Saltaire Flog It!


Saltaire

Paul Martin and the team visit the historic village of Saltaire, where experts David Barby and Michael Baggot find a Moorcroft vase and a silver knife and fork.


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Transcript


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Today we're in West Yorkshire,

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in the charming, historical village of Saltaire.

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It was founded as a model village by Yorkshire industrialist

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Sir Titus Salt in 1853,

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and it's a perfect example of culture and architecture,

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so it's got to be the right place to meet the locals

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to look at the unwanted antiques. Welcome to "Flog It!".

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Along with the mills and the workers' cottages,

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Sir Titus Salt built a recreation centre for his village,

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and here it is - the Victoria Hall, and it's our venue for today.

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Offering their expertise to the good people of Saltaire

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are two of "Flog It!"'s very best -

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Mr Michael Baggott and Mr David Barby.

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So all the ingredients are set for a fabulous day.

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This is the end of the queue.

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We had to start getting them in early,

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because it started to rain, but all these people are laden

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with bags and boxes full of unwanted antiques and collectables,

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all hoping they're one of the lucky ones to go off to auction

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and make a small fortune, and you've all come to our experts

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to ask that all-important question, which is "what's it worth",

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and when they've found out, hopefully they'll flog it.

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Here is the main venue. Look - this is where the queue ends,

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right here, and as you can see, our experts are hard at work.

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On today's show, we have some impressive pedigrees,

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including some Moorcroft and a Lowry

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as well as a few more unusual items such as an optical-testing kit

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and a collection of medals. Which of these earns the most at auction?

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Stay tuned to find out.

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Kicking us off is David Barby, with something everyone should recognise

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on the easel.

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It's Karen and Rachel. You're sisters.

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-Mother and daughter.

-Oh, mother and daughter!

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-That's ingratiating, isn't it?

-Yeah. That was very nice.

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THEY LAUGH

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Well, I find this an extraordinary image.

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This is by Lowry, one of the most famous of mid-20th century artists.

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I want to know why you acquired this image. Did you buy it,

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-or was it bequeathed to you?

-It belonged to my late husband.

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-Right.

-He had it before we got married.

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-Right.

-I don't know where he acquired it.

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Well, this is a famous image, known as the Bearded Lady.

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First of all, you might look at it and be repulsed...

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-Yes.

-..because of the amount of hair. There's more hair on the face

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than there is actually on her head itself.

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But then I look deeper into the picture,

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-and I look at the eyes, which are rather sad.

-Yes.

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And then the mouth, which is one of those half-smiles,

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-if you're put in front of a camera.

-Yes.

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So it's a very engaging image.

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Nobody knows who she is.

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Can you shed any light? Have you done any research?

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Well, I've done a little bit of research.

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I think the story basically goes that Lowry was on a train journey.

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This bearded lady was sat opposite him.

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He was sketching her out of sight, without her knowing.

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-Behind a book, almost?

-Yeah.

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And eventually she kind of spotted him,

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and there was a bit of an argument,

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and the story goes that at the end they were the best of friends.

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-Oh, that's nice.

-And he did this in dedication to her, really.

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-And we don't know who she is, but there she is for posterity.

-Yeah.

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Lowry's such a popular artist,

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and there are, I would say, millions of reproductions.

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This one is fortunate that it's got Lowry's signature,

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LS Lowry, here, which is a bonus.

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Now, I've checked on our records

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of what this print has been sold for,

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and they vary in price over the last few years.

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-The lowest record is £240.

-Right.

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And then the highest price has been 340.

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Lowry is always a good seller.

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So if this goes up for sale,

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I would anticipate the auctioneer will put a reserve

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in the region of about 300,

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then guide it between £300 and £400.

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Why do you want to sell it, Karen?

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Um, because I don't particularly like it.

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My daughter and my son do, but what I thought I would do

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was split it three ways, then buy something that I do like

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-with my share.

-Rachel, Karen, thank you very much.

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I hope you do well at auction.

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David thinks the bearded lady is strangely appealing.

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Let's hope the bidders agree.

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Every now and then on the show, we get big families that turn up.

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It's a proper day out. Today, we've got a family of 18 -

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well, not technically a family, but they do know each other,

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and they've all arrived together on a coach.

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Starts with Val, doesn't it? All of these ladies...

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It kind of ends here with you, but I gather Vicky is in charge.

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-So what's this all about?

-We're all from St James's Hospice in Leeds.

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We've got 20 charity shops, and we all work in the charity shops,

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so we've brought in items that we've had donated to get valued.

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Wow! So you're all the manageresses of each individual shop? Good luck!

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Hopefully one or two of you will get chosen to go through to auction,

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and if it sells, the money will go back, as you say, to charity.

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-Fingers crossed. Enjoy the day!

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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Michael's next, and he's spotted an imposing timepiece.

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Joan, thank you so much for bringing this impressive clock along today.

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Where did it come from? Not off the mantelpiece this morning, did it?

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Yes, it did. It came off the piano in the study this morning.

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Oh, my word! Is it a family piece?

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Yes. It was from my great-great-aunt Polly,

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and it's come down the family.

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You must remember it as a young child.

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Yes, I do remember it, on everybody's sideboard,

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in the lounge, in my grandma's, and then in my aunt Lily's,

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-and then my brother's.

-These were made for the houses

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of the middle-class Victorian gentleman,

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who wanted a really good-looking clock.

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-It is good looking.

-It's beautiful looking,

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-but it possibly isn't of the finest manufacture.

-Oh.

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Now, this wooden base that it's on is very suggestive

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of something which isn't here. Have you got one?

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A dome? Yes, but Mother inadvertently cracked it.

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Well, they're very fragile, and if you hit them in the right place,

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-not meaning to...

-She must have.

-..they will go.

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But what we've basically got is this lovely French mantel clock,

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-in gilt brass. These are panels of alabaster.

-Yes.

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-If it was a better quality clock, these would be marble.

-Oh.

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-So alabaster is the cheaper option.

-Yes.

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These components... We've got a sailor,

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in sort of classical garb,

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and we've got the crossed oars and the anchor and the bulrushes,

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all relating to water and to seafaring.

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You could get a clock in whatever theme you liked.

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If you were a sailor, you could get a sailing clock.

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I've seen them with firemen on, with agricultural figures.

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The favourite of the day has to be the nude lady,

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or the classical lady.

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There are, unfortunately, lots of them about like this,

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and because they've fallen out of fashion,

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they sort of fall into that middle ground.

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Had you any thoughts as to the value of this?

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No. I was wanting to know what you thought about the value of it.

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Right. When you look at it, and it's so imposing,

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you might think a lot of money,

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and you might think I'm being dreadfully mean,

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but it's going to be something like £60 to £120 at auction,

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and I really wouldn't put the reserve any more than £60 on it.

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What you can hope is that there are two people with large houses

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that think, "That's a good-looking clock for the money,"

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and go for it, but you have to start it off on a realistic figure.

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We'll put it into the auction. We'll pop the cracked dome on as well,

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cos someone might fancy superglueing it on

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-and just keeping the dust off.

-Mother tried that,

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-with elastoplast, I think, in one part.

-Elastoplast?

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-Something like that.

-That's a new one on me.

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I've never tried that before. We'll see how it does at the auction.

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Thank you very much for struggling in with it today.

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It did look pretty from over there when I looked across.

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I said to Bill, "It looks a lot prettier here than it does at"...

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Lovely at a distance.

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Who knows - we might get a bit extra for the plaster on the glass dome!

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Craig has just bought the most fabulous thing from one of his neighbours,

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but what does he know about its history?

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Craig, that's a lovely example of Tunbridge Ware.

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I didn't know this event was taking place at all.

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I'm over here from the Manchester area

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and staying in a nearby hotel,

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and I brought this with me to clean it.

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-That's rather lucky, isn't it?

-Total coincidence,

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that you happened to be 200 yards away from the hotel.

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-So you know nothing about it?

-Not at all.

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It's a beautiful thing. It's an attractive object.

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Seems to be in a reasonable condition.

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But any information gratefully received.

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It is a little writing slope, a tiny little one,

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originally made as tourist ware. It's from Tunbridge Wells,

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and that's why it's called Tunbridge Ware.

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Small, tiny little micro-mosaics of wood,

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forming the most wonderful little inlaid pattern.

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-It's almost photographic, isn't it?

-Oh, it's mesmerising.

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A lot of work's gone into that -

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micro-mosaic banding all around each side,

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and along the top.

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I would say this dates to around 1860, 1870,

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when it was at the height of production,

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and families made this in Tunbridge Wells

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to sell to the tourists, because it was Royal Tunbridge Wells.

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It was a spa town. People came.

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Inside it's beautifully fitted, as well.

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You can forgive this bit of velvet for being slightly shabby,

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can't you? It's seen the good days.

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But look at this! It's rosewood. It's absolutely stunning.

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Two little inkwells, with the tops...

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I think it's divine, I really do. It needs a bit of TLC,

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but look at the quality! Are you thinking of selling it?

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You've only just acquired this. I won't ask you how much for.

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Well, I paid £200 for it.

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Yeah. If this was in good condition, you'd be looking at around £600.

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-Wow!

-It really is that nice.

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Because of its condition, I would pitch this at £300 to £500,

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-a fixed reserve at 250.

-It's fun, this, isn't it?

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It is fun, but that's auctions for you.

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That's why you don't put price tags on things.

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It is a bit of a gamble, but as long as you protect your item

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with a fixed reserve, you can't really go wrong.

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'What a treat! I love Tunbridge Ware.'

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But before we go over to the saleroom in Halifax,

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let's take another look at the rest of our lots.

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I must say, keeping up with the traditions of Titus Salt,

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we've certainly had an industrious morning.

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We have now found our first three items to take off to auction.

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I think there's some real gems there.

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You've heard our experts. You've probably got your own opinions.

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Let's find out what the bidders think.

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Let's leave you with a recap of the items going under the hammer.

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Karen's Lowry print is signed by the artist,

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which should make all the difference.

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Michael has put a conservative estimate on the 19th-century clock.

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And I think Craig's Tunbridge Ware is really something to write home about.

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'We've come over the Calder Valley auction rooms in Halifax,

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'and I tell you what - the atmosphere in the building

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'is absolutely buzzing.'

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I don't know about our owners, but I'm certainly nervous right now.

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Anything could happen. It's an auction.

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Let's get on with it.

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There's a standard seller's commission of 15 percent plus VAT,

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and auctioneer Ian Peace is wielding the gavel for us.

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Going at £280.

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It looks like time is up for Joan's mantel clock,

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gilt metal and marble. This was Great-Great Aunt Polly's?

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-Yes. How did you remember that?

-Well...

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HE LAUGHS Yes, it was.

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It's been in the family a long time. Why do you want to sell this?

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-Because I don't want it.

-You just don't want it.

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It's not in keeping with my house.

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It wants to be in a big Victorian house,

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and mine's a modern bungalow.

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-It looks the part, that's for sure.

-It's bang for your buck, isn't it?

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I mean, it's out of favour at the moment,

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but I don't think they can be any lower in value than this, really.

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No. They've hit rock bottom, and the thing is,

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there are those houses out there, and they're difficult to furnish

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because they're so big.

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You should be buying this kind of kit now and furnishing them.

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If you've got the imagination to buy that for £60,

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and if you don't like winding it up, take the movement out,

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-put a digital movement in, and it'll last forever.

-Exactly.

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Let's find out what this packed saleroom think,

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because it's so busy in here, someone's bound to love this. This is it.

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Lot 176 is the gilt-metal and marble mantel clock.

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What am I bid, 176? May I say £50? 40?

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Good-looking clock. 40 I'm bid.

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-THEY WHISPER

-"Go on, more," says Joan!

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80. 90. £90.

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-Oh, it turned the corner!

-£100.

-He's still in.

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At £100, sat down over there. £100. All done?

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There you go. Now you know where your clock's going.

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-Oh, lovely.

-That gentleman there.

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-I'll tell him to look after it.

-Go and tell him to look after it!

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I'm sure he will.

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You can feel the heat in here right now.

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It's getting hotter for me. It's my turn to be the expert.

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We're about to sell Craig's micro-mosaic box,

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a bit of Tunbridge Ware. We're looking for £300 to £500.

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Fingers crossed we get it.

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Lot 344 is this lovely Victorian Tunbridge Ware writing slope.

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Can I have an opening bid of £200, please?

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£200? 150 I have. 150.

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At 175. 175.

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At 200. And 25.

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-At 225. Are you all done at 225?

-That's not going to sell, is it?

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At 225. We're not quite at the mark at 225.

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250 do I see? Then, at £225...

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HE BANGS HAMMER

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-Didn't sell it.

-Never mind.

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-You're not bothered, are you?

-Not at all.

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I'm not bothered, either, because I'm pleased it didn't sell at 250.

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If it had sold at 350 or £500, I'd have said, "It's gone,

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and you've made a bit of money." I think hang on to that.

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-I think it's beautiful.

-It's wonderful.

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It didn't sell, and it doesn't matter.

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Craig is very happy to take that home with him.

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Remember the Bearded Lady? Well, she's up next.

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Right! The Lowry print, and we have that and we have Karen.

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We do not have Rachel, unfortunately. Where is she today?

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-She has to work, unfortunately.

-But it is yours.

-Yes.

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What I want to know is, did he use artistic licence,

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or was there really a woman walking around Manchester like that?

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-Good luck.

-Thank you.

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-But it is all down...

-It is all down to...

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It's all down to those modern collectors.

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Now lot 79, the Lowry, the signed, coloured artist's proof.

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There we are. The Bearded Lady.

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Lot 79.

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£200 to open. £200 I have.

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£200. At 200.

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At 220. 240.

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260. 280. At £280. At £280. You all done?

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-It's worth more than that.

-300.

-There.

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I'll take ten if it helps. At 300.

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Chance to get a signed Lowry. At 310.

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310. I can just see your head there. 320, on the stairs.

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330. At 340, anywhere?

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Then, at £330, your bid at 330... Are there any further bids?

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-At £330...

-HE BANGS HAMMER

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-All right.

-Just!

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-Within expectations.

-Yes, within expectations.

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You see, it really is subject matter at the end of the day,

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and someone's got to live with that. That's the problem.

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-You've got to like it.

-Yeah, you've got to like it,

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-and you didn't, did you?

-I didn't.

-Well, you've got £330.

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I think someone has got that for a good price.

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There are plenty of items in the sale with a bit of age,

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but I don't think any of them go back to the time of Queen Elizabeth I.

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Who lived in a house like this?

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Well, if you look up at this splendid Elizabethan house,

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the clues are up there, the initials carved in stone

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by a master mason - ES. They're on these architectural pavilions.

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There's six in total adorning this three-storey building,

0:17:590:18:03

but they're kind of crowning it off. So, who is ES?

0:18:030:18:07

Obviously a very important chap - maybe a member of royalty

0:18:070:18:11

or a leading politician that's found favour in the royal court.

0:18:110:18:14

Wrong. This house belonged to a woman -

0:18:180:18:20

a formidable woman. These massive stone letters commemorate her -

0:18:200:18:23

Elizabeth, Countess of Shrewsbury, otherwise known as Bess of Hardwick,

0:18:230:18:27

and this is Hardwick Hall, which inspired the popular rhyme,

0:18:270:18:31

"Hardwick Hall, more glass than wall."

0:18:310:18:33

In her day, Bess was deemed one of the most eligible women

0:18:390:18:43

on the circuit. She was considered good looking,

0:18:430:18:45

and she was popular on the social scene and at court.

0:18:450:18:49

She was obviously intelligent, because she amassed in her lifetime

0:18:490:18:53

a fortune something equivalent, in today's money,

0:18:530:18:55

of around £13 million to £14 million,

0:18:550:18:59

and outside the royal court, she was the most powerful woman in the country.

0:18:590:19:03

But as well as beauty and wealth,

0:19:040:19:07

Bess had something that can still be appreciated even today -

0:19:070:19:11

a love of wonderful architecture.

0:19:110:19:13

Now, remarkably, Bess started out life here at Hardwick in 1527

0:19:150:19:21

as a member of a family of minor gentry

0:19:210:19:23

living in the original, smaller manor house.

0:19:230:19:26

But by marrying wisely,

0:19:260:19:29

four times, in fact,

0:19:290:19:32

Bess was able, in the last quarter of the 16th century,

0:19:320:19:34

to commission this beautiful house to be built,

0:19:340:19:37

and at the time, it was of the cutting edge

0:19:370:19:41

of architectural design and detail.

0:19:410:19:44

Let me show you why. Here we're in the Great Hall,

0:19:440:19:46

and as you can see, the main entrance is there,

0:19:460:19:49

so it runs on a central axis right through the house,

0:19:490:19:53

breaking with all medieval traditions,

0:19:530:19:55

so, you see, this footprint has been inspired by Classical Renaissance,

0:19:550:19:59

and so too has this wonderful stone screen -

0:19:590:20:03

again, Classical Renaissance.

0:20:030:20:05

So this is Bess saying, "Look, I've educated myself."

0:20:050:20:09

"I've worked my way up. I now have the money."

0:20:090:20:12

"I know what the height of fashion is, and I want it."

0:20:120:20:16

"I have arrived."

0:20:160:20:18

She'd gained power, wealth and sophistication

0:20:180:20:21

with each of her four marriages.

0:20:210:20:24

Her first marriage, to her cousin Robert Barlow,

0:20:240:20:26

was over by the time she was 16. He had become ill and died,

0:20:260:20:30

but he had left her with a little money,

0:20:300:20:33

and a foot up the social ladder,

0:20:330:20:35

making her a suitable wife for the elderly Sir William Cavendish,

0:20:350:20:40

whom she wedded in 1547.

0:20:400:20:43

It was through this marriage that Bess really came into her own.

0:20:430:20:48

The couple had eight children together,

0:20:480:20:50

and she became a resourceful and capable manager

0:20:500:20:53

of their large household.

0:20:530:20:56

Sadly, Sir William Cavendish died in 1557.

0:20:560:21:00

Two years later, Bess was at the altar again.

0:21:000:21:03

This time the bridegroom was Sir William St Loe,

0:21:060:21:09

and once again, Bess was climbing into the upper echelons,

0:21:090:21:12

the St Loes being an older and more established family.

0:21:120:21:16

But sadly, Sir William died five years later.

0:21:160:21:20

He was the big love of Bess's life.

0:21:200:21:22

Upon his death, he left Bess almost all of his property.

0:21:220:21:26

So who would Bess's final husband be?

0:21:280:21:31

No less than an earl - George Talbot,

0:21:310:21:33

Sixth Earl of Shrewsbury,

0:21:330:21:35

who would leave Bess one of the richest people in England

0:21:350:21:38

on his demise in 1590 - second only to the Queen herself.

0:21:380:21:42

So what would this exceptional woman have been like?

0:21:440:21:48

To find out, I'm going to talk to biographer Mary Lovell,

0:21:480:21:51

who has made a particular study of Bess.

0:21:510:21:54

Mary, what is it about Bess of Hardwick

0:21:580:22:00

that captures your imagination?

0:22:000:22:02

Well, she was such a strong and resourceful woman,

0:22:020:22:05

in an age when women had very few legal rights.

0:22:050:22:08

When you married, as a woman, everything you owned became that of your husband.

0:22:080:22:12

She was involved in so many business deals,

0:22:120:22:15

and particularly as she was an older woman -

0:22:150:22:18

she was in mining, she was in finance,

0:22:180:22:21

she was in land deals, she was in money lending.

0:22:210:22:23

She would never lend a penny without a mortgage.

0:22:230:22:28

But Bess, she was in some tight spots during her life,

0:22:280:22:31

and she managed to get herself out of them by her own nous, really.

0:22:310:22:35

There's no other word for it. I think that's why I like her so much.

0:22:350:22:39

Is there anybody today who's comparable to Bess?

0:22:390:22:42

-I've given this a lot of thought.

-Apart from yourself.

0:22:420:22:46

Apart from myself! Lots of woman are successful businesswomen,

0:22:460:22:50

and make jobs and employ lots of people,

0:22:500:22:52

but there's no-one who does all the things Bess did,

0:22:520:22:55

and, of course, she was a big noise at the Elizabethan court.

0:22:550:22:58

She was friends with Elizabeth, Mary, Queen of Scots.

0:22:580:23:01

There were so many elements in Bess's life.

0:23:010:23:04

That's what makes her such a personality for us.

0:23:040:23:06

-She was a modern woman then.

-Why did she build Hardwick Hall?

0:23:060:23:10

She'd moved into Old Hardwick Hall. She'd built wings on it,

0:23:100:23:13

but it didn't have the symmetry and the beauty that she wanted,

0:23:130:23:17

so she moved across the park here,

0:23:170:23:20

and she's got her initials 18 times -

0:23:200:23:23

not once, but 18 times - socking great six-foot letters on the roof.

0:23:230:23:27

-In those little pavilions.

-Yes. This house was Bess's,

0:23:270:23:31

you know? It was not anybody else's. Hardwick, as you see it now -

0:23:310:23:35

Bess could have just gone out for a ride,

0:23:350:23:38

and you actually feel her presence here.

0:23:380:23:40

So, there we are - Bess of Hardwick, a self-made woman

0:23:420:23:45

who is still a bit of an enigma.

0:23:450:23:48

But as long as this magnificent house, Hardwick Hall, keeps standing

0:23:480:23:51

she's hardly going to be forgotten.

0:23:510:23:54

Welcome back to our valuation-day venue,

0:24:070:24:09

the Victoria Hall in Saltaire. Now let's catch up with our experts

0:24:090:24:12

and see what other treasures we can find.

0:24:120:24:16

David is in his element with this bumper piece of Moorcroft.

0:24:180:24:22

This is fabulous. I can't believe you've brought this along to sell.

0:24:220:24:27

-It's Bill and Julie, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Is this a joint decision?

0:24:270:24:32

-Yes.

-So, why are you selling this?

0:24:320:24:34

Well, much as we love it, and we do like it immensely,

0:24:340:24:37

it is a bit big to be in the display cabinet.

0:24:370:24:41

And we don't want it sitting on the hearth,

0:24:410:24:44

because I'm quite clumsy, and I don't want it to end up

0:24:440:24:47

as a jigsaw puzzle. HE LAUGHS

0:24:470:24:49

You shouldn't be collecting pottery or porcelain.

0:24:490:24:52

But I think this is a lovely piece of modern Moorcroft,

0:24:520:24:56

and what I like about this is its design,

0:24:560:24:59

and the way that the design is created by all this tube-lining,

0:24:590:25:03

which is that liquid clay which literally draws the pattern onto the surface.

0:25:030:25:07

But the beauty is that, when it's fired,

0:25:070:25:10

you get the glazes running into one another,

0:25:100:25:12

so each piece is unique. I think it's terrific.

0:25:120:25:16

Have you tried this tube-lining?

0:25:160:25:18

Yes. I tried tube-lining at the factory.

0:25:180:25:23

Oh, you're a member of that exclusive collectors' club?

0:25:230:25:26

Yes, yes, and also the painting.

0:25:260:25:29

Tube-lining in the morning and doing the painting in the afternoon.

0:25:290:25:33

-But it's not as easy as it looks.

-Oh, no. It is not.

0:25:330:25:37

You need a steady hand and an even pressure

0:25:370:25:40

-to get the tube-lining right.

-Very delicate operation.

-Yes.

0:25:400:25:44

Now, this piece was designed - what, mid-1990s?

0:25:440:25:47

-And the artist was Sally Tuffin.

-That's correct.

0:25:470:25:50

Now, Sally Tuffin inherited, I think, all the qualities

0:25:500:25:54

of William and Walter Moorcroft,

0:25:540:25:57

particularly in her decoration and her overall design.

0:25:570:26:01

I love the way this fish curls,

0:26:010:26:04

and the whole thing is so magical,

0:26:040:26:07

and the colours are extraordinary.

0:26:070:26:10

Anybody collecting Moorcroft would be delighted to have this piece.

0:26:100:26:14

Now, let's talk in terms of value. How long ago did you buy this?

0:26:140:26:19

-About 18 months ago.

-About 18 months ago.

0:26:190:26:22

I won't ask you the price you paid.

0:26:220:26:24

I saw one of these, an identical one,

0:26:240:26:26

up for sale at an auction house on the east coast,

0:26:260:26:29

and their guide price was £1,300 to £1,500.

0:26:290:26:35

These pieces were originally selling

0:26:350:26:39

for something in the region of £5,000 to £8,000,

0:26:390:26:42

so anybody buying this at auction

0:26:420:26:46

at, sort of, anything under 2,000,

0:26:460:26:49

would be getting an absolute bargain.

0:26:490:26:51

What are you going to do with the money?

0:26:510:26:53

In all probability, we will buy another piece of Moorcroft, smaller.

0:26:530:26:57

I would love a piece of Florian Ware to put on display.

0:26:570:27:00

I'm now going to ask you how much you paid for it.

0:27:000:27:03

-Paid 1,300 for it.

-You paid £1,300.

0:27:030:27:05

I think you paid the going rate 18 months ago.

0:27:050:27:10

With Moorcroft, it's a peculiar market,

0:27:100:27:13

because collectors are fanatical.

0:27:130:27:16

-Yes.

-If somebody wants a piece by Sally Tuffin,

0:27:160:27:19

of the carp pattern,

0:27:190:27:22

-they will pay whatever it takes to get that piece.

-Yes.

0:27:220:27:27

So you might be surprised at the end of the day,

0:27:270:27:29

and I would say, for the purpose of auction,

0:27:290:27:33

that the guide ought to be 1,500 to 2,000.

0:27:330:27:37

-Sounds fine.

-Yes.

-And if it makes more than that,

0:27:370:27:40

-I will be deliriously happy for you.

-Not as happy as we are.

0:27:400:27:44

Fingers crossed that we all end up happy after the sale.

0:27:440:27:47

Now, what has Michael found? Let's find out.

0:27:500:27:53

Angela, thank you for bringing in a lovely box like this.

0:27:530:27:58

A lovely box like this usually means treasure inside.

0:27:580:28:01

-Mmm.

-Let's have a look. Oh, wow!

0:28:010:28:03

Isn't that fantastic?

0:28:030:28:05

I inherited them after my father died in 1985.

0:28:050:28:10

So these aren't in the cutlery drawer at home,

0:28:100:28:12

being used on Saturday nights and Sunday evenings?

0:28:120:28:15

I'm afraid they're not.

0:28:150:28:18

We've obviously got a large serving knife and fork.

0:28:180:28:21

They actually have a specific use. Do you know what it's for?

0:28:210:28:25

Absolutely no idea at all.

0:28:250:28:28

Well, you have to go back to the end of the 19th century,

0:28:280:28:32

and the one thing that you could put on your table

0:28:320:28:35

to distinguish you from all your middle-class neighbours

0:28:350:28:38

-would be a freshly grown melon.

-Really?

0:28:380:28:42

They were incredibly difficult to get hold of,

0:28:420:28:44

very expensive to grow, and so this is actually a melon knife and fork.

0:28:440:28:49

-How interesting!

-They are solid silver,

0:28:490:28:52

and they're hallmarked along there.

0:28:520:28:54

It's for a very large Sheffield company,

0:28:540:28:57

Martin, Hall and Company,

0:28:570:28:59

and they were going into the 19th and then into the 20th century.

0:28:590:29:03

The knife is 1879.

0:29:030:29:06

We've got this beautiful sort of Renaissance-style handle,

0:29:060:29:11

and a beautiful engraved blade.

0:29:110:29:14

-The sad thing is that I have seen these sets before.

-Yes.

0:29:140:29:18

But all the ones I've seen are in mint condition,

0:29:180:29:21

and in their original cases.

0:29:210:29:23

-The fad for serving melon, I think, was short-lived.

-Yeah.

0:29:230:29:26

So they've lain locked away in a cupboard or in a drawer?

0:29:260:29:30

In a drawer, yes.

0:29:300:29:32

So why have you decided to get them out and bring them to "Flog It!"?

0:29:320:29:36

Well, just that reason. They would have continued lying in the drawer.

0:29:360:29:41

In terms of value, any idea what they might be worth?

0:29:410:29:45

Absolutely no idea. I know they'll have a certain value

0:29:450:29:48

just from the silver, but I don't know what that would be.

0:29:480:29:51

I think we're quite safe in saying £100 to £150.

0:29:510:29:56

-Really?

-And put a fixed reserve of £100 on them.

0:29:560:29:58

-So, if you're happy...

-That's excellent, yeah.

0:29:580:30:01

-..we'll pop them in the sale...

-Yeah. Yeah.

0:30:010:30:04

..hope there's a couple of people with melons in their grocery bags,

0:30:040:30:07

waiting to raise their paddles, or their melons to bid, if they want.

0:30:070:30:11

But I think they'll do very well on the day.

0:30:110:30:14

-Oh, that would be great.

-Thank you so much for bringing them in.

0:30:140:30:17

I think Michael has another happy customer there.

0:30:170:30:20

David's beady eyes have picked out something rather unusual.

0:30:200:30:24

Tim, this is an extraordinarily beautiful box,

0:30:270:30:31

hand-constructed. It's walnut, and I would date this

0:30:310:30:35

possibly to the earlier part of the 20th century.

0:30:350:30:38

I'm intrigued to see what is inside.

0:30:380:30:41

Oh! This is an extraordinary arrangement of lens,

0:30:410:30:46

and I would imagine this is probably a travelling optician's set.

0:30:460:30:50

-Correct.

-And if this was made at the beginning of the 20th century,

0:30:500:30:54

often in newspapers of the day would be advertised

0:30:540:30:57

an ophthalmic surgeon or optician would be visiting a certain hotel

0:30:570:31:03

-to receive clients.

-I see.

0:31:030:31:06

So he would set up his equipment

0:31:060:31:09

and then invite people to have their eyes tested,

0:31:090:31:12

-with a view to making up glasses.

-I see, yes.

0:31:120:31:15

Is it part of your family background?

0:31:150:31:17

No. I picked it up in an antiques shop about 40 years ago.

0:31:170:31:22

Right. Why are you deciding to sell it now?

0:31:220:31:24

I think mainly everybody we know has seen it,

0:31:240:31:28

so I thought it was time it moved on to somebody who might appreciate it.

0:31:280:31:32

I find it intriguing,

0:31:320:31:34

because first of all it's in such lovely condition,

0:31:340:31:36

but we have all these various labels at the back -

0:31:360:31:40

spherical, concave,

0:31:400:31:43

concave, cylindrical, convex.

0:31:430:31:45

Gosh, what a difficult choice!

0:31:450:31:48

I have tested my own eyesight with it.

0:31:480:31:51

And you put these onto the bridge of your nose...

0:31:510:31:54

-Onto the victim, yes.

-And then you fit in these...

0:31:540:31:57

-Keep going until you find the right lenses to match.

-Oh, right.

0:31:570:32:01

And then there's extraordinary test types.

0:32:010:32:05

I normally get to about halfway down,

0:32:050:32:08

and I could never read the small print.

0:32:080:32:10

I think that's extraordinary.

0:32:100:32:13

It's nice to have these relevant pieces with it.

0:32:130:32:15

If you could read the small print, you wouldn't need glasses.

0:32:150:32:18

That looks an absolute blur to me, an absolute blur.

0:32:180:32:22

How much did you pay for it 40 years ago?

0:32:220:32:24

If memory serves me well, it must have been between £12 and £15.

0:32:240:32:28

-That wasn't a lot to pay, was it?

-No.

-These have been up for sale.

0:32:280:32:32

They're not particularly rare. They do exist -

0:32:320:32:35

not in large numbers, but when they come up for sale,

0:32:350:32:38

on average they make somewhere between £90 and £150,

0:32:380:32:41

that sort of price range. If we put a reserve of £90 on this,

0:32:410:32:45

-would that be acceptable?

-Yes, that would be acceptable.

0:32:450:32:49

Thank you! I shall see you at the auction.

0:32:490:32:51

Next, a rare reaction from Michael.

0:32:570:33:00

David, it's not often I'm left speechless

0:33:010:33:06

when people produce things from their bags,

0:33:060:33:08

but this is such an amazing archive of your family's material.

0:33:080:33:13

-Can you tell me about it?

-Yeah, by all means.

0:33:130:33:16

It was passed down to me by my grandfather.

0:33:160:33:19

It's basically his life in the army,

0:33:190:33:23

which most of it was predominantly through boxing, amateur level.

0:33:230:33:26

Good grief! So, this'll be a photograph

0:33:260:33:29

-with your grandfather in it.

-Yep.

0:33:290:33:32

-Point him out for us!

-He's this one here.

0:33:320:33:35

Handsome-looking chap, probably with the best haircut there, isn't he?

0:33:350:33:39

-Definitely.

-So this was done when - in 1923, 1924,

0:33:390:33:44

and we see "Winners, Rhine Army Boxing Team Championship".

0:33:440:33:49

So throughout his career with the army,

0:33:490:33:52

-the boxing went hand-in-hand with that, did it?

-Yes.

0:33:520:33:55

-So we've got - what, a selection of his medals...

-Yes.

0:33:550:33:59

-..and trophies.

-Yeah.

0:33:590:34:01

We've got a lot more than we can actually fit on the table today.

0:34:010:34:04

I mean, if we just look at that medal,

0:34:040:34:07

that's a wonderful thing. "Ville et Portus Dover".

0:34:070:34:10

Those are the Dover coat of arms, City of Dover,

0:34:100:34:13

and we've got "12th Infantry Brigade Team Boxing Championship,

0:34:130:34:18

1926, lightweight winner, Colonel Wood."

0:34:180:34:23

So he served again in the second war?

0:34:230:34:26

Yes. I think maybe the back end of the First World War

0:34:260:34:29

through the Second World War. It's absolutely fantastic.

0:34:290:34:33

So we've really got a cross-section here,

0:34:330:34:36

not only of military history but of boxing history.

0:34:360:34:39

So what regiment was he in?

0:34:390:34:41

He was in the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry.

0:34:410:34:44

Very local to today, then. Is there a history of the military in your family?

0:34:440:34:47

Yeah. About six generations of my family have been in the military.

0:34:470:34:51

Good grief! Were you serving?

0:34:510:34:53

Yes. I served in the Royal Artillery.

0:34:530:34:56

But, yes, I had a good time, though. It was good.

0:34:560:34:59

-Were you boxing as well?

-Yes, I did do a little boxing myself.

0:34:590:35:02

Good grief! So it really is in the blood?

0:35:020:35:05

-Yes.

-Well, I can confess to a secret

0:35:050:35:08

-that, actually, my father was a professional boxer.

-Oh, right!

0:35:080:35:13

So I know what it's all about, and the rigours and the commitment

0:35:130:35:17

that you have to do to make it a success,

0:35:170:35:20

so I can really appreciate the efforts

0:35:200:35:22

your grandfather went through to win

0:35:220:35:24

all these fantastic trophies and cups.

0:35:240:35:27

I almost feel a little bit vulgar trying to put a value on it for you,

0:35:270:35:34

because it is of such great sentimental value, I would imagine,

0:35:340:35:38

in your family. But why now have you decided to move it on?

0:35:380:35:42

Well, I've only got a young daughter myself.

0:35:420:35:45

She never actually met my grandfather.

0:35:450:35:48

And it's kind of just stuck in the loft,

0:35:480:35:50

so we'd like it to go to a home

0:35:500:35:53

where maybe a collector might want to keep it together,

0:35:530:35:56

or even somebody who will look after it and display it.

0:35:560:35:59

I think it's something that will appeal to a boxing collector,

0:35:590:36:04

there's no doubt of that. It's difficult,

0:36:040:36:06

because it is a very niche market.

0:36:060:36:08

I think let's be safe

0:36:080:36:13

-and let's say £300 to £500...

-OK.

0:36:130:36:15

..with a £300 reserve for the collection.

0:36:150:36:18

-Right.

-Where it goes to from that,

0:36:180:36:20

I don't know. It might make three, five,

0:36:200:36:24

might make £1,000 on the day. I just don't know.

0:36:240:36:26

I'll keep my fingers crossed, but I'll be as interested as you

0:36:260:36:30

to see how much this makes on the day.

0:36:300:36:32

Thank you so much for bringing along

0:36:320:36:35

-the most fascinating collection I've seen in a long time.

-Thank you.

0:36:350:36:40

What a marvellous collection! It deserves a good home.

0:36:400:36:43

Well, our experts have now made their final choices for today.

0:36:460:36:49

That's our last items found, so it's time to say goodbye

0:36:490:36:52

to our magnificent venue, Victoria Hall,

0:36:520:36:55

and all the hundreds of people who turned up.

0:36:550:36:57

We've had a marvellous day, but we have to put those valuations to the test.

0:36:570:37:01

And fingers crossed, we have one or two big surprises.

0:37:010:37:04

While we make our way to the saleroom in the Calder Valley,

0:37:040:37:07

here's a quick recap of what's going under the hammer.

0:37:070:37:10

Nobody in the saleroom would be able to miss the splendid Moorcroft vase

0:37:100:37:15

designed by Sally Tuffin.

0:37:150:37:17

Joan's silver serving knife and fork

0:37:170:37:19

would work for cake as well as for melons.

0:37:190:37:21

I hope the collectors are there for Timothy's optical-testing set.

0:37:230:37:27

And finally, David's collection of his grandfather's medals

0:37:270:37:31

and boxing trophies are bound to find a new home.

0:37:310:37:35

It's time to put our experts to the test!

0:37:400:37:43

It's always good to see a packed saleroom.

0:37:430:37:45

I hope you're staying focussed for this one!

0:37:470:37:49

Optical lenses. They're all cased, in beautiful condition,

0:37:490:37:53

and they belong to you, and not for much longer.

0:37:530:37:56

-Hopefully.

-Tim, why are you selling them?

0:37:560:37:58

Well, I've had them for about 40 years,

0:37:580:38:01

so I thought it was time to give somebody else the enjoyment.

0:38:010:38:04

I'm hopeful we'll sell these. There's other items of a similar nature.

0:38:040:38:08

You're in good company, and hopefully we should get that top end of around £130.

0:38:080:38:13

An early 20th-century mahogany-cased optical testing set.

0:38:130:38:17

What am I bid on that?

0:38:170:38:19

£100? 80? £50?

0:38:190:38:21

At £50. At £50.

0:38:210:38:23

At 60. At 70. And 80 there.

0:38:230:38:26

Oh, we'll sell them.

0:38:260:38:29

And £90. At £90. Selling for 90.

0:38:290:38:32

In the market at £90. Are you all done at £90?

0:38:320:38:36

That's a good lot. It's such an unusual lot.

0:38:370:38:40

-A really good thing to see.

-I was quite pleased.

-So was I.

0:38:400:38:43

-Happy?

-Yes, very happy.

0:38:430:38:45

I like it when more curious items like that reach their estimate.

0:38:460:38:51

Talking of unusual, here comes Angela's melon knife and fork.

0:38:510:38:55

Angela, I'm hoping you get the top end,

0:38:550:38:59

that £150. But you've dropped the reserve, haven't you, to £80.

0:38:590:39:02

Michael had a fixed reserve of £100.

0:39:020:39:04

We're talking about that lovely large silver fork and knife.

0:39:040:39:08

-For melons.

-For melons! This could be our choice dessert right now.

0:39:080:39:12

You need to go out and buy a melon.

0:39:120:39:15

I like melon, but I can't imagine using it for...

0:39:150:39:19

Someone will, and we're going to find them now. Here we go!

0:39:190:39:22

Lot 67, the cased Victorian hallmarked silver

0:39:220:39:25

dessert serving knife and fork.

0:39:250:39:28

Right. 100, may I say? 80? 50?

0:39:280:39:31

-HE WHISPERS

-55. 60.

0:39:310:39:34

And five?

0:39:340:39:36

At £60 there. £60. £60. 65. £70.

0:39:360:39:40

75. 80. 85. 90.

0:39:400:39:43

-95. 100. And five.

-Oh, it's done the business.

0:39:430:39:46

115. 120. And five.

0:39:460:39:49

-130. And five. 140. And five.

-Michael's feeling proud.

0:39:490:39:53

-£150.

-I feel vindicated now!

0:39:530:39:56

-THEY LAUGH

-I knew he was going to say that.

0:39:560:39:59

There was no worry, was there? At the top end, £150.

0:39:590:40:03

Michael is a really good silver expert.

0:40:030:40:05

-Happy? You are happy, aren't you?

-Very happy, yes.

0:40:050:40:08

And it's Angela's first auction experience.

0:40:080:40:11

Well, that should encourage her!

0:40:110:40:13

Julie and Bill, good luck!

0:40:130:40:16

This is the moment I have been waiting for.

0:40:160:40:18

We've got that wonderful piece of Moorcroft.

0:40:180:40:21

It's a great name in the industry. Here we go.

0:40:210:40:24

164, the large Moorcroft double-handled vase

0:40:240:40:28

designed by Sally Tuffin. Do I get an opening bid of £1,000?

0:40:280:40:33

£1,000?

0:40:330:40:35

800? Thank you. £800. At 800.

0:40:350:40:38

900. 1,000.

0:40:380:40:40

-We're back up now to where he started.

-Yes.

0:40:400:40:44

At 1,100. At 1,100.

0:40:440:40:46

1,200 do I see?

0:40:460:40:49

At 1,100. Are we all finished at 1,100?

0:40:490:40:52

At 1,100. We're not in the market at that level.

0:40:520:40:56

-1,100. Are we all done?

-HE BANGS HAMMER

0:40:560:40:59

-He was right.

-Back home, I'm afraid.

0:40:590:41:02

-At least it's not a bookcase...

-No.

0:41:020:41:05

..or something massive. At least you can pick it up and carry it.

0:41:050:41:09

You're not too disappointed? It's going back to a lovely home.

0:41:090:41:12

-I do really like it.

-You just wanted to test the market.

0:41:120:41:16

Yes!

0:41:160:41:17

Bill is going to have to be extra- careful around the Moorcroft now.

0:41:170:41:22

Right. Now I'm going to deliver a bit of a knockout blow,

0:41:240:41:27

because going under the hammer we've got medals and a boxing trophy

0:41:270:41:31

belonging to David. Thank you for bringing them in.

0:41:310:41:34

Hopefully we'll get the top end.

0:41:340:41:36

Michael, we're in good company today.

0:41:360:41:37

There are other medals in the sale, and the collectors are here.

0:41:370:41:41

It's an archive. There is a silver content too,

0:41:410:41:44

but I was conscious we had to move that above scrap,

0:41:440:41:47

because there's no way I want any of this stuff melted down.

0:41:470:41:50

If it comes to it, it can go back with you for another day,

0:41:500:41:53

so we'll see if there's the interest in it

0:41:530:41:55

as a complete sporting and military archive.

0:41:550:41:58

-OK. What are we hoping for?

-Um, I'll be happy with 300,

0:41:580:42:02

-but it might make 500.

-OK.

0:42:020:42:04

307, an interesting collection of war medals and boxing trophies.

0:42:040:42:08

What a collection! I'd like an opening bid at £200, please.

0:42:080:42:12

£200 for that collection. 150. Thank you. 150.

0:42:120:42:15

175. I've 200. And 25 here.

0:42:150:42:18

225. 250. 275.

0:42:180:42:22

At 300 there.

0:42:220:42:24

-Well, we're there.

-Yeah.

0:42:240:42:26

I have 325. 350.

0:42:260:42:28

375. I have 400.

0:42:280:42:31

-At 425.

-This is good!

0:42:310:42:33

At 450. 475.

0:42:330:42:35

It does deserve to make every penny of this.

0:42:350:42:38

And 25. 550.

0:42:380:42:41

575. 600.

0:42:420:42:45

And 25.

0:42:450:42:47

650.

0:42:470:42:49

-At 650...

-My word!

-That's very good.

0:42:490:42:52

Collectors love an archive they can research, that's the thing.

0:42:520:42:56

Yes. The hammer's gone down. £650. Top, top money.

0:42:560:43:00

Yeah, that was good. Thank you very much.

0:43:000:43:02

It's a pleasure. Glad they did so well.

0:43:020:43:05

Well, that's it! It's all over.

0:43:100:43:13

Another day in another saleroom for "Flog It!".

0:43:130:43:15

We've had a bit of a mixed day, some highs and some lows,

0:43:150:43:18

but everyone has gone home happy, and that's what it's all about.

0:43:180:43:22

Hope you enjoyed the show. See you next time for some more surprises,

0:43:220:43:25

but until then, from the Calder Valley, it's goodbye.

0:43:250:43:29

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:290:43:33

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:330:43:37

.

0:43:370:43:37

Paul Martin and the team are in the historic village of Saltaire, West Yorkshire. Expectations are running high with experts David Barby and Michael Baggot. David finds a massive Moorcroft vase and Michael comes across an equally oversize silver knife and fork, while Paul visits Hardwick Hall to find out more about its history.


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