Preston Flog It!


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Preston

Paul Martin, David Fletcher and James Lewis visit Preston in Lancashire, where David has a eureka moment about a clock and Paul learns more about the Preston Guild.


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The city of Preston has a long history of trading,

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dating right back to the 12th century

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when a guild was set up to represent traders and craftsmen from all kinds of genre.

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In order to trade, you had to be a member.

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Membership was celebrated with feasts and festivals.

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Now that sounds like the club to join, just like Flog It! Welcome to the show.

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The guild celebrations only happen every 20 years

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so there's a great local saying here, when something rare happens -

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"Once in a Preston Guild." Will today be that special?

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Our venue for today's valuations is St John's Minster, in the heart

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of this wonderful city.

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Let's hope we find something worthy of that phrase, shall we?

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-What are you going to do when you find out what it's worth?

-ALL: Flog it!

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Ready to search high and low for those treasures

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are our team of experts, led today by James Lewis...

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It's about 1800...

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..and David Fletcher.

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This could be worth about £80 to £100.

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On today's show, look out for traditional "Flog It!" antiques

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but with a twist.

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950 now.

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'Which of these three items goes for nearly double the estimate?'

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This is good, isn't it?

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'The coin collection?'

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This is some box of coins.

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'A 20th-century clock?'

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This is my Eureka moment!

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'Or a Clarice Cliff plate?'

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It might be ugly, but I love it.

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We'll keep you guessing on today's show.

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First, let's get everybody inside as there's a lot to get through.

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Look at that, what a marvellous turnout.

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Whatever you do, don't go away

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because I think there will be one or two whopping great big surprises.

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Hundreds of people are still queuing outside to come into this magnificent building!

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Our experts have their work cut out.

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It's about time I went down there and joined up with them.

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'To kick things off, we have James, at his most honest.'

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Winifred, I think you deserve an award.

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I think you have brought to us the ugliest piece of Clarice Cliff

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ever found on Flog It! It is great, I love it!

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Normally, you get all these bright, pretty colours

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but what is going on here? They look like some sort of weird triffid

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growing from a muddy pile!

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I actually like the fact that it's an ugly design. Tell me about it,

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now I've insulted your plate completely!

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Well, my mother must have bought it or thought it was quite nice

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or just because it was fashionable.

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Or something different. Did your mum just buy this on its own

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-or did she buy it...

-Yes, she did.

-Single piece?

-Single piece.

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And now it's mine, or has been for the last 20-odd years.

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-Are you a fan?

-Well, I like some of her things, yes.

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I suppose I was just proud to have a Clarice Cliff.

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The thing is, I'd much rather own that

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than one of these crocus-patterned bowls because that's different.

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The pattern is known as "cabbage roses". And if you turn it over,

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you see this wonderful Honeyglaze.

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Whenever you see that yellow buff glaze, you know it's quite an early piece.

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The 1930s were well known for this Honeyglaze.

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Just post-war, you tend to find a mushroomy colour

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which, for me, makes everything look quite drab.

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We've got the date stamped into the back there.

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And we've got 10 above 33. The 10 is for the month, which is October.

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The 33 is for the year, 1933.

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We have the Royal Staffordshire Pottery mark,

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Wilkinson's Honeyglaze,

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and then the normal Bizarre, Clarice Cliff, England.

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And it all says it on the back.

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This pattern was a fairly short-lived pattern,

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it only lasted for a couple of years.

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Of all the Clarice Cliff that I've sold,

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I've only ever sold two pieces of this.

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And I think that's worth 100 to 150.

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-Really?

-Yes. You ought to put a firm reserve of £100,

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no discretion, £100 firm as a reserve

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and I'm sure it'll do well.

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You know, if I was going to buy a piece of Clarice Cliff,

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I'd buy one like that.

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It might be ugly but I love it.

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Well, at least a good estimate was Winifred's reward

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for James' brutal honesty.

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Now, remember I told you about the Preston Guild?

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Well, just look what has turned up for me to see.

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Emma, thank you for coming in today.

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I know you are the curator of history at the local museum.

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You've brought some wonderful exhibits to show us,

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explaining the history of the guild of this famous city

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because it's the only city left with a guild that's celebrated today.

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Yes, it is. At one point, lots of merchant towns around Britain

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would celebrate a guild every 20 years,

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but the guild organisations were abolished in the 19th century

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but Preston, in 1842, decided to continue with its guild tradition.

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That makes it the only town in Britain to still celebrate a guild.

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-Let's look at this first.

-This is the oldest object

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-we have at the Harris Museum in Preston.

-Is it dated?

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It's from 1762.

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It's an official record of the guild of that year.

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This records the sort of events that went on.

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Amongst the famous people who visited that year,

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well, soon to be famous, were Richard Arkwright, the famous inventor

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-of the water frame.

-Let's look at this.

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A wonderful piece of fine carving.

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This is a guild object from 1952.

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It's a replica of the clock tower of Preston's famous town hall

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that was designed by George Gilbert Scott.

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It went round the world to New Zealand, Canada, America.

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And people would send their wishes to Preston

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so inside these wonderful scroll holders,

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are examples of the friendship scrolls that went round the world.

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-And it got signed.

-This started in 1952,

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it's something that's still going on today

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but now we have digital scrolls so we try to modernise it now.

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-But this is still an important object.

-Lovely.

-It's a lovely thing.

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Thank you for bringing these lovely examples in,

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it's good to learn about Preston and the places we go to when we're out and about.

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Over at David's table, Gary's timepiece has caused a stir.

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This is my Eureka moment. I've been waiting for it for a long time!

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A clock, manufactured by the Eureka Clock Company Ltd.

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What can you tell me about it?

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It was left to me by my father,

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about 15 years ago. I'm not too sure where he got it from.

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He was a builder so it could have been something he got as a payment,

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part of a payment of a job.

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It was a piece we used as decoration really.

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Well, at least it's right twice a day

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-which is something, I suppose.

-Yes!

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If you look at it, to all intents and purposes,

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it looks like a Georgian mantel-clock, but it is a modern battery-powered clock.

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This particular model dates from the first ten years of the 20th century.

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A man called Powers invented a battery-driven clock

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in America in the late 19th century.

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And in the early 20th century,

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the Eureka Clock Company developed clocks that look like this.

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And if we turn it round, we can see...

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..what's going on in here. There's an absence of a clock movement

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as we know it.

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What we have is a section devoted to housing the battery,

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and these wires pass a current which causes this part

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of the action to rock backwards and forwards,

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forming the pendulum effect.

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Now, if you're interested in clocks, you're going to want to own something like this

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because it plays an important part in the development

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of the manufacture of clock movements.

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I think it would really sell quite well.

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Have you any idea what it might be worth?

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Not really, no.

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We can expect it to make something in the region of 300 to 500.

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And if you were happy with that,

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I suggest we go ahead on that basis

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-with a £300 reserve.

-Yes.

-Have you got any plans for the money?

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I just got married last year so it'll be going towards...

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We're moving into a new house so it'll go towards decorations.

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And what does your new wife think of it?

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She likes it but it wouldn't fit in with the decor she has planned.

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-So it's not going to cause an early marital argument if you sell it?

-No!

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Well, good luck with the marriage, and good luck with the clock sale!

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Sue, tell me, do you say "walking stick" or "walking cane"?

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Walking stick.

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Ah, see, that gives something away.

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A friend of mine once said - he's a stick dealer in London -

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"James, a true gentleman has a walking cane,

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"but a bloke has a walking stick."

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I have to say, I'm a bloke, I have a walking stick.

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But, er, this would certainly be an ivory handle for a walking cane.

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It is a wonderful example of a carved, ivory cane handle

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from the 1860s to 1880s, late 19th century,

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carved out of one piece.

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And would have two little glass eyes. Although one is missing,

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I don't think the other one is original either.

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So, why do you have it? What's happened to its cane, or stick?

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And where has his other eye gone?

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-My husband collects walking sticks.

-Ah, OK.

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That one, he actually took it off the stick, or the cane

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and then he put something else on the cane.

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-Ah, he had a better handle, did he?

-Yes.

-Could he not find another cane to stick it on?

-Perhaps he can, yes.

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-We've never known it to have another eye.

-Ah, OK.

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-Over the years, we have tried to match it up.

-And no joy?

-No joy.

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The walking-cane market is very buoyant at the moment.

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A cane handle like that, if it was on its original shaft,

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would be very desirable.

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This little chap, almost certainly English, and very well carved.

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In terms of value,

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I think we should put an auction estimate of £80 to £120.

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-Oh, lovely!

-Is that all right?

-That's lovely, yes.

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-On that basis, shall we sell it?

-Yes, thank you very much.

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And as it was carved before 1947,

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that ivory dog is legal to sell

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and completes our trio of items to take off to auction.

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Winifred's Clarice Cliff got a strong reaction from James.

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I think you have brought to us the ugliest piece of Clarice Cliff ever found on Flog It!

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But he thought it was an unusual pattern

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so it's down for £100 to £150.

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The Eureka clock piqued David's interest

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and earned Gary a generous estimate of £300 to £500.

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And Sue's ivory dog head is without its walking cane and an eye.

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Despite that, it's still attractive enough to gain an estimate

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of £80 to £120 at auction. And that's where we're off right now.

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Today's sale comes from the heart of Cheshire.

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We're the guests at Frank Marshall auction rooms in Knutsford.

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This is a wealthy part of the world so fingers crossed,

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we should get some keen prices for some of our lots.

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And here we are, inside this lovely old building.

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As you can see, I'm walking past rows and rows of long-case clocks,

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wonderful items of furniture.

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The sale is taking place on the first floor

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and that's where all our owners will be waiting right now,

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feeling really, really nervous!

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It's OK for you, you can put your feet up and relax.

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I'm going to catch up with them and hopefully settle their nerves.

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Stay tuned, this could get really exciting!

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There is a standard seller's commission

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and it's 15% including VAT.

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With auctioneer Nick Hall

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on the rostrum, we are now ready to go,

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starting with Sue's ivory dog's head,

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which has now been reunited with its cane

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and had a small change in estimate of £80 to £100,

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just to tempt the bidders.

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Sue, it's great to see you again.

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-Who have you brought along?

-My husband, Ken.

-Ken, pleased to meet you.

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-Was this your walking cane?

-It was, yes.

-How did you come by it?

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At a car boot, I think.

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Car boot. You see, it goes around and around.

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That's the beauty of antiques. How much did you pick it up for?

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It was only a couple of quid, I think.

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-I thought it was plastic!

-It doesn't get any better, does it?

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Let's find out what the bidders think, it's going under the hammer now.

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Late 19th, early 20th-century carved walking-stick handle.

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Got a bit of interest as well, I can jump straight in...

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That's good.

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..65, 75, 80 with me.

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£80 I have, any advance with you now, it's £80, the bid's with me.

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Five online, 95, 100, 110, 120,

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130 with me, bidding online, 140, got 140 online, nothing in the room?

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With me now at 1-4-0...

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-Happy?

-Yes, very happy with that.

-I'll have to go and look for more!

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I was just about to say that.

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-Turn another profit!

-Not bad for a couple of pounds.

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'Brilliant result, above estimate.

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'Now, next, will the bidders deliver a Eureka moment for Gary?'

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-I know you're selling because you've just bought a house.

-Yes.

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We're looking to redecorate and buy another timepiece

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that will suit the decor of the house.

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It's got the look but not for your house. Good luck with this.

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We're looking at £300 to £500, it's going under the hammer right now.

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Early 20th-century Eureka Clock Company,

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mahogany and brass.

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Electric timepiece, good little quality lot, lot of interest.

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I can start the bidding on commission, straight in at...300.

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-Wow.

-You're right.

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Any advance on 300, where's 20? 20 with you on the phones,

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340 I'd take, 340.

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But it's not job done, it's still going on.

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380 with me, at 380, 400, 420,

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440 the phone, 460 I have.

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A phone line, that's encouraging.

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480, 500, 500 now. 520.

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-With you on the phone.

-On the top estimate.

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Someone else in the room, late legs.

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520, back of the room, 520.

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Bidding on the phone, 540.

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540 now, 560 here.

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At 560 now, any further bids?

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He wanted it!

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Selling now, at £560.

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-Great result. Got to be pleased with that!

-Very pleased!

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Just over the top end of the estimate.

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Well done.

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-That will help you out a lot.

-Thank you!

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'A good amount for Gary to redecorate with

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'and he'll need a new clock.

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'Let's continue with an old favourite.'

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I've just been joined by the gorgeous Winifred here

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-and it wouldn't be "Flog It!" without...

-Clarice Cliff!

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Well, it wouldn't, would it? Let's face it!

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And James said to me earlier, he only picked it because it was so ugly!

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-Yes, he did!

-You see so much Clarice Cliff but I have to say,

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this is about the ugliest piece I've seen. But I love it for that reason!

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Good. Ugly is beautiful, isn't it?

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A nice bit of Clarice Cliff there. What shall we say, £100 for it?

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100, surely? Start me at £50, come on! Nice bit of Clarice Cliff.

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Come on, Clarice!

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Nicely painted, good decorations, 50 I'm bid, 55, the bid's online,

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£55 only, 60, 60 bid, and five, 65.

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70 now, online at £70, five against you, 80,

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five I have, 85 now.

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£85.

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Any advance on £85? Against you online,

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90, new bidder. Five at the back. 100? 100 seated. 110 now.

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It's selling.

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Fresh blood at the back at 110, still in, madam? 120, 130...

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This is good, two people in the room bidding against each other!

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170, gent standing right at the back, nothing online.

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Blank screen. With you, sir,

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-at £170...

-HE BANGS GAVEL

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-How about that?

-Very good!

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-Yeah? Happy?

-I'm very pleased. Thank you very much.

-Good.

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Against you, five online.

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That's the end of our first visit to the auction room today.

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So far, so good. Don't go away

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because there could be one or two surprises when we come back later on in the show.

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As we're halfway through, it is time for a break, I'm feeling hungry

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so, it's time for a bit of cooking. Take a look at this.

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Five miles from Preston, the historic Salmesbury Hall

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in Lancashire dates back to the 14th century

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and over the years, it would have been a significant estate,

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with many mouths to feed.

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It was crucial that most of the food came from the hall's estate,

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which is why this is the perfect setting for me to explore

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the county's food heritage, starting with something traditional.

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Lancashire hotpot is a firm favourite amongst the county's residents

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for sustenance and good old-fashioned comfort food.

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Many families will have their own recipe that's been handed down over the generations.

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But it's still being made here, at the hall, by the resident chefs

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using produce as locally as they can source.

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Now, the ingredients may vary around the country

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but a proper Lancashire hotpot, a traditional one,

0:18:130:18:17

is comprised of four ingredients, four basic ones.

0:18:170:18:20

You've got lamb, potato, carrots, and onion.

0:18:200:18:26

Historically, meals needed to be high in calories

0:18:260:18:30

to sustain Lancashire's industrial workers and miners

0:18:300:18:34

throughout the working day.

0:18:340:18:36

Another traditional Lancashire dish, known for its simplicity

0:18:360:18:39

and convenience, is butter pie, also known as prater pie,

0:18:390:18:43

and it's got a simple potato and onion filling.

0:18:430:18:45

It was popular as a football match snack

0:18:450:18:48

with Preston North End fans.

0:18:480:18:50

WHISTLING AND APPLAUSE

0:18:500:18:52

Local sweet treats include Chorley cakes and Sad cakes

0:18:540:18:58

which originally used up bits of leftover pastry to make a dessert,

0:18:580:19:02

served up with Lancashire cheese.

0:19:020:19:04

There's still a huge value today in using local and simple ingredients,

0:19:050:19:09

so before I start cooking, I need to go foraging.

0:19:090:19:12

Although Salmesbury Hall does have its own lambs and pigs here today,

0:19:140:19:18

they are strictly pets. The two pigs here, Ozzy and Elvis,

0:19:180:19:23

eat up all the kitchen scraps so that's good.

0:19:230:19:26

Nothing but the best for them.

0:19:260:19:27

I expect they're named after Elvis Presley and Ozzy Osbourne.

0:19:270:19:31

HE LAUGHS

0:19:310:19:32

There's lots of chickens running around as well

0:19:340:19:36

so let's see if we can get any fresh eggs.

0:19:360:19:38

Open up here... Oh, yes!

0:19:380:19:41

And I tell you what, they don't get much fresher than this!

0:19:410:19:45

This reminds me of collecting eggs at home with my little boy, Dylan,

0:19:450:19:49

from our chickens. That's a decent-size egg.

0:19:490:19:53

And they're going to come in very useful later.

0:19:530:19:56

'One enthusiastic advocate of local produce and recipes

0:20:000:20:05

'is food writer and cook Philippa James,

0:20:050:20:07

'who's going to show me how to easily turn simple ingredients

0:20:070:20:11

'into something delicious.'

0:20:110:20:13

You're going to cook me something today

0:20:130:20:15

-and it's vegetarian.

-It is, specially for you.

0:20:150:20:17

A special dish for Lancashire, Lancashire tortilla.

0:20:170:20:20

Is this a traditional Lancashire dish for vegetarians?

0:20:200:20:23

It isn't but a lot of the traditional ingredients and recipes from the area

0:20:230:20:28

were based on ingredients that were cheap and easy to find.

0:20:280:20:31

What goes into the tortilla?

0:20:310:20:33

We're going to be using local eggs, we've got local cheese, butter,

0:20:330:20:37

cream, local potatoes and spring onions.

0:20:370:20:38

That's why we're in the herb garden, we need to get some herbs.

0:20:380:20:43

-How much do you want?

-Another bit more

0:20:440:20:46

and I'll just grab some parsley from round here.

0:20:460:20:49

CHICKEN CLUCKS SOFTLY

0:20:540:20:56

-Right, where do we start?

-We're doing a Lancashire tortilla

0:20:560:21:00

so first, we need to get some butter in the pan.

0:21:000:21:02

If you'd like to get some of the eggs we got from the nesting box,

0:21:030:21:07

there's a dish there to put the shell in.

0:21:070:21:09

I'm going to sling in some spring onions.

0:21:130:21:16

This is really easy cos you just snip the ends off.

0:21:160:21:19

And Ozzy and Elvis eat everything, all the scraps from the kitchen.

0:21:190:21:22

They're great, aren't they? Would you like to put in a bit of black pepper?

0:21:220:21:26

I just love cooking for people.

0:21:260:21:28

I have a need to feed people wherever I go, I force-feed people!

0:21:280:21:32

I'm going to add in some potatoes to there as well.

0:21:330:21:36

I've taken it off the heat for a moment because it is so hot today.

0:21:360:21:38

A layer of those, just to cover the bottom of the pan.

0:21:380:21:41

That's now taken the heat down in the pan already. I'll pop these over the base.

0:21:410:21:46

People think Lancashire's rainy but look at it today, isn't it glorious?

0:21:460:21:51

I'm going to be using some Lancashire cheese in a minute.

0:21:510:21:54

We get the rain in the autumn and winter, then the starches in the grass turn to sugars.

0:21:540:21:58

That's where we get sweet milk from.

0:21:580:22:00

-Are we going to grate some of that...

-Yes, I was going to ask.

0:22:000:22:03

Would you mind grating some for me? What sort of food do you like?

0:22:030:22:06

Omelettes!

0:22:060:22:08

-That'll be the omelettes!

-I'm an expert on omelettes, believe me.

0:22:090:22:12

I ask my wife, "What do you want for supper?" She says, "Not another omelette!"

0:22:120:22:16

I'm going to turn these now, in the butter.

0:22:160:22:18

-So both sides get some butter on them.

-They're just being caramelised.

0:22:180:22:22

-That's it, yes.

-Is that about enough cheese for that?

-That's great.

0:22:220:22:26

The next ingredient is our eggs.

0:22:260:22:28

I'm going to pop those in, there you go.

0:22:280:22:30

Right, listen to that sizzle.

0:22:300:22:33

-Run that round the pan like that.

-That's the trick of an omelette,

0:22:330:22:37

-isn't it, so it doesn't stick.

-Also, if you seal everything in,

0:22:370:22:40

-it's getting a little collar round the edge.

-It's easier to open out

0:22:400:22:44

-and take out of the pan.

-Absolutely.

0:22:440:22:46

-Can you see that hot-air balloon shape in the middle?

-I pat it down.

0:22:460:22:49

Let the egg run back under. These balloons have nowhere else

0:22:490:22:52

for the air to go that's trapped in there.

0:22:520:22:54

-So get the egg underneath.

-Yes, this is where you get your layers forming.

0:22:540:22:58

We'll put in some cheese next, now we've turned it down.

0:22:580:23:01

So, we'll put that back on. If you could pick some of the thyme you got

0:23:010:23:06

and just sprinkle some over for me, just break the leaves off.

0:23:060:23:09

This is where your flavour comes from.

0:23:090:23:11

Every time you make this dish, you could change it.

0:23:110:23:13

You could put sunblush tomatoes in there, finish it with basil.

0:23:130:23:17

-Every dish can be slightly different.

-Do you want me to slice these?

0:23:170:23:21

If you don't mind. Food and the provenance of our food is important.

0:23:210:23:24

-You can grow a tomato in a pot. You can go out and pick them.

-I've just had one!

0:23:240:23:29

There you go, whizz those in there.

0:23:290:23:31

Right, so I'm going to fold it over.

0:23:310:23:34

-It should, hopefully...

-Go on, go for it.

0:23:340:23:38

-You hope it's the right colour underneath!

-Perfect, look at that.

0:23:380:23:42

-We're ready to go now, this looks really good.

-Thank you.

0:23:420:23:44

-Exceptionally good.

-We'll put some of this on a plate.

0:23:440:23:47

-Cut that in half cos that's a meal for two, isn't it?

-It is.

0:23:470:23:50

It's economical, people don't realise. Quick and easy, made in about eight minutes.

0:23:500:23:54

-People say they haven't time to cook, this is quicker than a microwave meal.

-There's no excuse,

0:23:540:23:59

you can grow a lot of the herbs and all of the salad in window boxes

0:23:590:24:02

and in growbags, a little plot if you've got one, as well.

0:24:020:24:06

You can see, in the middle, the tomatoes you put in.

0:24:060:24:08

-Did you make the dressing?

-I did, it's simple, just three ingredients.

0:24:080:24:12

-Mustard.

-Mustard, honey

0:24:120:24:13

-from the bees here, the hives.

-You've got bees?

-There are bees at Salmesbury... White wine vinegar.

0:24:130:24:19

Finish off the dish with a little bit of snipped parsley.

0:24:190:24:22

The wind is doing a good job of blowing it around. There you go.

0:24:220:24:25

This is the good life. I'm ready to have a taste, here we go.

0:24:250:24:28

So simple.

0:24:290:24:30

-So tasty.

-This is the best omelette I've ever had.

0:24:300:24:33

That's a lovely meal.

0:24:330:24:36

We sometimes take the food we eat for granted

0:24:390:24:42

but there's a lot of history and wisdom that goes behind the dishes that we've grown up eating.

0:24:420:24:46

Circumstances and economy have dictated the creation

0:24:460:24:50

of traditional meals

0:24:500:24:52

and they can teach us something, just like Philippa has shown us, that by going back to basics,

0:24:520:24:57

and using locally sourced food that's affordable,

0:24:570:25:01

you can create a very tasty dish.

0:25:010:25:04

Hopefully, that's made you feel rather hungry.

0:25:040:25:06

What are you eating tonight?

0:25:060:25:09

Welcome back to our valuation day and to St John's Minster.

0:25:180:25:21

As you can see, there's a lot of people still here so we do have a lot more work to do.

0:25:210:25:25

Let's catch up with our experts and see what else we can find.

0:25:250:25:29

'And with David, who's in the middle of a styling session.'

0:25:290:25:32

-Now looking at you very quickly, you're not wearing a brooch.

-No.

0:25:320:25:37

-You're wearing a pendant but not a brooch. Does that mean you don't like brooches?

-I never wear them.

0:25:370:25:43

-This is lovely.

-It is very nice.

-You're not tempted to wear this one?

0:25:430:25:46

-No, no.

-Gosh.

0:25:460:25:48

I think it'll look very nice, sitting there.

0:25:480:25:51

Probably too good for everyday wear anyway.

0:25:510:25:53

-Do you know who it's by?

-I didn't know who it was by when I got it, when it was given to me.

0:25:540:25:59

The mark on the back says "Georg Jensen",

0:25:590:26:03

or "Geor-ge Yensen", or "George Jensen", depending on how you pronounce it.

0:26:030:26:08

Beneath that, it says "sterling" which means it's silver.

0:26:080:26:12

Beneath that, it says "Denmark" and beneath that, "295",

0:26:120:26:16

which is the design number.

0:26:160:26:18

And this particular brooch was designed by the great man himself,

0:26:180:26:22

probably before the war but not actually retailed

0:26:220:26:27

until after the war.

0:26:270:26:29

Georg Jensen represents today what more and more people are looking for

0:26:290:26:35

when they're buying antiques.

0:26:350:26:37

Something which is pared down, the decoration is spare

0:26:370:26:41

and that's what people are looking for today.

0:26:410:26:44

So it's a very commercial thing in today's markets.

0:26:440:26:49

I would like to suggest a reserve of 100, an estimate of 100 to 150,

0:26:490:26:55

-but I must say I'm optimistic that it will make more.

-That'd be nice.

0:26:550:26:59

-What will you do with the money? Buy yourself a necklace?

-No.

0:26:590:27:03

Not even a necklace, OK.

0:27:030:27:05

-Any ideas?

-There's one thing. I've done lots of different activities.

0:27:050:27:10

I've been in a helicopter and various things like that

0:27:100:27:14

but I've never been in a hot-air balloon.

0:27:140:27:16

-I knew you were going to say hot-air balloon!

-I might go for that.

0:27:160:27:21

OK, we will trade your Georg Jensen brooch for a hot-air balloon ride.

0:27:210:27:25

-OK?

-That sounds good.

0:27:250:27:27

From jewellery to soft furnishings, we're covering all the bases!

0:27:290:27:32

Jean and nephew Graham have brought along a quilt to show James.

0:27:320:27:38

This is fantastic.

0:27:380:27:41

What a wonderful bit of patchwork.

0:27:410:27:44

-How did you come by it?

-It was given to my mother

0:27:440:27:47

about 30 years ago. And after my mother died, I had it.

0:27:470:27:53

-Graham, are you the porter for the day?

-I am, yes, yes.

0:27:530:27:56

I carried it in, the muscle!

0:27:560:27:58

I bet it weighs quite a bit cos there's a lot of material in there.

0:27:580:28:01

Yes, there is.

0:28:010:28:02

Would you mind just giving me a little bit of a hand

0:28:020:28:06

and stretch it out slightly? And let's just see

0:28:060:28:10

how big it actually is.

0:28:100:28:12

See, now...

0:28:120:28:14

-Now... We've lost you!

-You'll have to come to the side. Where are you?

0:28:140:28:20

Look at the work that's gone into that.

0:28:220:28:25

Let's put it back up on here again.

0:28:250:28:29

-So, your mother inherited it?

-Yes.

-What was the relationship

0:28:290:28:34

between your mother and the person that left it to her?

0:28:340:28:36

She was our next-door neighbour for many years. She asked my mum

0:28:360:28:40

if she would like to have this quilt that had been made

0:28:400:28:43

by somebody in her family a long time ago.

0:28:430:28:46

I don't know who.

0:28:460:28:49

But she did say, she didn't want it to go to a jumble sale,

0:28:490:28:52

she would like it to be a treasure.

0:28:520:28:55

Well, they certainly haven't brought it to a jumble sale so you're doing the right thing.

0:28:550:28:59

It's something we don't see a lot of today in the auction houses

0:28:590:29:03

because it doesn't normally survive.

0:29:030:29:05

One of the things we always say is,

0:29:050:29:08

"I wonder how early it is?" because the same fashions went all the way

0:29:080:29:13

from the early 18th century really, right the way through

0:29:130:29:16

until the 20th century. They're quite difficult

0:29:160:29:19

to date, because what you have to understand

0:29:190:29:22

is that each individual piece is a piece of recycled material.

0:29:220:29:27

That was the idea of them.

0:29:270:29:28

But, of course, they become a little easier to date

0:29:280:29:33

when you've got that!

0:29:330:29:34

Did the neighbour give you any indication

0:29:340:29:37

of the relevance of that date, 1845?

0:29:370:29:40

None that I remember.

0:29:400:29:42

We've got two initials, "M" and "T".

0:29:420:29:44

My gut reaction is it's probably a marriage thing.

0:29:440:29:46

So, maybe Mary was marrying Tom, in 1845,

0:29:460:29:52

and this has been a gift of maybe the village,

0:29:520:29:54

to a newly married couple, something like that.

0:29:540:29:57

And I would put an auction estimate of £200 to £300.

0:29:570:30:02

-That's a pound a year, isn't it?

-Yes!

-It's 200 years old, isn't it?

0:30:020:30:06

Yes, absolutely.

0:30:060:30:07

Let's take it to the sale room, see how we do with it

0:30:070:30:11

but...it'll sell. Certainly.

0:30:110:30:14

Confidence there from James. Maybe he's peered into the future

0:30:180:30:22

with the binoculars on David's table, brought in by Maureen and Brian.

0:30:220:30:27

-Are you off to the races when you leave here?

-No.

0:30:270:30:30

Spot of birdwatching, maybe?

0:30:300:30:31

Clearly, they're a pair of binoculars.

0:30:310:30:35

-I can see very clearly that they were made by Carl Zeiss.

-Yes.

0:30:350:30:40

Carl Zeiss, as you probably know,

0:30:400:30:43

is one of those names which, in anything to do with optics,

0:30:430:30:48

binoculars or microscopes or telescopes, whatever,

0:30:480:30:51

-is one of those names that people respect.

-A good name.

0:30:510:30:55

You've only got to handle them

0:30:550:30:57

to see today what we would call "the build quality".

0:30:570:31:00

The element of engineering that goes into the manufacture of something like this is phenomenal.

0:31:000:31:05

-What can you tell me about them?

-Not a lot really.

0:31:050:31:08

I always assumed they came down from my father's side of the family.

0:31:080:31:11

They're World War I, apparently. Well, he wasn't around World War I.

0:31:110:31:16

Grandad didn't go to World War I because he was a miner.

0:31:160:31:19

-Yes.

-But my dad cleared up the estate of several bachelor friends.

0:31:190:31:24

So it's possible he got them from one of their estates,

0:31:240:31:29

-I don't know.

-The first thing you say,

0:31:290:31:31

which is right, is that they were made during the First World War.

0:31:310:31:36

And I think they were made for a German soldier,

0:31:360:31:39

-rather than for British. As far as you're concerned, is it price-sensitive?

-No.

0:31:390:31:44

-Or do you want to sell them anyway?

-We'll sell them in any case.

0:31:440:31:47

It's not something we use.

0:31:470:31:50

-They're not going to send you off on a world cruise, I'm afraid...

-Oh, shucks!

0:31:500:31:54

There's a pity.

0:31:540:31:56

But you might be able to go out and have a couple of pints

0:31:560:31:59

-and some fish and chips on the way back!

-That's fine.

0:31:590:32:02

-I'd estimate £40 to £60, something in that region.

-That's fine.

0:32:020:32:06

-I'll see you both at the sale.

-Yes, thank you.

0:32:060:32:08

Hello, what's your name?

0:32:100:32:12

'What a kaleidoscope of antiques brought along to the tables today!'

0:32:120:32:15

HE PLAYS A LOUD NOTE

0:32:150:32:17

'So, let's finish things off with a touch of gold

0:32:170:32:20

'and Graham's coin collection.'

0:32:200:32:22

Graham, when somebody tells me they've got a little box of coins,

0:32:240:32:27

I normally expect to see the odd twopence, the old sixpence,

0:32:270:32:31

you know, with the canted corners. This is some box of coins!

0:32:310:32:35

-It's a good collection.

-Isn't it.

0:32:350:32:37

So, tell me, this isn't a schoolboy collection.

0:32:370:32:41

It was my late father, he had a hobby of collecting coins.

0:32:410:32:45

I think he accumulated these over four or five years

0:32:450:32:47

so he used to get the specialist magazines and study them,

0:32:470:32:51

find out their history and heritage

0:32:510:32:52

-and make a purchase based on the back of that.

-Right.

0:32:520:32:57

There are some incredibly valuable coins in there.

0:32:570:33:00

At the moment, the sad thing is that a lot of them, in today's market,

0:33:000:33:06

are actually worth more for their gold value than they are

0:33:060:33:09

for their value as a coin. What do you think that little case is worth?

0:33:090:33:15

My father did have a tendency of over-exaggerating at times!

0:33:150:33:19

I know some of the coins are quite valuable because of the gold content.

0:33:190:33:23

I don't know much about the silver coins,

0:33:230:33:25

I've got a feeling that half the coins are valuable and half the coins aren't particularly valuable.

0:33:250:33:31

Silver is doing well but a lot of the silver coins

0:33:310:33:34

are probably worth more as coins than scrap.

0:33:340:33:37

Let's concentrate on the gold.

0:33:370:33:40

If we have a look at that one, there we have United States Of America,

0:33:400:33:45

20 with the bald eagle in full flight there.

0:33:450:33:48

And it has that lovely soft feel

0:33:480:33:50

that only you get with age. What's that, 1924.

0:33:500:33:55

And the weight... You know if you've got a fake gold coin,

0:33:550:33:58

if a gold coin is the right size, a fake will be too light.

0:33:580:34:05

But if it's the right weight, the fake will be too big.

0:34:050:34:09

That one is the right size and the right weight so it's good.

0:34:090:34:14

That's worth 600 to 650.

0:34:140:34:18

We've got two British £5 gold pieces, worth £800 to £850 each.

0:34:180:34:25

A 50-pesos gold piece, worth £700 to £750.

0:34:250:34:32

And this was the one that I was particularly interested in.

0:34:320:34:35

A Saudi Arabian gold ducat

0:34:350:34:39

-and that's worth between £800 and £1,000.

-OK.

0:34:390:34:42

Then another little gold coin down at the base here,

0:34:420:34:45

slightly more unusual, it's a commemorative coin

0:34:450:34:48

so not one for normal circulation.

0:34:480:34:50

This is to commemorate 500 years of the gold sovereign.

0:34:500:34:54

-And that's worth £400 to £600.

-Super.

0:34:540:34:58

This one is the cheeky fake!

0:34:580:35:01

-OK.

-Made in brass.

0:35:010:35:03

-OK!

-And that's worth a couple of pounds.

-Right.

0:35:030:35:07

At the moment, the gold prices are just about at an all-time high.

0:35:070:35:12

-OK.

-Five years ago, that would have been worth £200 or £300,

0:35:120:35:17

now worth 800, OK?

0:35:170:35:19

So, one, two, three, four, five, six coins,

0:35:190:35:22

you've got in that little box £4,500.

0:35:220:35:26

-In the gold.

-In gold.

-OK.

0:35:260:35:28

-Not at all bad. I think we should split them up and they'll do very well.

-Excellent.

-Well done.

0:35:280:35:34

-Fabulous box.

-Thank you.

0:35:340:35:36

What a marvellous time we've had here at St John's.

0:35:390:35:43

It's been fabulous.

0:35:430:35:45

Sadly, it's time to say goodbye as we head over to the auction room

0:35:450:35:48

for the last time. Let's hope we can make someone's dream come true.

0:35:480:35:52

Here's a recap of everything that's going...under the hammer.

0:35:520:35:55

Anne never wore her Georg Jensen brooch,

0:35:550:35:59

despite David's cajoling.

0:35:590:36:00

I think it'll look very nice sitting there, you know.

0:36:000:36:03

But she's selling it to go on a hot-air balloon ride

0:36:030:36:06

if it makes £100 to £150.

0:36:060:36:08

Jean's patchwork quilt was made in 1845 and is a great example of its type.

0:36:100:36:16

But will it make the predicted £200 to £300 without a reserve?

0:36:160:36:20

Those binoculars are unlikely to make a fortune

0:36:230:36:26

but Maureen and Brian were still pleased

0:36:260:36:28

with the estimate of £40 to £60.

0:36:280:36:30

Graham brought 20 of his father's coin collection to show James.

0:36:310:36:36

But only six gold coins will go to auction, all in separate lots.

0:36:360:36:40

Will they go beyond the scrap price for gold

0:36:400:36:43

with a minimum combined estimate of £4,100?

0:36:430:36:47

Time to find out.

0:36:470:36:49

Over at the auction in Knutsford, the saleroom is packed

0:36:520:36:56

with potential bidders.

0:36:560:36:58

Anne's brooch is on standby.

0:36:580:37:00

40 here, 50...

0:37:000:37:01

The beauty of this design is it never ages, never ever ages.

0:37:010:37:05

Do you know that? It's timeless, good design is.

0:37:050:37:08

-This is very desirable.

-Don't change your mind...

-I'm not changing my mind!

0:37:080:37:13

682 is your Georg Jensen, Danish, 925 silver brooch.

0:37:130:37:18

Georg Jensen, got to be £100, surely.

0:37:180:37:21

Where's £100? Thank you, sir, £100 I'm bid.

0:37:210:37:24

Someone down the front, discreetly bidding.

0:37:240:37:26

110 here, 120, 130, 130 now, 140.

0:37:260:37:30

150.

0:37:300:37:31

-That's good.

-They're all buying it for their wives.

0:37:310:37:34

Any further bids? 170, fresh bidder. 180,

0:37:340:37:37

190, 200, 210,

0:37:370:37:39

at 210, all done if you're sure, I'm selling.

0:37:390:37:43

-I'm really pleased with that!

-Proper stylish lot!

0:37:430:37:47

I heard, at the valuation day, a hot-air balloon ride was mentioned.

0:37:470:37:52

I like to do exciting things and it's one of the things I haven't done.

0:37:520:37:56

-You want to cross that one off the list?

-I might cross it off.

-That'll get you a balloon ride.

-I hope so.

0:37:560:38:04

'More than enough for a balloon ride but what about Jean's quilt

0:38:040:38:08

'which has no reserve?'

0:38:080:38:09

I'm excited about this, the auctioneer is,

0:38:120:38:14

you like it as well.

0:38:140:38:16

I do. If this won't sell well here, near Manchester,

0:38:160:38:19

which is the centre for textiles in the UK, it won't sell anywhere.

0:38:190:38:22

Nick has done his homework, he's notified all the local museums and collectors.

0:38:220:38:26

They know about it and I think they want it.

0:38:260:38:30

Very interesting little lot.

0:38:300:38:31

The large and impressive 19th-century stitch patchwork quilt.

0:38:310:38:36

I can start the bidding on commission at 200.

0:38:360:38:39

-Straight in, no problem with that.

-I am pleased.

0:38:390:38:43

Phone bidder coming in at 220, 240, 240 now.

0:38:430:38:46

It's so unusual and the condition is so good.

0:38:460:38:49

320 here, 340, 360.

0:38:490:38:52

380, 400 here, for 400. Still in? I've got 400 against you.

0:38:520:38:57

420, fresh bidder. At 420, another phone line in, at 420.

0:38:570:39:02

-I've got 440 against you.

-Well done.

-440 now.

0:39:020:39:04

460. I'm going to jump to 500.

0:39:040:39:08

Gosh, this is significantly very important then, isn't it?

0:39:080:39:14

£520, at £520, the bid's on the phone.

0:39:140:39:17

At 520, I sell.

0:39:170:39:19

The hammer's gone down. That's a nice figure, £520.

0:39:190:39:23

I'm surprised too, really.

0:39:230:39:25

But it just goes to show, those one-off items are so hard to value.

0:39:250:39:29

You can't put a price on our history.

0:39:290:39:31

That will tell a story somewhere.

0:39:310:39:34

Wow! Absolutely brilliant result there for Jean.

0:39:370:39:39

What a day of surprises!

0:39:390:39:42

You know what's coming up now? Yes, of course you do.

0:39:430:39:46

Maureen and Brian's binoculars, with no reserve.

0:39:460:39:49

-No reserve.

-So these are definitely going to go.

0:39:490:39:51

-You did not want to take them home, did you?

-No.

-No.

0:39:510:39:54

-Where have they been? In a cupboard somewhere?

-In a wardrobe, since we cleared Mum's house out.

0:39:540:39:59

Carl Zeiss Jena binoculars, pair of those.

0:39:590:40:02

Collectable little lot. I have some commissions here...

0:40:020:40:05

That's a good sign.

0:40:050:40:08

We'll come in at 35, 45, 50, I start.

0:40:080:40:10

£50 and five, 55, 60, 5, 65, the bid's with me, 70.

0:40:100:40:15

Five back on commission.

0:40:150:40:17

-It's good, isn't it?

-Very good.

0:40:170:40:19

75, 80 online. Bidder's out, online takes it at £80.

0:40:190:40:23

Anywhere else? The bid's at £80. Online bidder at £80, all done.

0:40:230:40:27

Yours, thank you, at 80.

0:40:270:40:29

-Fabulous result. Absolutely fabulous.

-Better than we expected!

0:40:290:40:33

Enjoy it.

0:40:330:40:34

I think you can get treated to a bit of lunch out now!

0:40:340:40:38

Yes, more than a fish-and-chip supper, isn't it?!

0:40:380:40:41

And for our next lot, there might be more than a fish-and-chip supper on the menu for Graham

0:40:410:40:46

if the fluctuating gold prices hold for the sale of his coins.

0:40:460:40:51

Tell me about the collection.

0:40:510:40:53

I had about 20 coins in total, some silver, some gold.

0:40:530:40:56

I decided to move the gold coins for the gold value at this moment

0:40:560:41:00

and sell the silver coins separately.

0:41:000:41:02

You've done your homework.

0:41:020:41:03

You knew the gold prices were quite high

0:41:030:41:06

but it is down to this packed saleroom and hopefully a few people online.

0:41:060:41:10

Let's find out what they think. This is going to be exciting!

0:41:100:41:13

Lot 204. I've got commission interest,

0:41:130:41:16

I'm going to come straight in at £1,150.

0:41:160:41:21

-Gold prices have gone up!

-Wow! Fabulous start!

0:41:210:41:26

£1,150, the bid's with me, on commission.

0:41:260:41:29

1,150 I sell. And sold.

0:41:290:41:31

First one gone.

0:41:310:41:33

Similar gold coinage, I'm going to come straight in here at...

0:41:330:41:37

you guessed it, £1,150 again. The bid's with me.

0:41:370:41:40

Any advance, any further bids? £1,150...

0:41:400:41:43

Late bidder!

0:41:430:41:44

1,200, phone bidder's in.

0:41:440:41:46

I'm out, by the way, it's just with you. At £1,200, all done,

0:41:460:41:49

are you sure, I'm selling.

0:41:490:41:51

Yours, 1,200.

0:41:510:41:52

You're going to be in the money!

0:41:520:41:54

Nice little Mexican 50-pesos piece.

0:41:540:41:57

Going to come straight in here at £1,200 on this one.

0:41:570:42:01

These aren't going for scrap value, the collectors are buying these!

0:42:010:42:05

I'm selling at 1,200.

0:42:050:42:06

1,250 online.

0:42:060:42:07

At £1,250. Last call, last chance, selling.

0:42:070:42:12

1,250, thank you.

0:42:120:42:14

Nice little USA gold 20 coin, 1924.

0:42:140:42:18

I'm going to come straight in at 650, 750, 850, 950 I have...

0:42:180:42:24

950!

0:42:240:42:26

That's a sneaky one, I got 960, back on the book at 970.

0:42:260:42:29

At £970, bidding online.

0:42:290:42:32

-I'll be having a few drinks this weekend!

-I think you will!

0:42:320:42:35

970 then, I'm selling, on commission bidder, at 970.

0:42:350:42:39

And sold!

0:42:390:42:40

We've lost count!

0:42:400:42:41

Gold proof Saudi Arabia medal this time.

0:42:410:42:44

-Goodness me, we're going to have to come in at £1,300, we start!

-Yes!

0:42:440:42:48

Get in!

0:42:480:42:50

At £1,300, the bid's on commission, £1,300...

0:42:500:42:54

-Am I allowed to jig?

-You...you can.

0:42:540:42:58

I've got 1,380.

0:42:580:42:59

1,380.

0:42:590:43:00

At £1,380, commission bidder.

0:43:000:43:03

£1,380. Last call, last chance, I'm selling

0:43:030:43:07

at 1,380 now.

0:43:070:43:09

And sold.

0:43:090:43:10

One more to go, we'll tot these up.

0:43:100:43:12

£2 coin, I'm in here at £470, I start.

0:43:120:43:19

The bid's with me at 470. Nothing online, are you sure?

0:43:190:43:22

At £470...480... I've got 480, the bidder's online.

0:43:220:43:28

Phones are out, it's all online.

0:43:280:43:30

480, I sell. And sold!

0:43:300:43:33

That is unbelievable! Nearly double what we were thinking.

0:43:330:43:37

-£6,430!

-Fantastic.

0:43:370:43:41

Oh, wow. If you've got anything like that, we want to see it.

0:43:410:43:44

-Thank you so much for coming in today.

-Well done!

0:43:440:43:48

What a wonderful end to a day here in Knutsford.

0:43:480:43:51

I hope you've enjoyed the show, we thoroughly enjoyed making it.

0:43:510:43:54

As I said, there was one big surprise!

0:43:540:43:56

We got it. See you next time!

0:43:560:43:59

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:44:030:44:06

E-mail [email protected]

0:44:060:44:09

Presenter Paul Martin and experts David Fletcher and James Lewis visit Preston in the heart of Lancashire, where James is shockingly cheeky about some Clarice Cliff, David has a eureka moment about a clock and Paul learns more about the Preston Guild.

Later in the show, Paul gets a personal cooking lesson and learns more about Lancashire's food heritage.