Cheltenham Flog It!


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Cheltenham

Paul Martin and the team are at the Pittville Pump Room, Cheltenham. Adam Partridge fancies a 19th-century Italian charger, and David Fletcher spots a 60s Formica table.


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Transcript


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This magnificent sun-kissed architectural delight is our venue for today's show.

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It is the Pittville Pump Room. Can you guess where we are? Yes - Cheltenham.

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Well, we have a spectacular venue today. A massive great big crowd,

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hopefully exciting times ahead.

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This crowd have come to have their antiques and collectables valued

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and hopefully get a small fortune.

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Our experts are led by Mr Adam Partridge and Mr David Fletcher.

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Hopefully, somebody today is going home with an awful lot of money. Stay tuned.

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-Right now it's time to get the doors open and let everybody in. Are you ready to go in?

-Yay!

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'Coming up on today's programme: Andrea shows me a little something that leaves me lost for words.'

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Oh, oh, oh.

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'David Fletcher puts me on the spot.'

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-How are you on botany?

-Not very good.

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-'And Adam Partridge tells it how it is.'

-I thought you'd say, "Rubbish!"

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Well, I've got news - rubbish.

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'Or is it? Find out later.

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'Our eager Cheltenham crowds are pouring in with their boxes and bags, packed full of treasure.

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'And our Flog It experts are ready and waiting to see what the first valuation will be.

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'Over at Adam's table, Mary wants to find out more about her silver trinkets.'

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-Mary, welcome to Flog It.

-Thank you.

-What can you tell us about this?

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-The box I bought in the '80s.

-Right.

-Cotswolds.

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It has been used for snuff, but it isn't a snuff box. I think it's far too small.

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And the brooches, I can't remember exactly where I got them,

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-but I used to go to a lot of fairs.

-Right.

-So I would assume that they came from...

-Picked up.

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-On the travels.

-And you're not likely to wear them any more?

-No.

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They've been in a drawer now for a long time.

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They're lovely little things. I presume it's not a space issue.

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-Why bring them in to Flog It?

-Well, I'd often wondered about the box and whether it had any age.

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-Yeah?

-And I couldn't find a silver mark on them anywhere I looked.

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So I thought, "Right, I'll bring it in and see what people say."

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I think it's probably a pill box.

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-Yes, yes.

-Although not many pills.

-Little ones.

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And on the bottom there we've got this 925 mark there.

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-And import marks there. How old do you think this is?

-It was implied it has a little age.

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Maybe not loads,

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-but certainly I would imagine... I would have understood it to be about 70 or 80 years.

-Right.

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-When did you buy it?

-You're going to surprise me now!

-When did you buy it?

-The '80s.

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The import mark on it is for 1979.

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-Good Lord!

-Did you pay a lot for it?

-Well, I suppose at the time it was fair.

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-I paid £40.

-Right. Well, it could have been worse.

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It's 925, sterling standard. A traditional hallmark on this typical Victorian brooch.

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-Inlaid with little pieces of yellow and rose gold.

-Pretty.

-Isn't it?

-I do like that.

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That's the standard model there. This one's dated 1885.

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-Lovely.

-So that's your oldest by some distance.

-Yes.

-Although that's also Victorian.

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-Are you happy to flog them?

-Yes, I am.

-I'm glad to hear that.

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If we were to break them down into lots, we'd get 30 or 40 there,

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-maybe 20 there and not an awful lot there.

-No.

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-So I would suggest one lot with a conservative guide price of £40-£60.

-OK, yeah.

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Would you rather have them back? Should we put a reserve on? Maybe a £40 reserve?

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Or do you just want to take your chance on the day?

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-Are you a risk taker, Mary?

-I'll go for it.

-No reserve? Trust in the sale room?

-Yes!

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-OK, that's much more exciting.

-Life on the edge!

-It is!

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'Any trip to the auction room can be a real gamble, but will it pay off for Mary?

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'Stay tuned to find out.

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'Over on the other side of the hall, I've found a real beauty.'

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-Angela, thank you for coming in.

-Welcome.

-I know what you've got is very precious and incredibly small.

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-Can you guess what it is? It's not in your pocket, is it?

-No.

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-It's not wrapped up in a bag.

-No.

-Come on, show me.

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-That's a sparkler, isn't it?

-It is. Beautiful.

-Who gave you that?

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I bought it several years ago.

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I wore it to lots of lovely functions which we don't go to any more.

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It sits in a box and I get it out occasionally, then put it back.

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-And get dazzled by it!

-Absolutely.

-It must be so nice to wear it

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-and watch everybody go, "Oh! Oh! Oh!"

-That's right, yeah.

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-When you're signing a cheque. "Ooh!"

-The problem is it's an old cut diamond and youngsters...

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-The cut is quite important.

-Yes.

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-It's the cut, the clarity, the colour. My wife likes diamonds raised and mounted up.

-As I do.

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The light goes underneath them and it sparkles even more. A fine stone.

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-And the centre diamond looks like a 4-carat.

-Something like that, yes.

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And the others are three. My gut feeling is that's a four grand ring.

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Now, in auction, maybe a little bit more.

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Once a jeweller gets his hands on that, resets it,

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it might be eight grand or a £9,000 ring.

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Where are you going to buy diamonds like that on a ring for £4,000?

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But you're not going to get eight for it on the open market.

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If Philip gets this photographed and on his website, alerts everybody, this will create a buzz

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-and a sparkle in the room.

-Lovely.

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Let's call the valuation £4,000 with a reserve at £4,000.

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I'd like to see you going home with £4,000,

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-hopefully a little bit more.

-Right, OK. That's lovely.

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-Are you happy?

-Yes, thank you.

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'What a stunning ring!

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'Now David Fletcher is with Marion, who has brought in something a bit more weighty.'

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-Hello, Marion.

-Hello.

-You've brought me a silver punch bowl.

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-I thought it was a fruit bowl.

-I think it probably is a fruit bowl.

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A punch bowl normally has more clearly defined indentations where you hang the spoon, the ladle.

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It's in the form of a Chinese ceramic bowl.

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It's based upon one of those lotus head bowls that were exported from China in the 18th century.

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And, as so often happens, once again China has come up with the design influence

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that's been interpreted in an entirely different medium.

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Tell me how you came by it.

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-I bought it in a boot sale.

-You'll tell me what you paid for it?

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-Yes.

-And what did you pay for it?

-£5.

-OK. And it was black?

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-It was.

-These things are always black when people find them in car boot sales.

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-The person who sold it had no idea it was silver?

-I doubt it.

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They were silly. All they had to do was look at the hallmark. There it is - a socking great one.

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And it's very clear. The crown, which tells us it was assayed in Sheffield.

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And the date letter, a capital U, which tells us it was made or at least assayed

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in 1937. And it was made by M&W. Who do you think that stands for?

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-Maplin and Webb?

-Mappin and Webb. Not Maplin and Webb.

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That was the holiday camp in Hi-De-Hi, Maplin's, wasn't it?

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So the mark's very clear. It's there for us all to see.

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It's not in 100% good condition, but it's not bad. More importantly,

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it's been engraved. And that will put some people off.

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This particular bowl was originally awarded as a prize by the Gloucester Area CSSA

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Horticultural and Handicrafts Show. And it's a very nice thing.

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And it's worth quite a lot of money, really. Certainly more than £5.

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-Have you any idea how much it might be worth?

-Not really. That's why I brought it.

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-Good answer. I think we'll make you a smallish profit on this.

-Good.

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Because, in my opinion, and I have had the weight checked - it comes in at 50 ounces.

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-So even at £10 an ounce, it's going to be worth 500 quid.

-Wow!

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OK? And I hope it'll make a bit more. So could we put an estimate of £500-£800 on it?

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-Yeah, that'd be great.

-And a reserve of 500.

-Lovely.

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So that was a good find. I'd say to anyone at a car boot sale,

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if you've got something you think might be silver, just clean it and make sure

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-before Marion turns up.

-Don't tell them that!

-All right, OK! Good point!

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'That bowl certainly scrubbed up well! We'll find out in a moment if buyers take a shine to it.'

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Well, it's all going on down there, hundreds of people enjoying themselves,

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and our crews working flat out. But we are halfway through our day and have our first batch of items.

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This is where it gets exciting - my favourite part of the show.

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It's not an exact science. Don't go away - there could be big surprises.

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We're going over to Malvern to see Mr Philip Serrell. Here's a quick recap of what we're taking and why.

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It's only three little pieces of silver from Mary and I don't think they'll break any records,

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but she's taken the gamble with no reserve and I hope it pays off for her.

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What would you pay for it? I think £4,000 is a good starting point.

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It's now up to Philip Serrell.

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This particular piece of silver would look great on your sideboard.

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I think it'll do well and I'm confident we'll get £500.

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Right, it's all now down to the bidders and, judging by the car park, it's going to be pretty full.

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Today we're in Malvern and some of you may even recognise today's auctioneer.

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Are you bidding, sir? There's a nice sale. 110 and done.

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'Philip's sale room is buzzing as our owners and experts wait nervously in the wings.

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'Commission here is 16.5% plus VAT.

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'The auction is well underway and first up is Mary with expert Adam Partridge.'

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-Two silver brooches and one little tiny pill box.

-And no reserve.

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-I don't think there's any cause for concern, Mary.

-No.

-You like to take a gamble.

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-Absolutely. As we said before, live on the edge a bit.

-That's right.

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-This is really living on the edge.

-It is, isn't it?

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As you see it catalogued, the brooches.

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£20 to start me? 20 I'm bid.

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-30 bid. £30. At 35.

-Come on. Let's see sort of 50.

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-At £35.

-35.

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-40. 40 bid.

-40.

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-We're on the bottom end.

-At 45. 50, is it?

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50. 5.

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55. 60?

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-60 bid. At £60, then. At 60.

-Well done, top end.

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-At £60.

-That's very cool.

-Done.

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-That is cool. Well done, Adam.

-I'm feeling pretty cool.

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'Top end of the estimate. What a good start.

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'On the auction preview, I had a chat with Philip Serrell

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'who had some things to say about that diamond ring.'

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I did this valuation. Andrea's five-stone diamond ring. I loved it.

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We talked about not being raised-mounted. It's dated.

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-I think whoever buys this will remount them.

-You're spot on in all respects.

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I think it's a very dated Victorian mount.

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-She knows that.

-The stones are lovely quality. I took this to a very good friend

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-who is a jewellery specialist and he catalogued it for me.

-Yeah.

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I also got my jewellery consultant to have a look at it

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and both of their views are that it's around £3,500, sort of £3,000-£3,500.

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So I spoke to the vendor. I know that she wanted £4,000.

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-I said to her, "Your reserve..."

-She was adamant she wanted £4,000.

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"Your reserve is what you think it'll make." A lot of people confuse an estimate with a reserve.

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An estimate is what you hope it'll make. A reserve is a price below which you won't sell it.

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I said, "If you want to sell this, you should lower your reserve."

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So we had a long chat and let her think about it and she's come back with a reserve of £3,200.

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-I'm happy with that.

-I think we'll get it away at 3,200.

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-We'll probably both be proved ridiculously wrong!

-We just need two people to fall in love with it.

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-It's a lovely thing.

-Good.

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'It's now time to put it to the test.'

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let's see if we can make this sale room sparkle. Going under the hammer is Andrea's lovely diamond ring.

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-It is a bit of a whopper.

-It is.

-You're happy with the new reserve, a fixed reserve of £3,200.

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-We'll see what happens.

-OK.

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A big smile! Your smile is sparkly enough! Let's find out what bidders think.

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This lovely five-stone ring.

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Bid me £3,500, chaps.

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Bid me £3,000. Two and a half.

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£2,500 I am bid. At £2,500.

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£2,550.

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2,600. 2,650.

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2,700.

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2,700. 50 anywhere? 2,750.

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2,800. 850. 2,900?

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£2,900.

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2,950. 3,000 I have.

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At 3,000. 3,100.

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-Nearly at the reserve.

-3,100.

-It's so close.

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All out, 3,200 the book. At 3,200. Is there any more?

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The book's in, you're all out at £3,200. Any more?

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-At £3,200 and done, then. At 3,200.

-He's selling.

-Thank you.

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-It's gone on the reserve.

-Right.

-Happy?

-Yes.

-It's gone.

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It's better to have gone at £3,200 than struggled at £3,500.

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-You'd be taking it home.

-Yes.

-For the sake of £300.

-That's true.

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-And that is a lot of money still.

-Oh, it'll go a long way, yes.

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That was close, wasn't it? Some of them are close. You are living on a knife edge.

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You certainly are.

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'I think that reached a fair auction value.

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'Next we've got Marion's silver bowl.'

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There's a lot of silver there with a value of £500-£800.

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Unfortunately, we do not have Marion. She's not well today, so get well soon!

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Now, David, lots of silver and hopefully we'll sell this.

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-You know you go away and think, "Did I over pot that?"

-Happens to me all the time!

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I'm a bit concerned I might have done. Also that it's not a lotus blossom. How are you on botany?

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-I'm not very good!

-I wonder if it might be a lily. I might have made that error.

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Oh, look, good luck. That's all I can say. We're only doing our best. Here goes.

0:17:130:17:19

The large, Mappin and Webb 49-ounce bowl.

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400 I'm bid. At 400. 410. 420.

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430. 440. 450. 460. 470.

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480. 490. 500.

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520.

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550.

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550 and the internet's out. £550. 580.

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At £600. In the room at 600. The contraption's out.

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620. 650.

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At 650.

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At £650.

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And I sell, then, at 650 and done. Thank you.

0:18:030:18:08

-Well done. That's mid-estimate.

-And it doesn't matter if it's a water lily or it's not.

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Not any more!

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'What a great profit for Marion on the £5 she spent at the car boot sale.

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'That's it for our first trip to the auction. We'll be back later,

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'but first I want to tell you about some strange happenings back in Cheltenham's past.'

0:18:250:18:31

In Victorian times, Cheltenham was a magnet for people in search of a cure. Many would flock here

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just to take the waters, hoping it would be good for their health.

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But it was also a time when people were after more spiritual cures.

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This was the place to come to indulge in more unorthodox treatment.

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In the mid-1800s, there was a growing fascination with seances,

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where spirits could, apparently, be summoned from the dead.

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They might be held in private rooms or in packed theatres.

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Here in Cheltenham, one man realised that many of these so-called spirit raisers were fakes

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and he made it his mission to lift the veil on their activities.

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In doing so, he became one of the most respected illusionists of his time.

0:19:230:19:29

John Nevil Maskelyne was born in one of the poorest parts of Cheltenham back in 1839.

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He trained as a watchmaker and had an interest in mechanical devices and science.

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And he was a keen amateur conjuror.

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But a visit to the theatre was about to change his life forever.

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It all started in 1865 when he went to see the American Davenport Brothers' spirit cabinet act.

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It was staged in semi-darkness in the town hall

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and it involved the Davenport Brothers being tied up by two members of the audience

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in a big wooden crate, which was locked. As the act got underway, the audience heard strange noises,

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music being played, hands waving, apparently from ghosts they'd summoned. At the end of the act,

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members of the audience would undo the crate and there were the brothers,

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still tied to a chair.

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Maskelyne watched the show intently. He was convinced that their act was a magic trick

0:20:280:20:34

and not spiritualism. And he worked out how they'd done it.

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He then staged an open-air show in Cheltenham before a huge crowd.

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He and his friend George Cooke went out to perform the same trick

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without any supernatural powers.

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Maskelyne's exposure of the Davenports soon made him more famous than the brothers themselves.

0:20:530:20:59

He and George Cooke toured the country with their act.

0:20:590:21:03

He knew how to draw in a crowd and he really took to being a showman.

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Inspired by the acclaim they received in Cheltenham,

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Maskelyne and Cooke turned to magic as a profession, becoming well-established,

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performing at the Crystal Palace before royalty. And in 1873 they took on a lease of part

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of the famous Egyptian Hall in Piccadilly.

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They remained there in residence for 30 years. Maskelyne used his scientific knowledge

0:21:270:21:33

to create even more mind-boggling tricks.

0:21:330:21:37

He developed his acts to include levitation, using carefully-constructed pulleys

0:21:370:21:42

to raise his wife high onstage

0:21:420:21:45

before astonished audiences.

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When his partner, George Cooke, died in 1905,

0:21:470:21:51

Maskelyne started a partnership with David Devant, who became a founder of the Magic Circle.

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Their headquarters in London still houses some of Maskelyne's stage equipment,

0:21:590:22:04

including a lifelike waxwork model of George Cooke's head,

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used in a stage illusion in which he appeared to be decapitated.

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It was an extraordinary time, a world rapidly changing.

0:22:130:22:17

Photography was in the hands of very few people, the motor car was seen on the street for the first time

0:22:170:22:23

and people were willing to believe absolutely anything.

0:22:230:22:27

Maskelyne didn't like the idea, though, of people being tricked.

0:22:270:22:32

That's why he spent so much time exposing fake spirit raisers like the Davenport Brothers.

0:22:320:22:38

Sue Rowbotham from the Cheltenham History Society has studied his life and work.

0:22:380:22:44

Sum up, in your opinion, Maskelyne's legacy.

0:22:440:22:47

Maskelyne's been called the father of modern magic. He took scientific principles,

0:22:470:22:53

physics, optics, that sort of thing and made it into a show,

0:22:530:22:58

but he never claimed it to be other than an illusion.

0:22:580:23:01

He and his family were all inventors and they actually took out more than 40 patents between them.

0:23:010:23:09

So they were not just performers. They were scientists, in one form or another.

0:23:090:23:15

What was the public's reaction when Maskelyne exposed the Davenports.

0:23:150:23:19

There was a lot of excitement locally. "Local boy made good".

0:23:190:23:24

But gradually the fame spread.

0:23:240:23:27

Their shows were reported all over the country as they travelled.

0:23:270:23:32

It started to make people think

0:23:320:23:35

because it was all too easy to go to a show and just believe it.

0:23:350:23:39

More and more people were thinking about the science behind it and questioning it.

0:23:390:23:45

Yeah. So I guess in a way he created his own free publicity

0:23:450:23:49

-by dispelling the myth.

-Absolutely.

-Getting his name known.

-Yes.

-Making his own act.

0:23:490:23:55

He actually did publicise himself as an anti-spiritualist throughout his career.

0:23:550:24:02

Was this then the turning point for spiritual acts to sort of, shall I say disappear?

0:24:020:24:08

-No, they didn't. They fought back.

-Did they?

-So there were fights in the papers

0:24:080:24:14

and Maskelyne published books

0:24:140:24:17

and then there were books published in response to that.

0:24:170:24:22

So it carried on for years.

0:24:220:24:24

Maskelyne's fame and influence continued to grow. In 1914, he founded The Occult Committee,

0:24:250:24:32

whose remit was to investigate claims to supernatural power and expose fraud.

0:24:320:24:39

John Nevil Maskelyne died in 1917. He was at the dawn of a new era

0:24:390:24:43

where science, not superstition, started to explain the world.

0:24:430:24:47

He didn't travel much out of the UK, so he wasn't internationally known, but he did inspire many people,

0:24:470:24:54

including Harry Houdini, who followed in his footsteps.

0:24:540:24:58

Maskelyne even started a dynasty of illusionists with two sons and three grandchildren in the profession.

0:24:580:25:04

Today the name Maskelyne is renowned worldwide among magicians.

0:25:040:25:08

Hello!

0:25:220:25:23

'We're at the Pittville Pump Room and the eager crowds are keeping us busy

0:25:230:25:28

'with all manner of exciting objects.

0:25:280:25:32

'Let's join David Fletcher who has met up with Sybil and Derek,

0:25:320:25:36

'who are keen to find out more about their oil painting.'

0:25:360:25:40

The artist's name - Arthur H Rigg. It's not known to me.

0:25:400:25:45

-What can you tell me about him?

-Well, I've had a quick look on the internet

0:25:450:25:51

-and I believe he was born in Bradford. I know he died in 1927.

-Yes.

0:25:510:25:58

He was a professional painter and I understand he exhibited

0:25:580:26:02

-in many of the large art galleries.

-Right.

0:26:020:26:06

I've looked him up and done a bit of homework. I can't find him in the Yorkshire records.

0:26:060:26:12

Let's think about what we know.

0:26:120:26:15

A typical late-Victorian, early-20th century picture.

0:26:150:26:20

-Sort of romantic, but a little bit gloomy.

-Yes.

0:26:200:26:23

I sense that Arthur Rigg was a good artist,

0:26:230:26:28

but hasn't probably put on his best show on this particular occasion.

0:26:280:26:32

-It's just a little bit boring, isn't it? I hate to be critical...

-Yes, yes.

0:26:320:26:39

We've got these two trees, a hazy autumnal colour here.

0:26:390:26:43

-A mallard flying across there.

-Yes.

-It almost needs something else, doesn't it?

0:26:430:26:49

I think it could do with a couple of birds going into the distance, just to liven it up a little bit.

0:26:490:26:56

-You weren't tempted to get your paintbrush out?

-Yes, I was!

0:26:560:27:00

Anyway, you haven't painted those two birds. Just as well, really.

0:27:000:27:04

-It does need a bit of life. It needs a figure, maybe.

-Yes.

0:27:040:27:08

That would just give it a bit more oomph and a little more interest,

0:27:080:27:12

but he wasn't a bad artist. It's competently painted.

0:27:120:27:16

It's suffered a bit.

0:27:160:27:18

-I've had a little look behind and you can see some damage...

-Yes.

-..verified by some bits of tape

0:27:180:27:25

-stuck on behind. Have you had it hanging up in your house?

-Oh, yes.

0:27:250:27:30

-We love the picture, actually.

-Yes.

-I bought it 45, 46 years ago.

-Right.

0:27:300:27:36

-I think it cost me... It could have been £23 or £25.

-Right.

0:27:360:27:41

If you like it, why sell it? It's an obvious question to ask.

0:27:410:27:45

There comes a time, I think, when you want to move a few things on

0:27:450:27:49

to replace them with something else you might like.

0:27:490:27:53

Given that you're not really concerned about its future

0:27:530:27:58

beyond obviously making sure that we do as much as we can for you,

0:27:580:28:03

-I would have thought an estimate of £100-£150.

-Yes.

0:28:030:28:07

And, you know, put a reserve in somewhere below that, ideally £90.

0:28:070:28:12

But with the important proviso that if we've done some homework

0:28:120:28:16

and we find out it's worth a lot more than that, we have a chat.

0:28:160:28:21

I don't want to let you down and I don't want to embarrass myself,

0:28:210:28:26

-which I do often enough.

-I'm quite happy with that. Absolutely.

0:28:260:28:32

-We'll do our best for you and I'll see you at the sale.

-Thank you.

0:28:320:28:37

'We'll find out later on if David discovers anything.

0:28:370:28:42

'Over at Adam's table, Cath's brought in a charger which has seen better days.'

0:28:420:28:48

-Nice to see you coming along with this great big plate in several pieces.

-I know!

-Spoiling us!

0:28:480:28:54

-I am!

-Where did you get it from?

-It was given to my husband.

0:28:540:28:58

-There was a pub opposite us being demolished.

-Where's that?

-This was in Gloucester.

0:28:580:29:04

It was going in the skip, so my husband took it. It's been on top of our wardrobe ever since.

0:29:040:29:11

-It is in a bit of a state.

-I know.

-Was it like that when he got it?

-It was.

0:29:110:29:16

-Which is why, I guess, it was heading for the skip.

-I think so.

0:29:160:29:21

-It would have been really nice.

-It would have been fantastic.

0:29:210:29:25

-It looks to us 19th-century Italian.

-Right.

0:29:250:29:29

A type of Majolica. Tin-glazed earthenware or Delft-ware to some.

0:29:290:29:35

-We've got a signature. M Rodrigue.

-That's right.

0:29:350:29:39

And we've got this Baroque style of an earlier period.

0:29:390:29:43

-So your husband decided to keep it.

-He did.

-What attracted him to it?

0:29:430:29:48

I don't know. He just thought it was old, that's why.

0:29:480:29:52

"Flog It's in town. I'll take along my big plate."

0:29:520:29:55

I thought you would say, "Rubbish." Out the door.

0:29:550:29:59

-Well, I've got news for you - rubbish.

-Yeah!

0:29:590:30:03

-Er, yes. You want to sell it. I suppose you just want it out the way?

-That's right.

0:30:040:30:10

-Would anyone be able to do anything with it?

-Yes.

-Oh, they would.

0:30:100:30:15

There's a few restorers who could turn that so you'd never know.

0:30:150:30:20

-That could be made good again, but it's a massive job.

-Yes.

-An expensive job.

0:30:200:30:25

Look at that. Just so you can see...

0:30:250:30:29

The fact that we've got these holes drilled in here also indicates that it's probably 19th century,

0:30:290:30:35

-rather than an earlier piece. Look at this repair!

-I know.

0:30:350:30:39

This was done a long time ago. Look at this old animal glue - brown, yucky brown glue.

0:30:390:30:46

-Right, down to the value.

-Right.

-It's a tricky thing to value.

0:30:460:30:50

-Most people say if it's damaged it's worth nothing.

-I would say!

0:30:500:30:55

-Estimate-wise, I'd put £100-£200 on it.

-Oh, that's a surprise!

0:30:560:31:00

-Well, it's a wide guide, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-Do you want to put a reserve on it? Would you have it back?

0:31:000:31:06

-I don't really want it back.

-Let's gamble and put it in. No reserve.

0:31:060:31:11

-That's right.

-But in that condition it's probably not going to be fortunes.

0:31:110:31:17

-What would you put that money towards?

-I'm a metal detectorist. I really need a new probe,

0:31:170:31:23

which is like a mini detector that you can get in the hole with.

0:31:230:31:27

-They're about £80, so...

-Well, this might just get you it.

-Yeah, it might do.

-Excellent.

0:31:270:31:35

'That's the second time today Adam's sent something off with no reserve, but will it pay off for Cath?

0:31:360:31:43

'Now for something slightly more modern. Michael is at David's table with a table.'

0:31:430:31:49

I think this is great.

0:31:490:31:51

We so rarely see this sort of thing on Flog It.

0:31:510:31:55

-When did you buy it?

-About 1968.

0:31:550:31:58

-'68. And you'd have bought it new.

-Bought it new, yes.

-OK.

0:31:580:32:02

And at that time, of course, the 1960s,

0:32:020:32:07

-this was the height of fashion.

-Yes, it must have been.

0:32:070:32:11

-Can you remember what you paid?

-I've no idea, no.

0:32:110:32:15

Pounds, shillings and pence.

0:32:150:32:18

Furniture like this was bought because it represented everything that was up to date, you know.

0:32:180:32:24

Pared down,

0:32:240:32:26

modern materials.

0:32:260:32:28

That's the most important thing of all. A Formica top and metal base.

0:32:280:32:33

-Apart from the decoration on top, that's it.

-Yes.

-There's no carving,

0:32:330:32:38

no inlay. All those sorts of things are just dispensed with.

0:32:380:32:43

-What I really like about this is the fact it's decorated by John Piper.

-Oh, yes.

0:32:430:32:49

Or at least after John Piper. He's probably one of Britain's greatest artists of the 20th century.

0:32:490:32:56

His life spanned the century, very nearly. He was famous in particular for his stained glass work

0:32:560:33:03

-at Coventry Cathedral.

-Yes.

-And for working with John Betjeman

0:33:030:33:07

-on the Shell motoring guides.

-Oh?

0:33:070:33:10

In, I think, the early 1950s. So he is a big name.

0:33:100:33:14

But I've never seen his work represented like this before.

0:33:140:33:19

It's curious, really. You have these amazing classical, baroque buildings.

0:33:190:33:26

They're all after Christopher Wren, I think. All Wren churches. This is St Paul's.

0:33:260:33:31

And they find themselves on this ultra-modern furniture.

0:33:310:33:36

As was so often the case in the 1960s, anything went.

0:33:360:33:40

You could mix and match and people loved it.

0:33:400:33:44

-I would have said it's going to make £100-£150.

-Yes.

0:33:440:33:48

-But I wouldn't want to sell it for less than £100.

-No.

0:33:480:33:53

-So would you be happy with a reserve of £100?

-Yes.

-OK.

0:33:530:33:57

-It only came out of the attic yesterday.

-You haven't been using it?

-It's been in the attic for 20 years.

0:33:570:34:03

-Oh, right. That's interesting.

-Knowing you were in town...

-You came along.

0:34:030:34:08

-OK, we'll go ahead on that basis.

-Thank you.

-I'll see you at the sale.

0:34:080:34:13

And that's our last item from Cheltenham. What a great day.

0:34:130:34:17

It's time to head back to the auction house in Malvern,

0:34:200:34:24

but let's have a quick reminder of why the experts rate these items.

0:34:240:34:29

The artist, Arthur Rigg, was a good artist,

0:34:290:34:32

but I don't want to get it wrong, so we're doing a little homework

0:34:320:34:37

and if I have underrated this picture, we'll let you know.

0:34:370:34:42

You probably think I'm mad taking on a plate like this, in several pieces,

0:34:420:34:47

but I'm quietly confident that we'll give Cath a nice surprise.

0:34:470:34:52

I really recommend you start thinking about buying furniture like this. Uber-cool.

0:34:520:34:57

Buy it now before it's too expensive.

0:34:570:35:01

Philip Serrell's sale room is bustling, but before the hammer goes down on our final lots,

0:35:020:35:08

I want to show you something that I came across on the preview day.

0:35:080:35:14

This has caught my eye today. A leather blackjack mug. A pint mug.

0:35:140:35:18

Typical of a tavern mug, made of Russian cowhide.

0:35:180:35:22

Rock hard over the years. And it takes on the patina of a lovely lump of oak.

0:35:220:35:29

But what I really love about this is you see a lot of leather blackjacks, some really quite big.

0:35:290:35:36

This one is catalogued at £80-£120 and Philip's put a "come and buy me" on this.

0:35:360:35:41

He knows it will probably fly away at 300 quid plus.

0:35:410:35:45

But this is quite an early 17th-century one.

0:35:450:35:49

If you look at these little trifoils around this rim, look,

0:35:490:35:53

that's so typical of the mid-17th century.

0:35:530:35:57

There would have been touch marks on the silver. That right there.

0:35:570:36:02

Somebody over the years has nibbled that off

0:36:020:36:06

and those touch marks have probably been sweated on to another piece of silver, something more desirable,

0:36:060:36:12

so they can make a bit more money. It devalues this a little bit.

0:36:120:36:17

The silver around the handle has been added in the 19th century. It's still 100 years old.

0:36:180:36:24

The colour's right and that is a lovely example of a tiny little pint leather blackjack mug.

0:36:240:36:30

And I think that will do £300-£400.

0:36:320:36:35

The auction is in full swing and first up we've got that lovely old oil painting.

0:36:400:36:46

-Sybil, Derek, hello.

-Hello.

-You took this off the wall.

0:36:480:36:53

-Yes!

-Absolutely.

-Is there now a gap on the wall?

-We need something else.

0:36:530:36:58

We did a bit of homework on Mr Rigg and I think the research rather bears out my estimate.

0:36:580:37:05

-We were happy with the valuation.

-Good.

-Let's find out if this lot are, shall we?

0:37:050:37:10

Arthur Rigg, oil on canvas, silver birch trees

0:37:120:37:16

with a pond and trees beyond.

0:37:160:37:19

Put it in the bidding, someone.

0:37:190:37:22

55 I'm bid. At 55.

0:37:220:37:24

At 55. And 60.

0:37:240:37:27

65. 70. And 5. 80.

0:37:270:37:30

And 5. 90. Book's out. At £90 only.

0:37:300:37:33

Any more, surely?

0:37:330:37:36

- Here's the bid. - Someone...

0:37:360:37:39

100. 10 now?

0:37:390:37:42

Have one more, sir.

0:37:420:37:44

At £100. And I sell then at £100. Done. Thank you.

0:37:450:37:51

-It's gone. A nice round figure. You're happy?

-Yes.

0:37:510:37:54

-That's £100 towards something else to fill that space.

-That's right.

-Good luck.

-Thank you.

0:37:540:38:00

'Let's hope they find something they love.

0:38:000:38:04

'Now it's Cath and her battered Victorian charger.'

0:38:040:38:08

So far, so good. Now a bit of classic Flog It recycling!

0:38:080:38:13

That's what antiques are all about. Especially when clearing out a pub.

0:38:130:38:18

-That's what you did.

-Correct. My husband...

-Dived in.

-..rescued it.

0:38:180:38:23

-A north Italian charger with a central portrait.

-One man's trash is another man's treasure.

0:38:230:38:29

-Do you know what the money's going to?

-No.

-If I went like this...

-Oh, yes, I do!

-Not hoovering.

0:38:290:38:36

-I've always fancied doing that. Have you done it?

-No. My dad did it on the beach in Cornwall.

0:38:360:38:42

-Let's have a Flog It field trip.

-Go metal detecting!

0:38:420:38:45

This north Italian charger, 19th century.

0:38:470:38:51

There we go. Bid me for that lot.

0:38:520:38:54

Bid me £100 to start me.

0:38:540:38:57

Bid me 100.

0:38:570:38:59

Bid me 50.

0:38:590:39:01

- It's here to go. - It's not going to go.

0:39:010:39:06

On the internet at 50. 50 bid. At £50 only.

0:39:060:39:09

My instructions are to sell. I've got £50 bid.

0:39:090:39:14

Who's got 5? At £50 only. At 50.

0:39:140:39:17

-Oh, come on.

-£50. I'll take 5 anywhere.

0:39:170:39:21

At £50.

0:39:210:39:23

Any more at all? The maiden bid will take it. At £50, done and sold.

0:39:230:39:27

At £50 and away.

0:39:270:39:30

-No reserve.

-That's fine.

0:39:300:39:33

It's £50 from nowhere. That's classic recycling. Someone will enjoy that.

0:39:330:39:38

-And you've done well.

-Yes.

-Something for nothing.

0:39:380:39:43

-And, as everybody says, the fun of the day.

-You can go back to that pub for a meal.

-It's all pulled down.

0:39:430:39:50

-You can go and detect the site.

-No, it's a housing estate now!

0:39:500:39:54

'If you dig up any more treasures, Cath, make sure you bring them in to show us.

0:39:560:40:02

'Now I've got my eye on that leather blackjack.'

0:40:020:40:06

It's just about to go under the hammer. Let's find out what the bidders make of it.

0:40:070:40:13

The antique leather and silver mounted leatherjack. There we are.

0:40:150:40:20

I think this is a lovely thing. Bids on the book start off at £180 bid.

0:40:200:40:26

190. 200.

0:40:260:40:28

210. 220. 230. 240.

0:40:280:40:30

250. 260. 270. 280. 290. 300.

0:40:300:40:35

310. 320. 330. At 330 on the book.

0:40:350:40:39

340.

0:40:390:40:41

In the room. You're out at 340.

0:40:410:40:45

At £340 and I sell, then, at 340 and done. Thank you.

0:40:450:40:50

Well, there you go. £340. A wonderful bit of history there.

0:40:500:40:54

If you've got something like that, bring it to a valuation day.

0:40:540:40:58

You can pick up up-and-coming dates and venues on out website. bbc.co.uk/flogit

0:40:580:41:04

Follow the links. All the information will be there.

0:41:040:41:07

Or check your local press. We want to see you.

0:41:070:41:11

'It's time for our final item of the day and it's Michael's John Piper-decorated table.'

0:41:120:41:18

-You bought this brand-new in 1968.

-That's right.

-And you've had it ever since.

-Yes.

0:41:200:41:26

He's got his money's worth.

0:41:260:41:28

-We talk about minimalism and the demise of brown furniture. This represents the future.

-It does.

0:41:280:41:35

There are over 150 lots of furniture in this sale and only one isn't made of wood.

0:41:350:41:41

Over the years, you get rid of all your brown furniture, but for some unknown reason I kept this.

0:41:410:41:48

-And you used it.

-And my son's used it. Then I had it back again, back up to the attic.

0:41:480:41:54

-Can you remember how much you paid?

-No, I can't.

0:41:540:41:57

I'm sure you'll make a healthy profit. We'll find out what it's worth right now. Here we go.

0:41:570:42:04

There you are. John Piper table. St Paul's and St Martin's.

0:42:040:42:08

£55 bid. At 55.

0:42:100:42:13

55. 55.

0:42:130:42:14

At 55. And 60. And 5.

0:42:140:42:17

70. And 5. 80. And 5. 90. And 5.

0:42:170:42:21

100. 110. 120.

0:42:210:42:23

130? One more, sir? 130.

0:42:230:42:26

140, thank you. At 140. 50 on the 'net bid. 150.

0:42:260:42:31

Here's the bid. 150. 160. 160.

0:42:310:42:35

Is there any more? At 160 bid.

0:42:350:42:38

170.

0:42:400:42:42

-180.

-Fresh legs.

-At £180.

0:42:420:42:45

180. At £180 in the room. Any more at all?

0:42:450:42:50

At £180 and I sell, in the room. And done then... 190.

0:42:500:42:55

Oh, yes! That was good.

0:42:550:42:58

At £200. At 200 in the room. The 'net's out. At £200. Any more?

0:42:580:43:02

At £200 and I sell, then.

0:43:020:43:05

At £200 and done. Thank you.

0:43:050:43:08

The hammer's gone down. £200. Top of that estimate. Well done.

0:43:080:43:12

That ticked all the right boxes - architecture and cathedrals.

0:43:120:43:16

-Someone's got a nice thing.

-They have. I hope they enjoy it.

-Good.

0:43:160:43:22

That's it. Another day in another auction room for our Flog It owners. Everyone's gone home happy.

0:43:270:43:33

I hope you've enjoyed the show. Do join me again soon. Cheerio.

0:43:330:43:38

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd - 2011

0:43:500:43:54

Email [email protected]

0:43:550:43:57

Paul Martin leads the team for a valuation day at the Pittville Pump Room in Cheltenham where he is joined by experts Adam Partridge and David Fletcher.

Adam likes the look of a 19th-century Italian charger, even though it is badly damaged. David spots a Formica table from the 60s which he thinks could be worth hundreds of pounds.

Meanwhile, Paul finds out about some rather mysterious goings-on which made a local clockmaker into a national celebrity.