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Winchester

Experts James Lewis and Christina Trevanion accompany Paul Martin to the Guildhall in Winchester, where they discover a mourning brooch with a curious past.


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Hello and welcome to the Guild Hall in the stunning city of Winchester, England's ancient capital.

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Today we're hoping to unearth some treasures from this massive queue!

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So come on, you lot! Are you ready to flog it?

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What a fabulous queue we've got here today, even if the weather is a little bit inclement.

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Here are our experts, Christina Trevanion and James Lewis, a font of knowledge!

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They've all come here to ask that all-important question:

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what's it worth? Exactly!

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Stay tuned because there will be one or two surprises today.

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Somebody will go home with a lot of money and they don't know it yet and it's our job to find it.

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So let's get the doors open and get the show on the road.

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'Coming up on today's programme: Rita introduces Christina to an old friend.'

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-What's her name?

-Fanny Tinker.

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'James goes down memory lane.'

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My thoughts go back to my grandfather telling me the stories of the navy.

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'And I go in search of the next generation of art stars.'

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Creative imagination!

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'So it's over to the valuation tables we go

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'and Christina's first off the starting block with Rita's exquisite pearl brooch.'

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-Is this a relative of yours?

-It was a relative of my husband.

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-Right, OK.

-It belonged initially to his great grandmother.

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So that would about tie in with the date.

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-Yes.

-We pretty much know exactly when it dates from. There's a nice date of 1853 on the back. Wonderful.

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-So it came down from your husband's grandmother?

-Yes.

-And do you know if she ever wore it?

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-No, I don't, no.

-And do you ever wear it?

-Not at all.

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What a shame! It's such a beautiful brooch. You've got this wonderful gold scroll around here.

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-A nice gold scroll border. Somebody mentioned you've had it tested as gold.

-I have.

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-And it looks like it's 18-carat.

-They didn't say it was 18-carat, just that it was gold.

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-OK.

-There's no hallmark on the back.

-That's absolutely right.

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That's not unusual for this sort of date. We wouldn't expect one.

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Oh, I expected it to have and I thought it may be pinchbeck, but it's tested as gold.

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-So we've got the nice gold border and then lovely freshwater seed pearls.

-Yes.

-Pearls, unfortunately,

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were supposed to symbolise tears in the Victorian era. Do you know if this was a mourning brooch?

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I don't know really very much about it at all.

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-If we look at the back, it gives us a little more information.

-Yes.

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There's a wonderful inscription and it tells us that this lady on the front was probably...

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-Fanny Tinker.

-And where did she live?

-Lower Broughton.

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-Do we know where Lower Broughton was?

-No, I thought it was in the suburbs of Manchester,

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-but I'm not sure about that.

-OK. We hope this is dear Fanny here.

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-And this is her in her prime of life because she looks quite healthy.

-She does.

-It's a beautiful brooch.

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It's a crime that it's not being worn and loved. I think at auction

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we'd probably be looking somewhere in the region of maybe £200-£300.

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-How does that sound to you?

-That's fine.

-If we put it forwards

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with an estimate of £200-£300 and hope somebody will wear it,

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we'll probably give it a reserve of about £200 on it

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-and hope we can find it a nice new home.

-That would be fine.

-Super.

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-And what will you put the money towards?

-I have a granddaughter getting married in June.

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-I thought it might go towards the flowers.

-A wonderful idea.

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-Huge congratulations. A good party to look forward to!

-Yes!

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That's wonderful news.

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'Let's hope Fanny Tinker manages to tickle someone's fancy when she goes up for auction.

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'On the other side of the room, it looks like Cecilia and Andy have commandeered James's table

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'with their maritime-themed pictures.'

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Thank you so much for bringing these wonderful little etchings into Flog It today.

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-They're great examples of a local artist's work.

-Yes.

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Tell me, are they family pieces or from a car boot sale...?

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-They are family pieces.

-They are?

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They belonged to my grandfather. He was a lieutenant in the Royal Navy.

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-Right.

-And we think he may have known Rowland Langmaid.

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Why do you think that? Tell me.

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We know that Langmaid was in Africa at some point.

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Also my grandfather was in Africa and he was arrested.

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-He used to go fairly brown when he was in the sun.

-Right.

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-He was arrested for being a black man drinking in a white man's bar.

-You're joking!

-It's true.

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-They had to send for his commander to prove he was actually white.

-No?!

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-Yes.

-He used to go so brown and with the white suit...

-Oh, how ridiculous!

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-What a comment on the times, eh?

-Yes.

-My grandfather was in the Royal Navy

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and that's why as soon as I see naval pictures, my thoughts go back to my grandfather, sitting with him

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telling me stories of the navy. And these are classic naval scenes.

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If you're looking at engravings and etchings that are marine subjects,

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-the first name that comes to mind is William Wyllie.

-That's right.

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But Langmaid was a pupil of his and worked under him.

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He was an official artist for the Royal Navy. He was a seaman in the First World War

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and was onboard HMS Agamemnon.

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He did a lot of the official sketches of the landing parties.

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Here we have a sailing ship in full sail and the little yachts at the front.

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-This scene here, is this a London scene?

-No, it's Portsmouth.

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I think it's called Leaving Portsmouth and that is the tower.

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-At Sally Port.

-At Sally Port.

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-This one is probably the best image.

-Yes.

-Luckily, it's also in the best condition.

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Here we've got a very serious water mark straight across the front.

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-I think this one is pretty much a goner.

-Yes.

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We almost ignore this one. Here we've got a little bit of foxing, a little water damage,

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but generally reasonable condition.

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-So I'm going to value them as a two, not a three.

-Yes.

-Yes.

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They make £50-£70 each, something like that.

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So if we put an estimate of £100-£150 on all three,

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-and we need to protect them with a reserve. £100?

-Yes.

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-The auctioneer has a bit of discretion, so if he gets 90, he'll still let them go.

-That's fine.

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Let's take them along and see how they do. It's the perfect place to sell them.

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'We'll be back to see if those Portsmouth prints make waves in just a moment.

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'Sticking with the maritime theme, as I dip into the queue and look at a rather rare artefact

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'that Dilys has brought along.'

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-I'm not sure if it's a ship's log or is it...

-A captain's journal?

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-Yeah.

-I don't think there are any latitudes or longitudes or any sailing destinations.

-No.

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-He's going through an inventory of guns here.

-That's right.

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-And the cannons.

-Yes.

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-And the names of personnel.

-Yes.

-I think this is absolutely fascinating, I really do.

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-I'd like to know more about it.

-Yes.

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-This needs a lot of research and a lot of looking at.

-It does.

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We need to start with the name of the vessel and the date.

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-The date is 1715.

-It's 1715.

-Definitely 1715.

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-It's not in a wonderful condition.

-It's in pretty good condition for its age.

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-The spine is in very good condition.

-Yes, that's true.

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-I shall take this away...

-Yes?

-..and let someone else have a quick look and we'll come back to you.

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We'll do a little bit of research and hopefully give you some news and put it into auction.

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'I'll be back to give Dilys's maritime journal a proper valuation a little late on in the show.

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'But first it looks like Christina has sniffed out a real gem

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'with Jennifer's silver snuff box.'

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-This is the most lovely silver snuff box you've brought in.

-Thank you.

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-Where has it come from?

-It comes from my father's side of the family.

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I inherited it when my mother passed away.

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I believe it belonged to my grandmother, who was widowed very young with three small children.

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-She later met somebody else and I think this belonged to him.

-Right.

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-Sadly, he passed away before they got married.

-Well, the box itself

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is a little bit of a mystery. If we look on the cover,

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it says, "Presented to Horace Hague, Head Warden 'A' Group, Doncaster Civil Defence,

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-"by his colleagues, 19th July, 1945."

-Yes.

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-Do we know who Horace Hague was?

-I think it was this gentleman.

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-So he was held in very high regard by his colleagues.

-I think so.

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-But 1945 is slightly misleading.

-It is.

-If we look on the inside,

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being silver, if we open it up,

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we've got the most wonderful hallmark for Birmingham.

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We've got the anchor. We've also got a date letter.

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-In this case it's a capital D, which is indicative of 1852.

-Yes.

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And we've also got the maker's initials - ES. That's actually Edward Smith.

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He was registered in 1826

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and he went through to about 1863.

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-So that fits in perfectly with our 1852 date.

-Yes.

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He was known for making what we call small works - little boxes, vinaigrettes -

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so slightly confusing that we've got quite a late inscription on what is a very Victorian box.

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It could well be that they've had the original inscription removed

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and had this inscribed at a later date, 1945.

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-I think at auction we might be looking somewhere in the region of £100-£200.

-Wow.

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This inscription might put a few people off, but hopefully we'll find someone that is more forgiving.

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-Perhaps it'll go back to Doncaster.

-Perhaps it will!

-You never know.

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With all this internet bidding, you never know!

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-So why are you selling it?

-I inherited quite a lot of trinkets

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-from my mother. She was a bit of a squirrel.

-Oh, was she?

-Yes.

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-I collect cut glass and silver-topped boxes and bottles.

-OK.

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So I'd like to sell it and perhaps buy something for my collection.

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That's a great idea. You can add to your collection.

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-I think £100-£200 with perhaps a firm reserve of £100.

-Lovely.

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And we'll find it a new home.

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'Priced to sell! That snuff box is certain to give Jennifer

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'enough cash to expand her cut glass collection.'

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That's it. Our experts have now made their final choices, so it's over to the auction room for the first time

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to put those valuations to the test. Anything can happen, as you know.

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It's not an exact science and I've got my favourites. Here's a quick recap from our experts.

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This gold and pearl Victorian brooch is particularly intricate.

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I hope we find someone at auction to love it and wear it.

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Although these aren't the most commercial of pictures, for me they evoke memories of childhood,

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listening to stories of Second World War navy exploits.

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I just hope somebody else will find that sort of interest.

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Despite the much later inscription on this silver snuff box, I'm confident we'll find it a new home.

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'We've travelled the few miles up the road to Andrew Smith and Sons in Itchen, Stoke, for our auction.'

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I love to see an auction room filling up. There's a buzz in the air and the sale hasn't started.

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Our lots are about to go under the hammer. There could be some big surprises.

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-On the rostrum, two auctioneers - Nick Jarrett and Andrew Smith.

-Last time at £100...

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'All auction houses charge a seller's commission and here at this one it's 15% plus VAT.

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'Before the auction kicks off, I catch up with Andrew Smith

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'about a small discrepancy he's discovered with Rita's gold brooch.'

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-What do you think of this?

-Charming. A quintessential Victorian piece.

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Unfortunately, we think it's gold, but it's not hallmarked.

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So we have it as yellow metal.

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Our experts have put £200-£300 on this for 18-carat gold with seed pearls.

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So it is gold, but technically we can't say it's gold. OK.

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-We're right with the seed pearls?

-Oh, yes.

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-Happy with the valuation?

-Yes. The reserve has been increased since you last saw it.

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Is that down to you or the owner?

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That is down to the owner. It still, we think, will sell at the new guide price, £300-£400.

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-We just have to work harder.

-There's nothing like an easy ride in an auction room.

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-You'll earn your commission!

-Yes.

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'So let's see just how much that missing hallmark matters as Rita joins me

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'to see her brooch go under the hammer.'

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-Look at the suntan since the valuation day! Where have you been?

-I've been to Tenerife!

-Fantastic!

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-Sunshine all the way.

-Do you go every year?

-Yes, I do.

-Oh, lovely.

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-Why are you selling this brooch?

-I've had it more than 50 years and never worn it. It's time to go.

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The auctioneer loved this. Let's see if the bidders do.

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The rather lovely brooch here.

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Fanny Tinker.

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I have to start you to clear bids at £200.

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220 can I say?

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At 220. 240. 260. 280. 300.

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-Oh!

-We've done it.

-Oh, Rita!

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At £300. Anybody else in at 300?

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At £300.

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-Well done! We just did it.

-Just made it.

-Just made it! In the nick of time as well.

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-Fantastic.

-Is that more holiday money funds?

-No, I've got a granddaughter getting married

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-so funds are needed.

-Exactly. What's her name?

-Helen.

-Helen.

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-She's getting married to who?

-Matt.

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-Oh, brilliant. Congratulations.

-Congratulations, yes.

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'Christina was spot on and I reckon that £300 will buy Rita a pretty spectacular hat

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'for her granddaughter's special day.

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'Let's see if James' valuation stacks up as those Rowland Langmaid etchings come up for auction.'

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-They are quality.

-They are.

-Why are you selling them?

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Well, I didn't have much room and I found them in the cupboard after my husband passed away.

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-The children don't want them.

-They'd look good on anybody's wall!

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-They certainly would. Great quality.

-And hopefully a good price.

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-If they don't sell well here within striking distance of Portsmouth, they won't sell anywhere!

-No.

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We're in the right place. Let's see what the bidders think.

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This is the Rowland Langmaid etchings.

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I have three commission bids. One telephone?

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I'm going to start the bidding at £200. Is there 220 in the room?

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-Good.

-Big smile on Andy's face.

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Yes.

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240. 260? At £240, commission bid.

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Any more? At £240. Are you all done?

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-That's a very good result.

-Very good.

-Happy?

-Yes!

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-What will you put the money towards?

-A family meal.

-Tonight?

-Yes.

-Good.

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-It'll be a special day. A day to remember.

-Well worth coming.

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'A double estimate result. Cecilia and Andy looked delighted.

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'So far, so good, but will fortune continue to point in our favour with Jennifer's silver snuff box?'

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-Jennifer, this was your mother's and your grandmother's.

-I believe so.

-No emotional attachment?

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-Don't get me started!

-I'm playing devil's advocate.

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I wouldn't be selling it. I just wanted to quiz you about that.

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-Well, I've got lots of bits...

-Other things.

-..that my mum left me.

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I don't collect these things. I do collect other things.

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Nevertheless, this is quality and quality always sells. Here we go.

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A Victorian snuff box.

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Start me at £100 for it.

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£100? £100? 80, then, if you like.

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£80 I have. At £80. 85.

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90. And 5.

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-100.

-Brilliant.

-110.

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120.

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130. 140. 150.

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160. 170?

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- £160 and selling. - Yes!

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At £160.

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£160, then, for the last time.

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-The hammer's gone down. £160.

-Yes.

-That's a good result.

-It is.

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-Well done.

-Thank you for bringing that in.

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If you've got anything like that, bring it to a valuation day. The details are on the BBC website.

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Just go to www.bbc.co.uk/flogit

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and access all the information you need about how to get involved in the show,

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as well as view bonus and behind the scenes footage.

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We're coming back here later on, so don't go away.

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While I was in the area, I went back to college.

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On the last 10 years of the show we've seen wonderful works of art passing through our valuation doors

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and many have sold for huge amounts of money.

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This was John Thomas Peel and he was a Victorian British artist.

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-I would like to put this in at £800-£1,200.

-£800-£1,200?

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David Cox is a renowned English landscape artist.

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He's very well sought after and you're looking in the region of about £4,000-£6,000.

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-They are both helpfully signed AA Glendening.

-At £6,100.

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Yes! £6,100. Spot on valuation, Elizabeth.

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Just imagine if we're still making the show in 10, 20, 30 years' time.

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What kind of art will we see coming through the valuation doors?

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And what prices will they command?

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To give us a hint of the next generation of art stars,

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I've come here to the prestigious Winchester School of Art.

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'Founded more than 130 years ago, Winchester School of Art joined

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'the University of Southampton in 1926 and today is still regarded

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'as one of Britain's leading art and design institutions.'

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What distinguishes this from many other art schools is

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it tries to meet the creative demands of tomorrow by investing in the youngsters of today.

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It does that by luring some of the best teaching talent in the world to come and pass on their skills.

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'But to get a real inside scoop, I'm off to meet John Gillett, the Director of Research.'

0:21:300:21:38

The art school has a really good pedigree. It's been around 130 years.

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Back then it would have been a highly academic institution,

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-full of people learning how to draw.

-Yes.

-More about skills than ideas.

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Ideas are the most important thing about what people come out with now.

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We're much more of an institution about ideas than any particular craft, and advances in technology

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-and particularly digital media that have made that shift possible.

-Yeah.

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You've been here for 20, 25 years. Obviously, you've seen the school evolve. It's constantly moving on.

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We have added all the programmes which involve the management of the things that we teach.

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That reflects the necessity that we face

0:22:240:22:28

to make our programmes as relevant as we can to the needs of the industries we try to service.

0:22:280:22:35

The pressure on us to do that is much greater now than it was 10, 20 years ago.

0:22:350:22:41

In a way, though, that's great that it's changing, as art should do.

0:22:410:22:46

-Oh, yes.

-Pushing frontiers.

0:22:460:22:48

'Competition for the 1,200 places on offer is pretty tough,

0:22:510:22:56

'so those who win through really are the cream of the creative crop.'

0:22:560:23:00

I'm doing my final major project on independent cinema.

0:23:070:23:11

My inspiration is everyday life.

0:23:130:23:16

People think a design is just a texture, just a colour, a stripe. It's so much more.

0:23:160:23:23

My work at the moment is really trying to find out more about advertising as a science.

0:23:230:23:29

That inspires me, that you can use something as old as cloth to tell a story. As simple as two threads.

0:23:290:23:36

'I have to admit that when I was an art student, my workload wasn't taxing! That's not the case here.

0:23:410:23:47

'So what's life like as an art student really all about these days?'

0:23:470:23:54

Emma, tell me what's going on here. Where's the inspiration?

0:23:540:23:59

Well, I look at the separation between art and life and I do performance art.

0:23:590:24:05

It's just using everyday objects to react and see how it would move.

0:24:050:24:10

I was looking at balance and the way that my body would change trying to walk with a stack of shoes.

0:24:100:24:17

-With half a dozen!

-Yeah! Doing something you do in everyday life,

0:24:170:24:21

-but with this uncertainty.

-I can see what you're getting at.

0:24:210:24:26

I did a performance where I stacked them live, starting from nothing and doing it.

0:24:260:24:33

-Doing the art process live. I want to get them bigger.

-Do you?!

0:24:330:24:37

I want a really big doorway so that my head's almost touching it

0:24:370:24:42

and just stand there and balance on them.

0:24:420:24:46

That's what it's all about - creative imagination. You've got it in abundance!

0:24:460:24:52

I can't remember working this hard. This lot are continuously assessed for their three years on the course

0:24:570:25:03

and they're expected to balance work experience with their studies.

0:25:030:25:07

But their biggest challenge has to be the final degree show. It really is make or break time.

0:25:070:25:13

It's a chance for them to showcase their creative talents.

0:25:130:25:18

There is non-stop workload. Real pressure to perform to your best.

0:25:230:25:27

I managed to win a competition and one of the designs will be sold at Liberty.

0:25:270:25:34

I've applied for jobs in LA, New York...

0:25:340:25:38

There's a lot to do, but if you're organised, we all do get it done.

0:25:380:25:43

I've been completely blown away by the talent, the vision and the passion that the students have.

0:25:470:25:55

I just hope their future is rosy and they don't suffer for their art, but flog it for a small fortune.

0:25:550:26:01

'From an art school to an education in antiques now as we head back to our valuation day.

0:26:130:26:18

'It seems that James has a thing or two to teach John

0:26:180:26:22

'about the unusual selection of pottery he's brought in with him.'

0:26:220:26:27

John, I have to say whenever I'm looking at the Flog It queues,

0:26:270:26:31

I'm always trying to find the most unusual, quirky objects.

0:26:310:26:35

-Yeah, I love quirky.

-I love quirky. I AM quirky!

0:26:350:26:39

But you've got a really interesting selection. Let's start with this.

0:26:390:26:44

-Tell me about that.

-Well, I bought that about a year ago on the internet.

0:26:440:26:50

-Right. What did it cost you?

-£70.

-OK.

0:26:500:26:54

-I don't know if you know very much about Blue John.

-Not a great deal.

0:26:540:26:59

It's mined in North Derbyshire and it's the only place in the world that you get this Blue John,

0:26:590:27:05

purple and white coloured quartz.

0:27:050:27:08

-So it IS Blue John?

-Well...

0:27:080:27:10

Ah. Because Blue John is so sought after, they're faking it.

0:27:100:27:15

-Really?

-There is another...

-How can you tell?

-Well,

0:27:150:27:20

there's a very similar vein of similar stone and it's in China.

0:27:200:27:25

-OK?

-Oh...

0:27:260:27:28

-But they inject it with a purple dye and...

-Thank you(!)

0:27:280:27:32

-And this little bowl...

-Is what that is.

-..never saw Derbyshire.

0:27:320:27:37

-It might have landed at East Midlands Airport.

-OK.

0:27:370:27:41

-It's a fake, I'm afraid.

-Thank you(!)

0:27:410:27:45

-You would have been buying a piece of Blue John ware for £400 or £500, but £70 bought you...

-I thought...

0:27:450:27:51

-..worth 40.

-My luck couldn't last that long. I'm gobsmacked.

0:27:510:27:57

Those are really what I thought were interesting. In particular, that one. Tell me the history.

0:27:570:28:03

Well, I bought that from a bric-a-brac stall 10 years ago

0:28:030:28:07

along with the other two items. He quoted me £30

0:28:070:28:13

-and I thought it was a must have.

-Yeah.

-I had to have it.

0:28:130:28:17

I just think all three are incredible.

0:28:170:28:21

I've since seen an expert. He thinks it's Roman.

0:28:210:28:26

-Etruscan?

-He's not too sure. He's never seen anything like that.

0:28:260:28:30

-I think that's an Etruscan shape, slightly pre-Roman.

-Really?

0:28:300:28:35

-I think it's 200-300 BC.

-Right.

-That's my guy reaction.

0:28:350:28:40

-It's Attic ware, which is black-coated...

-I have heard of that.

-..terracotta.

0:28:400:28:45

These sort of Etruscan pots are, in my opinion, some of the best shapes ever made. I love them.

0:28:450:28:51

Just look at that.

0:28:510:28:54

I mean, the actual design.... You know when you've got a leaning spout, it drips everywhere?

0:28:540:29:00

-What a wonderful design to have it leaning back.

-I never thought of that. Is that why?

-For oil, probably.

0:29:000:29:06

I think it's an oil vessel. This is probably...

0:29:060:29:11

looted, I should think, from an Etruscan tomb. They would put oil and they'd put water

0:29:110:29:18

and food dishes in the tomb.

0:29:180:29:20

-Well, it wasn't me.

-No, I'm sure. Probably a hundred years ago.

0:29:200:29:25

A wonderful piece of history and a lovely object.

0:29:250:29:28

The two glass vases, I think they're Roman.

0:29:280:29:32

They're probably 100 AD, 200 AD. I think they'll do well.

0:29:320:29:36

-I don't think they'll be life-changing...

-No.

0:29:360:29:40

But it's additional pocket money.

0:29:400:29:43

I think it'll be £100-£150.

0:29:430:29:45

-Could we have a reserve, please?

-£100, fixed and firm?

-Yes, please.

0:29:450:29:49

-If it doesn't make that, have them back.

-I don't mind taking them home again.

0:29:490:29:56

-£100.

-Thank you very much.

0:29:560:29:58

'We'll be back to see if John's Etruscan pottery reaches James' firm £100 reserve in a little while.

0:30:000:30:06

'But first I'm rejoining Dilys and Tricia to give them the lowdown on Dilys's maritime journal.'

0:30:080:30:14

Dilys, Tricia, I'm back.

0:30:140:30:17

I got our lovely Ann Anderson to get onto the computer.

0:30:170:30:22

There's good news and bad news. The not so good news is that 1771 was the tonnage, not the date.

0:30:220:30:30

OK? We're looking at the vessel The Dover, but there were several.

0:30:300:30:35

It's 1834, 1835, 1836. That's the dates we've seen.

0:30:350:30:39

Still early 1900s. It's a roll call of all the personnel onboard.

0:30:390:30:45

-Right.

-Paying passengers as well.

0:30:450:30:48

It is interesting. There's a lot going for it.

0:30:480:30:52

I don't think it's a log book as such, standard issue from the Royal Navy.

0:30:520:30:58

It's more of a personal thing that somebody's done themselves.

0:30:580:31:03

-It's really complicated, isn't it?

-Yes.

-You look at it one way and think it's just an inventory.

0:31:030:31:10

-But you've enlightened me quite a bit.

-Value, it's a really hard thing to put a price on.

0:31:100:31:17

I think, if it's all right with you, we should let the auctioneer establish...

0:31:170:31:24

-Oh, I would be very interested.

-We send this to the auction room.

0:31:240:31:28

-If he finds the right people...

-And as I say, you've got to find the right person for it.

0:31:280:31:35

-I'm not the right person.

-Well, I'm really excited.

0:31:350:31:39

We'll hoist it up the flagpole and see if anybody salutes it, shall we?

0:31:390:31:44

-We'll get the auctioneer earning his few bob.

-All right, then, yes.

0:31:440:31:49

-We'll do that.

-Thank you so much.

0:31:490:31:51

'That journal was a tricky item to value, so we'll just see how it does

0:31:520:31:57

'when it goes under the hammer a little later.

0:31:570:32:02

'It's over to Christina now as Stella fills her in on the history of her Royal Doulton heirloom.'

0:32:040:32:10

-You've brought in this rather lovely Doulton jug to us.

-I have, yes.

0:32:100:32:14

-You seem to know quite a lot about it.

-A little bit.

0:32:140:32:19

My grandmother told me a small amount about where she got it from.

0:32:190:32:24

I believe it was her sister gave it to her when she passed away.

0:32:240:32:29

And it's always been with my grandmother until she died about five years ago

0:32:290:32:35

-and then she passed it down to me.

-OK.

-I'm not so keen on the colour.

0:32:350:32:40

I'm not so keen on the colour, so it has been...

0:32:400:32:45

It's a very Victorian colour.

0:32:450:32:48

A sort of olive green and the cobalt blue.

0:32:480:32:51

-It's a very Victorian combination.

-Yes.

-Not as appealing today.

0:32:510:32:56

The shell detail is typically a Victorian motif.

0:32:560:33:01

It's stoneware.

0:33:010:33:03

-Yes.

-Which Doulton specialised in.

0:33:030:33:05

We know it's Doulton because we've got a wonderful mark on the bottom.

0:33:050:33:09

It's actually got its date as well, which is 1875, so we can tell exactly when it was made.

0:33:090:33:15

It's also got a wonderful signature.

0:33:150:33:18

Although it reads FAB, it is actually Frank Butler.

0:33:180:33:23

I believe he was a deaf mute,

0:33:230:33:26

-but he made some beautiful things.

-He really did. To be able to make this is quite spectacular.

-It is.

0:33:260:33:33

He was obviously incredibly talented and he's put his initials to this.

0:33:330:33:38

It's nice for Doulton collectors to be able to attribute an artist to a particular pot.

0:33:380:33:45

I think this is quite a lovely piece. Unfortunately...

0:33:450:33:49

-It's a little bit damaged. My grandmother did that.

-Did she?

0:33:490:33:54

By accident. She'd had it for that long and knocked it one day. A tiny chip from the top of the rim.

0:33:540:34:02

-I think she had a restoration on it.

-She has. She's had it provisionally restored and that helps there,

0:34:020:34:08

but we have got this damage, which will affect the value.

0:34:080:34:13

Doulton collectors do like to have things in good condition.

0:34:130:34:17

-Yeah.

-So very sad to see that, but, having said that,

0:34:170:34:22

-it's amazing really that the handle is still in good condition.

-Yes.

0:34:220:34:27

I think it's really lovely. We have to take into account this damage in the estimate.

0:34:270:34:32

If it was perfect, I would say you're probably looking at about £100-£200.

0:34:320:34:38

In this condition, we might be looking more in the region of £50.

0:34:380:34:43

-Yes...

-Maybe if we put an estimate of £40-£60

0:34:430:34:47

-with a firm reserve of 40.

-That's fine.

0:34:470:34:50

-How would you feel?

-That's fine. I'm not so keen on it myself.

0:34:500:34:55

Let's hope we can find somebody who is keen on it.

0:34:550:34:59

-That'll be lovely.

-Thanks so much.

0:34:590:35:02

'It may not be in the best condition, but I really hope Stella's jug does serious damage

0:35:060:35:12

'when it goes in to auction in a bit.

0:35:120:35:16

'We won't have to wait too long as we're heading back to the sale room in just a moment.

0:35:160:35:22

'First, here's a quick recap on what we're taking and why.'

0:35:220:35:26

To me, the really wonderful objects aren't always the most valuable.

0:35:260:35:30

They're the ones with character, history, feeling. And that is a prime example.

0:35:300:35:37

Frank Butler is one of the most collectable Doulton artists.

0:35:370:35:41

I really hope our buyers can look past the damage.

0:35:410:35:45

A ship's journal dated 1834. I love things like this.

0:35:450:35:49

It's not picking the obvious. It's full of heritage, maritime history.

0:35:490:35:55

I'm quite excited. Let's see what the auctioneer says.

0:35:550:35:59

'It's back to the sale room as we get our next batch of lots to go under the hammer.

0:35:590:36:06

'It's Stella's Frank Butler jug up first with a brand new estimate and reserve.'

0:36:060:36:13

-Good luck, both of you. Stella's very nervous!

-I am!

0:36:130:36:18

Family heirloom going under the hammer. Doulton, that jug.

0:36:180:36:22

-The Butler.

-It's got the name.

-But will it get one hundred or will it get one hundred and fifty?

0:36:220:36:28

That would be nice, wouldn't it?

0:36:280:36:31

This is what auctions are all about. There's such an electric atmosphere. I'm really feeling it today.

0:36:310:36:37

The Doulton Lambeth stoneware ewer.

0:36:380:36:42

Start me at 120. 120? £100, then.

0:36:430:36:46

£100? 80 to get it going.

0:36:460:36:49

£80 I have, thank you. And 5. 90.

0:36:510:36:54

And 5. 100.

0:36:540:36:56

-And 10.

-It's sold.

-130.

0:36:560:36:59

140. 150.

0:37:010:37:03

160. 170. 180. 190?

0:37:030:37:06

£180 and selling.

0:37:080:37:11

-- Is there 190?

-Fantastic.

-- My daughters are getting that!

0:37:110:37:16

Last time at £180.

0:37:170:37:19

-Yes! £180. Well done. Above the estimate.

-Brilliant.

0:37:210:37:25

-That's good news.

-Fantastic.

-And the daughters are getting the money?

0:37:250:37:29

Yes, Katy and Lucy. I've got to say Lucy, because she and her friends watch us on the telly.

0:37:290:37:35

-Yes, it'll go to them.

-Brilliant. And get something for yourself!

-Hopefully!

0:37:350:37:41

'A fantastic outcome, easily beating the top end of Christina's estimate.

0:37:410:37:47

'Now for a priceless slice of ancient history - John's Roman pottery.'

0:37:480:37:54

John loves his Roman artefacts. We've got a few, haven't we?

0:37:540:37:59

-We have.

-A couple of glass bottles and the pottery. And John doesn't want them to go for next to nothing.

0:37:590:38:06

I've upped the fixed reserve to 150 and it's now valued at £150-£200.

0:38:060:38:12

I wouldn't want to let it go for less than 150, either.

0:38:120:38:16

-Whether it will or not... If we were here bidding, I'd pay 150 for it.

-Yeah.

0:38:160:38:22

-But whether there's anybody in the room that likes it as much...

-We've got three items.

0:38:220:38:28

There's a lot of lot! We'll find out what the bidders think.

0:38:280:38:32

This is so exciting. Let's find out what that lot think.

0:38:320:38:36

This is the Roman terracotta flagon.

0:38:370:38:40

Start me at £150 here. £150?

0:38:420:38:45

100, then, if you like. £100?

0:38:470:38:50

-80 to get it going, surely.

-Oh, come on.

0:38:500:38:53

£70, thank you. And 5? At £70.

0:38:530:38:57

75. 80. And 5. 90.

0:38:570:38:59

And 5? At £90. Any more? At £90.

0:38:590:39:03

95 we have. And 100. And 10.

0:39:040:39:08

110. 120. 130.

0:39:080:39:11

140. 140.

0:39:110:39:14

-One more bid.

-140. 150?

0:39:140:39:16

At £140. Is there 150?

0:39:170:39:20

At £140. Any more?

0:39:200:39:23

-He's not selling, is he?

-At £140, are you sure?

0:39:230:39:27

For the last time, I'm sorry, we are so close there.

0:39:270:39:31

Just under that reserve.

0:39:310:39:34

-Sorry about that.

-That's OK.

-You wanted to keep it.

-I don't mind!

0:39:340:39:39

'Those Roman artefacts missed their reserve by just £10.

0:39:410:39:45

'John did seem somewhat relieved! He didn't want to let them go for nothing.

0:39:450:39:51

'It's the item now I've been waiting for - Dilys' maritime journal.

0:39:520:39:57

'Before the hammer goes down, I'm off for a quick chat with auctioneer Andrew Smith

0:39:570:40:03

'to see if he can shed any light.'

0:40:030:40:05

My eyes lit up when I came across this. What do you think?

0:40:050:40:08

I think this is fascinating. The detail in there is superb.

0:40:080:40:14

-It just gives you a real sort of snapshot of life onboard.

-Maritime history.

0:40:140:40:19

It belongs to Dilys. I found it so hard to put a price on this. I'll leave it up to you.

0:40:190:40:25

We're very comfortable with £300-£500. We hope to get interest.

0:40:250:40:29

We've done a lot more research since then, which we've put on the 'net and in the catalogue.

0:40:290:40:36

It's a journal written by a Captain Chambers. It spans three or four of his ships in about 1804 onwards.

0:40:360:40:43

And it goes into details of what they have onboard.

0:40:430:40:48

-It's a thing I can visualise somebody buying and developing a book or film from it.

-Now you're talking!

0:40:480:40:54

It all started here. This is the next blockbuster movie.

0:40:540:40:59

Don't go away. This is going under the hammer in just a moment.

0:40:590:41:03

'So let's see if Dilys' journal clocks up an award-winning result

0:41:030:41:08

'as we rejoin her and her friend Tricia in the sale room.'

0:41:080:41:13

Dilys and Tricia, thank you for bringing that in. Made my day.

0:41:130:41:17

I've got high hopes for this. I had a chat to the auctioneer.

0:41:170:41:22

He's done a little more research and hopefully it's created a lot of interest.

0:41:220:41:27

-Has it really?

-Isn't that good?

-Oh, has it?

-It's all down to you!

0:41:270:41:32

Oh, this is very interesting, this little maritime book.

0:41:330:41:39

Captain Chambers' book here.

0:41:390:41:41

£200? 200 do I have? Thank you.

0:41:440:41:46

And 10 can I say now? At £200.

0:41:460:41:48

210. 220 on the 'net. 230.

0:41:480:41:52

-240.

-This chap's keeping his paddle in the air. That's what we like.

0:41:520:41:56

At £230, then. 240.

0:41:580:42:01

-Oh, he's out now. He's not that determined!

-250.

0:42:010:42:06

-260.

-He's back in!

0:42:070:42:10

270. 280.

0:42:100:42:12

290. 300.

0:42:120:42:14

And 20? Lost you...320.

0:42:150:42:17

340. 360. 380.

0:42:170:42:20

400. And 20.

0:42:200:42:23

440. 460.

0:42:230:42:26

-480. 500.

-This is getting good!

0:42:260:42:29

600 on the 'net now. And 20? At £600 it is.

0:42:300:42:34

On the 'net at 600. Last chance at 600.

0:42:340:42:38

That's what we like to see. £600!

0:42:380:42:40

-Well done! Thank you so much for bringing that in!

-I'm so glad I did!

0:42:400:42:46

-Oh, what a lovely moment!

-Yes.

0:42:460:42:49

-Wonderful.

-That's what it's all about. Finding things like that.

0:42:490:42:53

You saw it immediately and said, "This could be worth quite a bit."

0:42:530:42:58

-And it's been in the bureau for 30 years.

-If you've got anything like that tucked away,

0:42:580:43:03

bring it along to a valuation day. It could be you standing here.

0:43:030:43:08

-Sadly, we've run out of time, but, Dilys, haven't we had a marvellous time?

-We have!

0:43:080:43:14

-It's been wonderful.

-I hope you enjoyed the show. Join me again,

0:43:140:43:19

but until then it's goodbye!

0:43:190:43:22

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd - 2011

0:43:360:43:40

Email [email protected]

0:43:410:43:43

Experts James Lewis and Christina Trevanion accompany Paul Martin to the Guildhall in Winchester for valuations, where they are met with huge support from the locals. Amid all the bags and boxes they discover a mourning brooch with a curious past and some truly ancient Etruscan pottery. But it's a maritime journal that gives Paul the biggest pause for thought. Paul also heads off to uncover the next generation of art stars with a visit to the prestigious Winchester School of Art.