Crathes Castle Flog It!


Crathes Castle

Paul Martin and experts Adam Partridge and Anita Manning are in Aberdeenshire. The team finds a Chinese kimono and a coin collection that surprises everyone.


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Transcript


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Today's programme comes from Crathes Castle in Aberdeenshire.

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This magnificent building has been home to the Burnett family for 350 years.

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For one day only, it's home to Flog It! Welcome to the show.

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The sun is shining. I've got a good feeling.

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I'm feeling happy and I hope so is this lot.

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That's the very end of the queue.

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It looks like the whole of Aberdeenshire has turned up.

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This is where their journey starts, a Flog It! valuation day.

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If you want to take part, you've got to come to one of these.

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Our experts pick the most interesting treasures

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to put to auction where, hopefully, we can make you a small fortune.

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I'm now at the front of the queue. Are you ready to go in?

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-EVERYONE: Yes!

-Come on, then!

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'Let's find out who our experts are today.

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'Adam Partridge is an accomplished violinist

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'who specialises in musical instruments.

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'He also seems to be skilled in wooing the ladies!'

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-You've broken my heart!

-Don't be like that!

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It's my kind of woman!

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'He's joined by Glaswegian auctioneer Anita Manning.

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'Isn't Adam meant to be the musical one?'

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HONKS

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ANITA LAUGHS

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'Coming up on today's Flog It! Anita gets in the mood for a party.'

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I love dressing up and this is the most wonderful kimono.

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'Adam soldiers on, despite the unpredictable weather.'

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I'm going to quickly value them as the rain is tumbling.

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-That sounds good.

-ANYTHING sounds good in our current condition!

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'And stay tuned for big surprises, when we take our items to auction.'

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I'm speechless.

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'Well, we've got a great turnout.

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'Our crowd can't wait to put our experts through their paces.

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'Adam's first up with Donald, who's brought in this pocket telescope.'

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-Good morning, Donald. How are you?

-I'm fab, on this wonderful day.

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-Beautiful day, lovely location.

-Absolutely perfect.

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-Castle behind us, couldn't get better.

-Not at all.

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You've brought in a telescope, which is useful round here.

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There's plenty of sights to see. Tell me about your telescope.

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Are you a maritime chap?

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Not really. I got it as a present from my oldest stepdaughter,

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-Anna, eight years ago at Christmas.

-Right.

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Because she says I like "old things". It's the usual story.

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-It's been in the drawer for eight years.

-How do you think she'll feel?

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She'll be fine. It was going to be sold at some point.

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-That was the point of it.

-Everything gets sold eventually.

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It's not a rare object, really.

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It's mid-19th century, mahogany with brass, and it extends.

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It's quite nice because it's an Edinburgh mark on it.

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Scottish origin or Scottish retail.

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-Is that fully extended?

-That's it.

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It sits in your pocket then extends all that way.

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-There we've got Lennie of Edinburgh.

-Who would have used it?

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Well, I would have thought it would have been used on the ships.

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But I think it's a pocket telescope. It's not a great big posh one.

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I think it would have had a leather case.

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Lennie of Edinburgh was the retailer

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of the mid 19th century, and it collapses down to just hand size.

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Leather outer case and it probably would have had a protective cap.

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You see these with a brass cap to keep that lens safe.

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-It looks in good condition. Ever used it?

-I've only used it once.

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-Only once?

-Yeah.

-But it looks as though it's functioning.

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You decided to put it into auction?

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-Yes.

-On Flog It!

-Yes.

-Any idea what it's worth?

-No.

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-No?

-No.

-No guess at all?

-No guess.

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I would expect £30 to £50, estimate.

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-It might do a bit better, hopefully make £50 or £60.

-OK.

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-Do you know what she paid for it?

-No. I've never asked her.

-No.

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-"Thanks for me telescope. How much was it?"

-Exactly.

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How does that sound, value-wise?

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-That sounds fine.

-We should put a reserve of £30. We don't want you disappointed.

-That's fair enough.

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I think it'll find its own value.

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-Again, because it's relatively local...

-Yeah.

-Scottish, anyway.

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You'd hope it'll have a greater appeal than one with a London mark.

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-Well, good luck. Thanks for coming along.

-Thank you.

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'It's great to see a Scottish item here.

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'Next up is Fiona, who's brought in something from much further afield.'

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Fiona, welcome to Flog It! Thank you for bringing this very nice oriental vase. Where did you get it?

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It belonged to an aunt who died in January, and she left it to me.

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-Do you like it?

-I wasn't sure about it.

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Another one she gave me, I like better.

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My husband's always thought this was more expensive.

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-He likes this one.

-He likes this one?

-Yes.

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It would have been one of a pair.

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-Do you have the other one?

-No.

-OK. Let's have a look at it.

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Oriental wares are highly sought after today.

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People want to buy Chinese items.

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I'm finding that oriental items are going higher than expected.

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This vase is what we call "famille rose",

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because of this rather lovely pink colour in the design of the vase.

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It's from, probably, 1890, 1900, 1910.

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So it's not an early one.

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I would like to look at the bottom to see if we have any marks.

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There are no marks on the bottom.

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This leads me to believe that it is export ware.

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That means porcelain, pottery which was made

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for the export market.

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In Victorian times,

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there was a great love of all things exotic and oriental.

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We imported large quantities of Chinese porcelain into Britain.

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In the west of Scotland, in Glasgow,

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we had many sea-faring folk, because it was a port.

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Often, captains would bring this type of thing.

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Was your aunt in any way involved with sea-faring men?

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I think the only person I could recall would have been her brother,

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who lived in Canada, and he travelled quite a lot.

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But whether it was him that brought this back, I don't know.

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OK. I like this little vase here. The painting is of some quality.

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Not the highest quality, but of some quality.

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There's lots of content there.

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At the front, we have these figures in an interior.

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Obviously, it's a situation of entertainment, or whatever.

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We have smaller figures outside of the house.

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We have rather pretty butterflies, flowers

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and so on, so there's lots of movement.

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There's lots of decoration on the vase. It's an extremely pretty one.

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Value. What sort of value do you...?

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-No idea.

-You've no idea at all?

-No idea at all.

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-Do you think it's something like 50 to a million?

-I hardly think so!

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If it is, my dog's tail's been wagging against it,

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-so I'd be really worried!

-OK.

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This is, as I say, for the export market, but it's a pretty one.

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Value on it, I would say 100 to 150, 80 to 120.

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-Would you be happy to sell it in that region?

-Yes, I would.

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Let's put it in at 100 to 150.

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We should put a reserve on it of £80. Would you be happy with that?

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Yes, I would.

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So I think that this should do quite well and you never know,

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the Chinese market is so strong

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-and things are taking flyers in the salerooms.

-Good. Good.

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'Wise words from Anita. Fiona may not like that vase,

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'but I've a feeling it'll find a new home where somebody will love it.'

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If you've got any unwanted antiques and collectables,

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bring them to one of our valuation days.

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Your journey starts right now.

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Details of dates and venues are on our website - bbc.co.uk/flogit

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All the information will be there. I would love to see you.

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Or check the details in your local press.

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'Back to the tables, and Linda's brought a great goblet collection.'

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-Good afternoon, Linda.

-Good afternoon.

-How are you doing?

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-Fine, thank you.

-You've brought an impressive selection of goblets.

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How long have you had them?

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I've had them about 30 years.

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I bought them from a jeweller's who was doing a house clearance.

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They just looked quite pretty.

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In the '80s, I thought they could sit on the dining table nicely.

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Yes. Have you ever used them?

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-The gilt ones we have.

-What did you drink out of them?

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-Oh, liqueur.

-Liquer, very good.

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-Creme de menthe?

-Maybe a Drambuie. THEY LAUGH

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They're very nice in their case and they're quite easy to do.

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We see lots of these around. They're both hallmarked silver.

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These ones, to a lot of people look like they're gold.

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Solid gold! But they're not, they're silver.

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They've got a layer of gold. We call that silver gilt.

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Or gold plated on a silver body. They've both got their hallmarks.

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These are Birmingham for 1910.

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We've got the retailers, Wilson & Sharp of Edinburgh.

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They've stayed in Scotland for 100 years.

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These ones are a London mark for 1912, but also a Scottish retailer.

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If I slip that back, you've got the retailer.

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Stewart, "By appointment to the Queen" and Glasgow!

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-Very posh! When was the last time you used them?

-Oh, 20 years ago!

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-Why are you selling them?

-They lie in a cupboard and do nothing.

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-RAIN FALLS HEAVILY

-I'm going to quickly value them.

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The rain is tumbling!

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This set of 12, I'd like to say £200 to £300 estimate.

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And the set of six, about half of that - £100, £150 estimate.

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-How does that sound?

-That sounds good.

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ANYTHING sounds good in our current condition!

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Let's put a reserve on them. We'll sell them separately.

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So we'll put £200 bottom limit on that, and £100 on those.

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-Is that acceptable to you?

-Yes. I would be delighted.

-That's great.

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Any plans on what you might do?

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They might make 300, 400, even a bit more,

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once we get to the final hammer price.

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-A weekend away.

-Anywhere in particular?

-Gleneagles?

-Gleneagles!

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Brilliant! I like a lady who's very decisive!

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Thank you for coming to Flog It!

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-We'll speak in more detail at the auction.

-Thank you.

-It's a pleasure.

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'It seems like it's a good time to escape the rain and get over to the auction.

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'Let's remind ourselves what we're taking along.

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'Adam valued Donald's pocket telescope at £30 to £50,

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'which I think is spot-on.

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'Anita thinks the Chinese vase will fly out the door,

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'and has given it an estimate of £100 to £150.'

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-That sounds good.

-ANYTHING sounds good in our current condition!

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'Finally, Adam braved the elements

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'to give Linda's goblets a value of £200 to £300 for the gilt set of 12,

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'and £100 to £150 for the silver collection.'

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This is where we're selling our items, John Milne Auctioneers, Aberdeen.

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As the sale day arrives, my sense of anticipation gets higher and higher.

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Anything could happen. It's an auction.

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'On the sale preview day,

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'I wanted to see if auctioneer Graham agreed with Anita's valuation on that oriental vase.'

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Fiona's Chinese vase. We got a valuation of £100 to £150.

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We get quite a lot of these Canton vases coming through.

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-It's Chinese export, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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-The market is still fairly inundated with this type of work.

-Yes.

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You see them used as lamp bases.

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I was going to say that. They make very good lamp bases for £80.

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The beauty about this one, it hasn't been bored.

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You're not going to lose the value. It's a good size.

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It's an interesting size. There's a lot going on.

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I think £80 is good value for money.

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-Hopefully, a bit more.

-Yes. We should push it up to a good price.

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'So, without further ado, let's get cracking with our first lot.

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'It's Donald's handy little telescope.'

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Edinburgh maker, should have a bit of local interest.

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We're only looking at £30 to £40.

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-Hopefully, we'll get a little more.

-I hope so.

-Fingers crossed. Adam?

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I'd like to see it make 50 or 60, but I think it's right for similar examples that have come up.

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-Nice thing.

-Very nice.

-Where's it been?

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It's been in a drawer for eight years.

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It's going under the hammer now.

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Lennie of Edinburgh. It's a pocket telescope.

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It's in a mahogany and brass case. Signed Lennie of Edinburgh.

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For the telescope, £60?

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Lot 85, for £60.

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50?

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I'm bid 40. Any advance at £40, the telescope?

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One bid. Lennie of Edinburgh telescope for £40. 42. 45.

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-48. At 48, the lady's.

-Sold it.

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Any advance on £48? The telescope at £48.

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It's going to be sold for 48...

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-You were right. Spot-on. Happy with that?

-Absolutely.

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-Well done. Thank you for bringing that in.

-Pleasure.

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'Great start. Next up, let's see if auctioneer Graham was right

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'to be confident about Fiona getting a good price for her Chinese vase.'

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Next, all the money is going towards a holiday, and I don't blame Fiona.

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-The weather hasn't been good in Aberdeen.

-It hasn't.

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-Where do you fancy?

-Anywhere warm, I don't mind.

-Anywhere warm!

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Glasgow's very warm!

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It's always a Mediterranean climate there.

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How about Cornwall, then? Seriously, where do you fancy?

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-Maybe Italy.

-Oh, how nice.

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-Cultured.

-Yes.

-Oh, very, very nice. Let's get you there, shall we?

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We're about to sell a famille rose vase. Hopefully, we'll sell it.

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-What do you think? £150?

-Uh-huh. I would hope for the top estimate.

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There are Chinese buyers in the room.

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The Chinese market is very strong just now.

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-So even a late vase like this should do reasonably well.

-Yeah.

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335 is Chinese vase, a Canton vase.

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The Chinese vase on my right. This one, 150?

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120?

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Canton vase for £120.

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£100?

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80?

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-60. >

-I'm bid 60.

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Five. 70? 75. 78.

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80. 85.

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90. 95.

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100. And ten.

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120. 130.

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140. 150.

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160. 170. 180.

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190. 200.

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210. At 210 near me.

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Any advance on £210? The bid's near me at 210.

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All finished now at 210?

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The hammer's gone down! That Chinese market's so strong at the moment.

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-I think Italy, don't you?

-I think so. Yeah.

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'Good for you, Fiona. Send us a postcard.

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'Now let's see what the bidders make of Linda's miniature goblet collection.'

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Coming up now, lots of miniature goblets.

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-Were they for drinking Drambuie in?

-Yes. Why not?

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-Tiny little shots, though. Mini ones!

-Bit small for my friends.

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-They prefer larger glasses.

-Yeah. Anyway, we've got lots here.

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Two lots coming up. First lot is a set of 12. Second lot, a set of six.

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-Correct.

-200 to 300 and 100 to 200, respectively.

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-OK?

-Yeah.

-Let's find out what our bidders think.

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Here's the first. We're looking at £200 to £300, a set of 12.

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Lot 145, a set of 12 London silver gilt miniature goblets

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in a fitted case.

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£300?

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250?

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£200?

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12 silver gilt goblets for £200. 150?

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I'm bid 150. 160.

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170. 180. 190.

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-This is good.

-Five. 200.

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210. 220.

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230. 240.

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250. 260.

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-Wow!

-It's not over yet.

-280. 290. 300.

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310. 320.

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330. 340. 350.

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-360. 360 in the room.

-360!

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It's in the centre at 360. Going to be sold at £360...

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-Well, that's fabulous!

-That was good.

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First lot £360.

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-Technically, we should get half this cos there's six.

-Yes.

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You never know!

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A set of six Birmingham silver miniature goblets in a fitted case.

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£150?

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120? 100?

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90? I'm bid 90. Any advance now? 100 at the door.

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£100. Any advance now at £100? 105.

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15. 120. Five. 130.

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Five. 140. Five.

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150. Five.

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160. Five.

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170. Five.

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At 175 outside the door now.

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Any advance on £175? The bid is on my left at 175...

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We'll settle for that. Nearly half.

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-We got our sums right!

-They weren't silver gilt.

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-No. You've got to be really happy.

-They weren't as shiny.

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Well, it was a smaller set.

0:19:510:19:53

It didn't look so expensive.

0:19:530:19:55

-Happy?

-Absolutely delighted.

-Good.

0:19:550:20:00

-Enjoy the money.

-We will.

-Good result. They snapped them up.

0:20:000:20:05

-Well spotted at the valuation day.

-They like their goblets in Aberdeen!

0:20:050:20:10

'That concludes our first visit to the auction house.

0:20:100:20:14

'We're back later to see the rest of our lots go under the hammer.

0:20:140:20:18

'During my time in Scotland, I travelled down the beautiful Aberdeenshire coast

0:20:180:20:23

'to find out about one of Scotland's great literary heroes.'

0:20:230:20:27

Isn't that absolutely breathtaking? What a backdrop!

0:20:460:20:50

The Scottish countryside has inspired many a writer.

0:20:500:20:54

None so much as author James Leslie Mitchell.

0:20:540:20:57

You may know him by his pen name, Lewis Grassic Gibbon -

0:20:570:21:01

a central figure in 20th-century Scottish renaissance,

0:21:010:21:04

best known for his fictional work

0:21:040:21:06

paying homage to his northeastern Scottish roots.

0:21:060:21:10

He went on to be one of the most celebrated Scottish writers of all time.

0:21:100:21:15

Gibbon was born in 1901.

0:21:180:21:20

He lived in the tiny village of Arbuthnott

0:21:200:21:23

in the Howe of the Mearns, Aberdeenshire,

0:21:230:21:26

during his formative years.

0:21:260:21:29

This experience

0:21:290:21:31

was to be profoundly influential on his writing.

0:21:310:21:34

He came from a long line of farmers,

0:21:360:21:38

and was fiercely proud of his peasant up-bringing.

0:21:380:21:41

He lived in this small cottage from the age of seven to 16.

0:21:410:21:45

Life in this small rural community

0:21:450:21:48

shaped the way he thought and the way he believed,

0:21:480:21:52

and it's all reflected in his novels.

0:21:520:21:55

He drew on the people, sights, sounds, smells that he encountered

0:21:550:21:59

while growing up here as a young lad.

0:21:590:22:03

Gibbon attended the local school.

0:22:040:22:07

It was here that his potential was recognised.

0:22:070:22:10

A headteacher called Alexander Gray nurtured the boy's talent

0:22:100:22:15

after being amazed by the 13-year-old's essays.

0:22:150:22:18

"In front of Arbuthnott school stretches a sea of green,

0:22:200:22:24

"intersected here and there with small square fields

0:22:240:22:27

"or a winding road disappearing in the waving masses of foliage."

0:22:270:22:32

However, despite his early talent,

0:22:320:22:35

it would be some years before the young man put it to good use.

0:22:350:22:39

The following years proved troublesome for Gibbon.

0:22:390:22:43

He spent time as a journalist, then he was in the army and the RAF.

0:22:430:22:47

It really didn't suit his character.

0:22:470:22:49

It wasn't until 1929,

0:22:490:22:51

at the age of 28, he realised his dream and started writing full time.

0:22:510:22:56

And, boy! Was it worth the wait?

0:22:560:22:58

He produced a wealth of novels, the most celebrated of all, Sunset Song.

0:22:580:23:03

In 2005, the public voted it the best Scottish book of all time.

0:23:030:23:09

It caused a sensation when it was first published in 1932.

0:23:090:23:14

Gibbon went on to write two more novels

0:23:140:23:17

to create the trilogy he named A Scots Quair,

0:23:170:23:20

"quair" meaning book.

0:23:200:23:22

The novels follow the life of heroine Chris Guthrie

0:23:220:23:26

and her experiences of the Great War and growing communism of the 1920s.

0:23:260:23:32

What was ground-breaking was the author's attitude towards women.

0:23:320:23:36

Gibbon disagreed with the traditional role of women.

0:23:360:23:40

He didn't think they were inferior.

0:23:400:23:42

In fact, he chose as a main character a strong female.

0:23:420:23:46

So when Sunset Song was published,

0:23:460:23:49

critics believed it was written by a woman,

0:23:490:23:52

it so accurately described their concerns.

0:23:520:23:55

It is also critically acclaimed

0:23:550:23:57

for the skilful recreation of the rhythm of Scots

0:23:570:24:00

without using spelling, dialect or Scottish vocabulary.

0:24:000:24:04

"Below and around where Chris Guthrie lay,

0:24:040:24:08

"the June moors whispered and rustled and shook their cloaks.

0:24:080:24:12

"In the east against the cobalt blue of the sky

0:24:120:24:16

"lay the shimmer of the North Sea that was by Bervie.

0:24:160:24:19

"Maybe the wind would veer there in an hour or so

0:24:190:24:23

"and you'd feel the change in the life and strum of the thing,

0:24:230:24:27

"bringing a streaming coolness out of the sea."

0:24:270:24:30

Many places near Arbuthnott feature in the novels.

0:24:320:24:35

Sometimes Gibbon changed the name and sometimes he kept them for real.

0:24:350:24:39

Behind me is spectacular Dunnottar Castle, a 14th-century keep.

0:24:390:24:44

I understand why he chose this to feature in Sunset Song.

0:24:440:24:48

It is absolutely awe-inspiring.

0:24:480:24:51

Look at that!

0:24:510:24:53

You can't help but feel creative when you look at that!

0:24:530:24:57

"The air was blind with the splash of the incoming tide,

0:24:590:25:03

"above you the rock rose sheer at the path wound downward sheer;

0:25:030:25:08

"and high up, crowning the rock were the ruins of the castle walls,

0:25:080:25:12

"splashed with sunlight."

0:25:120:25:15

As Gibbon was fiercely proud about HIS roots

0:25:200:25:23

are the villagers in Arbuthnott about their author, immensely proud.

0:25:230:25:28

At this little centre,

0:25:280:25:30

there's a fitting tribute to the man and his work.

0:25:300:25:34

It contains lots of personal items -

0:25:340:25:37

pens, papers, books, a writing slope.

0:25:370:25:40

It's a fitting testament to the man they loved and admired.

0:25:400:25:44

Gibbon was very much a young man in a hurry.

0:25:440:25:48

He wrote everything from short story collections

0:25:480:25:51

to books on history and biographies.

0:25:510:25:54

The author produced 17 novels -

0:25:540:25:56

some in his pen name and some in his real name -

0:25:560:25:59

in under seven years!

0:25:590:26:02

Lewis Grassic Gibbon passed away in 1935.

0:26:110:26:14

He died of peritonitis at the very young age of 34.

0:26:140:26:18

His final resting place is quite fitting.

0:26:180:26:22

It's here in the churchyard at Arbuthnott.

0:26:220:26:25

He wrote about this church. He loved it.

0:26:250:26:28

It begs the question, doesn't it?

0:26:280:26:31

If his life hadn't have ended so tragically early,

0:26:310:26:34

what other great works would he have given us?

0:26:340:26:38

'We're back at Crathes Castle, our stunning valuation day venue.

0:26:500:26:54

'The weather's unpredictable, but we won't let that dampen our spirits.

0:26:540:26:59

'Adam's with Carol, who wants to find out more about her watch.'

0:26:590:27:02

-You brought in this little Omega watch.

-Mm-hm.

0:27:020:27:06

Tell us where you got it from.

0:27:060:27:08

Well, it was left to me by my Great Aunt Lisetta.

0:27:080:27:12

She died 23 years ago.

0:27:120:27:14

-Lisetta's a pretty name. You don't hear that name often.

-Very unusual.

0:27:140:27:19

-She left it to you when she passed away?

-Yes. She was a career nurse.

0:27:190:27:24

Nursed through the war in the Middle East and Africa.

0:27:240:27:27

Ultimately, teaching in the teaching hospital in Aberdeen.

0:27:270:27:31

-A very well-travelled lady committed to nursing?

-Yes.

0:27:310:27:35

Never married, just a career lady.

0:27:350:27:37

-Do you know how she got the watch? Was she presented it?

-I don't know.

0:27:370:27:41

I think she, perhaps, saved up and treated herself.

0:27:410:27:45

-We really don't know.

-What do you know about the watch itself?

0:27:450:27:49

-Not a lot. It's an Omega.

-That's marked on it.

-I'm hoping it's gold.

0:27:490:27:54

-It IS gold.

-Good. A cocktail watch, I think.

-I suppose so, yeah.

0:27:540:27:59

-Have you ever worn it?

-No.

-It's a tiny bracelet.

-Far too small.

0:27:590:28:03

A lot of people were smaller.

0:28:030:28:05

-Yes.

-As you see when you try on an old military uniform.

0:28:050:28:09

You can barely get into them. Even me. I'm not a big fella.

0:28:090:28:13

It's a pretty little thing. It's about 1960.

0:28:130:28:17

It's nine-carat gold.

0:28:170:28:19

It is an Omega, one of the big names in watch-making.

0:28:190:28:23

The market isn't so strong. People don't wear them so much.

0:28:230:28:27

-No. Not chunky enough.

-Yeah. A little dated for the modern look.

0:28:270:28:31

These things go in cycles, so perhaps it'll come back one day.

0:28:310:28:35

What saves it is the magic name of Omega and it's nine-carat gold.

0:28:350:28:40

Why are you selling it?

0:28:400:28:42

Well, it's been in the bottom of my jewellery box since I got it.

0:28:420:28:46

Not too much sentimental value. I have two daughters.

0:28:460:28:50

-Neither of them like it.

-So you've tried every angle.

0:28:500:28:54

-Flog It! was coming and I'm dying to meet you all!

-That's lovely!

0:28:540:28:59

It's very nice to meet you, too. The valuation's just gone up!

0:28:590:29:03

Good, good. Glad to hear it.

0:29:030:29:05

We would normally expect £150, £200

0:29:050:29:09

-for this sort of watch at auction.

-OK.

-How does that sound?

0:29:090:29:13

That sounds fine, yeah.

0:29:130:29:15

-I suggest putting it in the auction with a 150 reserve.

-Fixed reserve?

0:29:150:29:19

-Fixed reserve, so it doesn't make any less.

-OK.

0:29:190:29:22

-It works, does that make a difference?

-It helps.

0:29:220:29:26

It keeps good time.

0:29:260:29:28

A couple of blemishes on the dial, that champagne coloured dial,

0:29:280:29:33

but the fact that it's working goes in its favour.

0:29:330:29:36

-OK.

-I'd like to think we get a couple of hundred pounds for it.

0:29:360:29:41

-Lovely.

-Sound all right?

-Peachy. LAUGHING:

-Excellent.

0:29:410:29:45

If it sells - hopefully it sells -

0:29:450:29:47

any idea what you'd do with the proceeds?

0:29:470:29:51

My daughter's expecting grandchild number two.

0:29:510:29:54

Probably, a big supply of nappies!

0:29:540:29:57

Well, that's unusual, but I like it.

0:29:570:29:59

Most people say "go on holiday".

0:29:590:30:02

In ten years of Flog It! that's the first time I've heard,

0:30:020:30:06

"I'm going to spend the profits from my Omega watch on some nappies."

0:30:060:30:10

I'll remember that one. Thanks for coming. It's been good to meet you.

0:30:100:30:14

-And you.

-See you at the auction.

-Yes.

0:30:140:30:16

'We'll find out how many nappies that watch will buy Carol

0:30:160:30:22

'later in the programme.

0:30:220:30:24

'We're all about sorting the treasure from the trash.

0:30:240:30:27

'The next item takes that to a whole new level.'

0:30:270:30:32

It's incredible what you can find in the rubbish.

0:30:320:30:35

Lucky for Barry, he was on the receiving end. These were thrown out?

0:30:350:30:40

Yes. A friend came across them on the pavement

0:30:400:30:44

outside a lawyer's office 25 years ago.

0:30:440:30:47

He asked permission to remove them. He took them to Edinburgh.

0:30:470:30:51

He took them to museums.

0:30:510:30:54

They translated most of it and then he returned with them.

0:30:540:30:58

I was on the receiving end, by giving a small gratuity.

0:30:580:31:01

Explain what's going on.

0:31:010:31:04

-It's a transference of land.

-Title deeds.

-Title deeds. 1656.

0:31:040:31:09

-The seal is of the Bishop of Murray.

-15...?

-No. 1656.

0:31:090:31:14

But this one is 1506.

0:31:140:31:17

-1506? That's older than the castle behind us.

-Mm-hm.

0:31:170:31:21

Is there anything interesting in the deeds?

0:31:210:31:24

It gives a list of the lands.

0:31:240:31:26

That's a summary.

0:31:260:31:28

It includes one village that's being transferred from John Gordon.

0:31:280:31:33

I haven't got the memory to remember all the detail.

0:31:330:31:36

Have you traced any names from that village? Gone to the church or the archives?

0:31:360:31:42

I've looked on the maps and all the locations

0:31:420:31:45

are very close to Peterhead, about 30 miles north of Aberdeen.

0:31:450:31:49

They're all villages or small farms or smallholdings.

0:31:490:31:53

Some of the names are so old Scots that I haven't found them yet.

0:31:530:31:58

I think this is the oldest thing, not only on today's programme,

0:31:580:32:02

but possibly on Flog It! for five or six years.

0:32:020:32:05

I don't think we've had anything as old as 1506.

0:32:050:32:09

-I'm glad you're not referring to me!

-The older things get the more valuable they are!

-I agree with you!

0:32:090:32:15

Although not a great deal of value.

0:32:150:32:18

I don't think they'd be worth more than £200 or £300.

0:32:180:32:21

That's all right. They're not for sale.

0:32:210:32:24

-I just love looking at them.

-Fascinating bit of social history.

0:32:240:32:29

It's been a real pleasure talking to you.

0:32:290:32:32

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Not everything is for sale!

0:32:320:32:36

'I think it's great that Barry is hanging on to those deeds.

0:32:360:32:40

'Anita's picked out her second Oriental item of the day.

0:32:400:32:45

'And it's a lovely rare piece.'

0:32:450:32:48

Elizabeth, I love dressing up, and this is the most wonderful kimono.

0:32:480:32:53

-Do you dress up in this?

-No.

-Tell me!

0:32:530:32:56

-My husband has worn it at a fancy dress.

-Has he?

-He looked good!

0:32:560:33:01

Please tell me where you got it.

0:33:010:33:03

An aunt brought it home from China

0:33:030:33:06

-about 50, 60 years ago.

-Uh-huh.

0:33:060:33:10

Did she travel in the east?

0:33:100:33:12

Her husband was in Bangkok. He worked in the dock.

0:33:120:33:16

He was manager of the Bangkok dock before the war.

0:33:160:33:19

-They had a wonderful life out there.

-And how did it come to you?

0:33:190:33:23

My aunt died and I got it about 20 years ago.

0:33:230:33:27

Let's look at it closely. It is quite a splendid kimono.

0:33:270:33:31

It's this wonderful,

0:33:310:33:33

I would say "singing" blue,

0:33:330:33:36

marvellously decorated with gold thread.

0:33:360:33:40

If we turn it round to the back first of all,

0:33:400:33:43

we can see this wonderful imperial dragon here.

0:33:430:33:49

To me, he's a stylised creature, and quite fierce.

0:33:490:33:53

We can see his five claws here. The imperial dragons had five claws.

0:33:530:33:58

Look at those eyes!

0:33:580:34:00

A wee bitty scary.

0:34:000:34:02

This symbol here denotes a pearl.

0:34:020:34:07

It's not just your everyday ordinary kimono.

0:34:070:34:11

It was worn by somebody of some standing within the community.

0:34:110:34:15

The buttons here

0:34:150:34:17

are made of a yellow metal.

0:34:170:34:20

They have some decoration and, again,

0:34:200:34:25

it's telling us that it has some quality.

0:34:250:34:29

There is some wear on the neck. Some people don't like that.

0:34:290:34:33

They like things in mint condition.

0:34:330:34:36

But I feel it's telling me that it has been worn.

0:34:360:34:40

And it sets my imagination...afire,

0:34:400:34:43

wondering who wore it and at what occasions.

0:34:430:34:47

I think that it could have been a military kimono

0:34:470:34:52

and may have been worn by an officer at ceremonial occasions.

0:34:520:34:59

Textiles are popular in the saleroom.

0:34:590:35:02

This type of thing will be well-fancied.

0:35:020:35:06

-Difficult to put a price on it.

-Yes.

0:35:060:35:09

But I'm thinking in the region of 100 to 150.

0:35:090:35:13

Would you be happy to put it into auction at that estimate?

0:35:130:35:18

-Probably a little more would be more acceptable.

-A little more?

-Yes.

0:35:180:35:22

If we... We could try it...

0:35:220:35:25

It could go.

0:35:250:35:27

It's not an exact science and this is quite an unusual item.

0:35:270:35:31

If we put it in at 150 to 200, we might have a chance at that.

0:35:310:35:36

-Shall we go for it?

-Yes.

-With a reserve of 150?

-We will.

0:35:360:35:41

-Are you sure you're happy?

-Yeah. Thank you.

0:35:410:35:44

-If you get it back, your husband can wear it at the next fancy dress party!

-Yes.

0:35:440:35:51

I'll keep my fingers crossed, Elizabeth.

0:35:510:35:54

What a fabulous day we have had here!

0:36:000:36:03

More people keep turning up. Wonderful items of local interest.

0:36:030:36:08

I came across an early 19th-century salmon rod made in Aberdeen.

0:36:080:36:12

Getting out and about around the British Isles, we find all these wonderful treasures.

0:36:120:36:18

Sadly, we have to leave Crathes Castle as we head to the auction.

0:36:180:36:23

Here's a recap of what's going under the hammer.

0:36:230:36:26

Hopefully, we'll reel in those bidders.

0:36:260:36:29

What saves it is the magic name of Omega and that it's nine-carat gold.

0:36:290:36:34

'Let's hope the bidders agree

0:36:340:36:36

'and the watch makes Adam's estimate of £150 to £200.'

0:36:360:36:40

It sets my imagination...afire wondering who wore it and at what occasions.

0:36:400:36:46

'Anita's really fallen for this unusual kimono,

0:36:460:36:50

'and thinks it will fetch £150 to £200 as well.

0:36:500:36:55

'We're back at John Milne Auctioneers.

0:36:560:36:59

'On the preview day, I took the opportunity to see what other lots are going in the sale.'

0:36:590:37:06

I love auction preview days.

0:37:070:37:09

It gives you a chance to browse everything at your leisure.

0:37:090:37:13

You're under no pressure, you can pick things up,

0:37:130:37:16

inspect things, ask the auctioneer his opinion.

0:37:160:37:20

Something has caught my eye.

0:37:200:37:23

It's this gorgeous little Cuban mahogany travelling box.

0:37:230:37:27

It's designed for travelling because the handles have been recessed.

0:37:270:37:32

It's not going to catch your fabric at all.

0:37:320:37:36

If you lift this little brass handle up

0:37:360:37:39

from its inset, you can open up the lid.

0:37:390:37:42

There's a wonderful compartment.

0:37:420:37:44

This is circa 1810, 1820.

0:37:440:37:47

It's absolutely beautiful.

0:37:470:37:49

You can see the grain, the figuring of the curl.

0:37:490:37:52

That's been selected to look very decorative.

0:37:520:37:55

It's not flat. It's got a lovely ambiguous glow to it.

0:37:550:37:59

It's very attractive.

0:37:590:38:01

Prior to 1721,

0:38:010:38:04

mahogany wasn't that popular in this country.

0:38:040:38:07

The Prime Minister, Walpole, dropped all the tax duties on it.

0:38:070:38:12

The wood came flooding in.

0:38:120:38:14

The big ships that brought this back from the West Indies,

0:38:140:38:18

filled their hulls and used the timber as ballast.

0:38:180:38:21

The cabinet makers couldn't wait to get their hands on it.

0:38:210:38:25

All the fine furniture from the 1700s was made of Cuban mahogany.

0:38:250:38:30

This little travel box is catalogued at £120 to £150.

0:38:300:38:35

If it goes for that, it's an absolute bargain.

0:38:350:38:38

I can see it topping £200.

0:38:380:38:40

If you asked a craftsman to make this, a good quality bench joiner,

0:38:400:38:45

to produce something like this out of Cuban mahogany today,

0:38:450:38:49

he would charge you about £1,000.

0:38:490:38:52

He really would.

0:38:520:38:54

That's absolutely divine and would make a wonderful jewellery box.

0:38:540:39:00

'Stay tuned to find out how much it makes a little later on.

0:39:000:39:05

'Now, the saleroom is buzzing and Carol's gold watch is up next.'

0:39:050:39:10

It's been in the family a long time, but Carol doesn't want it.

0:39:100:39:14

-I'm talking about that nine-carat gold Omega wrist watch. Hello.

-Hi.

0:39:140:39:18

-Left by your great aunt?

-That's right.

-You've never worn it?

-No. It's far too small.

0:39:180:39:24

-Fashion-wise, nowadays, people want a bigger watch.

-They do.

0:39:240:39:29

These tiny cocktail watches, it makes you wonder how they read them.

0:39:290:39:35

-No safety chain. I'd be terrified I'd lose it.

-It's nine-carat gold.

0:39:350:39:40

-Yes.

-And it's a great make, Omega. Good luck with that.

-Thank you.

0:39:400:39:44

You're doing the right thing. Sell it while the gold prices are high.

0:39:440:39:48

-It works.

-Oh, yes.

0:39:480:39:50

Hopefully, someone will want a small watch.

0:39:500:39:53

-Yes. I think we've priced it at the right level.

-Yeah.

0:39:530:39:57

If it doesn't make it, it's not worth selling.

0:39:570:40:01

If it does, we're happy.

0:40:010:40:03

-Time is ticking away. This is it.

-Oh! Love that one(!)

0:40:030:40:07

Lot 220 is a nine-carat gold Omega cocktail watch. £200?

0:40:070:40:12

200?

0:40:120:40:14

150? I'm bid 140...

0:40:140:40:17

-Straight in.

-That was good.

-Was it?

0:40:170:40:21

..The gold Omega wrist watch at 140. Any advance on £140?

0:40:210:40:27

-The bid's beside me at 140...

-Come on. It's a good starting point.

0:40:270:40:32

..Any advance now at £140?

0:40:320:40:34

Oh, come on!

0:40:340:40:37

-Not sold.

-The hammer's gone down.

0:40:370:40:39

-But he didn't sell it. We'd got a fixed reserve at 150.

-Yeah.

0:40:390:40:45

-He didn't get 140 in the room. I'm so sorry.

-That's all right.

0:40:450:40:49

-At least we fixed it with a reserve.

-It's worth that.

0:40:490:40:53

-I think so.

-Definitely worth that.

0:40:530:40:56

-I'm not used to unsolds.

-No!

-CAROL LAUGHS

0:40:560:41:00

'Bad luck, Carol, but I'm glad that watch was protected with a reserve.

0:41:000:41:06

'Remember that mahogany travelling box I spied on the preview day?

0:41:060:41:11

'It's up next, so let's watch this.'

0:41:110:41:13

297, a fitted jewellery table box, John Bell and company, London.

0:41:160:41:20

It's with Alan. The mahogany box. £100?

0:41:200:41:23

I'm bid 100. Any advance on £100? 110.

0:41:230:41:27

120. 130. 140.

0:41:270:41:30

150. 160. 170.

0:41:300:41:32

180. 190.

0:41:320:41:35

200. 210. 220.

0:41:350:41:37

230. At 230 at the door.

0:41:370:41:41

Any advance on £230?

0:41:410:41:44

230 it is. Number 20...

0:41:440:41:46

'I had a feeling that would go over estimate.

0:41:460:41:50

'Someone's bagged a lovely item.

0:41:500:41:52

'Finally, it's that beautiful kimono which caught Anita's eye.'

0:41:520:41:57

Next, we've got some textiles to go under the hammer.

0:42:000:42:03

We don't get a lot of textiles.

0:42:030:42:05

It's a brave expert that values a kimono.

0:42:050:42:08

This was brought back from China a long time ago.

0:42:080:42:11

-We've got a valuation of £150 to £200.

-Yes.

-Happy with that?

-Yeah.

0:42:110:42:15

-Let's hope we get that!

-Hope so!

-Chinese artefacts are very strong.

0:42:150:42:21

Hopefully, that applies to early textiles.

0:42:210:42:23

This is a thing of beauty.

0:42:230:42:26

It has great quality.

0:42:260:42:29

Although it HAS been worn for parties, it's in good condition.

0:42:290:42:33

-You've had fun with it!

-Yes, my husband has.

0:42:330:42:37

Why have you decided to sell now?

0:42:370:42:39

-I thought maybe someone else could appreciate it.

-OK. Yeah.

0:42:390:42:43

Fingers crossed. Let's see what it does, shall we? Here we go.

0:42:430:42:48

345 is this kimono. There we go.

0:42:480:42:52

-The kimono, £300?

-Yes.

-I'm bid 300...

0:42:520:42:55

-ANITA GASPS

-I'm speechless.

0:42:550:43:00

..400. 420.

0:43:000:43:02

450. 480. 500.

0:43:020:43:05

520. At 520.

0:43:050:43:07

Any advance? At 520 for the kimono.

0:43:070:43:10

-550. 580.

-Yes!

0:43:100:43:12

-600. 620. 650...

-Someone really wants it.

0:43:120:43:16

-..At £700.

-Wow!

0:43:160:43:19

Any advance on £700 for the kimono? To be sold at £700...

0:43:190:43:23

Yes! The hammer's gone down!

0:43:230:43:25

£700!

0:43:250:43:29

I'm tingling! Are you tingling?

0:43:290:43:31

-Absolutely!

-That's what auctions do for you.

0:43:310:43:34

Get down to your local saleroom. They can be such good fun.

0:43:340:43:38

-That was wonderful.

-I'm speechless. Enjoy the money, won't you?

-I will.

0:43:380:43:43

What a wonderful way to end today's show.

0:43:430:43:46

I told you there was going to be one or two surprises.

0:43:460:43:49

Join us again for many more but, from Aberdeen, from all of us,

0:43:490:43:53

with big smiles on our faces, it's goodbye.

0:43:530:43:56

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:44:110:44:14

E-mail [email protected]

0:44:140:44:17

Paul Martin and experts Adam Partridge and Anita Manning are tasked with finding the most intriguing objects from the hundreds brought along to be valued.

Anita's imagination runs riot when she sees a Chinese kimono, and Adam falls for a coin collection that surprises everyone when it's taken to auction.

But it's the beautiful surroundings that Paul is most wowed by, as he travels up the coast to find out how the Aberdeenshire landscape has been so influential to one of Scotland's literary heroes.


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