Wells Flog It!


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Wells

Paul Martin and experts Anita Manning and Will Axon are at Wells Cathedral in Somerset and are spoilt for choice. The team finds diamond rings and a giant pair of boots.


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Today we're in Wells in Somerset, at the city's stunning cathedral.

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From this vantage point, you can see why this cathedral

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is considered to be one of the most stunning in the country.

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Welcome to Flog It!

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I think today I'm going to be walking around

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with a big smile on my face, because we have come

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to one of the prettiest venues I have ever filmed in on Flog It! -

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Wells Cathedral.

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All you need is a big queue.

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Well, we're in the cloisters because, although it looks

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bright and sunny outside, it is biting cold,

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so we've brought everybody inside. That's where the queue starts

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and it keeps on going and going and going.

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Hopeful people all laden with unwanted antiques and collectibles.

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This is where their journey starts.

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We've got the experts, they've got the antiques,

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we're going to put a show together

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and hopefully send someone home with an awful lot of money.

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I think it's time to get everybody inside the cathedral now

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and get on with the valuations.

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Sorting the trash from the treasure this week

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are two Flog It! favourites -

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experts Will Axon and Anita Manning.

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They're both past masters at spotting gems

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so let's hope they find some booty to boast about from this lot today.

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-That's lovely. Where did you get it?

-A car boot sale.

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-You're joking?

-No.

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It's not as old as it's purported to be. It's lost its handle.

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Yes. Can't go back home now, though, can I?

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Coming up on today's show -

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Anita gets to value some unusual diamond rings.

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That one was a millionairess's handbag clip.

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A pair of giant boots stumps Will.

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For these to be sold at auction, I think it's just going to be

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a question of what someone is prepared to pay for them.

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But none of us see what's coming.

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It just goes to show,

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it is extremely hard to put a price on something.

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When two people want it, the sky's the limit.

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Let's march on with the valuations and it looks like Anita has netted

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something rather special with Pauline's aquamarine jewellery.

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Can you tell me where you got these two wonderful pieces?

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Well, the fish I bought, it must be about 30 years ago

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in Taunton antique market.

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I was drawn to it straight away because of the colour -

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I love turquoise.

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And, of course, it was a fish and I am a Pisces.

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I can't remember what I paid for it

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but it wouldn't have been a huge amount of money.

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I was told that it was Chinese.

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I was told that the colour of the turquoise

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was in fact made of feathers.

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Then about ten years later,

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I was at an antiques fair when I found the other piece.

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I couldn't believe that there were two bits that still had

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these feathers on, so I had to buy that as well.

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They're wonderful pieces. I love jewellery

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and I love this age and this type of jewellery.

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It's from the 1920s and 1930s. It is Chinese.

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That's what I wanted to know.

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But this would have been made for the export market,

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for the British market.

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If we look at it, we can see, as you said,

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this wonderful turquoise colour.

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It may be a kingfisher

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but in China, it could have been some other exotic bird.

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It is a gilt metal, perhaps silver,

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but it would never have been an expensive piece at the time.

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The shape is wonderful. It has sculptural qualities.

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This pendant here, the combination of the turquoise blue

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and this marvellous coral colour.

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-In fact, these are corals.

-Are they?

-Yes. These are little pieces of coral.

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The combination of colours is absolutely wonderful.

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I would wear either or both of these things. Tell me, do you wear them?

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No, I don't.

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The reason is, because of the feathers,

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I would be concerned about damage, so they've been in a cabinet

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with a lot of other little tiny bits and pieces that have got

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colour and beauty, just to look at.

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You have a place for them in your little cabinet?

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-No, we've moved recently, so we no longer have the cabinet.

-So it's time, really,

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to pass them on? Yeah.

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I would like to put them to auction and I think as one lot.

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I would want to keep the estimate fairly low.

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I would have no problem with that, because I hadn't really even

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thought properly that they might have a possibility to sell.

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I would put them in perhaps at 40 to 60, 30 to 50 - would you be happy?

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Yes, I'd be happy with that.

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Let's put them in at £30 to £50 and we'll put a reserve of £30 on them.

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-OK, that's fine.

-I wouldn't want them to go for any less than 30.

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-That's kind of you.

-I'm sure they'll do much better than that.

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Thank you very much.

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Fingers crossed those marine-themed gems make a big splash

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when they go to auction in a moment.

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Over to Will now, as he sizes up the rather unusual items

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that Anne has brought in with her.

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Tell me, how have you come by these,

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cos they're not exactly a very feminine thing to be collecting?

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No, they're not.

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My husband worked in insurance all his life

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and we've bought these over the years.

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They've been in our house.

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He started with Norwich Union, he's worked for the Northern at some time

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and finished with Phoenix.

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I bought this one for his birthday about 20 years ago.

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You obviously know what they are.

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They're the firemarks put on the front of buildings

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in a prominent position and then when the building

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unfortunately caught fire and was in danger of burning down,

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the fire engine would come out and they would

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make sure that the building was insured.

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The insurance companies owned the fire engines.

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There you go - so they would say,

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hang on a minute, we are not paid to put out Norwich Union fires,

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only Northern fires.

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I thought that might be a bit of a myth.

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I think that would go against the fireman's grain, as it where.

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I'm not a firemark expert and I don't know

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if you've become one over the years.

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No, no, no.

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What I do know is that these are reproduced in large numbers.

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There are a lot of reproduction ones.

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This one, perhaps, it looks not crisp enough to be an original.

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This one is nice and sharp, isn't it, in the way that it's cast.

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This one, I don't know if this has fallen off the building a few times

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or taken a hammering, but feeling it, it's got some weight to it.

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That's got to have a bit of value as to the lead content in it.

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Now, Anne, I look at this one

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and I think it looks like there's something missing here.

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-Has this got a bit broken off it?

-The spearhead is missing.

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-That's where the third screw went.

-How do you know all of this?

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Because I've got the book.

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-Ah!

-I've marked the page where there is...

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You could have shown me this earlier,

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I could have got a few tips out of here.

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We've got the Phoenix Assurance And The Development Of British Insurance.

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Actually, I'm glad you didn't give it to me.

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It's a hefty tome and it's a bit dry.

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Is this bookmark here going to help?

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The earliest surviving Phoenix firemark of 1782, cast in lead.

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You can see there you've got the spearhead together with the screw.

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-You've got a number here as well, so 53.

-And that's the earliest.

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If that's the earliest in 1782, you've got what looks like 6J6

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but is 616.

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It's not that far off, really, is it?

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-That could be, actually, a nice rare one.

-That's what we thought.

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-So, Anne, are you happy to sell the book with the firemarks?

-I am.

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You say you bought this one for your husband's birthday.

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What sort of money did you have to pay for that?

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I paid £100 for that one.

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You paid £100 for that one - what about these two? Remember?

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They were a lot less, something like £20.

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Reproduction ones, obviously, don't make a lot of money.

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They can make as little as £10 to £20 each.

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Right ones can make up to £100 at auction, that sort of level.

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I'm going to say...let's put all three at 100 to 150.

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-Now, if you are agreeable to that, I can fix the reserve at 100.

-Yes.

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That would be fine.

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Hopefully, on the day, we're going to find out if they're right or not.

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-I'll see you at the auction.

-Thank you.

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While Will cannot ensure that Anne's items make a fortune,

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I do hope they create a few sparks when they hit the sale room later.

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We've got a marvellous turn out from the locals of Wells today

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and our experts have already unearthed some pretty unusual finds.

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But it's my turn now and I have to say,

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I reckon I've landed the top prize

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with this gorgeous painting of Martin's.

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-Martin, what can you tell me about the watercolour?

-Not a lot, really.

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I bought it about 12 years ago at auction.

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Did you have to bid heavily for this?

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Yeah, there was quite a few after it, actually.

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I liked it and I just carried on till I got it at a sensible price.

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OK, can I ask you what you paid for it?

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I can't remember the exact amount but it was between £200 and £300.

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Did you know who it was by?

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I didn't know him before I bought the picture, I just liked it.

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-OK, you've done some research then?

-Yes.

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John Frederick Tayler, the Victorian artist.

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Renowned for his hunting scenes

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and dressing characters up in period costume.

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Even though this was a sort of Victorian artist,

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he would put people in sort of 18th century clothes

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and they'd either be hunting with dogs or hunting with hawks.

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He was born in 1802

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and he was one of Queen Victoria's favourite artists.

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If you look really closely under these lights, you can just see,

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I think it says Tayler on that rock.

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You don't normally see such good portrait work

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by John Frederick Taylor and look at the skin tones!

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It's absolutely beautiful. You can see why

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he was president of the Royal Watercolour Society, can't you?

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-It's just so good.

-The detail's really good.

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Why are you selling this, Martin?

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Well, we moved from a large country house to a suburban house.

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-It doesn't quite fit in.

-It doesn't work with low ceilings.

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If you put this into auction,

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I think you'd put it into auction with a value of £350 to £450.

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That's good.

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-And a 10% discretion, if that's OK with you at 350.

-Yeah, that's fine.

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You've made a bit of money, haven't you?

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And you've enjoyed it along the way.

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-Exactly.

-Looks a bit like Charlie Ross, one of our experts.

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Charlie's just about to go under the hammer here.

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I'm not sure how much cash Charlie Ross would make,

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but I really hope Martin's painting smashes my estimate.

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Our experts have now made their first choice of items

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to take off to auction.

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As you can see, it looks like chaos down there but right now,

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we're going to up the ante and put those valuations to the test.

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Here's our experts to give you a reminder of what we're taking

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and why we're taking them.

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I love these pieces of costume jewellery.

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They caught my eye in the crowd this morning.

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Now, costume jewellery's doing well, particularly unusual pieces.

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I'm hoping that these do much more than my estimate of 30 to 50.

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I'm pretty much out of my comfort zone with these firemarks.

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I think one might be reproduction, I'm not sure about the other one.

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I'm pinning all my hopes on the Phoenix -

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may she rise from the ashes.

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I've got to put John Frederick Tayler into auction

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because he doesn't look right in a contemporary home.

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He needs a new one.

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This is where we're putting our valuations to the test today -

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Tamlyn and Son Auction Rooms in the heart of Bridgwater.

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All auction houses charge a seller's commission

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and at this one, it's 16.5% plus VAT.

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Wielding the gavel is auctioneer Claire Rawle,

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and here's hoping she can tease out some good prices for our items.

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So, let's see how the first of our lots goes down.

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Going under the hammer right now, three firemarks belonging to Anne.

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Sadly, she can't be with us today. We do have Will, our expert.

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These marks were to be put on the outside of the house to tell

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the fire brigade you are insured so they come and put the fire out.

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Otherwise, they just walked past and say, sorry, you weren't insured.

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I had a look at these, I agree with you.

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I don't think they're quite right.

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I do agree with the valuation, though, of 100 to £150.

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I fully admitted, I was out of my comfort zone on these.

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Not really my thing.

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We thought we'd give them a go.

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-Good copies but good Victorian copies.

-Exactly.

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Let's find out how they do.

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Lot 475 - the three lead firemarks. These I have to start at £55.

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At 55, for the firemarks, at 55. Do I see 60?

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60, 5, 70, 5,

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80, 5,

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90, 5...

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£100 on the telephone. At £100, do I see 110 anywhere?

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At £100, the bid's on the telephone. All done at 100?

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Good, I'm ever so happy. That was sensible money,

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-right price for the package.

-I agree.

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-Well done, Will.

-Hopefully, she will be pleased.

-I'm sure she will.

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Will's instinct about those firemarks was obviously right

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and he was absolutely bang on estimate.

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Martin's up next and to alleviate the tension of seeing

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his prized portrait go under the hammer,

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he's brought along some moral support.

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Good to see you again. Who've you brought along?

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-This is my wife, Jackie.

-Pleased to meet you.

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Did you approve of Martin bringing this along and selling it?

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-Yes, I did.

-You did?

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-Because it doesn't fit the house.

-That's right.

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-It deserves to be in a sort of nice country house.

-Yeah.

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Well, let's hope all the bidders are here.

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There's a lot of country properties around here, the trade's here -

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-there's certainly a buzz in the place.

-There is, yes.

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Not a lot of space, is there?

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There's no space. We're hemmed in here!

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It's going under the hammer right now, good luck.

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John Frederick Tayler, portrait of a gentleman.

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Here we are, seated holding a shotgun with his setter

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and to start me away, I've got £280.

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At 280.

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-It's not enough.

-300 anywhere?

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At 280 here, at £280, do I see 300?

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At 280 then, if you're all sure. No.

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-Gosh, I'm ever so sorry.

-Never mind, it doesn't matter.

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It's a nice picture.

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But it won't suit your house so it's not going on the wall, is it?

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It will go somewhere.

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What a shame that none of the bidders wanted

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to give that gentleman a new home.

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But at least Martin and Jackie managed to see the bright side.

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Still, I do hope that Pauline's colourful Chinese gems

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have better luck.

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Coming up now, a wonderful fish brooch

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and a coral necklace belonging to Pauline, who's right next to me,

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and our wonderful expert, Anita.

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I've got to say, you look stunning and there's another fish brooch.

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I love the ones that we have in this sale.

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The colours are singing and they're very quirky.

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Not a lot of money, £30 to £50. Hopefully, you get the top end.

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Why are you selling if you're a big fan of brooches and necklaces?

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Well, because I had the offer.

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-We've come back from France specially to be attending here.

-You haven't?

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Yes, we have. If we make any money on it, it's going to go

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to Medecins Sans Frontieres.

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Well, good luck today. Good luck, Anita. Here we go, this is it.

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These are pretty.

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The Chinese gilt metal brooch

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and pendants with a kingfisher feather decoration.

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These, I have to start straight in at £100.

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-Well.

-Do I see 110 anywhere? 110, 120, 130, 140, 150, 160.

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-160, the bid's here with me.

-That's a surprise.

-£160.

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At £160 then, all done at 160.

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Wow. What happened there? I tell you what, blink and you'll miss it.

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Going straight in and straight out. £160.

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They were very pretty and the market loves quirky things.

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-Come and buy me.

-Thank you.

-A wee bit conservative again, Paul.

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A fantastic triple estimate result for Pauline

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and I really hope the wheel of fortune continues

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to spin in our favour when the next in our line-up

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comes up for sale later on in the show.

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For now, I'm off to find out how one man made his fortunes

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when he decided to breathe fresh life

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into an old and somewhat run-down city.

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When it comes to the region's vibrant urban centres,

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there's no disputing you cannot beat the variety

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and the vivacity that characterises this place.

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I'm in Bristol.

0:17:370:17:38

Like many British cities, Bristol was brutalised in the Blitz,

0:17:400:17:43

and then tinkered with at the hands of well-meaning town planners

0:17:430:17:47

during the 1960s.

0:17:470:17:49

But one man who had a major influence on how the city

0:17:490:17:52

has developed since is the enterprising

0:17:520:17:55

and distinctively unconventional George Ferguson.

0:17:550:17:58

George is a highly regarded architect,

0:17:580:18:00

the former president of the RIBA -

0:18:000:18:03

the Royal Institute of British Architects.

0:18:030:18:06

He's also the recent recipient of a CBE.

0:18:060:18:09

Known for his trademark red trousers,

0:18:100:18:12

he's more maverick campaigner than stuffed shirt professional,

0:18:120:18:16

and he's been responsible for revitalising

0:18:160:18:18

many of Bristol's landmark buildings,

0:18:180:18:21

influencing the way we think about urban regeneration.

0:18:210:18:26

But it's his conversion of this building here,

0:18:280:18:30

the Tobacco Factory in Southville,

0:18:300:18:33

where he's made his most dynamic impact.

0:18:330:18:35

And I've come to meet him here to find out more.

0:18:350:18:38

I tell you what, George, you've got a fantastic view from up here.

0:18:400:18:44

Point me some of your things out, then,

0:18:440:18:46

some of your great achievements.

0:18:460:18:48

Well, little, little achievements, really.

0:18:480:18:51

My first regeneration was buying one of those

0:18:510:18:53

little coloured houses on the hillside

0:18:530:18:56

for a few hundred quid in the '60s. A few hundred quid!

0:18:560:18:59

They were going to demolish the whole lot and build blocks of flats

0:18:590:19:03

like these ones across the hillside.

0:19:030:19:05

I painted mine pink and another friend of mine painted his blue

0:19:050:19:08

and then over the next 10, 20 years,

0:19:080:19:11

it's become that coloured hillside, including some new ones.

0:19:110:19:14

The magic thing for me is, I always looked from those houses

0:19:140:19:18

over here and you could see WD and HO Wills in the sky

0:19:180:19:23

on the top of the million square feet

0:19:230:19:26

of these wonderful red brick buildings.

0:19:260:19:29

This place was originally built and owned

0:19:290:19:32

by one of Britain's biggest tobacco businesses, WD and HO Wills.

0:19:320:19:37

They established a number of factories around this area

0:19:370:19:41

and provided work to thousands.

0:19:410:19:43

What's more, they showed an unusual level of care for their staff,

0:19:430:19:47

providing them not just with steady income

0:19:470:19:51

but with a real sense of community, too.

0:19:510:19:53

# We are the Willses girls

0:19:530:19:57

# We know our manners, we pay our tanners

0:19:570:20:00

# We are respected wherever we may go

0:20:000:20:04

# And when we're walking down Lombard Street... #

0:20:040:20:07

But in the 1970s, the factories were shut down,

0:20:070:20:10

tearing the heart out of the community.

0:20:100:20:13

When they became empty,

0:20:130:20:15

people approached me about ideas for doing something with it.

0:20:150:20:20

Unfortunately, they went into the hands of the receiver

0:20:200:20:24

and he'd decided, or been advised,

0:20:240:20:27

to demolish them all and sell it off

0:20:270:20:29

for sites for a supermarket and various things like that.

0:20:290:20:32

It seemed a waste of good fabric, good energy

0:20:320:20:37

and that it was a wonderful opportunity to make

0:20:370:20:41

a proper, sustainable, mixed-use development.

0:20:410:20:44

I lost a lot of the battle, but at least I kept this building

0:20:440:20:48

and this building enabled me to experiment

0:20:480:20:51

with the things I really believe in.

0:20:510:20:54

Today, the Tobacco Factory is a 24-hour multi-use building,

0:20:560:21:00

which houses a cafe-bar, an oriental bistro,

0:21:000:21:04

creative industry workspaces, live-work loft apartments,

0:21:040:21:09

animation and performing arts schools

0:21:090:21:12

and one of the most exciting small theatre venues in the country.

0:21:120:21:15

It's where George chose to make his home.

0:21:150:21:18

What are the dos and don'ts when it comes to regeneration?

0:21:190:21:24

I think my first rule is, go with what you've got.

0:21:240:21:28

Try and make the most of what you've got. I think too much regeneration

0:21:280:21:33

is big bang stuff - let's knock it all down

0:21:330:21:36

and put in a great big supermarket and a major hotel.

0:21:360:21:42

-That's not regeneration.

-No, and it's losing our heritage as well.

0:21:420:21:45

It's losing our heritage, but I think it doesn't attract

0:21:450:21:48

the real activity that cities are made of.

0:21:480:21:52

I start everything I do

0:21:520:21:54

thinking about what will people do here?

0:21:540:21:57

What will enable people to have more fulfilled lives in this place?

0:21:570:22:03

-So it's work and living and entertainment.

-Absolutely.

0:22:030:22:07

I think regeneration encourages independent organisations.

0:22:070:22:12

I love to encourage a high street with small shops.

0:22:120:22:16

That's what makes a proper place that buzzes.

0:22:160:22:19

The regeneration of the Tobacco Factory has been

0:22:190:22:23

something of a catalyst to this area,

0:22:230:22:25

prompting a spate of other activities

0:22:250:22:27

including a regular Sunday market and an annual urban festival.

0:22:270:22:33

It has also armed George with a blueprint for his latest projects

0:22:330:22:36

including an old chocolate factory in East Bristol.

0:22:360:22:40

This is a tiny little section of the chocolate factory

0:22:410:22:44

but it's a series of buildings, five of them, and then

0:22:440:22:47

they've got these glazed covered streets running through them.

0:22:470:22:50

To link them together.

0:22:500:22:52

If you demolish that,

0:22:520:22:54

you would end up probably building a housing estate.

0:22:540:22:57

It would be like anywhere else. By keeping these buildings,

0:22:570:23:00

one builds something really special,

0:23:000:23:02

that has a brilliant address -

0:23:020:23:03

The Chocolate Factory is pretty hard to beat.

0:23:030:23:06

That's a cool address. What fabulous buildings as well.

0:23:060:23:10

This would be workspace with residential up here.

0:23:100:23:13

This is residential with workspace down here.

0:23:130:23:15

As it goes across the site, it will become

0:23:150:23:18

more and more residential and then

0:23:180:23:20

houses along a cycle track that are designed for cycling families,

0:23:200:23:25

so they don't have garages, they have cycle stores.

0:23:250:23:28

Brilliant. Absolutely brilliant, George,

0:23:280:23:30

and it's been a real pleasure to meet you at last.

0:23:300:23:33

Great to meet you, Paul, and the pink trousers.

0:23:330:23:36

It's goodbye, Bristol, and hello again, Wells,

0:23:390:23:42

as we return to the cathedral for our next batch of valuations,

0:23:420:23:45

and it looks like Will's in for a giant surprise,

0:23:450:23:48

with the next item Liz and Conran have walked in with.

0:23:480:23:51

Now, I'm not going to lie to you, I would not like to meet the guy

0:23:530:23:56

who's wearing these in a dark alley at night.

0:23:560:23:58

Have you got the BFG at home or something?

0:23:580:24:00

Where have these come from?

0:24:000:24:02

They're an heirloom. Always been in our home. We've always loved them.

0:24:020:24:05

It's amazing. I've never seen anything like it.

0:24:050:24:07

I mean, what size are these?

0:24:070:24:09

I'm a size seven or eight when I'm lucky, and I'm feeling bigger than I am.

0:24:090:24:13

-What size are these?

-42.

-Size 42!

0:24:130:24:16

You said they've been in the family, for how long?

0:24:160:24:19

When I was about five, my father was given them by the manufacturer.

0:24:190:24:24

My father was a shoe retailer.

0:24:240:24:26

Ah! There's the connection.

0:24:260:24:27

And they've not been on display, but his father, my grandfather,

0:24:270:24:32

saw them in a parade in the town, about 1906.

0:24:320:24:35

I was looking at them and trying to work out a date,

0:24:350:24:38

because of the style, and so on, and you got these nice little hooks.

0:24:380:24:42

That would date them from the turn of the century, about 1900.

0:24:420:24:47

If I tip this one up - ooh!

0:24:470:24:50

It's not that heavy, but they are heavy!

0:24:500:24:52

If I tip that one up, we can see under here, we've got "Ivy."

0:24:520:24:55

Now, is that the firm that was making these?

0:24:550:24:58

The firm was Rhodes Rawling of Halifax, and it was the Ivy brand shoe.

0:24:580:25:03

And look at all these hob nails here! And, each one, stamped.

0:25:030:25:07

They're solid leather.

0:25:080:25:09

I was going to say, all of this is leather, including the soles.

0:25:090:25:13

-So, they're leather uppers.

-Yep.

0:25:130:25:14

I noticed you had to use a bit of ribbon.

0:25:140:25:17

It's difficult to get such long laces.

0:25:170:25:19

-And you packed them with newspaper?

-To stop them collapsing and cracking.

0:25:190:25:23

I was going to ask you, does he make you polish them?

0:25:230:25:25

Yes, I do polish them.

0:25:250:25:27

Because if you don't polish them, they're just going to dry out,

0:25:270:25:31

crack and be ruined.

0:25:310:25:33

I suppose that's where all the other things like this have gone.

0:25:330:25:36

Again, that's probably a couple of pots of polish in one go

0:25:360:25:39

and plenty of elbow grease.

0:25:390:25:42

There's a bit of damage here, but they're over 100 years old.

0:25:420:25:45

They're in great condition.

0:25:450:25:47

-Have you ever been tempted to put them on?

-I did wear them.

0:25:470:25:50

I won a fancy dress competition! I went as a clown.

0:25:500:25:54

I was asked to stop walking about and scratching the floors!

0:25:540:25:58

Because of the old hob nails. Exactly.

0:25:580:26:01

I mean, value-wise, this puts me in a tricky position,

0:26:010:26:05

because I haven't got anything I can compare these to.

0:26:050:26:08

I can't tell you, well, last week, I sold a pair, and they made X.

0:26:080:26:11

For these to sell at auction, it's going to be a question

0:26:110:26:14

of what someone's prepared to pay for them,

0:26:140:26:16

and that's the only way you're going to be able to value them.

0:26:160:26:19

They've got to be worth £100-£200, just for the novelty value.

0:26:190:26:23

So, let's put them in at £100-£200.

0:26:230:26:26

Let's reserve them at £100.

0:26:260:26:27

They've got to be worth that, all day long, surely.

0:26:270:26:30

And they could make three figures, they could make four figures.

0:26:300:26:34

The proof will be on the day.

0:26:340:26:35

Get them onto the market and let the market decide what they're worth.

0:26:350:26:39

We'll find out if there's a bidder big enough

0:26:390:26:42

for those boots in a moment.

0:26:420:26:45

But let's go over to the other side of the room now,

0:26:470:26:50

where Anita's taking a shine to a diamond collection

0:26:500:26:53

that Pamela has brought along with her.

0:26:530:26:55

Pamela, we have some pretty impressive diamonds here.

0:26:570:27:03

Tell me, where did you get them?

0:27:030:27:06

Well, these were left to me, and the middle one was from a friend,

0:27:060:27:10

but they've been my pride and joy for quite some time.

0:27:100:27:14

-And it's time somebody else had the pleasure.

-Did you wear them?

0:27:140:27:17

It was my 80th birthday recently, and I had them all on,

0:27:170:27:22

and I was so glittery and shiny.

0:27:220:27:24

Well, let's look at them individually.

0:27:240:27:28

If we look at this one first, it's a wee bit of a puzzle because,

0:27:280:27:34

although we have a modern setting here, we have five old cut diamonds.

0:27:340:27:40

Did you have it reset at any time?

0:27:400:27:42

Yes, I did, because my mother-in-law left me two bar settings,

0:27:420:27:47

and I would never have worn them, so I had them set like this.

0:27:470:27:51

And since then, I've worn them.

0:27:510:27:53

This is a very '60s setting.

0:27:530:27:55

Very much so.

0:27:550:27:56

If you had kept the five diamonds in this ring together, in a straight,

0:27:560:28:02

there would have been more commercial value today,

0:28:020:28:06

than in that 1960s setting.

0:28:060:28:08

I understand that, but I would never have worn it.

0:28:080:28:11

There's no point in having diamonds if you can't wear them.

0:28:110:28:14

-I think that's absolutely right!

-It's true!

-What a wonderful phrase!

0:28:140:28:18

It's true.

0:28:180:28:20

There are 3.5 carats of diamonds there,

0:28:200:28:23

and I would say that a sensible estimate would be £2,000-£2,500.

0:28:230:28:31

Yes.

0:28:310:28:32

-Would you feel happy to sell it within that range?

-I would.

0:28:320:28:37

-You would. It's time to pass it on.

-It's time.

0:28:370:28:40

-Shall we put a reserve on it?

-Please.

0:28:400:28:43

And the reserve you would like?

0:28:430:28:45

-£2,000, please.

-£2,000. I, personally, like this one very much.

0:28:450:28:50

I think that this is a gorgeous ring.

0:28:500:28:53

And it has a lovely 1930s look about it.

0:28:530:28:57

I think aquamarines and diamonds are a lovely combination.

0:28:570:29:03

-It's almost like water.

-It's almost like water. That's right.

0:29:030:29:06

Auction estimate on that? I would put £700-£900.

0:29:060:29:12

That's fair.

0:29:120:29:13

Reserve, I think, bring it down a bit, 600, 650.

0:29:130:29:19

What reserve do you want me to put on it?

0:29:190:29:22

-650, I think.

-650. Now, what about this one?

0:29:230:29:28

That one was a millionairess's handbag clip.

0:29:280:29:32

She had one either side on the handbag, and she pushed them,

0:29:320:29:37

and the handbag opened.

0:29:370:29:40

And a friend of mine had one, and I had the other.

0:29:400:29:43

That must've been a very expensive handbag.

0:29:430:29:46

She had a collection of them!

0:29:460:29:49

-Did you wear this one?

-Oh, yes!

0:29:490:29:50

-Was that great fun?

-Yes.

0:29:500:29:53

I think, value on it, £800-£1,200.

0:29:540:29:58

I'm looking again at the diamond content.

0:29:580:30:01

So, 800-1,200, reserve of, say, 750.

0:30:010:30:04

-Eight?

-Eight?

0:30:060:30:08

I want you to be happy.

0:30:080:30:11

Yes, eight. I don't want it to go for less.

0:30:110:30:13

Of course. We will put a reserve of 800 on it.

0:30:130:30:17

Well, we have three little beauties.

0:30:170:30:20

You've enjoyed wearing them.

0:30:200:30:22

You wore them for your 80th birthday.

0:30:220:30:24

What are you going to do for your 90th?

0:30:240:30:26

Well, I shall be very pleased to be on my legs.

0:30:260:30:29

Never mind what I'm wearing, as long as I can walk all right!

0:30:290:30:32

Those rings may not be set in a modern way,

0:30:320:30:34

but they say diamonds are a girl's best friend!

0:30:340:30:39

So I hope they sway the ladies when they enter the sale room later.

0:30:390:30:42

Over to Will now, and it looks like he's beaten a retreat

0:30:420:30:46

and headed to a quieter location to value Ros and Keith's vase.

0:30:460:30:50

You've brought along what I would say is a fairly decent sized

0:30:520:30:56

bit of Denby-ware. What can you tell me about this?

0:30:560:30:58

Is this something you've bought yourselves?

0:30:580:31:01

We had it given us when we first got married,

0:31:010:31:04

basically to put flowers in because my father used to grow chrysanthemums

0:31:040:31:08

and we've had it ever since, which is 44 years this month, in fact.

0:31:080:31:12

-Right, so it was a wedding gift.

-Mm hmm.

0:31:120:31:14

And you've had it all this time

0:31:140:31:15

and looking at it, it looks in pretty good condition.

0:31:150:31:19

Has it been pride of place on the sideboard with flowers ever since?

0:31:190:31:22

Or have you relegated it to somewhere...?

0:31:220:31:25

No, it's been in the porch with the umbrellas in

0:31:250:31:28

and it's been in the garage.

0:31:280:31:30

Not a chip or a mark on it. It's had a umbrellas in and out of it!

0:31:300:31:33

-So what happened to the idea of putting flowers in it?

-Too heavy!

0:31:330:31:37

That's the thing, because it's got some weight to it, hasn't it?

0:31:370:31:40

That's typical of what we would call stoneware,

0:31:400:31:43

which is what this is, which is the mix of clay,

0:31:430:31:46

so it usually ends up in a much heavier, denser body,

0:31:460:31:49

which in turn is more durable.

0:31:490:31:51

Denby actually started in the early 19th century making domestic wares

0:31:530:31:59

and then they developed a more artistic studio sort of department,

0:31:590:32:03

where they experimented more on design and glazes and shapes.

0:32:030:32:07

I think it was the Second World War where Glyn Colledge joined

0:32:070:32:12

and he was responsible for the hand-painted stoneware department.

0:32:120:32:16

If we look underneath, as we always like to do with ceramics,

0:32:160:32:19

we've got a nice mark there, if you can see that.

0:32:190:32:22

We've got the Denby and the "Made in England" mark.

0:32:220:32:25

The Glyn Colledge pieces that really make the top money

0:32:250:32:28

are those that are signed by him.

0:32:280:32:31

This is a later mark.

0:32:310:32:32

I would say that mark is '60s - I don't know if that ties in when you were married.

0:32:320:32:37

What was the date?

0:32:370:32:38

1967.

0:32:380:32:40

'67. OK, so that would sort of tie in with that.

0:32:400:32:43

With Denby-ware, it's, I think, becoming more and more collectible

0:32:430:32:47

and people are sort of reassessing the quality of it

0:32:470:32:51

and the impact it had at the time.

0:32:510:32:54

You know, the post-war period, the modernist design,

0:32:540:32:57

people were looking forwards rather than back,

0:32:570:33:00

and that appeals nowadays.

0:33:000:33:01

People like to sort of revisit that period in design.

0:33:010:33:05

Because of that, prices are creeping up

0:33:050:33:08

and to be fair, there's a lot of pot there for your money.

0:33:080:33:11

How would you feel if we put it in at £80 to £120

0:33:110:33:15

with a reserve of £80?

0:33:150:33:17

I'd let it go at 80.

0:33:170:33:19

You would?

0:33:190:33:21

If it didn't fetch that, I'd sooner take it back home with me,

0:33:210:33:25

especially with what you just said with it creeping up.

0:33:250:33:29

Listen, we're agreed at 80 to 120, we'll fix that reserve at £80

0:33:290:33:33

and hopefully, that will be cash in your pocket to spend on your good lady wife.

0:33:330:33:37

I look forward to seeing you at the sale room.

0:33:370:33:40

I do hope that Denby vase sells

0:33:400:33:42

and Ros gets a nice treat from Keith with the proceeds.

0:33:420:33:45

Our experts have just found their final items to take off to auction.

0:33:450:33:50

You've just seen them.

0:33:500:33:51

I've got my favourites and you've probably got yours,

0:33:510:33:54

but right now, it will be all down to the bidders.

0:33:540:33:56

We've got to let them decide exactly what it's worth.

0:33:560:33:59

This is where we put the pressure on.

0:33:590:34:01

We're making our way to the saleroom

0:34:010:34:03

and we'll leave you with a recap from our experts of what we're taking and why.

0:34:030:34:08

What we have here is my favourite lot of the day without doubt.

0:34:080:34:11

But what are they worth? I've never seen a pair, I don't think you have.

0:34:110:34:15

We'll find out on the day.

0:34:150:34:16

I think, secretly, these could make four figures.

0:34:160:34:21

These are the most expensive items that I've seen today

0:34:210:34:24

and jewellery is doing well,

0:34:240:34:26

but the reserves are quite high,

0:34:260:34:29

so we'll just have to keep our fingers crossed.

0:34:290:34:34

Here's my top tip for the day -

0:34:340:34:35

I think this Denby is on its way up

0:34:350:34:37

and I tell you what - it's a lot of pot for your money.

0:34:370:34:40

We're back at the auction house in Bridgwater

0:34:420:34:45

and it is time to discover how the rest of today's items perform

0:34:450:34:49

as they get set to go under auctioneer Claire Rawle's hammer.

0:34:490:34:52

And first up, it's the Denby vase that's been somewhat mistreated

0:34:530:34:57

by Ros and Keith.

0:34:570:34:59

You could put a plant, umbrellas in it,

0:34:590:35:01

stick it in the garage, put paint in it, put it outdoors.

0:35:010:35:03

It goes anywhere. It's the Denby-ware pot.

0:35:030:35:06

It's been used and abused.

0:35:060:35:07

-Lets hope we haven't got to put it back in the garage.

-We need around £100.

0:35:070:35:11

-Well, £80 or so.

-Yeah.

0:35:110:35:13

I mean, we might be forcing the market a little bit here.

0:35:130:35:16

-I'm 50-50 as to whether this is going to go.

-I don't think it will.

0:35:160:35:20

We need a couple of speculators in the crowd.

0:35:200:35:24

Let's see if it's pitched right on the rostrum

0:35:240:35:27

as a multi-purpose antique that can be used for everything.

0:35:270:35:30

Lot 400 is a large Denby stoneware jug.

0:35:310:35:35

Probably a Glyn Colledge design.

0:35:350:35:39

There we are, nice large jug, this, and I start it at £55.

0:35:390:35:43

At 55. Do I see 60 anywhere?

0:35:430:35:46

At 55. At 55 for the Denby.

0:35:460:35:49

At 55. 60.

0:35:490:35:52

At £55. Are you all sure?

0:35:520:35:54

-At 55.

-Can't see this going.

-It's not selling, is it?

0:35:540:35:57

You were right, weren't you?

0:35:570:35:59

-Lot 405.

-Sorry.

0:36:000:36:02

-I think I was talked up a bit on the day by you, wasn't I?!

-Hm.

0:36:020:36:05

-At least he agreed with me!

-I did.

0:36:070:36:10

I'll hold him, you tickle him.

0:36:100:36:12

-You said they were going up in price.

-They are.

0:36:120:36:15

It is becoming more fashionable. What would have helped is a Glyn Colledge signature.

0:36:150:36:19

It's one for the future, bear that in mind.

0:36:190:36:22

We'll have to take it back and put it in the garage!

0:36:220:36:24

While Will was overzealous with his estimate, another ten years

0:36:240:36:29

on Ros and Keith's shelf and I reckon that vase will fly.

0:36:290:36:33

Let's bring on some bling. It's Pamela up next.

0:36:340:36:37

Diamonds are a girl's best friend. We're about to find out. I've been joined by Pamela,

0:36:390:36:43

who looks gorgeous. We've got three rings split into three lots.

0:36:430:36:46

Hopefully, the jewellery buyers are here, we'll get the top end.

0:36:460:36:50

This is it, Pamela.

0:36:500:36:51

We're moving on to this large aquamarine and diamond dress ring.

0:36:530:36:58

Lot 73.

0:36:580:37:00

A nice, large ring this,

0:37:000:37:02

and I have to start... I've got £580.

0:37:020:37:04

At 580.

0:37:040:37:06

At 580, do I see 600 in the room? 600,

0:37:060:37:10

620, 650. In the room at £650.

0:37:100:37:15

At 650.

0:37:150:37:17

680 anywhere? At £650. If you're all done.

0:37:170:37:20

-Selling, then, at 650.

-Selling right on the reserve.

0:37:200:37:23

Never mind. It is sold.

0:37:230:37:25

The next ring, £2,000 to £2,500. This is the big one.

0:37:250:37:30

This is the big one.

0:37:300:37:32

The big one!

0:37:320:37:33

Lot 79, which is this large 18K ring made up of nice old diamonds.

0:37:350:37:43

Nice large ring. Lot 79.

0:37:430:37:45

Start away at £1,100. At 1,100.

0:37:450:37:50

Do I see 12 anywhere?

0:37:500:37:52

At 1,100. 12, 13, 14, 15.

0:37:520:37:56

1,500 with me.

0:37:560:37:58

-At 1,500. Do I see 1,600 anywhere?

-(Come on.)

0:37:580:38:02

At £1,500.

0:38:020:38:03

At 1,500, are you all done at 1,500?

0:38:030:38:08

No, that's not quite enough, I'm afraid.

0:38:080:38:10

-OK. That one's going back on the finger!

-Back on the finger.

0:38:100:38:15

Now for the last one, Pamela, this is it.

0:38:150:38:17

This is this rather unusual 18-carat gold ring.

0:38:190:38:22

Made out of a handbag clasp, I think, and set with diamonds.

0:38:220:38:26

Lot 85.

0:38:260:38:27

And I start away at 720. At 720. Do I see 750 anywhere?

0:38:270:38:32

With me at 720. At 720. Now 750?

0:38:320:38:35

At £720.

0:38:350:38:38

All rather quiet in the room.

0:38:380:38:40

At 720 it is. All done.

0:38:400:38:42

No, that stays here with me, I'm afraid.

0:38:420:38:45

-That's going back on the finger, as well.

-You look happy!

0:38:450:38:48

That big smile!

0:38:480:38:49

-You can carry that off with style.

-Oh, yes.

0:38:510:38:54

-I've got another few years, haven't I?

-You have.

0:38:540:38:57

We got the first one away.

0:38:570:38:59

It's a total of £650. The rest you get to wear.

0:38:590:39:03

It's been a real pleasure meeting you. You've brightened up my day.

0:39:030:39:06

Sadly, not all those rings were to everyone's taste but at least Pamela

0:39:080:39:12

got to walk away with a nice chunk of cash.

0:39:120:39:14

Finally, it's the one I've been waiting for.

0:39:160:39:19

Liz and Conran's super-sized boots.

0:39:190:39:23

Liz and Conran, thank you for putting a smile

0:39:230:39:25

on all our faces at the valuation day in Wells Cathedral.

0:39:250:39:28

-The boots turned up. Will said, "I've got to have those!"

-They're great.

-He zoomed in.

0:39:280:39:32

I think they're my favourite thing I've done so far on Flog It!

0:39:320:39:36

Do you know, when you take time to look at them, the quality is superb.

0:39:360:39:40

Where have you had them over the last few years?

0:39:400:39:42

-They were on show. We always had them on the piano, or the side of the stairs.

-Right.

0:39:420:39:48

-An entertaining thing to have in the house.

-Yeah.

0:39:480:39:51

I can't wait for Claire to introduce these. Let's see what she says.

0:39:510:39:55

Here we go. A pair of size 42 black leather Balmoral boots.

0:39:550:40:02

Wonderful items. And I start away at £75. At 75.

0:40:020:40:05

Do I see 80 anywhere? 80.

0:40:050:40:08

5, 90, 5.

0:40:080:40:09

100. 110. 120.

0:40:090:40:12

130.

0:40:120:40:13

140, 150, 160, 170.

0:40:130:40:16

180, 190.

0:40:160:40:18

200, 220? 220.

0:40:180:40:20

240. 260. 280.

0:40:200:40:23

300.

0:40:230:40:25

320. 340. 360.

0:40:250:40:27

380. 400. 420.

0:40:270:40:30

440. 460.

0:40:300:40:32

480. 500. 520.

0:40:320:40:35

520. Now, 550 anywhere?

0:40:350:40:38

550, fresh bidder. 600. 650.

0:40:380:40:42

700. 750. 800. 850.

0:40:420:40:46

900 on the telephone.

0:40:460:40:48

950? 950.

0:40:480:40:50

1,000?

0:40:500:40:51

1,000.

0:40:510:40:52

And 50.

0:40:520:40:54

1,050. 1,100.

0:40:540:40:55

1,100. 1,150.

0:40:570:41:00

1,200.

0:41:020:41:04

1,250.

0:41:040:41:05

1,300. 1,350.

0:41:070:41:09

1,400.

0:41:100:41:12

1,450.

0:41:120:41:14

1,500.

0:41:140:41:15

1,550.

0:41:160:41:17

1,600.

0:41:170:41:19

1,650.

0:41:190:41:20

1,700.

0:41:200:41:22

1,750. 1,800.

0:41:220:41:25

-Wow.

-(It's gone quiet.)

0:41:250:41:27

Your valuation was a load of cobblers, wasn't it?!

0:41:270:41:30

-1,900.

-Thank you for that.

0:41:300:41:32

1,950.

0:41:320:41:34

Not going to fill it up to 2,000?! 1,950. Ooh.

0:41:350:41:39

2,000 on the other telephone.

0:41:390:41:41

2,100. 2,200?

0:41:410:41:43

22?

0:41:450:41:47

23.

0:41:470:41:48

2,400?

0:41:490:41:51

2,500.

0:41:510:41:53

2,600. 2,700.

0:41:550:41:57

2,800.

0:41:590:42:00

What?!

0:42:000:42:02

2,900.

0:42:020:42:03

Now, even this beggars belief.

0:42:030:42:05

-3,000.

-I actually pitched this at £400 to £600.

-3,100.

0:42:050:42:09

I'm glad you don't say I pitched these at £4-6,000.

0:42:090:42:12

-£4-600.

-3,200.

0:42:120:42:14

3,300.

0:42:140:42:16

3,400.

0:42:160:42:19

Come on, you can't leave 'em now!

0:42:240:42:27

3,400 on the telephone.

0:42:270:42:30

At 3,400. Are you sure?

0:42:300:42:33

3,000... 3,500?

0:42:330:42:35

-3,500.

-Hey, gone one more!

0:42:350:42:38

3,600, then.

0:42:410:42:43

Are you sure?

0:42:430:42:44

-SHE LAUGHS

-3,600.

0:42:440:42:47

At 3,600, on the telephone.

0:42:470:42:50

At 3,600, are you sure?

0:42:510:42:53

You're sure. You're not bidding!

0:42:530:42:56

3,600 it is, then. Are you sure? 3,600.

0:42:570:43:01

-£3,600.

-APPLAUSE

0:43:010:43:06

Well done.

0:43:060:43:07

-£3,600.

-Thank you.

-I don't know what for!

0:43:070:43:11

-I got it wrong!

-Thank you for bringing such a quirky item in.

0:43:110:43:14

It just goes to show, it is extremely hard to put a price on something.

0:43:140:43:18

When two people want it, the sky's the limit.

0:43:180:43:20

I'm tingling, are you tingling?

0:43:200:43:22

What a wonderful way to end today's programme.

0:43:220:43:25

What a brilliant day we've had. I hope you've enjoyed it.

0:43:250:43:28

Join us again for much more fun and some more surprises next time.

0:43:280:43:31

Enjoy the rest of the afternoon. Until then, goodbye.

0:43:310:43:34

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:340:43:36

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:360:43:38

Paul Martin and experts Anita Manning and Will Axon are at Wells Cathedral in Somerset and are spoilt for choice by the sheer variety of items the locals have brought along for them to value. While Anita's head is turned by some diamond rings, it's a giant pair of boots that make biggest impression on Will. Paul takes a chance to heads to Bristol to meet a man responsible for breathing fresh life into the city.