Dulwich 36 Flog It!


Dulwich 36

Paul Martin, Kate Bateman and Michael Baggott visit Dulwich College in south London, where Michael has to sort through a collection of Clarice Cliff.


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Transcript


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Today's show comes from Dulwich College in the suburbs of south London.

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I've got a great feeling about today's programme. Just look at the size of the queue!

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Welcome to Flog It!

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In the early part of the 17th century,

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a successful actor and businessman, Edward Alleyn, founded Dulwich College.

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One of the most famous students was Sir Ernest Shackleton.

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This is the very lifeboat he used to rescue several members

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of his stranded crew back in 1916. It's called the James Caird.

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Surely his achievements must inspire today's students.

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I'm wondering if anything of great historical note is going to turn up today.

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On the look-out for rare finds are our team of experts

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led today by Michael Baggott

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and Kate Bateman.

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Michael hails from Birmingham where he works as a consultant

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and sometimes a detective, identifying antique mysteries.

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It's a monkey teapot.

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That's what my mother calls me, an ugly monkey.

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-That's a dog, isn't it?

-Is it?

-That's a dog!

-Right.

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Kate is from Stamford in Lincolnshire, where she's a valuer,

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asking all the important questions.

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-Where are they from? They're probably...

-A boot sale.

-Not from a boot sale!

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-Are you ready to go in, everyone?

-Yes!

-Let's do it.

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On today's show, straight talking is top of the agenda from Michael...

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You've made me break my golden Flog It rule -

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-I don't do Clarice Cliff.

-That makes two of us!

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..from Kate...

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What did you pay back then?

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One would rather not say!

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..and even our auctioneer, Robert.

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Three guys in a pub talking about a marrow!

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Where are you going to get another one?

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Michael's already invited Hazel out of the queue

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with her teapot and over to his table.

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Hazel, what a curious little teapot. I was drawn to this

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-in the queue outside when you showed it to me. You said it was?

-A monkey.

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A monkey. But I'm certain it's a little pug

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-which is good news because dogs are very collectable.

-Yes.

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-Are you a dog lover?

-I am, yes.

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-Is that how this got into your...

-No, it was given to me by an employer years ago

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in a box of bits and pieces.

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-Good grief.

-I always wondered from the marks on the back what it was.

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It's a good place to start with porcelain. Look at the marks.

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-In this case we've got the cover, and that's got a pattern number, 1261.

-Right.

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If we look at the back of this now,

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there we've got 1261 on the base, so they do go together.

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Right.

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And we've got the factory mark there and the depose mark, the French patent mark.

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Right.

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-Sadly, I can't tell you which French factory it is.

-Right.

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There are hundreds, if not thousands, of small factories working in and around Paris and Limoges.

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-It's good to know it's French.

-We can't pin it down.

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But I can tell you the date.

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These little, amusing anthropomorphic pieces that you get

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tend to be about 1890, up to about 1900, 1910.

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But this is a charming little thing

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and to someone that has an interest in pugs and pug-type dogs,

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I'd imagine this is quite a rare little thing.

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So any idea, when you were given this, of how much it might be worth?

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Um, no, not at all.

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I think normally, if this wasn't in the form of a dog

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and was just an 1890s, French, thinly moulded teapot,

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-you might be looking at £1.

-Right.

-They're that common and of no value.

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The novelty factor always enhances the value of antiques.

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-So I think if we're sensible and say 20 to £40.

-Right.

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And just hope there are two people that really love pugs there on the day

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-and decide they can't live without it.

-Yes.

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-If you're happy, we'll put a reserve of £20 on it.

-Right.

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-And keep our fingers crossed.

-Lovely. Thanks.

-Thank you.

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Now the animal teapot's identity has been verified,

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it's time for a bit of art.

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I've found a curious painting brought in by Pat.

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Pat, I don't know who Clifford Frost was, but he had a jolly good sense of humour!

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-I think so, too.

-Don't you? He sums up the very Englishness

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about the 1930s and 1940s early British 20th-century modern.

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-Don't you think?

-Yes, I do.

-Three guys in the pub,

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with their pints, looking at the marrow, saying, "Mine's bigger than yours!"

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-Gardeners, probably.

-All gardeners, yes.

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Look at this chap looking down, going...

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I think it's fabulous. Absolutely fabulous.

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It's such a shame there's no relative works that have sold.

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I can't find any form on the artist, I have no information.

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So I really think he's a very competent amateur.

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-Very possibly.

-Which does devalue it slightly.

-Yes.

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Where did the painting come from?

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It belonged to my father. He was a collector of 1930s, '40s paintings.

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I don't know where he got it from, before that.

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When you talk about early 20th-century modern, you look at artists with humour,

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British School, people like Stanley Spencer, the guy from Cookham,

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and he paints people in the local pub, in his village

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and there's a sense of humour with a sense of religion.

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Here is a sense of humour with a sense of gardening!

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But still with real people down the local pub.

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It's brilliant. Absolutely brilliant.

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-Any idea of value, though?

-About £20!

-It's worth a lot more than that.

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There's nothing on the back. Absolutely nothing.

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I think it's one of those classic 80 to 120s.

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-See what happens.

-OK.

-Put a reserve on of £60.

-Yep.

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-We know we're going to sell it.

-Right.

-It could struggle and get away at the bottom end

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-or surprise us and get away at the top end and do 120 to 160.

-That would be nice.

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-I'm up for it if you are!

-Yes, definitely. I'd be very happy.

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Kate is joined by collector Mark, and his group of Stoke-made crested Goss china.

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-Mark, hello.

-Hello.

-You've brought some Goss in.

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-What do you know about this?

-The lot on the table are pre-1920s.

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You've got a scent bottle,

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-you've got the...

-The leek. I love the leek.

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An unusual combination. We've got a Welsh shape here

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and a Portuguese flag. That's cool.

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-And local interest.

-Local interest in Lewisham.

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Excellent. And quite an unusual one down the front. What's this one?

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That's a Portland vase with the crest of HMS Bellerophon - you can say it better than me!

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Bellerophon, is it?

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Bellerophon. I happen to know that is a battleship in the Battle of Trafalgar.

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Obviously a very famous battle. And we are selling at Greenwich

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which has a fine naval and maritime history, with the Maritime Museum.

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That's quite an interesting piece. We've got local history,

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and some unusual bits.

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I like, of all of them, this bit.

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-It's such an unusual shape.

-That's a butterfly-handled vase.

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-Because it has...

-Butterfly handles!

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It's quite a weird one, actually.

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I quite like it. It looks more like Belleek or something like that.

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-Irish. But they are all Goss.

-Yes.

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-Is this all of your collection?

-No, I have 1,700 pieces.

-1,700?

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-1,700 pieces.

-So why these particular ones?

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Have you got doubles? Or don't like them?

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They're pieces that don't fit into my theme.

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The Welsh leek does, but it doesn't have a Welsh crest.

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So I'm not too worried about that.

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Any idea price-wise?

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-Price-wise, about 150 to 200.

-For the whole lot?

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-Yes.

-You've got nine items here. That doesn't seem bad. £10 apiece, something like that.

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I think you're about right. Would you have a reserve a bit lower,

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or a firm 150 reserve?

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-No, 120.

-OK.

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A bit of leeway from the low estimate. I think that's do-able.

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Let's say fixed reserve of 120. Estimate of 150 to 200.

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What would you do with the money? Silly question, I'm guessing more Goss investment.

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More Goss, or I'll go out for a nice slap-up meal.

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Slap-up meal. OK.

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-You don't think there's a point where 1,700 is too much Goss?

-No. Never.

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Never too much!

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Well, we're now half-way through our day with our first three items to take to auction.

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You could say this is where the talking stops and the action begins!

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Here's a quick reminder from our experts of the items we've found so far.

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It's a slightly psychotic-looking pug,

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but somebody will love this teapot.

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Mark has pared down his enormous collection of 1,700 items

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so he won't miss these nine!

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Hopefully we'll have a Welsh military Goss collector at the auction that might go for them. Hope they sell.

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If you're interested in fine art and you don't own any,

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to make an investment of around £100 to buy this

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is absolutely no money and a great starting point.

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That's why it's going into auction. Something like that will put a smile on your face.

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We're selling our items at Greenwich auctions

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where auctioneer Robert Dodd has adjusted our estimates to give them the best chance of selling.

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And now it's time to get cracking!

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Everybody at home is watching this, pouring a cup of tea and thinking what are we going to sell?

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Well, we're selling that pug dog teapot, with a blue glaze.

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Not a lot of money. 20 to £40. Hopefully, the top end.

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-Why are you selling it?

-I'm starting to declutter. Starting small!

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They're all decluttering, Michael. Start small!

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In a very gradual way. A very small teapot.

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It's not of fantastic quality, but it leapt out at me in the queue.

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When do you see a pug wearing a French beret?

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-Not often!

-There are plenty of teapot collectors about.

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You know who you are. And plenty of dog fanatics.

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Combine that and hopefully we'll have a good result. Let's find out.

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A nice lot, this.

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A nice early pug teapot.

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A nice little white hat cover.

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Absolutely superb, this.

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The bid's with me at £18 only. 20. Two. Five. I'm out.

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Looking for 28. 28. I'll be back.

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-Be patient. 28. £30.

-The collectors are going mad.

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35.

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38. £40. 42.

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45. 48. 50. And five.

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-Very good.

-60. No? Are you coming in at 65?

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Are we all done?

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Last time. Are you sure? At £60 on the pug teapot.

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-Over top estimate. £60. Pugs away! How about that?

-Very good.

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-Got to be happy?

-Yes!

-First experience a happy one!

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It's au revoir to the French teapot and hello to the English Goss collection.

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Next, I've been joined by Mark, selling nine pieces of Goss.

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-He's not too bothered, because at home you have?

-1,700 pieces.

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1,700 pieces of Goss! He could be the definitive Goss expert!

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-There's plenty of us!

-Are there?

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-You know your market.

-We do, indeed.

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Are you confident about what we'll get here? Top end?

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-I would hope to get the fixed reserve.

-Fixed reserve at least.

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-I'm pretty sure we'll do that.

-I'm bowing to the expert knowledge

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cos he knows more about it than I do.

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Going under the hammer now.

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Nice collection of Goss. A good lot.

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And the bid's with me straightaway

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at £100.

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I'm looking for 110 on these items. I've got 100. 110.

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120. 130. 140.

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-Climbing.

-Looking for 150.

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I've got 140. Are we all done on these Goss items? Last time.

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At £140.

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Hammer's gone down at 140.

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-I'm happy with that.

-He's happy with that.

-Sold.

-Very, very happy.

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That was a great result for the Goss,

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but will the marrow painting do as well?

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Now for my favourite lot of the day, Pat's oil painting.

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Three gentlemen with the big marrow.

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The auctioneer gave me a wink on it. He liked it.

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-Very good.

-He said somebody in America was interested in it.

-Really?

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-Yeah.

-Wow.

-Hopefully we get the top end and more. This is it.

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Lot 200. Absolutely stunning oil painting, this.

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-Stunning!

-He's selling things really well for us. Bless him, he's good!

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Typical 1930s, three guys in a pub

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talking about a marrow!

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Not being funny. Where would you get another one?

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And the bid's with me at £60 on this.

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Looking for 65. I've got 60.

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-Five. 70 here.

-A bid in the room.

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Five I need. 80 here.

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85. 90 here. 95. 100. And ten.

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120 here. 130. 140.

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Looking for 150. 150.

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160 here.

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Looking for 170. Are we all done? Last time.

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On the three guys and a marrow. At £160.

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-160, yes! That's a good result.

-Fantastic.

-Good, isn't it?

-Really good.

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I think someone's got themselves a lovely piece of art work.

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It's been good news all round for our first three owners,

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but you can never second-guess a sale.

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Keep watching for more later.

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This isn't a silent film, and yes, we're filming in glorious colour and high definition.

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I'm also proud to say I've been part of the British film industry.

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For two years after leaving college, I worked at Pinewood Studios in the prop and set department.

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So I know what goes on, all the hard work, behind the scenes.

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I'm pleased to say that this creative work produced by the major production companies

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and the independent film-maker is appreciated by the British Film Institute.

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First, I should explain what it does and why I'm here.

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In 1933, the British Film Institute was launched,

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followed two years later by an archive that would save films

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and, years later, television programmes

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as an important part of our cultural heritage.

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A large hi-tech cinema was built on London's South Bank

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to show films for 1951's Festival of Britain.

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When the temporary cinema was demolished, a new one was built in 1957 under Waterloo Bridge.

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It was visited over the years by famous names like director John Ford and Sir Laurence Olivier.

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In 2007, a revamped BFI South Bank building threw open its doors

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revealing a state-of-the-art treasure house of cinema.

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And because of all the famous connections in the film world, it's inevitable

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that other media memorabilia is going to end up here,

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being archived at the BFI. Things like this.

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Promotional packages, scripts, film posters, you name it, they've got it.

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This is a nice selection. The 39 Steps, one of my mother's favourite films.

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I've watched that in black and white with her.

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Here, a promotional package from one of Alfred Hitchcock's silent movies.

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All this stuff, in general, is what people would have just thrown away.

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The BFI's archive is by no means full,

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even with 180,000 movies

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and 750,00 TV shows.

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But they are on the look-out for missing films,

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for reasons that production companies go into bankruptcy

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or the film gets destroyed. They're currently seen as lost to the nation.

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The search goes on. BFI have a list of the most wanted 75 films

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which they hope you, the general public, will help them find

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by looking in attics and cellars and turning out the cupboards.

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At the top of this list is a film called Mountain Eagle, shot in 1926.

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It was only the second movie Alfred Hitchcock directed.

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One of our most respected British film directors.

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For some reason, there's no known print of it. Unless you've got it at home.

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Luckily, there are plenty of prints for us to see here.

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Over 1,000 films a year are screened here.

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It's also the location of the BFI's London Film Festival.

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There are a team of projectionists that work here.

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They're skilled in using real film reels as well as the newer digital technology.

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Projectionists like Russ, here. Russ.

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-Hello.

-Hiya.

-Pleased to meet you.

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-What are you up to? Lacing up a projector?

-Yes,

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-just running a film from the 1930s.

-All these films are shot in 35mm?

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Most of the stuff we run is 35. Sometimes it's the larger 70mm.

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Also we get a 16mm sometimes, which is a rarity, more the art-house thing.

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Is it always as noisy as this?

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Yes, sometimes noisier if you have two projectors going or more.

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-It can be louder than that. It's a noisy job, but you get used to it.

-I bet you do.

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-Are some of the films dangerous?

-Yes, we run seasons with nitrate and so on.

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Nitrate is a flammable substance. The light off the projector can make it catch fire

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and burn a burning down, so you have to be cautious.

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-Are they kept here?

-No, they're kept in Berkhamstead in an external vault.

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They're kept in chilled temperatures, a better environment for films.

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-I'll let you get on.

-Thank you, nice to meet you.

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We've seen how the films are shown. To find out how they're selected,

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I'm meeting Simon McCallum, one of the curators.

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-Simon, what's your role?

-I'm Mediatheque Curator, one of which we have at South Bank.

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We look after nearly a million films and TV programmes in the archive.

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So our aim is to get more of those accessible to wider audiences.

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How do you choose what's in the archive?

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It's tricky. It's a very complex process

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because the curators work together with their individual specialisms

0:20:080:20:12

to decide what the gaps might be in our collections.

0:20:120:20:16

We actively acquire new material as well,

0:20:160:20:19

so it's not just caring for past films and TV programmes.

0:20:190:20:22

-We'll actively acquire all new British feature films, for instance.

-Marvellous.

0:20:220:20:27

You've got a few clips to show me.

0:20:270:20:30

Yes, the first one's one of the earliest British films in the archive.

0:20:300:20:34

It's a film of Blackfriars Bridge in 1896.

0:20:340:20:37

This is only a year or so after the cinema really came about.

0:20:370:20:42

What we're seeing here is people making their way to work.

0:20:470:20:50

You can see the advertising on the side of the trams.

0:20:500:20:55

People are looking into the camera, thinking, "What's he doing?"

0:20:550:20:58

One of the interesting things is that it's a real novelty for people to see a big clunky movie camera.

0:20:580:21:04

-But today...

-People stare when we're filming.

-Exactly. The film crew.

0:21:040:21:08

-Marvellous. That's our heritage captured.

-And it's so much more visual.

0:21:080:21:14

-You're there, aren't you?

-It's really important for social history

0:21:140:21:18

-to see what people were wearing. It comes to life.

-What's next?

0:21:180:21:23

The next clip is the heroic age of Polar exploration.

0:21:230:21:26

This is one of our major restorations, The Great White Silence.

0:21:260:21:30

This is footage shot by Herbert Ponting of the British Antarctic Expedition in 1910 to 1913.

0:21:330:21:41

Led, of course, by Captain Scott, who came to a tragic end.

0:21:410:21:45

The footage was finally edited into a feature film in the '20s

0:21:450:21:49

with added tinting and toning.

0:21:490:21:53

What we're seeing here is the before shots before the tinting was recreated.

0:21:530:21:59

The colour's been restored from the original notes left by Ponting.

0:21:590:22:03

So it's been recreated as per his instructions.

0:22:030:22:08

This is fascinating.

0:22:080:22:11

It's been a huge boost for us to get this film back out there to people.

0:22:110:22:15

This is such an iconic part of British heritage and history.

0:22:150:22:20

Incredible.

0:22:200:22:21

Lots of penguins. They're very popular.

0:22:230:22:26

-Finally, you've got a bit of comedy to show us.

-Some light relief, now.

0:22:310:22:36

It's one of my favourite titles in the archive. It's called Daisy Doodad's Dial, from 1914,

0:22:360:22:42

starring, written and directed by a lady, Florence Turner,

0:22:420:22:45

who was a Hollywood star who came to Britain in the 1910s.

0:22:450:22:50

It's basically a gurning competition. Dial is slang for the face. As we will see!

0:22:500:22:56

She was really quite a pioneer, Florence Turner.

0:23:130:23:16

She went on to work with Buster Keaton in Hollywood, too. She was quite a big star.

0:23:160:23:21

-You can learn so much from these archives.

-You can.

0:23:240:23:27

Still funny, 100 years on, something like that.

0:23:270:23:30

-Thank you very much.

-My pleasure.

-My own private viewing!

0:23:300:23:33

What a privilege to see those pieces of British cinema.

0:23:380:23:41

It shows imagination and creativity have always been strong.

0:23:410:23:45

It's technology and what it allows us to do, pushing those creative boundaries.

0:23:450:23:51

British film has always been close to my heart

0:23:510:23:54

and it's been a real treat to see what the British Film Institute has to offer.

0:23:540:23:58

At Dulwich College, we had a fantastic turnout.

0:24:100:24:12

Michael's been joined by Christina and surrounded by plates!

0:24:120:24:16

Christina, what am I going to do with you? You've made me break my golden Flog It rule.

0:24:160:24:23

-I don't do Clarice Cliff.

-That makes two of us!

0:24:230:24:26

Where on earth did all this come from?

0:24:270:24:30

My father bought this in the mid-'50s.

0:24:300:24:32

It's been in the family ever since.

0:24:320:24:35

I've had this particular plate on my wall for 30, 35 years.

0:24:350:24:39

But the rest has been in a cupboard.

0:24:390:24:42

-Do you like it?

-Not really, no.

0:24:420:24:45

I must say, for your father to be buying this in the '50s,

0:24:450:24:48

-he's really at the forefront, because people were throwing Clarice Cliff away.

-I know.

0:24:480:24:54

They weren't keeping it. You've had this, you've seen the mark. We need to see it.

0:24:540:24:59

-This is the one.

-There we go. That's a whopper of a mark. Bizarre by Clarice Cliff.

0:24:590:25:06

I like that one best, with the orange. I like that much better.

0:25:060:25:11

-This one is the same.

-There's a slight variation there.

0:25:110:25:14

With the orange centre and not as many points.

0:25:140:25:19

I didn't realise that until I was packing things away

0:25:190:25:22

and I saw the centres were different.

0:25:220:25:24

-But you've had it over 30 years.

-I know. But I didn't realise it.

0:25:240:25:28

-It's two versions of the same pattern.

-I thought it could be.

0:25:280:25:32

What I did, interestingly, is look at the dates.

0:25:320:25:35

Some of the cups, saucers and plates are dated 1930.

0:25:350:25:39

These more vigorous ones

0:25:390:25:42

we've got a ten there for October...

0:25:420:25:46

-..1928.

-Oh.

0:25:470:25:49

1928 was the first year that Clarice Cliff introduced the Bizarre range.

0:25:490:25:54

They're very early, then.

0:25:540:25:56

They're very early and these are actually called the original Bizarre pattern.

0:25:560:26:02

They are the first pattern that she produced.

0:26:020:26:05

You can imagine what a breakaway it is when you think of all those chintzy designs and curves,

0:26:050:26:13

to produce something like that.

0:26:130:26:16

Even I, as a Clarice Cliff detester,

0:26:160:26:18

can appreciate the thinking and imagination that's gone in to producing a pattern like this.

0:26:180:26:24

Any idea what this set might be worth now?

0:26:240:26:28

No, I don't. I think it's about 350-odd.

0:26:280:26:32

We'll have to swap places. You'll have to be the expert!

0:26:320:26:36

I think because it's two versions of the same pattern,

0:26:360:26:39

two different dates,

0:26:390:26:40

and we've got bits of a service, I think you're spot on.

0:26:400:26:44

-Oh.

-I think let's put 400 to £600 on it.

0:26:440:26:49

-A fixed reserve of £350.

-Right.

0:26:490:26:52

And we'll see on the day how many people there are

0:26:520:26:55

that, unlike me, do like Clarice Cliff and turn up to bid.

0:26:550:26:59

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much for bringing it in.

-Thank you.

0:26:590:27:03

There are still plenty of people to see and items to value.

0:27:030:27:07

Kate's found an unusual case with John Eric.

0:27:070:27:09

John, you've brought in a rather unprepossessing covered book.

0:27:100:27:14

-Let's have a look inside.

-Open it up.

0:27:140:27:16

We have some Japanese writing.

0:27:160:27:19

Not being fluent in Japanese, I don't know what it says,

0:27:190:27:22

but the real gem is when we get a few pages in.

0:27:220:27:25

Because... Look at this!

0:27:250:27:28

Tell me about this book. Where did you get it? What do you know about it?

0:27:280:27:32

I took a flutter on the internet

0:27:340:27:35

with some very heavy research,

0:27:350:27:38

having bought a few pieces of Japanese textiles - obis and an unfinished kimono.

0:27:380:27:45

-The unfinished kimono I made into a waistcoat.

-As you do!

0:27:450:27:48

As one does. But what interested me was the overall artwork of the whole folio.

0:27:480:27:54

It's absolutely brilliant. It's not hand-painted. It's wood block prints.

0:27:540:27:58

-Date-wise, you thought early 20th century.

-Yeah.

0:27:580:28:05

-So 1912.

-Thereabouts.

-Right at the end of the major period in Japan.

0:28:050:28:09

These are brilliant. It's like a catalogue of kimonos.

0:28:090:28:13

-A kimono catalogue. I presume this was from a shop or dressmaker's?

-Yes.

0:28:130:28:19

-That's even embossed as well.

-Yes, embossed paper. They've textured the paper.

0:28:190:28:25

-Great.

-From what I understand from the description I had on the internet,

0:28:250:28:29

it was put together by a department store within Kyoto

0:28:290:28:32

in order to sell kimonos.

0:28:320:28:33

"I want three of these for Sunday and two of those for best."

0:28:330:28:38

-Exactly.

-The traditional blossom, the good luck cranes, a symbol of the emperor.

0:28:380:28:44

They're absolutely beautiful.

0:28:440:28:47

It puts catalogue shopping today to absolute shame!

0:28:470:28:51

I think they're lovely. It's very hard to price. You bought this recently?

0:28:510:28:56

No, it's going eight, ten years ago, thereabouts.

0:28:560:29:00

What did you pay back then?

0:29:000:29:03

One would rather not say.

0:29:040:29:06

OK. Fair enough. You're being very cagey about it.

0:29:060:29:10

All right. It's almost too good condition.

0:29:100:29:13

I can see it broken up for prints, though that's heartbreaking.

0:29:130:29:17

-That's exactly what I bought it for and I couldn't bring myself to it.

-It's too nice.

0:29:170:29:22

I think, working value out, that's kind of a way to do it.

0:29:220:29:26

Probably if you're thinking 40 to £50 per thing when they're framed up.

0:29:260:29:32

Maybe that's the sort of figure. 300, 400, £500, something like that.

0:29:320:29:36

What price would you want to put on it as a reserve or estimate?

0:29:360:29:39

-I would like to see about £400.

-OK.

0:29:390:29:43

-That being more than you paid for it.

-Yes.

-About what you paid?

0:29:430:29:47

-We'll try 400 to 500.

-Yeah.

-Hopefully it'll be seen on the internet.

0:29:470:29:51

And fingers crossed.

0:29:510:29:53

-Thank you for bringing it in. It's gorgeous.

-My pleasure.

-Thank you.

0:29:530:29:57

A beautiful book. I bet that'll be snapped up by someone at the auction.

0:29:570:30:02

We've just got time for one more item, just up Michael's street.

0:30:020:30:07

A glass vase brought in by Jean.

0:30:070:30:10

Jean, where did you get this darling little vase from?

0:30:100:30:14

-A jumble sale.

-Not recently.

0:30:140:30:17

-1980-ish.

-1980.

0:30:170:30:19

I'm going to say, "How much did you pay for it?" But I'm bracing myself.

0:30:190:30:23

The were originally charging me 50p.

0:30:230:30:25

-Originally?

-But then they decided to charge me 25p.

0:30:250:30:29

-Was that under duress?

-No, they just changed their mind!

0:30:290:30:32

Sometimes you wish you had a time machine, Jean. I wish I could build one.

0:30:320:30:37

-Did you buy it because you liked it or..?

-Something told me it was something special.

0:30:370:30:42

-Really?

-Almost looked Chinesey decorations, but I didn't think it was Chinese.

0:30:420:30:47

-You just had a feeling about it.

-It just felt right.

0:30:470:30:51

You've actually bought, to my eyes, a really beautiful little glass vase.

0:30:510:30:57

If we look at it more carefully, it's sadly not marked

0:30:570:31:01

or inscribed in any way.

0:31:010:31:02

But you could say that this glass was marked all over

0:31:020:31:05

in the way that it's executed.

0:31:050:31:07

We've got this beautiful, almost satin glass ground

0:31:070:31:12

which has then been dipped in white glass.

0:31:120:31:15

Then the whole thing has been carved back on a wheel.

0:31:150:31:19

You've just got to take just enough off, just enough,

0:31:190:31:23

because that's a very smooth, even surface.

0:31:230:31:26

It's a phenomenal bit of work.

0:31:260:31:28

Now, it could have been made in France

0:31:280:31:32

by a firm such as Galle or Daum.

0:31:320:31:36

But if this glass spoke, it would speak with my native accent.

0:31:360:31:39

It would say, "Hello, Jean!" Because this is actually from Stourbridge,

0:31:390:31:44

which is just outside, on the outskirts of Birmingham.

0:31:440:31:48

It was a major centre for glassworking.

0:31:480:31:50

This is almost certainly from the workshop of Thomas Webb

0:31:500:31:54

who specialised in this immaculate quality cameo glass.

0:31:540:32:00

The design we've got, when you first said you thought it was a bit Chinese,

0:32:000:32:05

it's actually inspired by Chinese design.

0:32:050:32:07

They're called The Three Friends.

0:32:070:32:11

You've got cherry blossom, prunus and bamboo.

0:32:110:32:16

They're, together, emblematic of long life.

0:32:170:32:19

I think in terms of date,

0:32:190:32:23

we're possibly as early as 1880

0:32:230:32:26

possibly as late as 1890, 1895.

0:32:260:32:30

It's survived in miraculously good condition.

0:32:300:32:33

Well, has your 25p been a good investment?

0:32:340:32:37

I'd like to know!

0:32:370:32:40

I think we should be sensible

0:32:400:32:43

and put an estimate of 600 to £800 on it.

0:32:430:32:46

-Really?

-With a fixed reserve of £600.

0:32:460:32:49

Right.

0:32:490:32:51

Webb's cameo glass is extremely collectable.

0:32:510:32:54

But can I ask you now, after living with it for 30 years,

0:32:540:32:58

why are you selling it?

0:32:580:33:00

I took early retirement in January

0:33:000:33:04

and I've got a houseful of things I've got to start sorting out.

0:33:040:33:09

-It's a small step towards it.

-It's a small step in terms of size.

0:33:090:33:16

But a big step financially, I hope.

0:33:160:33:19

Let's hope for lots of bidders at the sale

0:33:190:33:22

and that it really does well.

0:33:220:33:24

-Thank you.

-Thank you so much.

0:33:240:33:26

Right. Time's up for Dulwich.

0:33:260:33:28

Let's hear why these three items caught Kate and Michael's attention.

0:33:280:33:32

This Clarice Cliff service isn't exactly my cup of tea,

0:33:340:33:38

but I think it will appeal to the bidders at the auction.

0:33:380:33:41

I really like John's Japanese prints. They're brilliant. They look so modern, but they're 100 years old.

0:33:410:33:47

I've come all the way down from Birmingham to London today

0:33:470:33:51

but this Stourbridge glass vase has followed me!

0:33:510:33:54

Over in Greenwich, I caught up with auctioneer Robert on the preview day

0:33:540:33:59

to find out what he thought of Christina's Clarice Cliff collection.

0:33:590:34:03

The Clarice Cliff. Christina's father got this in the mid-'50s.

0:34:040:34:10

There's a lot of it. We've got ten separate lots here.

0:34:100:34:14

You've split them into ten lots rather than keep them as one lot.

0:34:140:34:18

I spoke to the lady concerned.

0:34:180:34:20

I suggested what I would do if she'd come in and put it over the counter.

0:34:200:34:25

There's no sets here. They're a different pattern, for a start.

0:34:250:34:29

And in any case, I'm not being funny,

0:34:290:34:32

I can't see anyone having a sandwich off one of these plates.

0:34:320:34:36

-Bought to be viewed.

-Go on the wall.

-Absolutely.

0:34:360:34:39

We've got a reserve on the whole lot of £350. How will you deal with that?

0:34:390:34:44

Look at them as ten individual lots.

0:34:440:34:46

The larger plate is 70 to £80. Cup and saucer, 30 to £40.

0:34:460:34:51

I asked one of my staff what it added up to and they went, "£350". That's the reserve.

0:34:510:34:56

-Separate numbers make up the sum total.

-They make it up.

0:34:560:34:59

So if we get a good run at it,

0:34:590:35:02

we could see that reserve in three lots.

0:35:020:35:08

He knows something!

0:35:100:35:12

We'll see how that decision works out later.

0:35:130:35:17

But now the moment our owners have been waiting for.

0:35:170:35:20

First, will Jean's piece of cameo glass find the right buyer here?

0:35:200:35:25

It's Jean's turn next. Let's talk about that cameo glass vase. 600 to £800.

0:35:250:35:30

I had a chat to the auctioneer. He agrees with the value,

0:35:300:35:33

but possibly the lower end, not top end.

0:35:330:35:36

That's fine. But it's that great name Thomas Webb. A great name in English glass.

0:35:360:35:41

-And the great thing is, it only cost 25p!

-True.

0:35:410:35:45

Let's do some recycling! Here we go!

0:35:450:35:48

Amber glass cameo bud vase.

0:35:500:35:53

A white raised plant and foliage relief.

0:35:530:35:55

Attributed to Thomas Webb.

0:35:550:35:57

Dated around 1880s.

0:35:570:36:01

-It's got to start with a bid with me of £150 on this vase.

-That's low.

0:36:010:36:07

160. 70 with me. Looking for 180.

0:36:070:36:09

-No commission bids, then.

-No.

0:36:090:36:11

190 with me.

0:36:110:36:13

200. 210 here. Looking for 220.

0:36:130:36:16

Are we all done? Last time.

0:36:170:36:20

At £210.

0:36:200:36:23

-I'm ever so sorry about that.

-It doesn't matter.

0:36:230:36:26

-I'm glad to take it home.

-Can you hear that?

0:36:260:36:28

It was Thomas Webb collectors didn't know it was for sale, screaming

0:36:280:36:32

at their TV screens!

0:36:320:36:33

There are specialist sales for glass in the Stourbridge area.

0:36:330:36:37

I think that's... If you want to sell it. If you decide to keep it...

0:36:370:36:42

But if you want to sell it, take it to a specialist sale. It's 600 to £800.

0:36:420:36:46

-I know I say this a lot, all day long.

-Sound advice.

0:36:460:36:49

What a shame that didn't sell.

0:36:490:36:52

But today was not the right day for the cameo vase.

0:36:520:36:56

Another specialist item under scrutiny now, John's kimono book.

0:36:560:37:01

Next, a really special lot. I like this. It's a folio of kimono samples.

0:37:010:37:05

-It belongs to John Eric here.

-Hi.

-Hello.

0:37:050:37:09

Quality item. Quality item. Why are you selling it? You bought it on the internet.

0:37:090:37:15

I wanted to break it up originally, to frame them.

0:37:150:37:19

That's quite a good idea. I mean, that is a good idea.

0:37:190:37:23

But too costly because of the way it's put together.

0:37:230:37:26

-Yes.

-And I found I didn't have the heart to break them up.

0:37:260:37:31

OK. I wonder if anybody else will?

0:37:310:37:35

That's probably what a dealer would do, and they'd look good.

0:37:350:37:39

-You could enjoy them.

-But someone more hard-hearted.

-I couldn't do it morally.

0:37:390:37:43

-You won't have to live with that decision.

-Yes.

0:37:430:37:46

It's a quirky lot. It's a lovely thing, really.

0:37:460:37:50

Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:37:500:37:53

Stunning piece, this.

0:37:550:37:56

Late 19th, early 20th-century hand-painted kimono sample folio

0:37:560:38:01

with original linen-padded cover.

0:38:010:38:03

Absolutely stunning piece of work.

0:38:030:38:06

Really proud to get this.

0:38:060:38:08

And it's got to start with me

0:38:080:38:11

-at £370.

-Close!

0:38:110:38:15

Come on!

0:38:150:38:16

-John Eric, that is just one bid away, isn't it?

-Here we go.

0:38:160:38:20

380. 390 here. 400. 410.

0:38:200:38:24

420. 430. 440.

0:38:240:38:26

-450.

-There are some hard-hearted people in the room!

0:38:260:38:30

-They'll break it up.

-Anywhere? I've got 450. Looking for 460.

0:38:300:38:34

460. 470. 480. 490.

0:38:340:38:38

500. 510 here.

0:38:380:38:40

520. 530. 540. 550.

0:38:400:38:43

Looking for 560 anywhere. Are we all done?

0:38:430:38:47

Last time. At £550 on the sample book.

0:38:470:38:51

-£550.

-Wow!

0:38:510:38:53

-I'm stunned!

-That's a brilliant result!

-So am I.

0:38:530:38:57

I was dubious... I was happy with the value,

0:38:570:39:00

but dubious we'd find a buyer here.

0:39:000:39:02

It goes to show. If it's quality, people will always find it.

0:39:020:39:07

And unusual. It's fired the imagination for somebody.

0:39:070:39:10

-Well done, you.

-Thank you very much.

0:39:100:39:13

Get yourself comfortable, because Christina's group of Clarice Cliff is going under the hammer.

0:39:130:39:20

Not just one lot. We've got ten.

0:39:200:39:23

Christina's Clarice Cliff has been split into ten lots.

0:39:230:39:27

I had a chat to the auctioneer, as you know.

0:39:270:39:30

He thinks it's better to split them because people may be interested in the large plate

0:39:300:39:35

or maybe just a cup and saucer.

0:39:350:39:37

Fair enough. It gives more collectors a bite at having a piece.

0:39:370:39:41

-Your father bought this in the '50s.

-Yes.

-Why are you selling now?

0:39:410:39:44

-I don't need it and I don't like it.

-No. There's a lot of people out there

0:39:440:39:49

that really love it.

0:39:490:39:51

It's going under the hammer now. This is it.

0:39:510:39:54

Lot 525 is the first of ten -

0:39:550:40:00

I'm not making apologies - collectors' lot, Clarice Cliff items.

0:40:000:40:04

And the first one, lot 525, is an original Bizarre pattern nine-inch octagonal plate by Clarice Cliff.

0:40:040:40:10

A blue circle centre. The bid's with me.

0:40:100:40:13

At £180 on this plate. Looking for 190.

0:40:130:40:18

I've got 180. 190. 200 here. Looking for 210 on this plate.

0:40:180:40:23

210. 220. Looking for 230.

0:40:230:40:26

240 here. Looking for 250.

0:40:260:40:28

250. 260 here. Looking for 270.

0:40:280:40:31

-80 here.

-Christina, this is ridiculously good for one item!

0:40:310:40:37

Are we all done on this plate? At £300.

0:40:370:40:41

£300. There's the first one.

0:40:410:40:43

That's almost done my valuation for the lot!

0:40:430:40:46

Late 1920s, early '30s Art Deco original Bizarre pattern...

0:40:460:40:52

Brace yourselves! Fasten the seatbelts!

0:40:520:40:55

The bid's with me straightaway at £35.

0:40:550:40:58

Looking for 38 on this plate. Are we all done? 38.

0:40:580:41:02

£40. 42. 44. 46. 48.

0:41:020:41:06

50. Two. 52 with me. Looking for 55.

0:41:060:41:10

All done on this plate? At £52!

0:41:100:41:12

We've already met the reserve and we've only sold two. Eight more to go!

0:41:120:41:18

42. 45. 48.

0:41:180:41:21

-50. Two I need.

-You're causing a stir!

0:41:210:41:23

£50. Are we all done?

0:41:230:41:25

Last time. At £50.

0:41:250:41:28

There's 50 on top of that.

0:41:280:41:31

Let's have another go, eh? The bid is with me at £35.

0:41:310:41:35

38. £40.

0:41:350:41:37

42. 45. 48. 50 here.

0:41:370:41:39

52.

0:41:390:41:41

54 with me. Looking for 56.

0:41:410:41:43

56. 58 with me.

0:41:430:41:46

-It's pushing and pushing.

-It's all going on in the room.

0:41:460:41:49

-Wow.

-Sold, 133.

0:41:490:41:51

All done? With me, last time on this plate. £54.

0:41:510:41:55

This was Michael's first valuation on Clarice.

0:41:550:41:58

I know what you're thinking - "Not again!"

0:41:580:42:00

I won't do it again. Not after this. Once is enough!

0:42:000:42:03

Go on, have a go. This is a nice one.

0:42:030:42:06

58. £60. 62.

0:42:060:42:10

Michael's on edge because he's our specialist in metals.

0:42:100:42:13

Lovely things from the 16th and 17th century.

0:42:130:42:17

I weighed this tea set. I should have done it at scrap!

0:42:170:42:19

-I don't know!

-45. 48. £50.

0:42:190:42:23

I don't know why they love it so much.

0:42:230:42:26

-But they do.

-They do, don't they?

0:42:260:42:28

All done? Last time. At £45.

0:42:280:42:32

-Are you keeping a tally?

-No.

-No, nor am I!

0:42:320:42:36

At 60.

0:42:360:42:38

Looking for 62. Are we all done on the cup and saucer?

0:42:380:42:42

At £60.

0:42:420:42:44

Last one of the Clarice Cliff Bizarre cup and saucer.

0:42:440:42:47

Bid's with me at £50.

0:42:470:42:48

Five. £60 with me.

0:42:480:42:50

I'll take 61. 62 with me.

0:42:500:42:53

Looking at 63. 64. 65.

0:42:530:42:56

66. All done at 66? Looking at 67. Have we all done?

0:42:560:43:01

At £66 only on the cabinet cup and saucer.

0:43:010:43:04

-Oh, that's a noise, Paul.

-It is.

-What do you think his gavel's made of?

0:43:040:43:08

I don't think it's a gavel. It's a carpenter's mallet!

0:43:080:43:11

-Christina, that's the end of it.

-Wonderful!

-That's all ten.

0:43:110:43:14

And it's a grand total - I'm looking at a calculator here!

0:43:140:43:17

-It's £802!

-Wonderful!

0:43:170:43:21

-I can't believe it!

-Fantastic.

0:43:210:43:23

Gosh, what a lovely surprise! What a lovely surprise!

0:43:230:43:26

I hope that was a big surprise for you as well.

0:43:260:43:29

It's rounded off a wonderful day here in Greenwich.

0:43:290:43:32

Christina will go home happy.

0:43:320:43:33

Lots of our owners will today.

0:43:330:43:35

All credit to our experts and the man on the rostrum. He's done us proud. See you next time!

0:43:350:43:40

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:44:010:44:05

Presenter Paul Martin and experts Kate Bateman and Michael Baggott visit the impressive Dulwich College in south London, where Michael has to sort through a collection of Clarice Cliff, Kate finds an unusual book of kimono patterns and Paul loves a painting with a quirky subject matter.

And, whilst in London, Paul takes time out to tell the fascinating story of the British Film Institute.


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