Exmouth Flog It!


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Exmouth

Paul Martin and the team are in Exmouth, where Christina discovers a solid gold lighter bought at a jumble sale, while Will spots a 19th-century watercolour.


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LineFromTo

Welcome to Devon and the seaside town of Exmouth.

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Nobody's clutching their buckets and spades today playing on the sand

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but they are in a healthy queue clutching bags and boxes,

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-hopefully full of treasure. And what are you going to do with all that lot?

-ALL: Flog it!

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'Regarded by some as the oldest holiday resort in Devon,

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'Exmouth has been a popular tourist destination ever since the 18th century.

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'Its golden age came with the arrival of the railway in 1861,

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'bringing with it mass tourism and it looks like we've also brought out quite a crowd today.

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'Fingers crossed a few gems from that golden age make an appearance.

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'Keen to keep on track and already in the queue

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'looking for today's gems are experts Christina Trevanion...'

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Oh, what is it that you've got? A Victorian scrapbook. That's beautiful, isn't it?

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The colours are still so good.

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-'..and Will Axon.'

-I've seen a lot of horses

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and I don't think either of those are going to make that water jump.

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'Both highly experienced valuers and auctioneers.

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'I can guarantee nothing will slip past them.'

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I'll give you this and we'll have a closer look inside.

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Let's get the doors open and get the show on the road.

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'While everyone takes their seats inside the pavilion, here's what's coming up later.

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'Christina is amazed by what you can find if you're lucky.'

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I actually bought it at a jumble sale. I paid 50 pence for it.

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-Bought it from a jumble sale?

-Yeah.

-For 50p?

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'Will has a little wobble at the unpredictability of the auction room.'

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I hope it sells, you know.

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'And I fulfil a boyhood dream.'

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I tell you what, this is the life. This is the life every schoolboy wants.

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Everybody is now safely seated inside.

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This is where it gets exciting. Who is going to be one of the lucky ones to be whisked off to auction?

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We'll find out because Will is first at the tables. Let's see who he's talking to and what he's found.

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Well, Sue, I saw you looking very glamorous, I must say, in the queue this morning.

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As soon as you pulled this little picture out of your bag, I knew exactly who it was by.

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-Did you?

-Well, I knew it was Adam Buck but I don't know anything about it.

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I looked on the internet and found nothing out.

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-Found nothing out?

-No.

-Cos he's actually a pretty prolific artist.

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Sort of early 19th century.

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Just down here in this little bottom corner, he's kindly signed and dated it, 1821,

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which is really the sort of prime of his career, early 19th century,

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that's really when Adam Buck was painting his best work.

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-Is it something that you've bought yourself or something you've inherited?

-Yes.

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-It's been inherited by the family. My mother.

-Your mother's side?

-Yeah.

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And does she remember where it came from?

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Erm, it came down the family from my grandmother's side.

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OK. So what I'm edging towards is whether or not this is a family member.

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Well, that's what I'm wondering, cos there's two. My sister's got the other one.

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-And is the other one a gentleman?

-No, it's a lady.

-Another lady.

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Is there anyone in the family around this date? Have you got the family tree?

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I haven't gone right back on the family tree, so I really don't know.

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-That's the trouble. Unfortunately, you run out of people to ask, as well.

-Well, this is the problem.

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The work itself is very typical of Buck's work.

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And she's wearing this wonderful hat here with I suppose ostrich feathers.

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-It's lovely.

-Ostrich feathers in her hat.

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-And this delicate face with the eyes and the little rose lips there.

-I think it's lovely.

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One thing I have got to draw your attention to that I'm not very happy about is the colour of this frame.

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-I think someone's got the old spray paint out.

-Have they?

-I think so.

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-Because looking at the back, it's actually an old frame.

-Yeah.

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Let's just spin it over quickly and then you can see what I mean. You can see these blind holes

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and the way the frame's been constructed is in an old way.

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It's got this rather nice label, as well, on the back.

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Carver and Gilder, picture frame manufacturer.

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So he may well have made the original frame

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-or, because it's on the back board here...

-Possibly the back board.

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Yeah, could've come with it from another frame.

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Now, value-wise, have you had any thoughts as to what you think it's worth?

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No, but I would hope it's worth more than £100.

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Well, I think you're in the right sort of ballpark figure.

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I was thinking 100, 150 as an estimate.

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So if we reserve it at that bottom figure, fixed reserve at £100,

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I think she stands a good chance of making a little bit more

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-cos she's a pretty face, isn't she?

-Very.

-It's not like it's a withered old whiskered gentleman,

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which isn't terribly commercial, but a nice pretty period lady

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in dress like that, I think 100 to 150 is on the money.

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-So are we agreed?

-Yes, were agreed.

-100 fixed reserve?

-Yep.

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I think you should say goodbye, cos I'm pretty confident she'll find a new home.

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-Good. Thanks a lot.

-Not at all.

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'And I'm confident, too, that she'll find some admirers in the saleroom. Next I'm in the driving seat.'

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I've just been joined by Colin and this little chap here in the middle.

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Tell me, this is a wild guess, but are you in the tyre business?

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Yes, I was. I was a company director for Southwestern Tyres.

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-Right, OK. Based where?

-In Exeter.

-In Exeter.

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Looking at this, I'm pretty sure this is compressed card or felt.

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Looking at it, you can see all brown grinning through.

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I've seen a lot of these and they're normally late 60s, early 1970s,

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made of fibreglass, more translucent,

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so you can put a bulb up inside so they light up.

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-That's right.

-This one is a much earlier one. This is very early 1950s.

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-So does that correlate with how long you've had this?

-Yes, it does.

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I was in business for 48 years

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and I bought this more or less when I started off a local coach dealer.

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-How much did you pay for it?

-I cannot remember. I think I gave him a tyre.

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A tyre? That's a fair exchange, isn't it? And where have you had this bolted down? Onto the worktop?

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-No, it was on top of my lorry.

-How long was this on top of the lorry for?

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-About 20 years.

-Wow! He's had a good life!

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-Did you give him a name?

-No, I didn't. No, I didn't.

-Colin.

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-THEY LAUGH

-It's in relatively good condition. It needs a jolly good clean.

-Yes.

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-So has this been in the garage in the last few years?

-It's been in my attic.

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I retired so I sold the lorry and took this off.

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I do like it. There's something about it, isn't there?

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When I was at school, you grew up with these kind of images of this logo. It's that branding,

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that iconic branding which sticks with you. Because you've seen it as a kid, you grow up with it

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-and you never forget it.

-True.

-The good thing about trade signs like this one

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and other early examples from the 50s is these were only available to people in the trade.

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People like you, dealers. And the general public couldn't buy these back then.

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So when this comes on the market, I think people will fight for this, if you're into automobilia.

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-What do you think it's worth?

-I have no idea whatsoever.

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If this was in brilliant condition, if this was in perfect original condition,

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I think you'd be looking at £200.

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Unfortunately, it's not. It's had its knocks and its wear, but that's only to be expected.

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It's been on top of a lorry for 20 years.

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Let's get this into auction with a value of £80 to £120.

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And put a reserve on, if you're happy, of around £60.

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-Are you happy with that?

-I'm happy with that, yeah.

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I think we'll have a surprise. I think this is a come and buy me

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and I think if we get this on the right website with the right search engines,

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the automobile collectors and the trade collectors will love this.

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'It always amazes me what turns up on a valuation day.

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'However, Hilary's brought along something a little bit more familiar.'

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-Hilary, you've brought in this collection of silver for us today.

-Yes.

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You've got some teaspoons and then this rather lovely cigarette case here

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-which has got Bristol & District Table Tennis Association on the front.

-That's correct.

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-So are you a table tennis fan?

-Well, I was when I was younger.

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My father was one of the members of the Bristol & District Table Tennis Association. He was the treasurer.

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And in 1959, he was presented with this cigarette case

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in recognition of the work he'd done for the association.

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-And he obviously represented his club and did a lot for the club.

-He was mainly the treasurer.

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I think that's why he got this recognition.

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Well, what a lovely gift that they've given him. You've got the enamelled front.

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-The case is solid silver.

-Right.

-And it's hallmarked for Birmingham 1957.

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-And they've obviously engraved his initials in the top corner here.

-Yes.

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If we open it up, it's still got its box there and a little dust case,

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and you've got this rather lovely inscription here, which says,

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"Presented to AG Norman on his appointment as a life member, B&DTTA,"

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which is the table tennis association, "May 1959," which is lovely

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because although it's hallmarked for 1957, it's contemporary within that two year period.

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So it really is a quality piece. You've got this gilt interior, as well, which is really nice.

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-Just adds to the luxurious feel of it. Do you know if he ever used it?

-Oh, yes.

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-Oh, really?

-Yes. In fact, when I opened it up, it still had little bit of tobacco in which I brushed out.

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Oh, wonderful! Aww.

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So that was the first item you brought in to us.

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And then you've also brought these very Art Deco teaspoons here, which are solid silver.

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-Right.

-And they are hallmarked for Sheffield 1937.

-Right.

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Marker's mark CB&S, which I can't track down.

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-I think it may well be Charles Boyton & Sons.

-Right.

-I'm not sure. Where have they come from?

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I don't know. They were my mother's and she's long dead, I'm afraid.

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-There's nothing significant that I know of in her life at that time so I'm not sure how she got those.

-OK.

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And then we've also got this nice retailer's label here for James Walker Ltd.

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The spoons fit beautifully in this box, so I think they are contemporary...

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-They look contemporary.

-..with the box. Exactly.

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Then this second set of silver teaspoons, they're a little bit smaller and are monogrammed

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and those are hallmarked for London 1923.

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And that was when she was married first.

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-And her married name was Faracre and the F monogram is for Faracre.

-Oh, right.

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-So those would've been a wedding present in 1923.

-Absolutely.

-Why have you brought them in?

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Well, I'm moving house and I've been turning out cupboards

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and, frankly, I haven't seen these since I moved into the house I'm in,

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which is 16 years, so it just seems that they're sitting in a drawer

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-and somebody else might enjoy them.

-OK.

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It is quite difficult to put a price on the items because they are very different.

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-With regards to a value, I think what we would do is put them as one lot.

-OK.

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Because the stronger items will help sell the weaker items.

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-So I think, at auction, we're looking at somewhere in the region of £80 to £120.

-OK.

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-For the group.

-Yes.

-The main value being in your cigarette case

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and in your Art Deco spoons.

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OK? So we're looking at £80 to £120, maybe with a reserve of £70.

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-All right?

-Yeah.

-How do you feel about that?

-That'll be fine.

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-Let's hope that Dad's many hard voluntary hours at the table tennis club pay off for you.

-Yeah.

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-All right? Thanks for bringing them in.

-No problem.

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'So we've got our first three items, but before we go to the saleroom,

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'here's a quick recap of what we're taking to auction and why we're taking it.'

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A pretty face by a known artist.

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I think there's going to be plenty of admirers in the saleroom for this Regency beauty.

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I want to put this into auction because I strongly believe he could still do £200 or £300.

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It is absolutely fabulous and it's timeless, because that is good design.

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Silver is selling particularly well at the moment. We've got the two sets of spoons

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and this cigarette case with a wonderful sporting connection. They could be gems for Hilary.

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'We're in Exeter at Bearnes, Hampton & Littlewood for our sale today.'

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This is a really good sign. The car park is full. I've got a good feeling about today.

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I think our owners are going to go home very happy, some with a lot of money, some within estimate.

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But you never know what happens at an auction. That's why it's so exciting.

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'We're lucky enough to have Chris Hampton auctioneering our lots

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'and the seller's commission here is 16.5 percent plus VAT.

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'So let's crack on. Our first lot is Sue's charming painting.'

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Going under the hammer right now, a wonderful watercolour by Adam Buck, an Irish artist born in Cork.

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We had an original valuation which Sue was pleased with of £100 to £150.

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-Since the valuation day, you've had a chat to the auctioneer.

-Yes.

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-And you've raised that reserve to £200.

-Yes.

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-New valuation, £200 to £300.

-Right.

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To be honest, I've sold prints by Adam Buck at £100 plus.

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The only thing that made me hold back a bit was the frame.

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This is it. It's down to the bidders.

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Adam Buck, portrait of a young woman, half length,

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wearing a splendid hat. £150 is bid.

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-At £150.

-I hope it sells, you know.

-160.

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170. 170.

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Where's 180?

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180. 190.

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-200.

-It's sold.

-Good.

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£200. Seated near me.

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At £200. 10 will you?

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-At £200.

-No, it's going on the reserve.

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-At £200.

-HAMMER BANGS

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-Well done. Good for you for putting up the reserve.

-Well done.

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-It might have gone for much less.

-If no-one was bidding against you,

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he would've got it at 100. Well done.

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Thank you. I've got very sweaty hands. Nice to meet you.

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-The tension.

-Nice to have met you.

-Thanks for a good day.

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'What a great start! Let's hope it continues.

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'I'm up next with Colin's advertising icon.'

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It's the Michelin Man about to go under the hammer.

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We've got a reserve of £60. I'm hoping to get around 80.

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Unfortunately, Colin hasn't made it in yet.

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We've been on the phone to him. He said he's left home but maybe he's having problems parking

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because it is really busy out there.

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I'm expecting him to run through the door any second now and join with me in this wonderful moment.

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The seated advertising figure of a Michelin Man with mounting bracket.

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£45 is bid. At £45. At 45.

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50. 55.

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At £55. And 60 now.

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And 60 will you? 60 in the doorway.

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At £60. 5 now.

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-Come on, Colin.

-At £60 and selling it at 60.

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Sold. Here's Colin now. Look at that.

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-HE LAUGHS

-I'm not joking,

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I've literally just said to the camera, "The hammer's gone down".

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-The hammer went down.

-Oh, right.

-At £60.

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-Is that OK?

-Yeah, that's quite all right.

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-Colin, it's great to see you anyway.

-And you.

-We did it.

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'Well, he got there in the end in the nick of time to wave goodbye to his old friend.

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'And coming up next we've got a collection of silver all from the 1900s.'

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It belongs to Hilary who's right next to me.

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-And this is your first auction.

-It is.

-You're having a bit of a tough time at the moment, aren't you?

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I am. I've just moved out of one house and I haven't moved into my next hour

0:15:380:15:42

-and I'm staying with a very nice friend.

-Stressful, isn't it, living out of boxes?

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-Absolutely.

-Good luck in your new house. Where is it?

-Heavitree.

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-Where's that?

-In Exeter. It's sort of the other side of town.

0:15:500:15:54

-You're staying in the area.

-Yes.

-Oh, good.

-Cos I have an allotment and I want to keep it.

-Ooh.

0:15:540:15:59

-Where I'll be this afternoon.

-We've digressed. We should be talking about antiques.

0:15:590:16:04

Your lot is next. Good luck, Hilary.

0:16:040:16:06

Silver cigarette case,

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a set of six George VI teaspoons

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and a set of six George V coffee spoons, cased. All together.

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£70 is bid. At 70. 5. 80.

0:16:160:16:19

5. 90. 5.

0:16:190:16:22

100. And 5. 110. 120.

0:16:220:16:26

He's looking at his book. People have left bids on the book

0:16:260:16:29

prior to the sale. They've viewed it earlier in the week but aren't here.

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-Selling at £160.

-HAMMER BANGS

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-Result! £160!

-Excellent!

0:16:370:16:41

-Wow!

-That's really good!

0:16:410:16:43

Yes! You can now go from the tension, the high drama of the auction room

0:16:430:16:48

-to the calm of the allotment.

-I will, thank you, Paul.

-I quite envy you.

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-Yes.

-On a day like today.

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-Is that where you're heading off to?

-Absolutely.

0:16:540:16:57

'While Hilary heads off to the allotment, I've got my own journey to make, back to a bygone era.'

0:16:570:17:03

Now, I'm a bit of an old romantic and I'm passionate about nostalgia

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and so I should be, because I love antiques and everything old.

0:17:150:17:18

Today we're going to relive the past. I'm going to take you on a trip down memory lane

0:17:180:17:22

on one of the best heritage railway lines in the country.

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This is the age of steam, so come on, I've got a train to catch.

0:17:260:17:29

'And that train is here at the South Devon Railway.

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'The UK's railway system in the oldest in the world,

0:17:330:17:36

'built as a patchwork of local rail links operated by small private companies

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'which over time developed into a national network. This branch was part of

0:17:410:17:45

'the South Devon Railway Company and it joined the Plymouth to Exeter mainline.

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'Opened in 1872, it originally ran for nine miles,

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'from Totnes to Ashburton.'

0:17:530:17:56

Today it's a bit shorter. It runs for about seven miles,

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from this station, Buckfastleigh, to Totnes, which is in that direction.

0:18:020:18:07

Now, you're probably wondering why I'm dressed like this.

0:18:070:18:10

Today I have the opportunity to fulfil every schoolboy's dream.

0:18:100:18:13

I'm going to be riding on the footplate and learning how to drive this locomotive and be the fireman.

0:18:130:18:19

Obviously, under instruction from Chris and Dave who are up here waiting for me.

0:18:190:18:23

I am prepared to put in a full-day shift.

0:18:230:18:26

I've even got my steel toe cap boots on. So let's get dirty.

0:18:260:18:31

Hello, guys! Pleased to meet you!

0:18:310:18:33

-Hi, Paul.

-Hello.

-Paul.

-Hi, Chris.

0:18:330:18:35

I've got to say, you're immaculately turned out.

0:18:350:18:38

Will we look like this at the end of the day, completely clean,

0:18:380:18:41

-or will we be covered in...

-We might, but you won't.

-THEY LAUGH

0:18:410:18:46

-How long have you been working on this railway line?

-I've been a member since 1968.

0:18:460:18:50

-Wow.

-Just before it actually started running. And I've been driving since 1993.

0:18:500:18:55

-You've got the hardest job. You're the fireman.

-No, you've got the hardest job.

0:18:550:19:00

I'm going to be the fireman today! I'll really work at this and put in a good day shift for you.

0:19:000:19:05

Is this really the apprenticeship for becoming an engine driver?

0:19:050:19:09

-Did you have to be a fireman first?

-You start off as a cleaner.

0:19:090:19:12

Gradually you learn how to light the fire and then you progress to the footplate

0:19:120:19:16

and then under the guidance of the driver and the fireman, you learn how to fire the engine.

0:19:160:19:21

You then progress to learning this side of the engine, driving that,

0:19:210:19:25

and you learn how to oil the engine up, where to look, all this sort of thing.

0:19:250:19:29

So it does take a few years before you get over to this side.

0:19:290:19:32

What do I have to do first? What is the first job of the fireman?

0:19:320:19:36

There was nothing in the firebox this morning,

0:19:360:19:38

so we've spent three hours bringing up the pressure and we've got 160 on the clock

0:19:380:19:42

and three quarters of water in the boiler.

0:19:420:19:45

-The boiler is the most important thing on the engine. If we lose water, we go bang.

-That's the gauge.

0:19:450:19:51

I tell you what, the size of the coal... Look at this!

0:19:510:19:54

That is a whopping great lump of coal!

0:19:540:19:57

-I shove it in there?

-Yep.

-There you go!

0:19:570:19:59

TRAIN WHISTLE BLOWS

0:19:590:20:02

You guys have kindly got up at six o'clock this morning to sort this trip out for me today.

0:20:080:20:13

You do it day in and day out throughout the season. Why do you do it?

0:20:130:20:16

I thoroughly enjoy it. Somebody said to me, "What would you do if you won the lottery?"

0:20:160:20:21

I said, "I would do what I'm doing now". It was always a passion. I always wanted to be an engine driver.

0:20:210:20:26

-So I always felt privileged to get on a steam locomotive.

-Yeah.

0:20:260:20:31

-And what about you, Chris?

-I love doing it.

0:20:310:20:33

If you didn't love the job, you wouldn't do the hours, because it's such hard work.

0:20:330:20:39

-But you do get some satisfaction at the end of the day.

-Yeah.

0:20:390:20:43

This is a very important part of our heritage here down in the West Country.

0:20:430:20:46

Thank goodness it's alive for future generations to appreciate. What about the next generation?

0:20:460:20:51

We've got some youngsters coming through, we've got some 17-year-olds, 18-year-olds.

0:20:510:20:56

They can't take their fire exam until they're 18

0:20:560:21:00

and then once they pass, you have to wait till 21, that's the minimum age to become a driver.

0:21:000:21:05

-I need to put water in the boiler now. Would you like to do that?

-Yes. It's about time I did something.

0:21:050:21:10

Pull that lever there. That puts the water on.

0:21:100:21:13

-And then you turn the steam valve anticlockwise.

-This one?

0:21:130:21:17

Yep. You might have to crack it.

0:21:170:21:19

That's it. That way.

0:21:200:21:22

And then we listen for the sound. That usually tells you it's picked up.

0:21:220:21:26

-I can hear it whistling.

-Yeah. And if not, you look down the side

0:21:260:21:29

and if there's no water coming through, you just trim it with that there.

0:21:290:21:33

-As a fireman, you've got to think ahead all the time.

-Sure.

0:21:330:21:36

-It's really hot just here.

-Turn it off now.

0:21:360:21:39

-Off with the steam.

-That's off.

-And off with the water.

0:21:390:21:43

When was the 305 class, this type of locomotive decommissioned?

0:21:460:21:50

-Well, it was never decommissioned.

-Really?

0:21:500:21:52

No, it actually came off British Railways

0:21:520:21:56

and it actually came down to Totnes first off

0:21:560:21:59

and it did come up this branch back in the mid 60s.

0:21:590:22:02

And then it disappeared to the Severn Valley Railway

0:22:020:22:05

where it actually ran their inaugural train up there in 1970, I believe.

0:22:050:22:10

How many have survived? Do you know?

0:22:100:22:12

-This is it. This is the only one that survived.

-Really?

0:22:120:22:15

-TRAIN WHISTLE BLOWS

-Wow! I was going to say, "Wow!" and he went, "Whoo-whoo!"

0:22:150:22:21

This is the only survivor! That is quite incredible, isn't it?

0:22:210:22:24

'Running along the stunning valley of the River Dart,

0:22:270:22:30

'the journey to Totnes takes approximately 25 minutes, stopping only once at Staverton.'

0:22:300:22:36

'But it gives you ample time to take in the breathtaking views.'

0:22:410:22:46

This is just beautiful. It's absolutely stunning. Nice time of the year to do this.

0:22:460:22:50

-Yes, the leaves are just out now.

-Isn't that spectacular?

0:22:500:22:53

Underneath a canopy of green foliage. This is the life.

0:22:530:22:57

This is the life every schoolboy wants.

0:22:570:23:00

I just love the smell. Everything about this journey is wonderful.

0:23:000:23:04

-What sort of speed are we doing now?

-We're doing approximately 20.

0:23:040:23:08

What would our braking distance be if we saw a cow or sheep on the line?

0:23:080:23:12

-Probably about quarter of a mile safely.

-Really? Quarter of a mile?

0:23:120:23:16

I mean, there's a lot of weight here to stop, really, I guess, isn't there?

0:23:160:23:20

That'll be enough now. Thank you. Lovely.

0:23:350:23:39

What happens at the end of the day when you're on your last route and you have a boiler full of coal?

0:23:390:23:44

Do you knock it out or let it die off gradually?

0:23:440:23:46

No, I work in advance, think ahead.

0:23:460:23:49

On the last trip, I won't put some much coal in the firebox so it'll be a lighter fire,

0:23:490:23:53

keep the boiler on full, and when we get back, the fire should be nice and flat

0:23:530:23:59

-and just about going out.

-OK.

0:23:590:24:01

You actually work non-stop. You work harder than Chris does, really.

0:24:010:24:05

-Drivers don't do anything, do they?

-Not really.

0:24:050:24:08

No, he's got the responsibility of being the engine driver and he's in charge of me, as well.

0:24:080:24:13

Dave, thank you so much. And you, Chris. I've thoroughly enjoyed my day here.

0:24:210:24:25

I'm going to do the return journey sitting in the carriage, soak up the nostalgia and the scenery

0:24:250:24:30

-and carry on enjoying the day. How did I do?

-You did very well.

0:24:300:24:33

And you didn't drop my shovel in the fire. THEY LAUGH

0:24:330:24:37

'So my job has finished, but Dave and Chris are still hard at it.

0:24:370:24:42

'As Totnes is at the end of the line, the locomotive needs to be uncoupled

0:24:440:24:49

'and repositioned at the head of the carriages.

0:24:490:24:51

'Once everything's secured, we're all set for the return journey. This time I get to enjoy a comfy seat.'

0:24:540:25:01

Isn't that just stunning out there, the beautiful Devonshire countryside?

0:25:010:25:06

Completely unspoilt, unchanged and not a trace of the modern world.

0:25:060:25:11

And I must say, it's a lot warmer and quieter here in this second class carriage.

0:25:110:25:16

It reminds me of being a schoolboy, growing up in Surrey and living near Hampton Court

0:25:160:25:20

and getting on the train there and travelling to Surbiton. Wonderful times.

0:25:200:25:25

'The history of the line commercially is quite a quiet one, really.

0:25:260:25:30

'It was used for transporting goods, things like coal, wool, cider

0:25:300:25:34

'and agricultural equipment and the local population.

0:25:340:25:37

But with the advent of the motorcar becoming a lot more popular in the early 20th century,

0:25:370:25:42

takings on the line here declined

0:25:420:25:44

and, sadly, it closed on 3rd November 1958.

0:25:440:25:49

It carried on transporting goods for a few more years,

0:25:490:25:52

but that finished also in 1962.

0:25:520:25:55

'In fact, the 1960s was a defining moment for all the railways in the UK.

0:25:560:26:01

'Richard Beeching, chairman of British Rail,

0:26:010:26:04

'became infamous for the reshaping and slimming down of a whole network.

0:26:040:26:09

'So it was with a sense of irony that in 1969

0:26:090:26:13

'Beeching was invited to open this picturesque line,

0:26:130:26:16

'named at the time the Dart Valley Railway.'

0:26:160:26:18

A group of enterprising businessmen decided to reopen this line and run it for tourists

0:26:190:26:24

and thank goodness they did. It's been running ever since and it's keeping our heritage alive.

0:26:240:26:29

Today it's a registered charity run by volunteers,

0:26:290:26:32

people like Chris and Dave who get up early in the morning

0:26:320:26:36

and make this journey so special. It's well worth the trip.

0:26:360:26:40

Love it to bits. I'm going to look out the window now.

0:26:400:26:43

'We've travelled back to Exmouth, where everyone has been waiting patiently for some more valuations.'

0:26:530:26:59

-Are you still happy?

-ALL: Yes!

0:26:590:27:01

-It's your turn next, believe me.

-THEY LAUGH

0:27:010:27:05

Welcome back to our valuation day here at the Pavilion in Exmouth.

0:27:050:27:08

Let's now catch up with our experts and see what else we can find to take off to auction.

0:27:080:27:12

'And it's Will who's spotted something first, so sit up straight as we listen in

0:27:120:27:17

'to what he has to say about Sally's chair.'

0:27:170:27:20

I'm pleased to see a bit of furniture at Exmouth today. We don't often get the chance,

0:27:200:27:24

us furniture experts or people who are geared towards furniture.

0:27:240:27:28

It's often too big or bulky to bring in.

0:27:280:27:31

-But no problem with this little piece.

-No.

-What can you tell me about it?

-Not a lot.

0:27:310:27:35

I bought it in a shop about 30 years ago now when I'd just moved into a new house.

0:27:350:27:40

-Has anyone perched on it since then?

-No, nobody's sat on it.

0:27:400:27:44

-Because someone at some stage has and would have.

-Yes.

0:27:440:27:47

These are generally called correctional chairs or deportment chairs where if you sat in them,

0:27:470:27:52

because of the very vertical nature of the back, it would stop you from slouching.

0:27:520:27:57

-Yes.

-Which is a natural position we fall into.

0:27:570:28:01

-Yes.

-And you can tell someone has used it by the natural wear on the turnings here on the stretchers.

0:28:010:28:07

-Yes.

-Can I ask you what you paid for it?

-I think I paid around £50.

-That's not too bad.

0:28:070:28:13

Because, of its type, I think it's a rather nice one.

0:28:130:28:16

Starting from the top and working down,

0:28:160:28:19

we've got a nice top rail that echoes dining chairs of the time.

0:28:190:28:23

-We're talking early 19th century to mid-19th, William IV, Victorian crossover.

-Yes.

0:28:230:28:29

This carved rail, as well, that's a nice touch of quality.

0:28:290:28:32

Someone's gone to the effort of hand-carving that.

0:28:320:28:35

And, again, that echoes the dining chairs of the time.

0:28:350:28:38

-You'll see a lot of dining chairs with that sort of splat on the back.

-Right.

-Nice little caned seat,

0:28:380:28:43

-which is actually in good order, which is nice.

-Yes.

-Looks like it could be original.

0:28:430:28:47

It could have been replaced. But it's been done sympathetically.

0:28:470:28:51

-Yes.

-And it's been done well. And then these long, elegant legs.

0:28:510:28:55

-There's a nice little splay at the bottom.

-Yes.

-It adds that little... It gives it that stability.

0:28:550:29:01

-Yes, I particularly like that, the way it splays out.

-That's another typical feature of the period.

0:29:010:29:06

That little splayed front leg. And the wood itself is in beech.

0:29:060:29:11

-Oh, right, yes.

-You can generally tell beech when you get these flecks...

0:29:110:29:15

-Yes.

-..just by the way the wood is cut.

0:29:150:29:18

-Right. I see.

-That's the way the rings appear on the surface.

0:29:180:29:22

-Yes.

-But up here, they've just added these little pen marks or paint marks,

0:29:220:29:27

-just to simulate the rosewood grain.

-Yes. That's interesting. I didn't know that.

0:29:270:29:31

So if someone was sitting on it, you might just see the top rail.

0:29:310:29:34

-So that's where they've made the effort to try and make it look more expensive than it is.

-Yes.

0:29:340:29:40

-I mean, I like it myself. Do you like it?

-Yes, I do like it.

-So why are you selling it?

0:29:400:29:44

-Well, since I had that, parents have died and I've inherited various other chairs.

-Yes.

0:29:440:29:50

There isn't really a lot of room left for chairs.

0:29:500:29:53

As this one isn't used, I thought it made sense to get rid of that one.

0:29:530:29:57

-OK, so if you got your money back...

-Yes.

-..that would be a good ending to the story, wouldn't it?

0:29:570:30:02

-You'd have had the enjoyment of it.

-Yes.

-So I'm going to say let me put the estimate at 40 to 60.

0:30:020:30:09

-Yes.

-Straddle that £50 mark.

-Right, yes, that's fine.

0:30:090:30:12

-Do you want to reserve it? Or are you happy for it to...

-Perhaps I should have a reserve on it.

0:30:120:30:16

-Let's put a reserve on at 30.

-Yes.

-If it's not worth £30 then I say take it home.

-Yes.

0:30:160:30:20

-It's got to be worth £30.

-That's fine.

0:30:200:30:23

-I'm pretty sure you'll have no trouble getting that away on the day.

-OK.

0:30:230:30:26

And thanks for bringing in a bit of furniture for me to look at.

0:30:260:30:30

-That's all right.

-Thanks very much.

-Thanks.

0:30:300:30:33

Chris, you brought this lighter in to show us. Tell me where you got it from.

0:30:380:30:42

Well, I actually bought it in a jumble sale about 30 years-plus ago.

0:30:420:30:46

-I paid 50 pence for it.

-You bought it from a jumble sale for 50p?

0:30:460:30:50

-Yeah.

-That's brilliant.

-I took it home and cleaned it up and realised it was nine-carat gold.

-It is.

0:30:500:30:56

Absolutely, nine-carat gold, yeah. And it's got a wonderful maker's mark.

0:30:560:31:00

-Did you recognise the name at the time, Dunhill?

-Yeah, I did, yes.

0:31:000:31:04

-I sent it away to Dunhill cigarette manufacturers in London.

-Yeah.

0:31:040:31:08

-And I asked if they could repair it, cos there was a pin broken on it.

-Right.

-They refurbished it fully.

0:31:080:31:14

-They sent it back to me with no charge.

-Oh, gosh, that was very generous, wasn't it?

0:31:140:31:18

And also they offered me £100 to buy it for their museum.

0:31:180:31:23

-Wow! So how long ago was that?

-That's got to be about 30 years ago because I didn't have it that long.

0:31:230:31:28

-I wasn't planning on keeping it anyway.

-Mm.

0:31:280:31:31

But when they said it was £100, I thought I'd hang onto it, you know?

0:31:310:31:35

Exactly. So why have you changed your mind about selling it?

0:31:350:31:38

Well, it's been in a drawer for 30 years now, and I watched the Flog It! programme,

0:31:380:31:45

-and I saw you were down at Exmouth so I thought I'd bring it along just to see what it's worth now.

-Brilliant.

0:31:450:31:50

Excellent. That's good news. They've done a very good job refurbishing it.

0:31:500:31:54

-And you haven't used it, because we've got this very, very clean...

-Never been used.

-No.

0:31:540:31:59

-Not since I had it refurbished.

-Fabulous, absolutely fabulous. And it's in very good condition.

0:31:590:32:05

It's in nine-carat gold. We've got a nine-carat gold coat here.

0:32:050:32:08

And on the bottom, all the information about it. Nice nine-carat gold hallmark there.

0:32:080:32:12

Which is also hallmarked Dunhill. So the case was also made by Dunhill.

0:32:120:32:18

Some of them weren't. Some were made by a different manufacturer, and they put the Dunhill name to it.

0:32:180:32:23

-Right.

-You do get them in a variety of different forms. You get them with engine turning,

0:32:230:32:28

also, rather than this oval shape, I have seen them in a facetted form.

0:32:280:32:32

-I think it's really quite nice in its simplicity.

-Yeah.

0:32:320:32:35

-You bought it from a jumble sale, you don't know who owned it before?

-No.

0:32:350:32:39

You would have been fairly affluent to have a nine-carat gold lighter.

0:32:390:32:43

-Yeah.

-From the hallmark, it's dated 1929.

0:32:430:32:48

So it's from the late 20s. It's nice we can pinpoint the date accurately.

0:32:480:32:52

Value-wise, we might be looking somewhere in the region of £250 to £350. How do you feel about that?

0:32:520:32:59

-Sounds good.

-Good. Excellent. So would you be happy if we put an estimate of £250 to £350?

0:32:590:33:06

-Yeah.

-And a firm reserve of £250. How would you feel about that?

0:33:060:33:10

-I was thinking more a £300 reserve.

-£300 reserve, OK.

0:33:100:33:14

So we'll say £300 to £400 with a reserve of £300.

0:33:140:33:17

I hope that's not a little bit too high, it might be, but let's keep our fingers crossed.

0:33:170:33:22

-I could always keep it and it would go up in value.

-That's very true. It will not go down in value.

0:33:220:33:28

-Brilliant. Thank you very much for bringing it in.

-Thank you.

-We look forward to the auction.

0:33:280:33:33

-Hopefully it will be very successful for you.

-Hopefully, yes.

-Thank you.

0:33:330:33:37

'Whatever happens, you're onto a winner, Chris.

0:33:370:33:40

'It's time for our final valuation, and it looks like Will has found quite a collection.'

0:33:400:33:45

Well, Jean, you've come in today with a real Aladdin's cave here of various gold items.

0:33:450:33:50

-Tell me, have these come out of your own jewellery box?

-No, I inherited them many years ago.

0:33:500:33:55

Inherited pieces, OK. So you're not going to feel a pang of sentimentality when you sell them?

0:33:550:34:00

-Was it a close family member?

-No, not at all. I think I met the relation once as a child.

0:34:000:34:05

So there's no sentimental or emotional attachment to them at all.

0:34:050:34:09

OK. Let's have a look at what you have brought in. I like this necklace you have brought in,

0:34:090:34:14

which I've had a closer look at and is marked 15-carat gold, so a reasonable purity of gold.

0:34:140:34:19

-But I love this wirework onto the cabochon beads...

-Yes.

-..tied on this strung necklace.

0:34:190:34:26

-Never been tempted to wear it?

-No, I think it's hideous. I don't like it.

-There's me talking it up.

0:34:260:34:31

What about this? I don't think that's going to be in your pocket, being a gents watch.

0:34:310:34:35

And the condition of it is rather poor. Was it like that when you inherited it?

0:34:350:34:40

-I think it was, yes. It's never worked since I had it.

-Never worked, OK.

0:34:400:34:44

Well, to be honest with you, that's not really a big problem because, even though it is a pocket watch,

0:34:440:34:49

-all the value in that is in the 18-carat gold case.

-Right.

0:34:490:34:53

Then over here we've got various little charms and sweetheart brooches on this little bracelet.

0:34:530:34:59

-Again, when was the last time you ever wore a charm bracelet?

-Oh, as a child.

-Exactly.

0:34:590:35:04

-They've really fallen out of fashion.

-Yes.

-But good news is they're nearly all nine-carat gold.

0:35:040:35:11

-So that has value in the material value of what they're made of.

-Lovely.

0:35:110:35:14

These little sweetheart brooches are nearly always nine-carat gold.

0:35:140:35:18

You see a lot of those late-Victorian period.

0:35:180:35:21

And then here a little charm that perhaps fell off a bracelet.

0:35:210:35:24

Or maybe was on a chain as a little pendant locket, perhaps.

0:35:240:35:29

So, we've got 15-carat gold there, we've got 18-carat gold here,

0:35:290:35:32

we've got various nine-carat gold items there. It pains me to talk in this way,

0:35:320:35:37

but with the price of gold being so high, these are literally going to be weighed in, I'm afraid.

0:35:370:35:43

-Yes.

-And their value is purely in what they weigh.

-On the weight, right.

0:35:430:35:46

Now, the watch case, 18-carat gold,

0:35:460:35:49

you're probably looking at £300, that sort of level for the case.

0:35:490:35:54

-That does surprise me.

-It's a lot of money, isn't it? For really not a lot of gold.

-Yes.

0:35:540:35:58

The price is up there. Nine-carat gold charms and so on,

0:35:580:36:02

you're probably looking at, say, £100, £150.

0:36:020:36:06

And then for the 15-carat gold necklace, again, you're probably looking at around the £300 mark.

0:36:060:36:12

-Very good.

-Surprising, isn't it?

-Yes.

-It soon mounts up.

0:36:120:36:15

So if we think we are looking here at £750-ish, that sort of level.

0:36:150:36:19

-Good grief!

-I think we're going to need to reserve these,

0:36:190:36:22

but a lot of the buyers of these things will go to the sales armed with their digital scales.

0:36:220:36:27

-And they will weigh the items there and then. So they know exactly where to bid.

-Yes.

0:36:270:36:32

You have to allow a bit compared to the bullion price, bearing in mind that buyers pay a buyers' premium.

0:36:320:36:37

But even so, I'm confident that if you were happy to put these in

0:36:370:36:42

at £600 to £800 with a reserve at £600,

0:36:420:36:46

-I'm pretty confident we will see these away. How do you feel about that as a level?

-Sounds good. Fine.

0:36:460:36:51

What's the money going towards, maybe some jewellery you do wear?

0:36:510:36:54

-I think a nice holiday.

-Oh, very nice. Let's swap this gold for the goldy, sandy beach, how's that?

0:36:540:37:01

-Very good.

-I'll see you on the day.

-Thank you.

0:37:010:37:05

Well, that's it. We've found our final items to take off to auction.

0:37:080:37:12

So it's time to say farewell to the Pavilion here in Exmouth.

0:37:120:37:15

We've found some real treasures. Hopefully there will be one or two big surprises on our second visit.

0:37:150:37:20

Here's our experts to give you a quick reminder of what we're taking along,

0:37:200:37:24

but more importantly, why we're taking them.

0:37:240:37:27

I'm not mean enough to make my kids sit on this chair, but look,

0:37:270:37:31

a nice, clean, good quality example of a model. I think this will do quite well at the saleroom.

0:37:310:37:37

Bearing in mind Chris bought this lighter for 50p,

0:37:370:37:39

I think any Dunhill collector would be delighted to add this to their collection.

0:37:390:37:43

Seems a shame to talk about this jewellery in terms of scrap weight,

0:37:430:37:47

but it's really a reflection of the market. And if Jean gets a holiday out of it, I'm all for it.

0:37:470:37:52

'So we're back in Exeter for a last visit to the saleroom

0:37:560:38:00

'with auctioneer Chris Hampton.

0:38:000:38:02

'And first up hoping his lighter sparks a bidding frenzy is Chris.'

0:38:020:38:06

These are the stories we like to hear.

0:38:060:38:08

Picked up for 50p on a jumble sale and hopefully it's going to achieve £300 to £400. Chris, good luck.

0:38:080:38:15

-Christina, these are the stories we love.

-I know. Isn't it wonderful?

0:38:150:38:19

-Nine-carat gold, George V. Why are you selling now?

-It's been in a drawer at home for 30 to 40 years.

0:38:190:38:25

I saw your programme in Exmouth and thought I'd see how much it's worth.

0:38:250:38:29

-And we're going to find out right now.

-Fingers crossed.

0:38:290:38:32

-Hopefully we get that top end.

-Selling now at £370.

-This is it. It's exciting.

0:38:320:38:36

Dunhill, the George V nine-carat gold

0:38:360:38:39

petrol-operated cigarette lighter.

0:38:390:38:41

£200.

0:38:410:38:44

200, thank you, at £200. At 200.

0:38:440:38:47

At 220. 240. 60. 280. 300.

0:38:470:38:52

-Ah!

-At 300.

0:38:520:38:54

At £300. Where's 20? At £300.

0:38:540:38:58

-It's sold on the reserve.

-Yes.

-Selling at £300.

0:38:580:39:03

We did it! That's not a bad return on 50p. Put it there.

0:39:030:39:07

-Pleased with that.

-Good spotting, sir!

0:39:070:39:09

-That was a bit tight, wasn't it?

-It really was.

0:39:090:39:11

-THEY LAUGH

-It is a rollercoaster ride.

0:39:110:39:14

-Well done. There's commission to pay, don't forget. It's 16.5 percent plus VAT.

-Yep.

0:39:140:39:19

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you for bringing it in.

0:39:190:39:22

'Selling for 600 times the purchase price,

0:39:220:39:25

'it's a result that would have any of us on the edge of our seat.

0:39:250:39:28

'Talking of which, next is that lovely beech wood deportment chair.'

0:39:280:39:32

It's a lovely example. It belongs to Sally.

0:39:320:39:34

We're not looking for a lot of money, are we, Will? £40, £50.

0:39:340:39:38

Condition is really good. I like the bar back. It's nice and high. Makes you sit straight.

0:39:380:39:44

-Why are you selling today?

-Well, I've inherited quite a few chairs since I bought that one.

0:39:440:39:48

-And I need to do a bit of work on the ones I've inherited.

-Sure.

0:39:480:39:52

-So one has got to go.

-One has got to go, really, so hopefully it will.

0:39:520:39:56

Let's find out, shall we? And hopefully we'll find a home for it. Here we go!

0:39:560:40:01

The stained beech deportment or correction chair,

0:40:010:40:05

-and I've two bids at £40.

-Two bids straight in at 40.

-Excellent.

0:40:050:40:08

At £55. Where's 60? 60. 65?

0:40:080:40:13

In the room against the reserve.

0:40:130:40:15

-And I sell then at £65.

-HAMMER BANGS

0:40:150:40:19

Sally, it's a good result. Hammer's gone down, £65. Good clean example.

0:40:190:40:24

I'm glad that went, because if that hadn't sold,

0:40:240:40:26

-then the furniture market really would've been in the doldrums today.

-And that's quite sad.

-Exactly.

0:40:260:40:31

-I'm pleased about that.

-Good. Good. And thank you for bringing it in.

-Thank you.

0:40:310:40:36

'Before our final lot, on the preview day, I caught up with auctioneer Chris.

0:40:360:40:40

'Market values fluctuate in the antiques business, some items more than others.'

0:40:400:40:46

We've got a collection of jewellery belonging to Jean. No sentimental value.

0:40:460:40:50

She's raising money for a holiday. It includes charm bracelets, necklaces and a gold pocket watch.

0:40:500:40:56

With a value of £600 to £800 as a job lot, all that as one lot.

0:40:560:41:00

And we think it's a bit on the low side.

0:41:000:41:04

I think, given the value of gold, which has shown significant increase over the last year,

0:41:040:41:10

on the basis of that, the estimate, and therefore the reserve, does need to be a bit higher than we've got.

0:41:100:41:15

OK, currently we had a £600 reserve. What have you put the reserve up to now?

0:41:150:41:21

-We think £900.

-Wow! As much as that?

0:41:210:41:23

So, you're hoping this might do £900 to £1,200?

0:41:230:41:27

-I would hope 900 to 1,300. That sort of estimate.

-OK, wow.

0:41:270:41:32

And this is all down to the melt value, for scrap value. But hopefully a lot of this...

0:41:320:41:36

That won't get melted down, will it? There's collectables there.

0:41:360:41:39

-This is a very nice 18-carat gold watch.

-Yep.

-Nice charm bracelet.

0:41:390:41:44

So, all being well, those items will be bought for what they are,

0:41:440:41:48

-rather than to put in the pot.

-Yeah.

0:41:480:41:51

-Much interest?

-A lot of interest, yeah.

-Good. Good.

0:41:510:41:56

Well, it's your job to get on the rostrum and get that hammer going, I guess.

0:41:560:42:00

THEY LAUGH

0:42:000:42:01

'So there's no time to waste. Let's fill Jean in on what Chris said.'

0:42:010:42:06

-The original valuation, £600 to £800.

-Yeah.

-Gold prices have just gone up recently.

-Mm.

0:42:060:42:11

-Good news for you. Because I know the auctioneer has had a chat to you on the phone, hasn't he?

-Yes.

0:42:110:42:16

-The new estimate is £900 to £1,300.

-Amazing.

-Good news.

0:42:160:42:20

-You've got to keep your eye on those gold prices, haven't you?

-Exciting.

-It is, isn't it?

0:42:200:42:25

-If we wait ten minutes, hopefully the price will have gone up again.

-THEY LAUGH

0:42:250:42:29

It's going under the hammer now. This is it.

0:42:290:42:31

The gentleman's 18-carat gold, key-wound pocket watch,

0:42:310:42:36

15-carat gold rope-twist necklace with filigree beads,

0:42:360:42:39

a continental bracelet, ten charms attached, two brooches,

0:42:390:42:43

a chain and a book-form locket.

0:42:430:42:47

And I'm bid £750. At £750.

0:42:470:42:51

At 750. At £750. 800.

0:42:510:42:54

And 50. At £850.

0:42:540:42:57

-900. 50.

-I can't see who's bidding.

-Someone's left a bid on the book.

0:42:570:43:02

You don't have to be in the room, you can bid on the phone, online,

0:43:020:43:06

-or you can leave a bid on the book.

-1,200. And 50.

0:43:060:43:10

1,300. At £1,300 near me.

0:43:100:43:15

-Top end of the estimate.

-Selling now at £1,300. You all done?

0:43:150:43:19

£1,300, thank you.

0:43:190:43:21

-Oh, you must be so made up with that.

-I'm staggered!

0:43:210:43:25

-Worth getting up this morning.

-Oh, definitely.

0:43:250:43:28

'With that money going towards a holiday,

0:43:280:43:30

'I'm sure Jean will be packing her suitcase and feeling the sand between her toes in no time at all.'

0:43:300:43:36

How about that? Most people have gone home happy. That's what it's all about.

0:43:360:43:40

As you see, the auction is still on. We've had a terrific time here at Exeter.

0:43:400:43:44

Thanks to everybody here for looking after us. I can't wait to come back.

0:43:440:43:47

But until then, join me again for many more surprises on Flog It! Bye-bye.

0:43:470:43:52

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:530:43:57

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:570:44:01

.

0:44:010:44:02

Paul Martin and the Flog it team are in seaside town of Exmouth. Clutching their bags and boxes - and not their buckets and spades - the locals turn out in force, giving experts Christina Trevanion and Will Axon an array of antiques and collectibles to take a look at. Christina discovers a solid gold lighter bought at a jumble sale for 50 pence, while Will lights up after spotting a 19th-century watercolour of an attractive lady. Paul also takes a trip back to the age of steam when he visits the South Devon Railway.