Exmouth Flog It!


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Exmouth

Paul Martin is joined by experts Christina Trevanion and Will Axon as Flog It! visits Exmouth on Devon's Jurassic Coast. Amongst the finds is a charming vinaigrette.


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Well, we all love to be beside the seaside,

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even on a day like this, which is slightly overcast and breezy.

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I'm on Devon's Jurassic coastline.

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I know we're not going to find any dinosaurs today,

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but you never know what might turn up. Welcome to "Flog It!".

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This seaside town sits on the east coast of Devon,

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and boasts two miles of golden, sandy beach

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coupled with the stunning scenery of the majestic Jurassic Coast -

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a perfect place for a relaxing break.

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Or a "Flog It!" valuation day! The Deco-style Exmouth Pavilion

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is our nerve centre for today's valuations.

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We got a wonderful healthy queue here. Look!

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It looks like the whole town has turned up laden with bags

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full of unwanted antiques and treasures.

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We'll whisk the best ones off to auction, so stay tuned

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and find out exactly what it's worth.

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Two people with sunny dispositions are today's lead experts - Christina Trevanion...

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-It's obviously seen a couple of really good parties!

-I think so!

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..and Will Axon.

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What have we got in here? Ooh!

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We like a nice fitted box. Look!

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Both highly experienced in the antiques trade,

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they're sizzling down the queue.

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I just saw all you lot over that side!

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-Yes. We had to move across.

-The queue's all over the shop.

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Why do you think that's Henley-on-Thames?

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The person told me that I bought it from.

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I lived just round the corner from there, and that's Shrewsbury.

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THEY LAUGH

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-That's unusual, isn't it?

-Yes.

-You interested in flogging that?

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-Yes.

-That's what we like to hear.

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A "Flog It!" favourite!

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So, let's get everyone inside and see what's coming up.

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Christina investigates everything's above board...

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-She does know you've brought it, doesn't she?

-Oh, yes.

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THEY LAUGH

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..Will strikes it lucky and attempts to tune in to his musical side...

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With your permission, may I give the gong a bong?

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Certainly.

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..and I get a painting master-class.

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This is ten years of you going...

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That's the problem. It's all feel, isn't it?

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Everyone's sitting comfortably. The experts are ready,

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and Will kicks off things with a bit of colour.

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Well, Muriel, I don't think what we have on the table

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needs any introduction for our viewers at home,

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because it's easily recognisable as Clarice Cliff.

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Tell me, how have you come by these two pieces?

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Well, the first one I bought in Australia

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when I was out there, and I think that was either 1999 or around 2000.

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That was the little plate?

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Yes, in a gold-mining town in Victoria, actually.

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Was it an auction that was going on there?

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No. It was lots of little antique shops there,

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and I saw that.

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I just thought it was a bit of an unusual piece of Clarice.

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With the crinoline lady, which gives it its name.

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The pattern is Crinoline Lady. And what about the Dragon jug?

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I bought that in an auction, so about the year 2000.

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I think it was the millennium year.

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It's called the Dragon jug mainly because of this moulded handle.

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You don't notice that first of all, do you?

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You have to look quite closely, because it's the decoration

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that catches the eye, as often with Clarice,

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because it's so jazzy and bright. You bought the jug in an auction

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in 2000. What I like about it is,

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we've still got this rather nice label on the bottom

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for the Barry Jones collection.

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Barry Jones is a well known collector of Clarice Cliff,

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a big collector in the '80s and '90s.

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Christie's held his sale... I think it was in 2000,

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and this has even got the lot number there, lot 148.

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And below that you've got these nice Clarice Cliff printed marks

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for the Bizarre range,

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which started in 1928, by Clarice, who joined Wilkinson's in 1916.

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They acquired Newport Pottery in 1920,

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hence the Newport Pottery mark beneath that.

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Once the Bizarre range really took off,

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she started to design her own pots, jugs and shapes.

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And then the Crinoline Lady plate -

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you remember buying this when you were in Australia.

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-Do you remember what you paid?

-About 200 Australian dollars...

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-Right. So what is that?

-I think it was about £70.

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-OK, £70. Not bad, actually!

-The rate of exchange was quite good then.

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Better then, wasn't it? And the jug, you remember what you paid for it?

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Yes. With the commission, it was about 450.

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-450.

-Yes. So I did pay quite a lot for that, really.

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Well, when you have single-owner-collection sales,

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prices do tend to be a little bit higher.

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So we know what you paid for each piece -

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around 70 for the plate,

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around four and a bit for the Dragon jug,

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so we're looking at sending you in at around £500, aren't you?

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Now, I'm going to be honest with you - I think 500 to 800

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is going to be too punchy an estimate.

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We're going to have to pitch these at sort of 300 to 500.

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-How do you feel about that?

-Yes.

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But you'll put a reserve on it?

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Yes. I think yes. I'm going to agree with you here.

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Sometimes I try to get people to go without reserve,

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but in this instance, where it stands you in at money,

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and you would like to see some of that back,

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let's reserve it fixed at that £300. How does that sound?

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-You can't make it 350, do you think? No?

-We've got to be realistic.

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The auctioneer will want to maximise the value of these.

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The more you get, the more he gets. He's working in your favour.

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So let's wait for the day, and we'll see what happens.

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That's the beauty of auctions. We'll need some Clarice Cliff collectors to help us along, though.

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-You've brought some wonderful things in for us here.

-Thank you.

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Have these been handed down through the family?

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The spoons and the knives came from my mother.

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These I did buy about 20 years ago, cos I liked the shape

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and I'd just had a bonus or something.

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Oh! Well, it's good to invest it in silver,

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especially at the moment, cos the price of silver is quite high,

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so you did a very sensible thing.

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I particularly like this little case set here.

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I would like to call it a strawberries-and-cream set,

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because you've got a cream jug and a lovely sugar caster.

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It's very decadent to have silver equipment

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to have your strawberries with.

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I can't say it's been used an awful lot.

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-On the patio with your strawberries!

-CHRISTINA LAUGHS

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They are solid silver, made by a company called Adie Brothers,

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and they were assayed in Birmingham. Got a nice Birmingham mark there,

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and a date letter for 1931.

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On closer inspection, if you look at the lid,

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they were actually retailed in Edinburgh,

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-so they've gone from Birmingham to Edinburgh.

-Is that quite usual?

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It's not unusual. Let's put it that way.

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-Birmingham silver, there was...

-A lot made.

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It was a major, major office. So they really are rather lovely.

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I particularly like the sugar caster with this rather wonderful knob

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on the top, and very pretty. It's very transitional,

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Art Nouveau to Art Deco. This faceted decoration

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particularly is Art Deco. When you bought it,

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-was it damaged?

-It was, actually.

-It was?

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-But I liked the shape.

-Exactly. Because if we put cream in it

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these days, it would be a bit of disaster,

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because unfortunately we've got a crack at the bottom of the spout,

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and there's also been a repair to the crack in there.

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So unfortunately it has been fairly knocked around,

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so that's why I'm not going to put them separately,

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because there is a bit of a condition issue.

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We've also got these very beautiful enamelled spoons,

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again very Art Deco in style, with a little coffee bean on the top,

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so coffee spoons, and the enamelled bowls

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-are particularly beautiful. Have you ever used them?

-Never.

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I'd be terrified of using them, wouldn't you?

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They all use mugs now, don't they, and you couldn't use that.

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I did have a lovely coffee set, but you just don't use them. Very sad.

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Very difficult. You'd be terrified of putting them in the dishwasher,

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because they'd just disintegrate.

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They aren't hallmarked, so I think they may be silver gilt,

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but without a hallmark it's difficult to say.

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You've got a similar set there which has got the coffee-bean knob again.

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-Those are silver.

-They were quite popular, I think.

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They were. We do see a lot of them coming through the saleroom.

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We have done research on these before, so we know these are silver,

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and these have got silver handles but not silver blades,

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these fruit knives. Then you've got a pair of silver conserve spoons.

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Those are a similar sort of date, 1930s.

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They're by a company called William Hutton & Sons.

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-Is that Birmingham as well, or...

-Yes, it is. yes.

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So all in all, you've got quite a usable set.

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-So you'd put them all in together?

-Yes, I think so,

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purely because teaspoons aren't that valuable these days,

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even though it's nice that you've got their original boxes.

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As a group lot, we might be looking in the region

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of about £150 to £200, something like that.

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And I think we'd probably set the reserve at £150,

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-with some slight discretion.

-Right.

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The way the silver market is going at the moment,

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-we shouldn't need it. So fingers crossed!

-Thank you.

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-See you at the auction.

-Lovely. I'll look forward to it.

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Here's a cracking example of how hard it is

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to put a value on something like this lignum vitae pestle and mortar.

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Let's just ask a few of our off-screeners quickly.

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-John?

-Yeah?

-What sort of a value would you put on that?

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-Pestle and mortar?

-Yeah.

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100, 150?

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All right. 100 to 150.

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Anthony, Sophie! 18th-century pestle and mortar.

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That's a bit later. That's 19th.

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What sort of price would you put on that?

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-Nice wood, isn't it?

-100 and... 100?

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-OK.

-150, 200.

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Actually, no, maybe more, cos turned wooden items of that period

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would split, wouldn't they? 300, 400, £500, something like that.

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There you go. It's getting higher.

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Off the cuff, a value?

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-Two-ish?

-There you are, look. Mixed opinions.

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That's how difficult it is to put a price on something.

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I'll leave it up to Will now to tell you all about it

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-and give you a valuation. There you go, Will.

-Thanks.

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That's lovely. Best thing of the day!

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Told you he'd like it. We've been hiding it from him all day

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so he didn't pinch it off our table! Well, Judith,

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-thanks for bringing in the pestle and mortar.

-My pleasure.

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-Where's it come from?

-We found it in my husband's parents' house

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when we were clearing up. He can remember it

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since the age of ten, so it's about 55 years.

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He thinks that it was to do with his grandparents.

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Right. It's certainly older than you or your husband remembers it.

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I've been looking at it, and it can be quite hard to date...

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-I would have thought, yes.

-..this sort of turned wood,

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but I think we're probably into the 18th century here.

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-Incredible!

-So, yeah, we're thinking 1700s.

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That's possible, because his grandmother was in service,

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a big house in Tiverton.

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This would probably have been used below stairs

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in the kitchen, to prepare, or even for medicinal purposes,

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for preparing medicines and so on, and mixing up certain ingredients.

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And I'm fairly confident that it's lignum vitae,

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which is a well known wood for turning,

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because it's so dense. You can feel the weight of it.

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-Very heavy, yes.

-Lignum vitae actually is one of the few woods

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that actually sinks in water. It's so dense that it doesn't float.

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Now, the pestle I think is probably associated, to be fair.

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I don't think they started off life together.

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If you put it inside there, you can see the proportions are a bit odd.

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-I thought that.

-It's certainly done the job.

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It fits in quite nicely. Have you given a thought

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-of what it might be worth?

-Absolutely no idea.

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We were just intrigued about it, really.

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"Flog It!" was coming to Exmouth, so we'd like to be told about it.

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That's what we're here for. I think you're right.

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I'm going to suggest we put it in the sale with an estimate of...

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-I'm thinking around the £200 mark.

-Wow!

-How do you feel about that?

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-Very happy with that! Very happy.

-Let's put it in.

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Let's straddle that £200 mark. Let's put it in at 150 to 250.

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-Fair enough. Yes, that's fine.

-And who knows,

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on the day it could make 200, 300, maybe £400.

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That sounds wonderful.

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The only thing to say now is, "See you at the auction!"

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-Thank you very much.

-Not at all.

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So even Will's hedging his bets.

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But it's not long now before we find out its true value.

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Before we head to the saleroom, here's a recap of what we're taking

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and why we're taking it.

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I know you either love it or you hate it,

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but there's no denying, Clarice rarely lets us down at auction.

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We've got a mixed and matched collection of silver here,

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but the sheer quantity should ensure it reaches its estimate.

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Let's hope our buyers are forgiving about the damage.

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A genuine piece of early treen! Right up my street,

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and one of the nicest things I've seen today.

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I'm looking forward to seeing it away at Exeter.

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And Exeter is where we're auctioning our lots today,

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at Bearnes, Hampton & Littlewood.

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That's what it's all about - "sale today"!

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That's what we've all been waiting for.

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I've got my favourites. You've probably got yours.

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You've heard our experts. You've heard the valuation.

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You've probably made your own mind up about what it's worth.

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You've watched the show long enough. You've become a bit of an expert.

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At the end of the day, it's all down to the bidders.

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It's what they think.

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Helping them along is our auctioneer Chris Hampton.

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Remember, there's always seller's commission to pay,

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and here it's 16.5 percent plus VAT.

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So, with the saleroom all filled up,

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let's crack on with Muriel's Clarice Cliff.

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Now, you bought these two items, total value £500.

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We'd like to get you your money back.

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-I'd like to have it back.

-Why have you decided to sell?

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Well, we've just redecorated the house.

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-Doesn't work?

-Don't want to put everything back.

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-Trying to de-clutter a little bit.

-With the Clarice Cliff collectors,

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it's all to do with pattern, so fingers crossed

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that someone's on the phone, or has spotted it on the internet,

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-and has left a hefty commission bid.

-It really is down to the bidders.

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They've got their own opinion. Let's let them decide. Here we go.

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The Clarice Cliff Fantasque Dragon jug,

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from the Barry Jones collection,

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and a tea plate in the Idyll pattern, and £280 is bid.

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-Right. We're in at £280, with the auctioneer.

-That's good.

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At £300. At £300. At 300.

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And 20. 340.

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-360.

-We have a commission bid on the books.

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At £380 against you.

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At £380.

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Now selling, then, at £380. All done?

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Well, that's good, £380. It's better than what Chris said yesterday.

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-Really?

-Yeah. He thought it might struggle around the £300 mark,

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-but I'm pleased with that.

-Yeah. It's cost you a bit of money,

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-but you can buy something else now.

-Yes.

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-But Muriel's de-cluttering.

-That's true. Sorry.

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Put it in the bank.

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That's a pretty good start, and more than we expected.

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Can we do the same again with the silverware?

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I think you could say it's time to say goodbye to your mother's silver.

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-Yes, OK.

-We're just a couple of lots away.

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We're looking at 150 to £200. There is a lot there, isn't there?

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-Several boxes.

-It's all from the early 1900s,

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and someone's just told me it's all going towards some fencing.

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-Am I right? The proceeds are going to...

-Garden fencing?

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Garden fencing. You've just bought a new house, haven't you?

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We've downsized, yes. We bought the house in December,

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so it's still new.

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-Enjoying it?

-Yes,

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but you do find a lot of stuff you've got to get rid of...

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-Yes.

-..such as coffee spoons. THEY LAUGH

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It's a good silver sale. Hopefully we'll get some good buyers.

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-There's a lot of people here for silver.

-Gosh, yes!

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A lot of dealers are here, so fingers crossed.

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Pair of George V silver preserve spoons,

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with some coffee spoons,

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fruit knives, sugar caster, all the lot together.

0:16:310:16:35

£140 is bid. 150. 160.

0:16:350:16:38

170. 180.

0:16:380:16:40

-190. 200.

-200!

0:16:400:16:42

And ten. 220.

0:16:420:16:45

With me at £220.

0:16:450:16:47

-That's top estimate.

-Yes.

-240.

-Another trader in now.

0:16:470:16:51

Still with me. Commission bid at £240.

0:16:510:16:55

Selling at 240.

0:16:550:16:57

-That's what it's worth.

-Well done!

-Thank you very much.

0:16:570:17:00

£240! Not bad, is it? That's half the fence.

0:17:000:17:03

-You've got quite a big garden, haven't you?

-Not really.

0:17:030:17:06

-Half the fence.

-Are you going for high fencing,

0:17:060:17:09

-or post and rail?

-No, it's high, yes.

0:17:090:17:12

-High. Bit of privacy.

-Yes. THEY LAUGH

0:17:120:17:15

Another sale above the estimate. Can we make it a hat-trick

0:17:150:17:19

with the pestle and mortar?

0:17:190:17:21

Oh, have I been waiting for this moment

0:17:210:17:24

ever since that valuation day back in Exmouth.

0:17:240:17:27

Judith's here. What a stir you caused!

0:17:270:17:29

-I'm very pleased about that.

-What a lovely item, as well!

0:17:290:17:32

Something so tactile, something so sculptural,

0:17:320:17:35

which I took around to all the off-screeners.

0:17:350:17:39

We got a mixed variation of valuations

0:17:390:17:41

and we let Will go ahead with it with you at the table.

0:17:410:17:44

-You were ever so excited.

-I was very pleased, yes.

0:17:440:17:47

I'd love to have done that one. This could fly away.

0:17:470:17:50

-Fingers crossed.

-Yeah.

0:17:500:17:51

The 18th-century lignum-vitae mortar,

0:17:510:17:55

and a treen pestle,

0:17:550:17:57

and £150 starts it. 160. 170.

0:17:570:18:01

-180.

-Bid on the book.

-190. 200.

0:18:010:18:03

220. 240. 260.

0:18:030:18:07

280. £280.

0:18:070:18:09

Where's 300?

0:18:090:18:11

At £280 straight ahead.

0:18:110:18:14

-Oh, come on. A bit more.

-Now selling at £280.

0:18:140:18:18

Well, it's gone. Top end, though, 280.

0:18:180:18:21

-Happy, Judith?

-I'm very happy about that.

0:18:210:18:23

That's very good. That's very good. Had a lot going for it, that did.

0:18:230:18:27

Really good. Nice thing. Thank you so much for bringing it in.

0:18:270:18:31

-Our pleasure!

-There is commission to pay,

0:18:310:18:33

-and enjoy the money.

-Yes, I will.

0:18:330:18:36

After the raft of valuations made earlier,

0:18:360:18:38

Will was the closest, but the overall winner is Judith.

0:18:380:18:42

Stay tuned for more action later on from Exeter in the show,

0:18:420:18:45

and hopefully someone's going home with a lot of money.

0:18:450:18:48

You know I'm passionate about my art,

0:18:480:18:51

so while we're here filming, I thought I'd get a master-class!

0:18:510:18:55

Take a look at this. I hope you enjoy it.

0:18:550:18:58

Over the years on the show, I've discovered some superb antiques,

0:19:060:19:10

seen wonderful works of art and met extraordinary people.

0:19:100:19:14

But every now and then, when I least expect it,

0:19:140:19:16

I come across an artist who completely bowls me over,

0:19:160:19:20

totally inspires me, and that's what happened when I was staying here

0:19:200:19:24

in the Dartmoor National Park.

0:19:240:19:26

I have two passions in life - art and animals,

0:19:320:19:35

and when I saw this painting here in the entrance hall

0:19:350:19:38

at Bovey Castle, well, it was love at first sight.

0:19:380:19:41

For me, this work is contemporary, it's fresh,

0:19:410:19:44

it's alive - vibrant hues, yet understated,

0:19:440:19:48

broad square brushstrokes perfectly placed,

0:19:480:19:51

but with confidence. This work is complicated,

0:19:510:19:54

yet at the same time it's refreshingly simple

0:19:540:19:56

and easy on the eye.

0:19:560:19:58

It's by contemporary artist Katharine Lightfoot,

0:19:580:20:01

and she's kindly agreed to meet up with me today

0:20:010:20:04

to have a chat and also give me a lesson,

0:20:040:20:06

so hopefully I can pick up some tips,

0:20:060:20:08

because her work has inspired me to pick up a paintbrush

0:20:080:20:11

and start to paint.

0:20:110:20:14

Katharine's an impressionist painter,

0:20:140:20:17

who knew from primary school that she wanted to be an artist.

0:20:170:20:21

She grew up in Dartmoor, so it's no surprise that most of her work

0:20:210:20:24

is inspired by the moorland and the farm animals.

0:20:240:20:27

She says it's their stubborn ability to survive the elements

0:20:270:20:32

within their remote and beautiful environment

0:20:320:20:34

that she admires, and the mood and the character she captures

0:20:340:20:38

is stunningly beautiful.

0:20:380:20:41

-Katharine?

-Hello, Paul!

0:20:460:20:48

-I'm so pleased to meet you at last.

-You, too.

0:20:480:20:51

Thank you for meeting up with me. Oh, crikey!

0:20:510:20:53

Two are underway. One's for me, one's for you.

0:20:530:20:56

-We're painting sheep.

-That's right.

-You're working from photos?

0:20:560:20:59

I'm afraid we haven't got a resident sheep here,

0:20:590:21:02

so we'll have to paint from photographs,

0:21:020:21:04

-and I've got a lovely Devon Longwool.

-Oh, gosh!

0:21:040:21:06

That looks stunning as it is. I'm going to muck this up!

0:21:060:21:09

-No, you're not.

-So, you start with a blank canvas.

0:21:090:21:12

Do you put a ground colour on straight away?

0:21:120:21:15

Yes. Always start with a wash that gives more depth to it.

0:21:150:21:18

You've started with a charcoaly dark colour.

0:21:180:21:21

Are we hoping to put green grass on that?

0:21:210:21:23

You can put whatever you like, but green would complement the sheep,

0:21:230:21:27

or a sky blue. Make it up as you go along.

0:21:270:21:30

-Is that what you tend to do?

-Artistic licence!

0:21:300:21:33

Can I just pick a brush up? I love your palette.

0:21:330:21:35

Yes. I don't clean it as often as I should,

0:21:350:21:38

-but it works for me.

-But animals are your thing.

0:21:380:21:41

-Yes, pretty much.

-Sheep, horses...

0:21:410:21:44

-Mostly Dartmoor-inspired, so yes.

-Look, I need a lesson.

0:21:440:21:47

I want to learn how to paint like this.

0:21:470:21:50

Where do we start? With this outline?

0:21:500:21:52

I work from dark to light, then bring in the creams and whites

0:21:520:21:56

and highlights, and build it up from there.

0:21:560:21:58

Did you always paint like this?

0:21:580:22:00

It's just a style that's evolved, you know,

0:22:000:22:03

over the space of ten years, and it's just the way I paint now.

0:22:030:22:07

Can I start more on the background, cos I'm feeling really scared,

0:22:070:22:11

and I'm not going to muck up the image so much.

0:22:110:22:14

If I start to feel confident with a bit of blue...

0:22:140:22:16

You've got a lot of white and cream and highlight,

0:22:160:22:19

and on the nose, so that would maybe start building up some depth.

0:22:190:22:23

You tend not to clean your brushes off.

0:22:230:22:25

-You use the same brush for the same colour.

-I try to,

0:22:250:22:29

to stop using too much turps. If the brush is too wet,

0:22:290:22:32

it stops the colours underneath from coming through,

0:22:320:22:35

so work with a dryish brush.

0:22:350:22:37

And it's sort of dragged, is it? Sort of moved and sort of...

0:22:370:22:40

-That's right, yes.

-I don't know if that's the right colour to use.

0:22:400:22:44

I think it works. The secret's to paint fast.

0:22:440:22:46

I gather that. I've just been watching you,

0:22:460:22:49

and all of a sudden you've put some highlight on your sheep,

0:22:490:22:53

and all of a sudden the sheep's talking to you,

0:22:530:22:56

whereas mine is in the distance, frightened.

0:22:560:22:58

SHE LAUGHS

0:22:580:23:00

We're lucky. We're painting from photos. If you think about Monet,

0:23:000:23:04

he had to paint as fast as he could, and wet on wet.

0:23:040:23:07

-Is his work a big influence to you?

-Yes.

0:23:070:23:10

-More so than any other artist?

-Yes, definitely.

0:23:100:23:13

Your work has totally inspired me to pick up paintbrushes

0:23:130:23:16

-and do this kind of thing...

-Oh, thank you.

0:23:160:23:18

..be loose with it, and be creative and imaginative,

0:23:180:23:21

and that's what I think good art is all about.

0:23:210:23:24

Yeah. I think, when you're starting out as a painter,

0:23:240:23:27

it's always best to use a big canvas and a big brush.

0:23:270:23:30

-Don't be frightened of it.

-How long have you been painting?

0:23:300:23:33

-About 12 years full-time now.

-And you went to art school?

-Yes.

0:23:330:23:37

So you learned the traditional way, then developed your own style,

0:23:370:23:42

which I think is the greatest accolade an artist could ever have -

0:23:420:23:45

-get recognised for your own thing.

-And I love my subject matter.

0:23:450:23:48

I love being on the moor. I love animals.

0:23:480:23:51

-It's very therapeutic as well, isn't it?

-It is great.

0:23:510:23:54

Can you give me a tip on what to do for some of these curls in the wool?

0:23:540:23:58

-Just...

-"Just"!

-..do a curl.

0:23:580:24:01

It's not that easy.

0:24:010:24:03

Just go...

0:24:030:24:05

You see, this is ten years of you going...

0:24:050:24:08

That's the problem. It's all feel, isn't it?

0:24:080:24:12

Katharine's painting style enables her to capture the feeling and the movement of her subjects.

0:24:160:24:22

Bold strokes and layers give every canvas its own individuality,

0:24:220:24:26

capturing the depth and the character of each animal.

0:24:260:24:29

Some have a sense of vulnerability.

0:24:320:24:34

Some seem detached or even isolated,

0:24:340:24:38

while others are just inquisitive.

0:24:380:24:40

I'm going to turn my painting upside down so I can look at it like that.

0:24:520:24:56

It's just something I do. It helps me to look.

0:24:560:24:58

What will you look for when you stand back?

0:24:580:25:01

It helps you to see where you've gone wrong, or where to go

0:25:010:25:04

when you're a bit stuck.

0:25:040:25:06

Will you work on more than one canvas at a time?

0:25:060:25:08

Yes, I do, so I don't overwork them, and because they're oils,

0:25:080:25:12

I let them dry and pick them up, and put fresh colours over the top.

0:25:120:25:16

What do you like painting most? Is it sheep, or would it be the cattle

0:25:160:25:20

-or hounds?

-Sheep, I think.

0:25:200:25:23

There's something nice and familiar,

0:25:230:25:25

childhood memories or something. When I have a show in London,

0:25:250:25:29

and I put a sheep in a big swanky gallery, a sheep in the window...

0:25:290:25:32

-In the city centre?

-..you see these businessmen rushing past,

0:25:320:25:36

and they stop and have a look,

0:25:360:25:38

and they smile. It makes them smile, you know?

0:25:380:25:41

Your work does that. It puts a smile on people's faces,

0:25:410:25:44

and I think that's a brilliant quality.

0:25:440:25:47

It's technically very, very clever,

0:25:470:25:49

but because it's loose and expressionistic,

0:25:490:25:52

you don't understand the cleverness. This is why I'm so grateful

0:25:520:25:55

to have this lesson, cos I would never have the confidence

0:25:550:25:58

-to start like this at home.

-Starting to relax into it now?

0:25:580:26:01

Just. Yeah, just.

0:26:010:26:04

Now I've lost its ear.

0:26:040:26:06

This is looking more like Highland cattle than a sheep...

0:26:060:26:10

-THEY LAUGH

-..on Exmoor.

0:26:100:26:12

-You're doing really well.

-Do you actually stand back and go,

0:26:130:26:17

"Yeah, it's finished," then tomorrow change your mind

0:26:170:26:20

-and want to put more on?

-Yeah, absolutely.

0:26:200:26:22

You can go home thinking, "Wow, I've done a good job today,"

0:26:220:26:25

come back the next morning and think, "No way."

0:26:250:26:28

-"How did I think that was good?"

-So when do you know?

0:26:280:26:31

When's that definitive moment when you know it's finished?

0:26:310:26:35

When you're actually pleased with it, I suppose -

0:26:350:26:37

when you actually see it and think,

0:26:370:26:40

"Mmm. Done OK there." Yeah.

0:26:400:26:42

Cos sometimes less is best, isn't it?

0:26:420:26:45

That's going to be my maxim - "less is best".

0:26:450:26:47

I want to keep my sheep quite dark. I know it's not finished,

0:26:470:26:51

-but I'm frightened to...

-Maybe you could use a big brush.

0:26:510:26:55

-OK.

-That one's a bit huge.

-Just show me.

0:26:550:26:59

He's got a big blob of white there, and a big blob there,

0:26:590:27:02

-so if you maybe incorporate a few big blobs...

-OK.

0:27:020:27:06

..just to soften all those smaller brush marks you've got.

0:27:060:27:09

-Cos there's a lot there.

-Yeah.

0:27:090:27:11

-Just here?

-Yeah.

0:27:110:27:13

Just... What? A big blob?

0:27:130:27:15

-Yes, cos all this area's quite light, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:27:150:27:18

That's the good thing about oils. You can keep going over it

0:27:180:27:21

-and over it, can't you?

-You can, definitely.

0:27:210:27:23

Shall we have a look? Can you turn that back up?

0:27:230:27:26

I'm just intrigued that you've been painting for half an hour now

0:27:260:27:29

-with that upside down.

-Too long!

0:27:290:27:32

No, not at all!

0:27:320:27:34

-Did that help, turning it over?

-It did, actually, yes.

0:27:380:27:42

Gosh! That is so good.

0:27:420:27:45

Thank you so much for helping me. I'll shake your hand.

0:27:450:27:48

-Oily hand.

-Can we carry on for a bit more?

0:27:480:27:50

-Yes.

-I think this is lovely. What a perfect day out!

0:27:500:27:53

Having finally put the paintbrushes down,

0:28:020:28:04

it's back to the day job in Exmouth for some more valuations.

0:28:040:28:08

Let's get our skates on and see what's on Christina's table.

0:28:080:28:11

Mary, I love this figure. I saw you in the queue,

0:28:110:28:13

and I thought he was just absolutely delightful.

0:28:130:28:16

-Tell me where you got him from.

-When I was a child,

0:28:160:28:19

my father used to take me to antique dealers,

0:28:190:28:21

and I used to spend my pocket money on things like this.

0:28:210:28:25

-Really?

-I think I probably bought him when I was about ten...

0:28:250:28:29

-Oh!

-..for about sixpence, I think.

-Oh, wow!

0:28:290:28:33

So he's been with you quite a long time, really.

0:28:330:28:36

-Yes. Over 60 years.

-Oh, my goodness! Why are you thinking of selling him?

0:28:360:28:40

I had no idea that he was unusual, and if someone's got a collection,

0:28:400:28:45

they might want him. I don't mind, cos he's got lots of friends at home.

0:28:450:28:49

-So you actually collect figures?

-I did. I don't anymore.

0:28:490:28:52

Right. OK. Obviously as a child, you used to have very good taste.

0:28:520:28:56

He's a lovely pearlware Staffordshire figure.

0:28:560:28:58

I've never seen one that is an ice-skater before.

0:28:580:29:02

I didn't know until today he was an ice-skater.

0:29:020:29:04

-Really? What did you think he was?

-I've no idea.

0:29:040:29:08

-I just thought he was rather sweet.

-Ahh!

0:29:080:29:10

I'm just wondering whether he might have been part of a series

0:29:100:29:13

for spring, summer, autumn and winter,

0:29:130:29:16

and whether he was representative of winter,

0:29:160:29:18

because you associate ice skating and ice with winter sports.

0:29:180:29:22

You didn't see three of his friends in the shop at the same time?

0:29:220:29:25

Probably not. I probably had him because he was cheap,

0:29:250:29:28

because he's damaged, and I could only afford a certain amount.

0:29:280:29:32

Yes, exactly.

0:29:320:29:34

Well, really, he dates from the early 19th century,

0:29:340:29:37

about maybe 1820, something like that - 1820, 1830.

0:29:370:29:41

And I just think he's great. We know that he's pearlware.

0:29:410:29:44

If we tip him upside down, we can see in the bottom,

0:29:440:29:47

there's some blue pooling of the glaze,

0:29:470:29:49

so this is earthenware that's been covered with a tin-type glaze,

0:29:490:29:52

and on creamware, this pooling would be green.

0:29:520:29:56

So that's how we know that he's pearlware,

0:29:560:29:58

and he's made in the Staffordshire area

0:29:580:30:01

by one of the Staffordshire potters in the early 19th century.

0:30:010:30:04

He's lovely. He's very brightly enamelled.

0:30:040:30:06

-His wonderful stripy waistcoat...

-I do like his waistcoat.

0:30:060:30:10

It's great, isn't it? It does worry me slightly

0:30:100:30:12

that we've got a bit of a chip on his hat,

0:30:120:30:15

and his hat's been repainted, so he has had a bit of attention.

0:30:150:30:18

And if we turn him round, we can also see

0:30:180:30:21

that there has been some repainting to the top of the tree stump here.

0:30:210:30:25

I wonder whether somebody has tried to repair it at some point,

0:30:250:30:28

and done a bit of a repaint there. But having said all that,

0:30:280:30:31

I still think he's lovely. He's a great character,

0:30:310:30:34

and I think this ice-skating subject is really quite unusual.

0:30:340:30:37

I sold another pearlware figure that was quite similar recently,

0:30:370:30:41

but he was in much better condition,

0:30:410:30:43

and I sold that for the £80 region.

0:30:430:30:46

So I think at auction, for this little chappie,

0:30:460:30:50

because of his condition, I might go slightly lower than that

0:30:500:30:53

at maybe sort of 50 to 70, with a reserve of 50 firm.

0:30:530:30:57

-That's fine.

-Is that all right?

-Fine.

0:30:570:31:00

So we'll go 50-70, a reserve of 50,

0:31:000:31:02

-and will we see you at the auction?

-No.

0:31:020:31:05

-Where are you off to?

-To France for a month.

0:31:050:31:07

-Oh, wonderful. You can't just pop back for the auction?

-Not really.

0:31:070:31:11

-Fair enough.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:31:110:31:14

Super. Well, hopefully we'll be sending you a nice cheque

0:31:140:31:17

-that you'll get on your return.

-That would be nice.

-Let's keep our fingers crossed.

0:31:170:31:21

Well, Juanita, first of all can I say, what a lovely name!

0:31:260:31:30

I love this piece you've brought in to show us today,

0:31:300:31:33

the dinner gong, hung from these rather wonderful tusks.

0:31:330:31:37

Initially a lot of people might have seen this

0:31:370:31:40

and thought, "Oh, dear, elephant tusk or elephant ivory."

0:31:400:31:43

Well, they're not. You know and I know that these are wild-boar tusks,

0:31:430:31:47

mounted in the middle here and then on this oak shield.

0:31:470:31:50

So they're definitely boar tusks.

0:31:500:31:52

There's no question of this being elephant ivory,

0:31:520:31:55

-and because of that, we're perfectly legal to sell it.

-That's right.

0:31:550:31:59

Is this something you remember being summoned by?

0:31:590:32:02

Occasionally. After we moved house... We had a big house.

0:32:020:32:05

We had the space for it, so...

0:32:050:32:08

just occasionally Mum or Dad used to ring it.

0:32:080:32:11

I mean, it really harks back to an age

0:32:110:32:13

where these sort of things were used for everyday use.

0:32:130:32:16

-Well, that's right.

-And I think date-wise,

0:32:160:32:19

I think we could be in the late 19th century,

0:32:190:32:22

that sort of period. How far back do you remember it?

0:32:220:32:25

Has it been with your family forever?

0:32:250:32:27

No. 1964, Daddy bought it.

0:32:270:32:30

Yes? Any ideas what he might have paid for it, do you think?

0:32:300:32:34

-None, unfortunately.

-And tell me why you're selling it.

0:32:340:32:37

Is it something you have pleasure having a bang with,

0:32:370:32:41

or is it something that languishes, hidden away in a cupboard?

0:32:410:32:44

It languishes on the floor at the moment.

0:32:440:32:47

I used to enjoy ringing it when we lived as a family,

0:32:470:32:51

but I'm a single person on my own, and really I don't use it.

0:32:510:32:55

It's an example of one of those things that,

0:32:550:32:58

in the way we live our lives nowadays, it's a little redundant.

0:32:580:33:02

-Have you ever thought of what it might be worth?

-I don't know.

0:33:020:33:05

You hear certain things. Sometimes they say,

0:33:050:33:08

"Oh, it might be worth"... You know, when you watch "Flog It!" or...

0:33:080:33:12

-Yes.

-..antiques roadshows,

0:33:120:33:14

they say, "It's gone up in value so it's now that."

0:33:140:33:17

-Yes.

-"Now it's no longer politically correct,

0:33:170:33:21

so it's gone down." So I don't know at all.

0:33:210:33:24

There is an element of that, yes. Anything made with animal parts

0:33:240:33:28

doesn't tend to be as well received as it once was,

0:33:280:33:31

but it's a piece of social history. I mean, value-wise,

0:33:310:33:35

I think even though it's not terribly fashionable,

0:33:350:33:39

I think there is still a market out there for it.

0:33:390:33:42

I'm going to say between 100 and £200.

0:33:420:33:45

I don't know how you feel about that.

0:33:450:33:47

Is that a sort of ballpark figure you would be pleased with?

0:33:470:33:50

-Ooh, very pleased!

-OK.

0:33:500:33:53

Well, listen, why don't we put that estimate on it,

0:33:530:33:56

100 to 200. Let's reserve it at £100.

0:33:560:33:59

Can I have a bit of discretion on that as a reserve figure?

0:33:590:34:02

-Certainly.

-So that's £100 discretionary reserve,

0:34:020:34:05

and I think it's going to find a new home at the saleroom.

0:34:050:34:09

There's only one thing left to do. With your permission,

0:34:090:34:12

-may I give the gong a bong?

-Certainly.

0:34:120:34:14

Oh, I feel like that chap on the films. Here we go!

0:34:140:34:17

-HE PLAYS ECHOING NOTE

-What a lovely sound! It is.

0:34:170:34:21

Well, on that note, thank you very much for bringing it in,

0:34:210:34:25

and I look forward to seeing you again at the saleroom. It's been a pleasure.

0:34:250:34:29

It's an interesting item. I just hope it's a hit with the bidders

0:34:290:34:32

and it's not too specialist.

0:34:320:34:35

Right, John!

0:34:350:34:38

Well, talk to me about this vinaigrette, which my wife had.

0:34:380:34:42

I saw you in the queue, and it was very blustery outside.

0:34:420:34:45

You had a big box of things, and you came up with this little gem.

0:34:450:34:49

-Where has it come from?

-It's come from her family

0:34:490:34:52

who've passed on, from her great-aunt Julia.

0:34:520:34:55

-So this is on your wife's side.

-On my wife's side.

0:34:550:34:58

-And do you know what it is?

-Yes. I gathered...

0:34:580:35:02

My wife has educated me a bit, and told me it was a vinaigrette.

0:35:020:35:05

Ah! Do you know what they were used for?

0:35:050:35:07

-Yes, for obnoxious smells.

-Oh!

0:35:070:35:10

-SHE LAUGHS

-That's right.

0:35:100:35:13

In the 19th century, when there was something not too sweet-smelling,

0:35:130:35:17

you would have your vinaigrette, wave it under your nose,

0:35:170:35:20

and it would bring lightness back to your life.

0:35:200:35:23

This is the most wonderful vinaigrette.

0:35:230:35:25

It's silver. You've got this wonderful agate top,

0:35:250:35:28

which has been especially chosen and polished

0:35:280:35:31

to fit this space, and also the banding has been selected

0:35:310:35:34

to create these wonderful striations here.

0:35:340:35:37

If we open it up, inside we've got this beautiful silver-gilt...

0:35:370:35:42

what we call a grille. Underneath this grille

0:35:420:35:44

you would have had a sponge soaked in perfume

0:35:440:35:48

or scent, basically. Yes. And what's even more exciting

0:35:480:35:51

for a vinaigrette collector, if we lift the grille,

0:35:510:35:54

which sadly has had some damage to it...

0:35:540:35:56

The grille hinge, unfortunately, is a little bit damaged there.

0:35:560:36:00

But underneath the grille we've got this wonderful hallmark

0:36:000:36:04

which tells us that it was made in Birmingham,

0:36:040:36:07

and the date letter is for 1850,

0:36:070:36:10

and we've got those magic initials NM.

0:36:100:36:12

Now, NM stands for Nathaniel Mills...

0:36:120:36:16

-Oh!

-..who, for vinaigrette collectors,

0:36:160:36:18

is the creme de la creme of makers. OK?

0:36:180:36:22

At this stage in his career, Nathaniel Mills had passed away,

0:36:220:36:25

and his vinaigrette or small-working firm had passed to his sons.

0:36:250:36:30

-To his sons.

-So at this particular date,

0:36:300:36:33

it's not actually Nathaniel Mills making these pieces anymore.

0:36:330:36:36

However, as we can see from how intricate this grille is,

0:36:360:36:40

his sons have really maintained his standards,

0:36:400:36:42

and he's still popular today with vinaigrette collectors.

0:36:420:36:46

And if we turn it over, we've got this continuing floral engraved design here,

0:36:460:36:51

and what we call a cartouche in the middle,

0:36:510:36:54

which you would have had your initials, your name

0:36:540:36:57

or some sort of dedicatory inscription in.

0:36:570:37:01

Sometimes they can detract from the value, but this has been left vacant.

0:37:010:37:04

That actually will be a plus point to any buyer,

0:37:040:37:07

because they can have their own put in,

0:37:070:37:09

so that's fantastic. So, tell me, John, why are you selling it?

0:37:090:37:13

My wife has literally said, "Well, I don't need it."

0:37:130:37:16

-Yeah.

-And it's better to go towards something else

0:37:160:37:19

-which we might want to buy.

-Yes, exactly.

0:37:190:37:22

-Modern jewellery.

-Sensible woman. I like that.

0:37:220:37:26

I think, if you were to send it to auction,

0:37:260:37:28

we're looking somewhere in the region

0:37:280:37:30

of maybe 150 to £200...

0:37:300:37:32

-Right.

-..with a reserve of 150, with some slight discretion.

0:37:320:37:37

-Right.

-I just think it could do better,

0:37:370:37:39

but I do have some concerns about the condition.

0:37:390:37:42

-How do you feel about that?

-I feel fine about it.

0:37:420:37:45

I think my wife will be happy as well.

0:37:450:37:47

-She'd be OK with that?

-Oh, definitely.

0:37:470:37:49

Oh, good. I'm pleased. She does know you've brought it, doesn't she?

0:37:490:37:53

Oh, yes, she knows I've brought it. THEY LAUGH

0:37:530:37:56

'Well, I wouldn't want to be in your shoes if she didn't!'

0:37:560:37:59

Sadly it's time to say goodbye to the Pavilion here in Exmouth,

0:38:020:38:06

and to all of these wonderful people.

0:38:060:38:08

We've found the final items to take to the saleroom.

0:38:080:38:11

There could be some surprises there. Here's a recap of what we're taking,

0:38:110:38:15

but, more importantly, why we are taking them to auction. Let's flog it!

0:38:150:38:19

This is a lovely piece of nearly 200-year-old Staffordshire pottery.

0:38:200:38:24

Despite his faults, let's hope he skates away at over £50 for Mary.

0:38:240:38:28

What a great tusk-mounted dinner gong!

0:38:280:38:30

I'm certain that at 100 to £200,

0:38:300:38:32

the bidders are going to get their teeth right into it.

0:38:320:38:35

I really like this silver-and-agate- set Nathaniel Mills vinaigrette.

0:38:370:38:41

With the right internet exposure, it could really fly.

0:38:410:38:44

We're back in Exeter for our last visit to the saleroom

0:38:480:38:51

with auctioneer Chris Hampton. It's the ice-skating figure next,

0:38:510:38:55

but with Mary on holiday in France, it's up to Christina and myself

0:38:550:38:58

to see the sale go through.

0:38:580:39:00

With only a fixed reserve of £50! Surely it's got to do that.

0:39:000:39:04

I hope so. I really hope so. It's difficult,

0:39:040:39:06

because the condition... There's a bit of repainting.

0:39:060:39:09

Nice-looking thing, though!

0:39:090:39:11

Yes. It's an unusual subject, isn't it?

0:39:110:39:14

The ice-skating is what should clinch it.

0:39:140:39:16

Fingers crossed. It's a shame Mary can't be with us,

0:39:160:39:19

but unfortunately she hasn't made it today.

0:39:190:39:21

Nevertheless you'll enjoy watching this,

0:39:210:39:24

-especially as we should sell it.

-Hope so.

0:39:240:39:26

This is it.

0:39:260:39:28

The Staffordshire pearl-glazed figure,

0:39:280:39:31

allegorical of winter, and at £40...

0:39:310:39:34

-40, thank you.

-Yes!

-£40. At 40.

0:39:340:39:37

-Come on, come on.

-45? 50? 50.

-Yes! We've sold it.

0:39:370:39:40

-Has it sold?

-At £50. At 50. Straight ahead at 50.

0:39:400:39:44

Five anywhere now? At £50, then. All done? Selling at £50.

0:39:440:39:49

-Is that all right?

-She'll be happy with that.

0:39:510:39:53

She wanted to see it go. But it's a fine line in the auction room!

0:39:530:39:56

Oh, it's very nerve-racking, even though I've done this for years.

0:39:560:40:00

It's all right for you. You've got your feet up, enjoying this.

0:40:000:40:03

If you haven't experienced it, get down to your local saleroom,

0:40:030:40:06

or why not come to a valuation day, details on our BBC website.

0:40:060:40:10

Follow the links. All the information will be there,

0:40:120:40:15

plus a lot more about what goes on behind the scenes.

0:40:150:40:18

Dust down your unwanted antiques and bring them along,

0:40:180:40:21

because we're coming to a place near you soon.

0:40:210:40:23

Juanita dusted down our next item to go under the hammer.

0:40:230:40:27

I've just been joined by Juanita and Will,

0:40:270:40:30

and will it be a case of "going, going, gong"?

0:40:300:40:32

It would look great down here in a big old manor house

0:40:320:40:37

-in the West Country, wouldn't it?

-It would.

0:40:370:40:40

-Why are you selling this?

-Oh...

-Just remind us.

0:40:400:40:44

When my dad bought it we had a big house,

0:40:440:40:48

a detached house,

0:40:480:40:50

and we used to use it every so often.

0:40:500:40:54

But I live in a semi-detached bungalow.

0:40:540:40:57

A smaller place, so it doesn't really work, does it?

0:40:570:41:00

Hopefully somebody will fall in love with this.

0:41:000:41:03

It'll look nice with those little Edwardian letterboxes.

0:41:030:41:06

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:41:060:41:08

Let's find out what this lot think.

0:41:080:41:11

The early 20th-century dinner gong,

0:41:110:41:13

suspended between two ivory tusks, on the oak base.

0:41:130:41:18

And at £75. At £75.

0:41:180:41:21

At 75. At £75.

0:41:210:41:24

80. Five.

0:41:240:41:26

-He shakes the head.

-85.

0:41:270:41:30

At 85. 90 anywhere? 90, new place.

0:41:300:41:33

-At £90. At 90.

-We've sold it.

-We've sold it.

0:41:330:41:37

At £90, then. Last chance. Selling.

0:41:370:41:41

At £90...

0:41:410:41:43

Ten percent under the discretionary reserve.

0:41:430:41:46

-It's all right, though.

-We're happy with that.

-Good.

0:41:460:41:49

The trouble there was, the buyers have got the same problem as you.

0:41:490:41:53

-If you don't have the sort of house -

-It won't work.

0:41:530:41:56

-But it had to be worth £90.

-It's "gong".

-Good.

0:41:560:42:00

THEY LAUGH

0:42:000:42:02

So that ten percent discretionary reserve was definitely worth it.

0:42:020:42:06

Next it's John with our final lot, and that lovely Nathaniel Mills vinaigrette.

0:42:060:42:11

John, it's good to see you again. This is Heather,

0:42:110:42:13

who we didn't see at the valuation day, John's wife.

0:42:130:42:17

-Now, it's yours, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Well, it was Great Aunt's.

0:42:170:42:20

-Sad to see it go?

-Not really.

-No!

0:42:200:42:23

-THEY LAUGH

-That's the answer we like!

0:42:230:42:25

We're here to sell things, not keep things.

0:42:250:42:27

I'm sure you've got other things of hers.

0:42:270:42:30

-What a quality piece!

-I know. It's lovely.

0:42:300:42:33

I know most Nathaniel Mills collectors do want castle-tops

0:42:330:42:37

and what you'd expect of Nathaniel Mills,

0:42:370:42:40

but this is slightly unusual, so hopefully we'll find good bidders

0:42:400:42:44

-who'll want it.

-Here we go.

0:42:440:42:46

It won't be in the saleroom for much longer.

0:42:460:42:48

A Victorian silver and polished-agate oval vinaigrette

0:42:480:42:52

by Nathaniel Mills, and we'll start here at £180.

0:42:520:42:57

-Oh!

-That's straight in at the top end.

0:42:570:42:59

And ten. 220.

0:42:590:43:02

230 with me. 240. 250.

0:43:020:43:04

260. 270. 280. Five.

0:43:040:43:08

290. £290.

0:43:080:43:11

-Brilliant!

-Yeah.

0:43:110:43:13

At £290 I sell. At 290.

0:43:130:43:16

-THEY LAUGH

-£290!

0:43:160:43:18

-Brilliant!

-I'll dig my wallet out now to buy more jewellery!

0:43:180:43:22

THEY LAUGH

0:43:220:43:24

-John!

-That's a promise! That's a promise.

0:43:240:43:28

-A man that loves you. There you go.

-Brilliant. Well done.

0:43:280:43:32

-Thank you.

-You're more than welcome.

0:43:320:43:34

Thank you for doing the valuation.

0:43:340:43:36

How about that? I think most people have gone home happy.

0:43:400:43:42

That's what it's all about. We've had a terrific time

0:43:420:43:46

here at Exeter, and thanks to everybody here

0:43:460:43:49

for looking after us. I can't wait to come back. But until then,

0:43:490:43:52

join me again for many more surprises on "Flog It!". Bye-bye.

0:43:520:43:56

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:560:44:00

E-mail [email protected]

0:44:000:44:04

.

0:44:040:44:04

Presenter Paul Martin is joined by experts Christina Trevanion and Will Axon as Flog It! visits Exmouth on Devon's Jurassic Coast. Christina finds a charming vinaigrette designed by 19th century silversmith Nathanial Mills, while Will discovers a wonderful 18th century pestle and mortar which everyone gets excited about. Also, presenter Paul taps into his creative side during a painting masterclass with contemporary artist Katherine Lightfoot.