanthe pattern dish.

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Two items of Clarice Cliff here. Start me.

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£300 to start me?

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£300 to start me, ladies and gentlemen. 300 I have.

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£300 bid now. 320. 340.

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350 I have. 350 is bid here now.

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At 350. 350. 360 I'll take.

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360 behind you. 360 is bid now. 360.

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360 is bid here now.

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At 360. 380, anywhere?

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At £360. It's going to be sold. All done at 360.

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Well done. Just scraped it in there, didn't we? There's commission to pay.

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-Yeah.

-You wouldn't have lost much money. Maybe £20 at the end of the day.

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-But you've had the joy out of them.

-Yeah, I want to buy something new now.

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-What are you going to buy? Not shoes.

-No, not shoes, handbags. I've bought a new house

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so it'll go for bits in there.

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-And that haemorrhages money. Curtains, cushions, carpets.

-Yes.

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-I know the feeling. Enjoy the new house.

-Thank you.

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Well done. Spot on.

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-Yeah. I thought they might struggle.

-Yeah, so did James. He'll be surprised.

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The M25. Mile after miles of cars, lorries and road works.

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But look carefully and there are some real treasures nearby.

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Sometimes you might glimpse something special out of the corner of your eye

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and there never seems to be time to stop and take a closer look.

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Well, today, I am going to stop.

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Just 600 yards off the M25, Europe's busiest motorway -

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you can hear it, just over there, with the lorries bombing along -

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is this wonderful Georgian mansion, Copped Hall.

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It's survived a fire, road construction, obviously,

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and land-hungry developers.

0:18:300:18:33

It was a grand country mansion, once surrounded by thousands of acres of hunting parks and farmland.

0:18:340:18:40

But one Sunday morning in 1917, most of Copped Hall was burnt out

0:18:420:18:45

in a disastrous fire.

0:18:450:18:48

It fell into ruin. Over the years, it was stripped of doors, fireplaces,

0:18:480:18:53

even the roof.

0:18:530:18:55

When the M25 cut through the grounds in the 1980s,

0:18:550:18:58

Copped Hall once more came to wider attention

0:18:580:19:00

and developers tried to move in.

0:19:000:19:03

It was down to local campaigners to save the hall and start a long, slow job of rebuilding it.

0:19:030:19:08

Architect Alan Cox, who played in the ruins as a boy,

0:19:080:19:12

is one of those campaigners.

0:19:120:19:15

-Why did you get involved?

-I knew it since I was a teenager. I've studied architecture

0:19:150:19:20

and by various coincidences I got involved and joined in with local people

0:19:200:19:27

and we set up a campaign to save it. And we got support for that.

0:19:270:19:30

Everywhere. Powerful people supported us. It took nine years

0:19:300:19:34

and eventually we won.

0:19:340:19:36

-Did you have to raise much money?

-Yes. We had to borrow money.

0:19:360:19:40

But we found two people to lend us the money.

0:19:400:19:42

So that was it. We set up a charitable trust quite near the end

0:19:420:19:47

before we bought it, and then raised the money.

0:19:470:19:49

-Exciting!

-And then we paid the money back.

-Paid it back.

-Which took five years.

0:19:490:19:54

So we had no mortgage and it's just putting it back together again.

0:19:540:19:58

-It's an ongoing project.

-Yes. The budget to do it all is a lot of money.

0:19:580:20:01

Probably ten million. But we don't think like that.

0:20:010:20:04

The process of doing it is part of the attraction.

0:20:040:20:07

-It's evolving all the time.

-Yes.

0:20:070:20:09

The point about this is it's a work in progress.

0:20:090:20:12

People come here. They go and look at buildings that are complete,

0:20:120:20:16

but this is half-way done and they see it gradually restored.

0:20:160:20:20

-As an architect, are you overseeing this project?

-Yes.

0:20:200:20:24

-Is it running on schedule?

-There's no schedule.

0:20:240:20:27

-No budget?

-We own it. No budget, no schedule,

0:20:270:20:30

we just move on and we share what we do with the public who come in their hundreds.

0:20:300:20:34

What's the most exciting part of the build so far for you?

0:20:340:20:38

I think finishing the saloon - not finishing it, but getting it usable.

0:20:380:20:42

When we get a bit of floor or roof on, we use it for a concert or play

0:20:420:20:48

so it's used regardless of the fact it's only half-done or quarter-done.

0:20:480:20:53

-You're putting heart and soul back into the building already.

-It's not only about the building,

0:20:530:20:58

it's about the people here. Without the people, it wouldn't happen.

0:20:580:21:02

-It's two things.

-How often are you open to the public?

0:21:020:21:05

We have guided tour days every month. Three open days a year.

0:21:050:21:09

We have open gardens.

0:21:090:21:11

And we have lots of groups visiting us. Special interest groups visit.

0:21:110:21:15

And we have study days, plays, et cetera. There's a lot going on.

0:21:150:21:21

-That brings in income.

-Which is great. It helps...

0:21:210:21:24

Nothing is run at a loss. And all the people that look after it are volunteers.

0:21:240:21:29

So that's good.

0:21:290:21:31

The money comes in. We need the money to fix the place up.

0:21:320:21:36

It might be a mess now, but when Copped Hall was built in 1758,

0:21:360:21:41

it was a grand residence.

0:21:410:21:43

The huge landscaped gardens were tended by an army of 31 gardeners.

0:21:430:21:47

It had style and character.

0:21:470:21:49

Ghostly reminders of those glorious days are still scattered around the grounds.

0:21:490:21:55

It would have been a perfect setting for a lavish garden party.

0:21:550:21:58

The inside was spectacular, too.

0:22:040:22:06

I'm off to see the work the Trust has done so far.

0:22:060:22:09

The fire in 1917 and subsequent demolitions

0:22:110:22:14

have left this incredible building without any roof and 90% of its floor joists,

0:22:140:22:20

the two key elements that hold this grand building together.

0:22:200:22:23

They stop the walls from imploding inwards and falling outwards.

0:22:230:22:27

So that was the first thing to be tackled,

0:22:270:22:29

to get the shell, the superstructure, solid.

0:22:290:22:32

And also get it watertight so work can carry on.

0:22:320:22:36

Interestingly, Alan's discovered in the cellar, right below me,

0:22:370:22:42

there are four supporting columns.

0:22:420:22:44

One here, one here,

0:22:440:22:48

there and there.

0:22:480:22:49

If he finds there's evidence that these columns come up through this floor which has been re-screeded,

0:22:490:22:57

if there's evidence they poke through, that means there's four classical columns

0:22:570:23:02

that would have sat on them holding these joists up. The big oak joists that were here.

0:23:020:23:07

This is what Alan thinks the entrance hall might have looked like.

0:23:090:23:12

This is a great space, the saloon, a very important room in the house

0:23:160:23:20

where all the entertaining was done. The ceilings here are a lot higher than the other rooms.

0:23:200:23:26

The cornice would have been incredibly deep. See where it starts.

0:23:260:23:31

See these holes in the wall which are there to support great big chunks of plaster

0:23:310:23:37

moulded in great big sections going around here.

0:23:370:23:40

This photo of the saloon taken in about 1900

0:23:400:23:44

shows just how that plasterwork would have looked

0:23:440:23:47

and how it fitted into the opulent surroundings of this mansion.

0:23:470:23:50

The ornate and ostentatious look is simply stunning.

0:23:500:23:53

The Trust is bringing it all back slowly but surely.

0:23:530:23:57

Eventually, all this will be wood-panelled and will look stunning.

0:23:590:24:04

I can't wait to see this finished!

0:24:040:24:06

These holes here in the wall

0:24:140:24:16

are where the original stone stringers and risers of the staircase were tied in.

0:24:160:24:21

Winding all the way around this great big stairwell.

0:24:210:24:27

Sadly, in the 1950s, somebody demolished it.

0:24:290:24:33

They started at the top and pulled out these stone treads and risers and newel posts

0:24:330:24:37

and dropped them from up there down to there on this lovely flagstone floor.

0:24:370:24:43

So you get an idea of just how much work there is still to do.

0:24:430:24:48

If you want to see the mountain that's left to climb, follow me.

0:24:480:24:51

Look at this!

0:24:560:24:58

I should have brought my tool kit!

0:24:580:25:00

The Trust has had some grants in the past and they've used that money wisely and sensibly.

0:25:000:25:05

But they've now run out of money. You can see the amount of work they've still got to do.

0:25:050:25:11

This is the next project. That's the first floor dining room up there.

0:25:110:25:15

There's still no roof. One thing that does happen in big stately piles like this

0:25:150:25:20

when they need to raise money, and Alan's adopted the scheme here,

0:25:200:25:24

anybody can pay to have a Georgian window, a lovely sash window reinstated

0:25:240:25:30

into the original apertures. These cost £2,000 a window.

0:25:300:25:34

It would be really nice to see these horrible steel shutters and doors removed from this building.

0:25:340:25:40

I just hope they raise the money.

0:25:400:25:43

Wow! Restoring one great big antique!

0:26:010:26:05

The main aim of the Trust is to permanently protect Copped Hall,

0:26:050:26:09

restore it to its former glory so it can be used for educational purposes

0:26:090:26:13

and the local community can really benefit.

0:26:130:26:16

Future generations can come here and appreciate it. That's the good thing.

0:26:160:26:20

I just wish them luck!

0:26:200:26:23

Now back to those smaller antiques and our valuation day at Colchester town hall.

0:26:290:26:34

Over to David Barby for our next item.

0:26:350:26:38

Sandra, I'm fascinated by anybody that owns Troika.

0:26:380:26:42

-Good!

-Did you acquire this from a car boot sale

0:26:420:26:47

or did you actually buy it from a shop many years ago?

0:26:470:26:51

No, we bought it from a shop in Tintagel in Cornwall.

0:26:510:26:55

Wonderful. What was the appeal?

0:26:550:26:57

Just the look of it and the feel of it.

0:26:570:26:59

And the Aztec part of it, I've always liked it.

0:26:590:27:04

So you bought this in the late '70s, early '80s, that sort of period.

0:27:040:27:08

-Yes.

-Right.

-Yes.

-Right.

0:27:080:27:10

This freestanding sculpture here, which I think is superb,

0:27:100:27:15

is known as the Aztec mask.

0:27:150:27:17

So we have the Aztec features there and a stylised mask on the other side.

0:27:170:27:22

-I love the colouring and the rough woven feel to it. It's very tactile.

-It is, yes.

0:27:220:27:29

It gives the impression of being so modernistic.

0:27:290:27:33

How much did you pay for that?

0:27:330:27:35

-I think it would have been 15 to £17.

-15 to £17.

-Yes.

0:27:350:27:41

It's going to be worth considerably more now.

0:27:410:27:45

-Yes.

-If that goes up for auction, I think the price is going to be round about

0:27:450:27:50

250 to £500.

0:27:500:27:53

With reservation because we have one little bit of damage there.

0:27:530:27:59

-It's chipped.

-Yes. I didn't know that.

0:27:590:28:03

-Where's this been in your home?

-It has been wrapped, in a box, in the shed.

0:28:030:28:09

-In the shed?!

-Yes!

0:28:090:28:11

Why did you put it in the shed?

0:28:110:28:14

I didn't have anywhere nice to put it to show it off.

0:28:140:28:17

"I'll put those away for now." And you forget about them.

0:28:170:28:20

-The shed's hardly the best place to put them.

-It was wrapped, though!

0:28:200:28:25

This piece here, which I particularly like, this little roundel,

0:28:250:28:29

that's more sort of Ben Nicholson designs. I think that's an attractive piece.

0:28:290:28:34

But that's more of a common shape and form to this one.

0:28:340:28:38

So we're probably looking 40 to £50.

0:28:380:28:41

I was never quite sure what it was classed as. A vase, or...

0:28:410:28:47

I think it would look ridiculous with flowers coming out.

0:28:470:28:50

-It's had bits in it.

-It stands in its own right.

0:28:500:28:53

Look, you're parting with family memories, aren't you?

0:28:530:28:56

-Yes.

-What do your children think about this? Do they like them?

0:28:560:29:00

I've never asked them, to be honest.

0:29:010:29:03

-They won't be angry with you if you sold?

-No, they've probably forgotten that they're there.

0:29:030:29:08

-They've never gone into the garden shed!

-No!

0:29:080:29:11

Too many spiders!

0:29:110:29:13

So what would you do. Let's say this one goes in at top end of the estimate at 500.

0:29:130:29:18

And this one goes for round about 60?

0:29:180:29:21

What would you do? Reinvest in art?

0:29:210:29:23

-I have a daughter who has a birthday coming up.

-Right.

0:29:230:29:26

-She'll be coming 21?

-(40!)

0:29:260:29:29

-(40?) Well, life begins at 40!

-Yes.

0:29:290:29:32

I've yet to experience that!

0:29:320:29:35

I believe you!

0:29:350:29:37

Thousands wouldn't! But I believe Kate's found another item for us.

0:29:380:29:42

-Bobby, hello. Welcome to Flog It!

-Thank you.

0:29:450:29:48

You've brought some books in today. Tell me about them.

0:29:480:29:51

They were my great-uncle's.

0:29:510:29:54

When he passed away, some time ago, about 20 years ago,

0:29:540:29:59

they were some of the things that we thought looked interesting

0:29:590:30:03

and that we collected from his house.

0:30:030:30:05

-Looked old and caught your eye.

-They certainly did.

0:30:050:30:08

They've certainly got age. We'll start with this which caught my eye.

0:30:080:30:12

Quite a plain leather binding. But when we open it up,

0:30:120:30:15

it's incredibly old.

0:30:150:30:17

"The Saints Treasury, being sundry sermons preached in London

0:30:170:30:21

"by the late Reverend and painful minister of the Gospel."

0:30:210:30:24

Not quite sure what that means! "Jeremiah Burroughs, 1654."

0:30:240:30:28

So we're talking just after Shakespeare, Cromwellian times.

0:30:280:30:34

Commonwealth. We'd got rid of the monarchy, basically, instated a parliament.

0:30:340:30:40

This is exciting times. Not a particularly exciting text, sermons.

0:30:400:30:46

-Parliamentarian sermons!

-Exactly.

0:30:460:30:48

Just having a flick through,

0:30:480:30:50

it's not the most fun thing to sit through on a Sunday, I must say!

0:30:500:30:54

-No.

-But it's ridiculous, it's 350 years old

0:30:540:30:57

and in incredibly good condition considering how old it is.

0:30:570:31:01

In terms of book collectors, age does not in itself make it exciting.

0:31:010:31:07

If it was a very early atlas or something else,

0:31:070:31:11

or Shakespeare text, something of that age.

0:31:110:31:13

Someone somewhere might like it.

0:31:130:31:15

But it brings us on to the other book from your uncle.

0:31:150:31:18

Which is, looking at the cover, County Maps.

0:31:180:31:23

Now, what I see all the time coming into our sale room

0:31:230:31:27

is these maps, framed up, hand-coloured,

0:31:270:31:31

either contemporary with when they were done or later.

0:31:310:31:34

And just frames of single counties.

0:31:340:31:36

What you have is the whole book. I assume it's complete with every county in.

0:31:360:31:41

There's no front page, so it's not saying who did it,

0:31:410:31:44

but I think it's by a chap called Greenwood.

0:31:440:31:45

-And we're talking early to mid-Victorian so about 1840.

-OK.

0:31:450:31:51

We have got railways on here, so that should help date it.

0:31:510:31:55

Although it's not brilliant condition with the binding,

0:31:550:31:58

you have got a bit of the spine gone, it's not what we'd call a breaker

0:31:580:32:02

in that's it's not broken and ripped to pieces...

0:32:020:32:05

-OK.

-..and sold off separately.

0:32:050:32:07

It's got a bit of water damage here. It's got damp at some point.

0:32:070:32:11

Weren't you tempted to rip it out?

0:32:110:32:15

No. I'd rather see it go in one piece.

0:32:150:32:19

-And hope that somebody would keep it in one piece.

-Yeah.

0:32:190:32:23

-Because the condition's good...

-I know they say this is the price per page because they'll rip it up.

0:32:230:32:30

But hopefully because it's in one piece, they won't.

0:32:300:32:33

-Here we are in Essex. Colchester. There it is.

-Yep.

0:32:330:32:38

The Roman town of Colchester. They have a vignette here of Chelmsford and Southend.

0:32:380:32:43

They're very beautiful things. Price-wise,

0:32:430:32:47

-conservatively 150 to £200.

-Really? As much as that?

0:32:470:32:52

There are a lot of prints. At least 20 to 30.

0:32:520:32:55

-I'm surprised.

-They'll get at least £30 each.

-Yes.

0:32:550:32:58

-Yes, I think that's about right. Is that a price you'd be happy to sell for?

-Absolutely.

0:32:580:33:04

I didn't think it would be that much.

0:33:040:33:06

Maybe put a reserve of £100?

0:33:060:33:09

-Try 150 to £200 as the estimate for the catalogue.

-Yes. OK.

0:33:090:33:14

-See how they go.

-Sure.

-All right?

0:33:140:33:16

We'll hope that somebody wants a preaching sermon as well on the side!

0:33:160:33:20

Beryl, these are quite exciting pictures.

0:33:250:33:30

They look as though they've been either stuck in an attic

0:33:300:33:34

or neglected, because they've never been restored.

0:33:340:33:38

-No.

-The frames have never been cleaned.

0:33:380:33:41

-Where do they come from?

-They're from my friend's cottage.

0:33:410:33:44

-They were on the wall. I don't think they were loved very much by her.

-Right.

0:33:440:33:51

When she died and I got them down, they were really, really dirty.

0:33:510:33:56

I've wiped them over, but I don't think they were loved very much.

0:33:560:34:01

Do you like fishy subjects?

0:34:010:34:03

Um, not really!

0:34:030:34:05

-Not really. They're more masculine, aren't they?

-Yes.

0:34:050:34:09

If you think in terms of the period when these were painted,

0:34:090:34:12

late 19th century, early 20th century,

0:34:120:34:16

the hobby of the very wealthy was hunting, shooting, fishing.

0:34:160:34:21

These would have been in a gentleman's residence,

0:34:210:34:26

maybe in his library, or his sporting room!

0:34:260:34:29

On the wall, you'd have cased pike that he'd caught, stuffed,

0:34:290:34:33

or heads of animals that he'd shot, things like that.

0:34:330:34:37

These pictures were painted by an artist called Roland Knight.

0:34:370:34:42

His signature is there. And he painted exclusively fish

0:34:420:34:46

for that middle-class market.

0:34:460:34:48

These are oil paint onto canvas.

0:34:480:34:51

And they're slightly dirty.

0:34:510:34:53

Even here where the gap has gone into the pike's side,

0:34:530:34:58

that should be a brilliant red.

0:34:580:35:00

When they were up in your friend's house, did she have open fires?

0:35:000:35:04

-Yes, she did, yes.

-So the smoke from the open fires has discoloured the paint.

0:35:040:35:09

That can be taken off to reveal some depths of blue and red on the fins

0:35:090:35:15

and they will look entirely different.

0:35:150:35:17

But these are sought-after pictures.

0:35:170:35:20

To have a pair is wonderful. They can be put in each recess of the fireplace.

0:35:200:35:25

In a symmetrical room. So these are quite nice.

0:35:250:35:28

He does achieve good prices.

0:35:280:35:30

I'm going to project a price for the pair

0:35:300:35:34

of about 200 to £400.

0:35:340:35:36

That sort of price range. If you get up to £500, I'll jump with joy!

0:35:360:35:41

For a reserve, we need to put £200 on them.

0:35:410:35:44

-OK.

-I'd hate to see them go for less.

0:35:440:35:46

-Are you agreeable to that?

-Yes, that's fine.

0:35:460:35:49

-They belonged to a friend. No regrets about parting with them?

-No. She wanted me to sell them.

0:35:490:35:55

Well, I'll be there at the auction, batting for you. So fingers crossed!

0:35:550:36:01

Thank you!

0:36:010:36:03

I look forward to seeing David jumping for joy!

0:36:030:36:06

And here's my chance. We're off to auction.

0:36:060:36:09

Here's what David and Kate think of our items.

0:36:090:36:11

I can't say I really like Troika.

0:36:110:36:14

But I'm sure this is going to make a fortune for Sandra.

0:36:140:36:17

I think Bobby's two books will do really well.

0:36:190:36:21

I've put 150 to £200.

0:36:210:36:24

I hope the buyer doesn't split them up. Fingers crossed for sale day.

0:36:240:36:28

The only fish I like is fish on a plate, disguised in batter, surrounded by chips!

0:36:280:36:33

But I think Beryl's fish are going to make more than we anticipate.

0:36:330:36:38

We're selling our items at Reeman Dansie in Colchester.

0:36:440:36:47

Our auctioneer today is James Grinter.

0:36:470:36:49

If you'd like to take part in Flog It, come along to one of our valuation days.

0:36:490:36:55

Details are on the BBC website. Log on to...

0:36:550:37:00

Follow the links. All the details and information are there

0:37:000:37:03

about coming dates and venues.

0:37:030:37:05

First up are Sandra's two Troika pieces.

0:37:050:37:07

David gave them a total value of 290 to £560.

0:37:070:37:12

On closer inspection of damage, our auctioneers advised reducing that to 250 to £350.

0:37:120:37:19

-You paid what, £15 for these?

-About 15 to £17.

0:37:190:37:23

Hopefully we can turn it into 300 quid and you can go back to Cornwall!

0:37:230:37:27

-Turkey!

-Yeah!

-Turkey?! Cornwall! Cornwall!

0:37:270:37:32

-You won't get that tan in Cornwall!

-You will! Oh, you will!

0:37:320:37:35

-If it isn't raining.

-If it's not raining!

0:37:350:37:38

The Troika Aztec mask pottery ornament.

0:37:400:37:44

And the Troika roundel vase.

0:37:440:37:46

Two vases. What do you say for these?

0:37:460:37:48

£200 to start me? £200 start me for the Troika.

0:37:480:37:51

Two is bid on there. At £200 bid now. At 200.

0:37:520:37:56

£200. 210. 220.

0:37:560:37:58

There we are, look!

0:37:580:38:00

220. 230. 240.

0:38:000:38:03

At 240 down here now. 250.

0:38:030:38:05

260. 260 is bid now. At 260.

0:38:050:38:09

-Come on!

-260 is bid.

0:38:090:38:10

270. 280.

0:38:100:38:12

At 280 in the room now. At 280. 290.

0:38:120:38:15

-300.

-That's good, Sandra.

0:38:150:38:17

£300 in the room now. 300. 320.

0:38:170:38:19

340.

0:38:190:38:20

At 340 in the room now. At 340.

0:38:200:38:22

At 340 in the room. 360.

0:38:220:38:25

380. At 380.

0:38:250:38:27

Back in the room now at 380.

0:38:270:38:29

380 back in the room. Against you on the internet. 400. £400.

0:38:290:38:34

-Excellent!

-On the internet now. 420 another place.

0:38:340:38:37

James, well done. He's doing a proper job!

0:38:370:38:40

Against you on the internet. At £420 in the room. Final warning now.

0:38:400:38:45

I'm going to sell it. All done now at 420.

0:38:450:38:48

Come on, my 'andsome! £420! Brilliant. Well done!

0:38:480:38:52

That is a holiday if you want to go to Cornwall for a weekend.

0:38:520:38:56

I think it's more a day out with the grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

0:38:560:39:00

OK. How many grandchildren?

0:39:000:39:03

-Three grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

-Wow!

0:39:030:39:06

Well, even with all that lot, the Troikas pulled in enough to go round the whole family!

0:39:060:39:11

We might need a prayer for this next item. Bobby's sermon book and the county maps.

0:39:120:39:17

I wondered if the auctioneer might split them, but he's kept them together.

0:39:190:39:23

-One will help sell the other.

-Yes.

-150 to £200.

0:39:230:39:26

Why are you selling now?

0:39:260:39:28

-We came to Flog It for the valuation and thought, "Yes..."

-Got carried away!

0:39:280:39:35

-I pounced on you!

-Got swept up in the moment!

-Flog it!

0:39:350:39:39

That's what it's all about. We're here to flog it! Here it is.

0:39:390:39:43

The parliamentary sermon book, The Saints Treasury, 1654.

0:39:430:39:49

And another one, County Maps, as well.

0:39:490:39:52

Quite a lot of interest. I start the bidding with me at £220 with me.

0:39:520:39:57

At £220 with me now. 220.

0:39:570:40:01

230?

0:40:010:40:02

At £220 with me now. At 220. Do I see 230 anywhere?

0:40:020:40:07

At £220. A maiden bid. All done?

0:40:070:40:10

The road to success were the maps.

0:40:100:40:12

-Brilliant.

-Well done.

-Thank you.

0:40:120:40:15

-There's commission to pay, but enjoy that money.

-Yes!

0:40:150:40:18

-Thanks for bringing it in. Well done.

-That was a great result!

-Straight in!

-Great!

0:40:180:40:22

-I thought we might be stuck, but we weren't.

-There was a bit of damage, but it didn't apply.

0:40:220:40:29

-It was fine.

-Enjoy the money!

-I will do. Thank you very much.

0:40:290:40:33

What a good result!

0:40:330:40:35

On to our final item of the day, Beryl's pair of Roland Knight fish paintings.

0:40:350:40:39

-Beryl, good to see you. These came from a little cottage.

-Yes.

0:40:430:40:46

They do have that country house look, don't they?

0:40:460:40:50

A perch and a pike.

0:40:500:40:52

200 to £400. Why are you selling these?

0:40:520:40:54

-I don't really like them.

-No.

0:40:540:40:58

-My friend who gave them to me asked me to sell them.

-Sell them.

0:40:580:41:02

-"Get a bit of money for yourself."

-It's that nasty pike!

0:41:020:41:05

I don't mind the perch. I've caught perch but never pike.

0:41:050:41:08

-They have a nice naive quality about them.

-They do.

0:41:080:41:12

-I can see these all cleaned up in a study.

-They need a clean. They're dull.

0:41:120:41:16

Good luck. It's a pair. £200. That's no money, is it?

0:41:160:41:21

Let's see what the bidders think.

0:41:210:41:23

The Roland Knight, a pair of oils.

0:41:260:41:28

Fishing catches here.

0:41:280:41:30

I have two commissions with me and I start the bidding

0:41:300:41:34

-at £220.

-That's great!

-230.

0:41:340:41:38

240. 250. 260. 270.

0:41:380:41:41

280. 290. 300. 320.

0:41:410:41:45

320 in the room, now. £320 bid. 340.

0:41:480:41:51

360. 380. 400.

0:41:510:41:54

420. 440.

0:41:540:41:56

460. 480. 500.

0:41:560:41:58

At £500. Back of the room.

0:42:000:42:02

£500. 520 on the internet.

0:42:020:42:05

-520!

-540.

0:42:050:42:06

-540 in the room.

-540, Beryl!

0:42:060:42:09

560.

0:42:090:42:10

580.

0:42:100:42:12

At 580 still in the room.

0:42:120:42:13

-600.

-600!

-£600.

0:42:130:42:16

On the internet, against you all.

0:42:160:42:19

All done now at £600.

0:42:190:42:21

-What a big catch! Hey! £600.

-That was good!

-What a surprise!

0:42:210:42:26

Wasn't that a surprise! I was expecting around 250. Something like that.

0:42:260:42:30

-You've got to be over the moon.

-Absolutely thrilled.

0:42:300:42:34

-Commission here is 15% plus VAT.

-OK, that's fine.

0:42:340:42:37

-Brilliant!

-What will you put that money towards?

0:42:370:42:41

A flight to Thailand.

0:42:410:42:42

-Thailand? Why?

-My son lives there.

0:42:420:42:46

-Right. OK. Oh, bless you!

-I'll go and see him. Brilliant.

0:42:460:42:50

-When was the last time you saw him?

-In the summer.

-Oh, great.

0:42:500:42:54

-Thank you for bringing them in.

-Thank you!

0:42:540:42:56

Thank you so much.

0:42:560:42:59

That's it. Sadly, the end of our show.

0:43:060:43:08

Another day in another auction room.

0:43:080:43:10

The sale is still going on,

0:43:100:43:12

but it's all over for our owners. They've gone home with smiles on their faces.

0:43:120:43:16

I hope you're smiling. Hope you enjoyed the show as much as we have.

0:43:160:43:21

So till the next time, it's cheerio. I can put my feet up now!

0:43:210:43:25

Have a rest!

0:43:250:43:27

What a day!

0:43:270:43:29

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:500:43:53

Paul Martin visits Colchester with experts Kate Bateman and David Barby to offer expert valuations to the crowd gathering at the town hall.

David nets a pair of fish paintings, while Kate finds two Clarice Cliff items - but which is her favourite, and which will be worth the most at auction?

Paul visits a stately home that is being brought back to life after 90 years of neglect thanks to a group of local campaigners.