Buckland Abbey Flog It!


Buckland Abbey

Paul Martin and the team visit Buckland Abbey in Devon. Expert David Barby is blown away by a French revolver and Catherine Southon becomes attached to a bisque baby.


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Buckland Abbey in Devon is full of grand connections and history.

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Sir Francis Drake, the great Elizabethan mariner,

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bought the Abbey in 1580 as a family home.

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Several generations of his family have lived here,

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spanning 370-odd years.

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So, will today's valuation day turn up any art and artefacts

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worthy of the new golden age?

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Stay tuned and you'll find out. Welcome to Flog It!

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Buckland Abbey was built in 1278 by an order of Cistercian monks.

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It was their home.

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Throughout history, over the years,

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it's been altered to suit different architectural styles and trends.

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There are certainly Elizabethan elements.

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There are Georgian doorways and entrances and of course, Victorian wings.

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All of these elements, you might think,

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all these different styles would be confusing but I tell you something, they're not.

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They actually add to the Abbey's magnificent charm.

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Owned by the National Trust since 1948,

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today it's the glorious setting for our valuation day

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and what a glorious turnout!

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I think we're going to be in for a good day here.

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The sun is shining, everybody's happy. You are happy, aren't you?

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Yes, of course you are!

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And to add to all the magic, we have Catherine Southon and David Barby,

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two fabulous experts, sweet talking all the crowd here

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into showing them items which hopefully will be worth a small fortune.

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Someone's found something!

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Hopefully it's the experts.

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That is absolutely wonderful.

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I love it.

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Very, very interesting.

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Among the many items passing across our tables today

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is one that fetches a few thousand pounds.

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So, let's put your antique knowledge to the test, shall we?

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Is it this exquisite 200-year-old relic from the schoolroom?

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This elaborately decorated French revolver?

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Or these 18th-century glass goblets?

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The answer may surprise you, so stay tuned!

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There's a wonderful atmosphere here today.

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Definitely an air of excitement as everybody's clutching something

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they are hoping is worth a lot of money.

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It looks like David Barby has spotted his first item.

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Let's take a look.

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Barbara, this is a lovely piece of glass.

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Where did you get it from?

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It was my grandmother's. I have a feeling it was a wedding present.

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-They were married in 1910.

-Right.

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Of course, my mum inherited it and then it's been passed on.

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Passed on to you.

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All of the stuff, it's just part of the whole clutter

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that we have at home belonging to my grandmother.

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-When you look at this, what do you think of?

-I think of my grandmother.

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It was always on the mantelpiece.

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You must have liked it or you wouldn't have kept it?

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I do, I quite like it. I think it's very tactile to touch.

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It is very tactile.

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It follows a fashion at the end of the 19th coming into the 20th-century

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for this iridescent glass.

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The high point was Tiffany's, who produced this iridescent glass,

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and they called their wares Favrile and that is very exotic.

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This is made for the ordinary folk,

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like you and I.

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But this is of a certain period and you can date it

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because of this very cheap metal band that goes all the way round.

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That is stamped out steel

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which would have been polished or it might have even been gilded at some stage.

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If you look at the designs, it's all organic,

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so it's rather like water lilies but exaggerated.

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This is a blown glass and whilst it's still in its molten form,

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it's been pushed down and manipulated,

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so you get this sort of crushed feel about it.

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Now, let's think in terms of value.

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Allowing for the wear and tear that it's had,

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we're looking at around £40-60, not a lot.

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If there's going to be an enthusiast that could look at that

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and just think of when it was made, how it was made

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and the whole period.

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I think it's fascinating.

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What I think is good is that you can remember it

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from your grandmother's home and she was married in 1910.

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-Yeah.

-So, in 1910, she had this.

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She must have been very, very fashionable. Was she?

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-Not particularly, no!

-Oh, you disappoint me!

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Is this the beginning of your declutter?

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Yes, put boxes of stuff in the loft.

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Before you do any more, get me to visit.

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What a smooth talker!

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But hurrah for all the hoarders -

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without you, we would not have a programme.

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Now, I've found something that simply oozes history.

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I've escaped the main hubbub of the valuations

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taking place on the far side of the Abbey.

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I've sneaked off to this side. It's the Victorian garden.

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I've just been joined by Wendy, who's holding the most interesting journal, that's dated 1796.

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So, how did you come by this?

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My mother looked after an elderly lady for many years

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and she died when she was nearly 100.

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She left these little bits and pieces to my mother.

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My mother, who's now 93, has given me them

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and I don't really know quite what to do with them.

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Are you local?

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Yes, I am. I'm from Whitchurch, Tavistock.

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-So, you're literally right on...?

-On the edge of Dartmoor, yes.

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-And what do you do for a living?

-We're farmers.

-What do you farm?

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-Beef and sheep.

-And has it been a good year?

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Not too bad, yes, but the weather's being a bit difficult.

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Yeah, it has. Let's just look at this.

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It is literally all about mathematical equations, isn't it?

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-Yes.

-There are examples in here, look.

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"Mr Thomas Serge bought from John Drab on September 2nd 1794,"

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and then we've got yards of broad cloth, drab, yards of shallon, yards of drugget.

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I just think this is an exercise in a classroom

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that's been handwritten out and someone's used their imagination

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and they've added up the pounds and the shillings and the pence.

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I just love some of the little equations in here.

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-The handwriting...

-It's incredible.

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-It's discipline, is what it is.

-Yes, yes.

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Unfortunately, we don't know how old he is and what he did for a living.

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-This is not a child's hand, is it, let's face it.

-No.

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I'd be tempted to get a calculator out and see if they do work out.

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-Here we go, look at this! Here's a table, for instance, OK?

-Oh, yes.

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And it says here, "Two pints make a quart.

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"Two quarts make a bottle. Two bottles make one gallon.

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"Two gallons make one peck. Four pecks make one bushel.

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"Two bushels make one strike."

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And it goes on and on and on.

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So, you can see this is wonderful social history, isn't it?

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-Yes, it is.

-If only we knew who this chap Strong was and where he lived.

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-Yes.

-If it had an address on that, we might be able to sort of...

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-..trace him.

-Yeah, go to the county records, places like that.

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If you want to put this into auction,

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I think you should try it with a valuation of around about £40-£60.

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Do you really want to sell it?

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I'm just afraid to keep it, really, because I'm afraid that

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the condition might deteriorate and somebody who really likes maths

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and mathematical books will find it very interesting and conserve it.

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-Shall we give it a go?

-Yes, see what happens.

-See you in the auction room.

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-Yes, thank you.

-If you can get off the farm!

-Oh yes, I will!

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'There's so much history in that book.'

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Holding it transported me back to when it was written - a thrilling experience.

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Now, let's see what attracted Catherine's attention.

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-Lorraine, welcome to Flog It!

-Thank you.

-Thank you for coming

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and bringing your selection of mourning jewellery.

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Now, the big question that I have is, why mourning jewellery?

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Because it's different and when I bought it many years ago,

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I just wanted something different than what other people were wearing.

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-So did you actually collect?

-I actually collected.

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I used to go into antique shops or little shops

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and if I found any mourning jewellery and I liked it, I bought it.

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-So, when did you start collecting?

-In the 60s, 1960.

-Oh, wow.

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-So, quite a long time.

-A very long time.

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So, did you ever wear any of them?

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All the time. This ring especially, I wore all the time.

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And the locket, it actually opens up

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and there's an inscription inside with the lady.

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Oh, so it's actually got a photograph.

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-And the lady's hair is behind it.

-Oh, wonderful.

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And an inscription - 10th November 1875.

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Perfect, it is obviously a Victorian piece. Most of these are Victorian.

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This one, however, is Georgian.

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Yes, yes, it is, isn't it?

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That is lovely.

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That is quite a sweet little brooch with the pearls around the outside.

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I think that's quite a sweet one.

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-The one that you mentioned first of all...

-..was the ring.

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-That was the first piece I bought, actually.

-Really?

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Now, that is absolutely lovely and it says,

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"in memory of"

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and the date is 1870.

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It's very delicate and a very nice ring. I like that very much indeed.

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That one, strangely, that is Russian.

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I thought it was Hebrew when I bought it.

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I couldn't understand the words, and I thought,

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"Yes, it's probably Hebrew," but I found out it was Russian.

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That's got a Russian inscription around the outside.

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Why aren't you interested in these any more?

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-Why have you come to us to sell them?

-I don't wear it any more.

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I think I've grown out of that stage.

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It's just in a box in the wardrobe.

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Now, value, what I would suggest

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is to put them all together as one lot.

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-Would you be happy to sell at that?

-Yes, I would.

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With an estimate of £200-£300? Would you be happy to sell at that?

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-Yes, I would.

-And will you come along to the auction?

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-No, I'm not!

-Oh, no!

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You're not even going to see them sell.

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I'm off to Cyprus. My husband will come to the auction for me.

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OK, and we'll wish the jewellery well together

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and we'll give you a call and let you know how it does.

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For all their high morals and strict social rules,

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the Victorians were famously sentimental

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and the idea of mourning jewellery, a locket or ring containing hair from a dear departed,

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was a popular way of keeping them close.

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And now for my favourite part of the show.

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This is where anything can happen.

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We are off to auction to put those valuations to the test

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and here's a quick recap of what we're taking.

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David couldn't wait to get his hands on Barbara's Art Nouveau vase.

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This relic from a studious 18th-century mathematician speaks volumes.

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And Lorraine's mourning jewellery gives us an insight into the Victorian attitude to death.

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Here we are at Eldreds auction rooms just on the outskirts of Plymouth.

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This is where we're putting our valuations to the test

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and as you can see, the car park is full, which means, hopefully,

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inside that sale room, it's going to be packed full of bidders.

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The auctioneer today is Anthony Eldred.

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Before the sale begins, let's see

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if Anthony is as intrigued with Wendy's historic notebook as I was.

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I fell in love with this little maths book, I really did.

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It belongs to Wendy and she no longer wants it, wants it to go to a good home,

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so I put £40-£60 on this and I'm hoping it'll do the top end.

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I'm the first to admit, I do not understand this maths book.

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-It's beautifully written.

-Lots of different exercises within it.

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-It's not terribly exciting to a buyer.

-It's not.

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What do you do with it? This is the problem?

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So, I'm a little bit cold on it, to be honest.

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I'd find it hard to quote £40-£50 on it but I hope that you're right

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and I hope that it's someone that's going to love it.

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I understand she's now changed the reserve anyway.

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Yes, I spoke to her and she feels that she'd rather keep it in the family

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than sell it for less than £50,

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so that's what we've agreed as a reserve.

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-But it'll take a couple of special people to buy it.

-I'm sure it will.

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It won't be me!

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We'll find out how it does in just a minute but first up,

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it's Barbara's Art Nouveau vase.

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Why are you selling this?

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Well, I've got one or two, or three or four vases belonging

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to my grandmother and I thought, well, saw Flog It!...

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-..bring it along.

-So I brought it along.

-It's a lovely thing.

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You don't sound like you're from the West Country?

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-No, I'm from the North, Lancashire.

-What brought you to Plymouth?

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-My husband was in the Navy.

-That figures.

-We've been here ever since.

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-Hopefully we'll get the top end.

-I hope so.

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There's just one little bit of damage on the actual metal.

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The overall concept is nice.

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Righty-oh, it's going under the hammer now. This is it.

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Lot 94. It's a little Art Nouveau iridescent green glass vase.

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There it is, and I'm bid £40 for it.

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-Straight in.

-£40, 2 if you want it.

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At £40, 2, 5, at 45, it's still against you all.

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Come on! At 45...

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Yes, hammer's gone down!

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£45, straight in, straight out, blink and you'll miss that one.

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I'm really happy about that, thanks very much.

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'Smiles all round and we're off to a good start.

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'I hope our luck continues. It's my turn now.'

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Now it brings us to that maths book dated 1796.

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-How can you put a price on history like that?

-I know, I know!

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-Although you did put the reserve up £5?

-I have.

-But that's no big deal, is it?

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Had a chat to Anthony before the auction,

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he said he thinks it might struggle.

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Yes, I think if it doesn't sell, we might give it to a museum.

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-Let's find out what the bidders think.

-Yes.

-Good luck.

-Thank you.

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Lot 240. It's a late 18th-century hand-written volume, it's a maths exercise book.

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It's dated 1794 and I'm bid £55 for it.

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Against you all at 55, 8 if you want it? At £55, then?

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Sold straight in.

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£55, 58 and 60. 2, at £62, seated here.

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At £62, take 5?

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All done then at £62? Quite sure?

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That was a precious piece of our heritage, it really was.

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-Thank you for bringing it.

-Thank you very much.

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Items like that sum up my passion for antiques.

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Vivid, tangible links to the past.

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At £200 then, any more at 200?

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Lorraine's jewellery is about to go under the hammer.

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They have been split into two lots. We do have those.

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We have our expert, Catherine, who is standing right next to me, but we don't have Lorraine.

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She is in Cyprus, but we do have husband, Ray.

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-So why aren't you in Cyprus with her?

-It's far too hot for me.

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-I just don't like it.

-You don't like the heat.

-I don't like the heat at all.

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Well, things are getting hot right now.

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Our first lot is about to go under the hammer.

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-What do you think of these?

-They're quite nice.

-Yeah.

-They look good.

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-Did you encourage the collecting?

-No.

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Next is lot 300, which is a mourning locket. I'm bid £90 for it.

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Again at 90. 5. 105. 110. 115.

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It's an acquired taste, isn't it?

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It certainly is.

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140. 150. 160.

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That's very good.

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180. 190. At 190, then.

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All finished at £190.

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-That is a very good price.

-It is, isn't it?

-Definitely.

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Next is lot 301.

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This time a little collection of mourning jewellery.

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A lot of bids for this. £260 to start.

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Who's in the money?

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-290. 300. At £300 and 10.

-That chap is bidding there, look.

-330. 340.

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£340. Still against you all at £340.

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That's excellent. I think she'll be really happy with that.

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-What a surprise as well. Someone is in the money.

-She is.

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And she's not here. She's in Cyprus!

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I think you should fly out there and surprise her.

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That's a good idea, go on. Be Mr Romantic.

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I'm sure that will put a smile on Lorraine's face.

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As big as the one on Ray's tie!

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Great results so far,

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We'll be back for more auction a little later on in the show.

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While I was here in the area,

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I got the opportunity to visit a heritage centre with a difference.

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It's a very big part of our childhood,

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and they restore and collect all these items.

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Take a look at this, it's going to put a smile on your face.

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Carousels and coconut shies, ghost trains and goldfish.

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When the fair came to town, you knew you were in for a real treat.

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As soon as I walked into this barn,

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childhood memories came flooding back to me.

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I hope they will for you as well.

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Because right now we're going on a nostalgic ride

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through the golden years of popular fairground entertainment.

0:17:380:17:41

I'm here at Dingles Fairground Heritage Centre

0:17:410:17:44

to explore their incredible collection of fairground memorabilia.

0:17:440:17:47

Not to mention their wonderful, colourful artworks.

0:17:470:17:51

They have thousands of pieces here in their collection,

0:17:510:17:54

covering many aspects of fairground life.

0:17:540:17:57

From old stall prizes to huge travelling trucks.

0:17:570:18:02

But things have changed with trends and advancing technologies.

0:18:020:18:05

So let's go back a few years,

0:18:050:18:07

starting with how the rides got on the road.

0:18:070:18:11

Travelling fairs date back centuries,

0:18:110:18:14

with groups of tightly knit nomadic families

0:18:140:18:16

touring the countryside in a snake of living wagons and carriages just like this one,

0:18:160:18:21

carrying all their belongings and their rides.

0:18:210:18:24

This living wagon was owned by the DeVey family,

0:18:260:18:29

who commissioned it just before World War I.

0:18:290:18:32

It's a unique example of how a fairground boss and his wife

0:18:320:18:36

would have lived on the road.

0:18:360:18:38

The traditional fairground art

0:18:400:18:43

covering nearly every surface of the fair is all hand-painted.

0:18:430:18:47

And an attraction in itself with its bright, vivid colours.

0:18:470:18:52

This one is taken from one of the galloping horses rides.

0:18:530:18:56

It's painted beautifully by a scenic artist called Henry Whiting, who was born in 1839.

0:18:560:19:03

This is circa 1890, 1900.

0:19:030:19:06

Heavily carved borders, but look at that beautifully picked out in all of these colours,

0:19:060:19:11

so it makes the relief look even deeper.

0:19:110:19:13

Wonderful. Look, there it's signed Henry Whiting, painter.

0:19:130:19:17

And his family were based in Norwich.

0:19:170:19:20

The latest ride to be restored by the trust is Supersonic Skid.

0:19:220:19:26

And to tell me more about the process is trustee, Guy Belshaw.

0:19:260:19:30

-How much did it cost?

-It cost just under £15,000.

0:19:310:19:35

That was the cost of timber and the electrical installation.

0:19:350:19:39

But the labour was all voluntary.

0:19:390:19:41

Where does the labour force come from?

0:19:410:19:43

We've got most skills. We've got carpenters, electricians.

0:19:430:19:47

We haven't got any scenic painters, though.

0:19:470:19:49

That's one skill we haven't got here.

0:19:490:19:51

-Which is kind of the most important thing really.

-It is.

0:19:510:19:54

It's what we call "the flash" in the business.

0:19:540:19:56

-Once you've got over the health and safety aspect. The flash.

-Yeah.

0:19:560:20:00

-It's wonderful 1950s artwork you can see here.

-It's lovely.

-By Fred Fowl.

0:20:000:20:03

-It's fantastic!

-And the lights shine off the aluminium and gold leaf. It looks great, doesn't it?

0:20:030:20:08

I've got to ask you, though.

0:20:080:20:10

Where do you get the lightbulbs from, because you can't get these anymore?

0:20:100:20:13

-We can't. You have to go to China or India.

-So you can still get them?

0:20:130:20:16

We can get them but it's becoming more difficult. But we are going to maintain the incandescent lightbulbs.

0:20:160:20:21

They look the business.

0:20:210:20:23

You've kind of left little bits weathered with original paintwork.

0:20:230:20:26

It looks so authentic.

0:20:260:20:28

It's conservation.

0:20:280:20:29

We're trying to conserve it as it was rather than enhance it.

0:20:290:20:32

So there's no shiny varnish. It's all a bit of a pattern now.

0:20:320:20:35

But that's the way we want to preserve it, as it looks now.

0:20:350:20:38

But done in a professional manner, obviously.

0:20:380:20:40

-So do you have a favourite ride?

-This one, the Supersonic Skid.

0:20:400:20:44

-Without a doubt it's my favourite.

-Are we going to have a go on it?

-Let's try number seven.

0:20:440:20:47

-Lucky number seven.

-Lucky number seven.

0:20:470:20:50

Rock 'n' roll!

0:20:560:20:57

The heritage of the fairground is being saved here.

0:21:000:21:02

And there are even four working funfair rides

0:21:020:21:06

dating back from 1889, with the Rodeo Switchback.

0:21:060:21:10

To the mid 1930s with the Supersonic Skid...

0:21:120:21:17

The Chariot Racer...

0:21:170:21:19

..And the ever-popular dodgems, first built in the 1930s.

0:21:200:21:25

The funfair had its heyday in the mid-20th-century.

0:21:270:21:30

But today they are still really popular.

0:21:300:21:32

Let's face it, this is a fun day out

0:21:320:21:35

despite all the other modern entertainment facilities

0:21:350:21:38

that are vying for business against the fairs.

0:21:380:21:41

You'll be surprised to know there are some 4,000 show families here in the United Kingdom,

0:21:410:21:46

which means around 200 fairs each week are taking place.

0:21:460:21:50

So the next time you're out and about,

0:21:500:21:52

look out for a bit of nostalgia like this

0:21:520:21:54

because they attract all kinds of people from all walks of life,

0:21:540:21:58

including big kids like me who grew up on things like this.

0:21:580:22:02

And today I'm even bringing my son to the fair.

0:22:020:22:05

He loves the dodgems.

0:22:050:22:06

And for those of you who are a little bit scared,

0:22:080:22:11

you might want to look away now as I head into this restored ghost train from the 1940s.

0:22:110:22:16

-Here we go.

-# Cos this is thriller

0:22:160:22:19

# Thriller night

0:22:190:22:21

# And no one's going to save you from the beast about to strike

0:22:210:22:25

# You know it's thriller

0:22:250:22:27

# Thriller night

0:22:270:22:29

# You're fighting for your life

0:22:290:22:31

# Inside a killer

0:22:310:22:33

# Thriller tonight. #

0:22:330:22:36

Oh, you don't want to go in there, you don't want to go in there!

0:22:360:22:40

The side stalls are a big attraction to fairground visitors,

0:22:430:22:46

with many of us remembering the coconut shy.

0:22:460:22:49

Here goes.

0:22:490:22:51

And what about the plate smasher?

0:22:540:22:56

That was rubbish!

0:22:590:23:01

Oh! Yeah!

0:23:020:23:05

The Hall of Mirrors. Not flattering for everyone.

0:23:080:23:11

It's a great example of how simple an attraction can be

0:23:110:23:14

to entertain people.

0:23:140:23:17

This amusement was built in the 1930s.

0:23:170:23:19

And although it's been restored,

0:23:190:23:21

it still has some of the original mirrored glass recycled from other stalls.

0:23:210:23:26

Not only were the stalls a great source of revenue for the showmen,

0:23:320:23:36

but they were also a great attraction for the visitors

0:23:360:23:38

because everybody wanted to go home with something, they wanted to win something.

0:23:380:23:42

During the 1930s, the time of the depression,

0:23:420:23:45

one famous showman called Chicken Joe Barrack

0:23:450:23:47

actually gave away groceries and whole chickens as his surprises.

0:23:470:23:51

But at the end of the day, it wasn't just the noise of the fair,

0:23:510:23:55

the whole atmosphere, the lights, the music,

0:23:550:23:58

it was the face of the showman.

0:23:580:24:00

It was his job to attract you in, to make you spend your money

0:24:000:24:03

and keep you here.

0:24:030:24:04

I tell you what, I am so impressed with this place.

0:24:090:24:12

There really is so much to see, take my word for it.

0:24:120:24:15

This particular beauty is called the Rodeo Switchback ride.

0:24:150:24:19

It is a rare treat to see.

0:24:190:24:21

Not only is the oldest ride in the centre,

0:24:210:24:24

but it's also the most loved.

0:24:240:24:26

In its heyday this toured all over the British Isles.

0:24:260:24:28

It even had a residency on Southsea Pier for well over 25 years.

0:24:280:24:34

And then it went to the United States of America.

0:24:340:24:36

It's found its way back and in 2008, once again it's open to the public.

0:24:360:24:41

That is well after 100 years of it first being built.

0:24:410:24:46

That's what I call longevity.

0:24:460:24:48

You see, they certainly knew how to build things back then.

0:24:480:24:51

All this is only possible because of the Fairground Heritage Trust.

0:24:510:24:55

The skill, the dedication and the passion from their volunteers,

0:24:550:24:59

keeping the fun of the fair well and truly alive

0:24:590:25:02

for future generations.

0:25:020:25:04

Yeah, take it away.

0:25:040:25:07

Welcome back to Buckland Abbey. Now let's join up with our experts

0:25:150:25:19

and see what else we can find to take off to auction.

0:25:190:25:21

Who's Catherine cuddling up to?

0:25:260:25:28

Barry, welcome to Flog It!

0:25:280:25:30

and welcome to beautiful Buckland Abbey today.

0:25:300:25:33

You've brought along with you this rather nice bisque doll.

0:25:330:25:39

Can you tell me where you got it from?

0:25:390:25:41

We inherited it from a neighbour that passed away

0:25:410:25:43

and the wife used to go round and visit.

0:25:430:25:46

It was a favourite thing of the daughter's when she used to visit.

0:25:460:25:50

How lovely!

0:25:500:25:51

Your daughter used to go to your neighbour's

0:25:510:25:54

and play with this beautiful doll?

0:25:540:25:55

She did indeed so she got quite attached to it. She inherited it when the lady passed away.

0:25:550:26:01

What about these clothes that the doll's dressed in?

0:26:010:26:03

The clothes belong to my daughter

0:26:030:26:05

and those are the clothes that she wore as a baby.

0:26:050:26:07

That's very sweet. Your daughter, presumably, is grown up now.

0:26:070:26:11

Is there anyone else in the family who plays...?

0:26:110:26:14

My daughter's got a son called Alfie who's two and a half now

0:26:140:26:17

and he's become quite attached to the baby.

0:26:170:26:20

He was upset when it disappeared this morning. He was asking where the baby was going.

0:26:200:26:24

Let's have a little look more closely at the dolly.

0:26:240:26:28

The body of the dolly is composition, but the head, where 50%

0:26:280:26:33

of the value is, is actually made from bisque which is a type of porcelain, fired porcelain.

0:26:330:26:39

Looking around it, there doesn't seem to be any major cracks.

0:26:390:26:44

As I tip this head forward, I can see it's stamped on the back

0:26:440:26:49

of the neck with the initials A-M which stand for Armand Marseilles,

0:26:490:26:54

which was a doll factory, although it sounds French,

0:26:540:26:57

was actually in Germany.

0:26:570:26:59

Armand Marseilles were a factory that were set up around 1885

0:26:590:27:05

and were making dolls until about the 1920s.

0:27:050:27:08

It's a very famous factory and this has got a mould number of 341.

0:27:080:27:15

When we look at the value of dolls, we look at the characters

0:27:150:27:20

and the type of faces, whether they've got a nice,

0:27:200:27:23

pretty face or the expression, whether they're laughing or smiling.

0:27:230:27:27

This is quite nicely painted.

0:27:270:27:29

The lips are nicely painted and also, it's got weighted eyes

0:27:290:27:33

so when you lie it down, you can see that it closes its eyes.

0:27:330:27:37

If I suggest that we put it into auction

0:27:370:27:41

with an estimate of £40-60, and a 30 reserve, does that sound reasonable?

0:27:410:27:45

-That sounds very reasonable.

-You'll be happy with that?

-Yeah, thank you.

0:27:450:27:48

What about poor old Alfie?

0:27:480:27:50

What will you do when you go home and haven't got

0:27:500:27:52

this dolly in your arms? He's going to be devastated.

0:27:520:27:55

We're planning a visit to the circus this evening so I think

0:27:550:27:58

that will be good compensation for not taking the baby home.

0:27:580:28:01

I think that sounds fantastic. Good luck with that.

0:28:010:28:03

# What's it all about, Alfie? #

0:28:030:28:08

Some people will do anything to get on Flog It! But flogging the baby?!

0:28:080:28:13

David's discovering something a bit special.

0:28:130:28:18

I can honestly say that weapons have never really interested me...

0:28:180:28:25

until today.

0:28:250:28:27

You have brought the most wonderful piece of equipment in.

0:28:270:28:32

All the various bronze sections

0:28:340:28:36

and blued sections are covered in a gold.

0:28:360:28:39

The cross-hatching of the gun itself is beautifully done.

0:28:400:28:46

It's complete with all its requisites,

0:28:460:28:51

the powder horn is there, the cleaning rod and the gun

0:28:510:28:56

is in immaculate condition as though it's never been used.

0:28:560:29:00

It's a percussion gun with a revolving barrel.

0:29:000:29:04

The blued state of the barrel is such that I don't think

0:29:040:29:08

it's ever been used, which leads me to think

0:29:080:29:13

that it's a presentation gun.

0:29:130:29:16

Where did it come from?

0:29:160:29:18

My father's had it. It's been in his family,

0:29:180:29:20

I don't know, about 30 years, I can remember it.

0:29:200:29:23

This is much older than 30 years, obviously.

0:29:230:29:26

I find the actual velvet inside and the embossing in incredibly good condition.

0:29:260:29:34

-Lovely, isn't it?

-And it's all in its original state.

0:29:340:29:38

That is such a bonus when you're selling weapons like this.

0:29:380:29:43

The whole thing is governed by this here,

0:29:430:29:47

that these manufacturers, Laine,

0:29:470:29:50

gun manufacturers of Paris were awarded a first-class medal in 1855.

0:29:500:29:57

That doesn't mean that it dates from 1855, but it's very close.

0:29:570:30:05

I would think that this is a presentation set and I might

0:30:050:30:09

be wildly optimistic or completely off my rocker,

0:30:090:30:14

but I would think that we're looking at something in the region

0:30:140:30:19

of £2,500-3,000.

0:30:190:30:22

-Goodness.

-I think it's superb. As a decorative element, it's wonderful.

0:30:220:30:29

As a weapon of destruction, it's dreadful.

0:30:290:30:31

Yes, definitely!

0:30:310:30:33

We aim to please. Now it's Catherine's turn to spread the cheer.

0:30:350:30:39

Judy, welcome to Buckland Abbey

0:30:390:30:41

and thank you for bringing along your pair of chamber sticks.

0:30:410:30:45

Where did these come from?

0:30:450:30:47

They belong to my mother-in-law which she got 15-20 years ago

0:30:470:30:52

off an old lady she used to clean for.

0:30:520:30:54

So they were given to her as a gift or a thank-you?

0:30:540:30:57

A thank-you.

0:30:570:30:59

-Wonderful, so they've stayed in your family ever since?

-Mm-hm.

0:30:590:31:02

-Do you display them at home?

-Yes, they're on the mantelpiece.

0:31:020:31:06

-Do you know much about them?

-No, not really.

0:31:060:31:09

What attracted me to them was the design and the fact

0:31:090:31:12

that you've got a pair and they're complete with the snuffers

0:31:120:31:17

which is rather nice.

0:31:170:31:19

I love the handle

0:31:190:31:21

with this scalloped design mounted on the top.

0:31:210:31:24

The thing that's missing is,

0:31:240:31:27

originally, it would have had some glass liners.

0:31:270:31:30

So there would have been some cylindrical glass pieces here.

0:31:300:31:35

As you walked from room to room, the candle wouldn't have blown out.

0:31:350:31:40

Do you know anything about those liners? Do you remember them?

0:31:400:31:44

-No, no.

-They're silver plate, not solid silver.

0:31:440:31:50

They're 1900s in date, but today,

0:31:500:31:51

something like this would sit quite comfortably in modern homes.

0:31:510:31:57

Because it has quite a nice, stylised design. Do you like them?

0:31:570:32:01

Um, I like them, but I don't think my mother-in-law likes them.

0:32:010:32:07

-She's happy to sell?

-Yes.

0:32:070:32:09

They're worth £50-80, but with the glass liners, they would have been double that.

0:32:090:32:16

You'd be looking at more like 100-150.

0:32:160:32:19

-Are you happy to put them into auction at £50-80?

-Certainly.

0:32:190:32:22

That's great news. You're very relaxed here.

0:32:220:32:26

-Is there something you want to share with me?

-I've done some acting.

0:32:260:32:30

I was an extra with an A-list American actor.

0:32:300:32:34

-Tell me more.

-He's done quite a few films. He's very good looking.

0:32:340:32:39

-Ooh, I'm bound to know him.

-His initials are BP.

0:32:390:32:45

-BP, BP, BP. I don't know. Enlighten me.

-Brad Pitt.

0:32:450:32:50

-Oh! Really?

-Yes.

0:32:500:32:54

Gosh, that's far more interesting than chamber sticks.

0:32:540:32:58

-Is he gorgeous?

-He's very good looking.

-Oh, I bet.

0:32:580:33:01

Oh, how wonderful! Lucky you.

0:33:010:33:03

Well, sadly, he won't come to our auction,

0:33:030:33:06

-but we can still dream of him.

-Yes.

0:33:060:33:10

Continuing the theme, David's found someone after his own heart.

0:33:100:33:15

It's Christine and David. What a good name! Beloved.

0:33:150:33:19

It means beloved.

0:33:190:33:21

It's appropriate because we have in front of us

0:33:210:33:25

two goblets which are often referred to as marriage goblets.

0:33:250:33:29

You've got two and they're both dated with the same date of 1767.

0:33:290:33:35

-Do they date from then? Where did you get them from?

-His family.

0:33:350:33:41

They came down through my parents.

0:33:410:33:43

I believe they may have come from my father's parents

0:33:430:33:47

who were in service in a stately home in Surrey.

0:33:470:33:49

-So they came to their possession when?

-As long as I can remember.

0:33:490:33:53

-60 years?

-I'm 74. And they've always been in the family that I can remember.

0:33:530:33:58

-You must have had an easy life. That's all I can say.

-THEY LAUGH

0:33:580:34:02

These are expensive, I would say, tourist souvenirs.

0:34:020:34:09

These are not the normal heraldic devices

0:34:090:34:13

you bought as a souvenir from an English seaside.

0:34:130:34:16

These would be part and parcel of a grand tour

0:34:160:34:20

or an educational tour in the latter part of the 19th century.

0:34:200:34:23

All this enamelling is done by hand and is copying

0:34:230:34:27

a much earlier style.

0:34:270:34:30

If we look at this piece, we call this a conical bowl.

0:34:300:34:35

That section is called the base.

0:34:350:34:38

Normally, you would have a solid stem,

0:34:380:34:42

but that is hollow all the way through.

0:34:420:34:46

We are looking at a facsimile of a much earlier glass.

0:34:460:34:51

From the same source, we also have this small glass which says

0:34:510:34:56

"Holland 1761," but I think these are of 19th century origin.

0:34:560:35:03

And they're looking back the 18th century in style.

0:35:030:35:07

I think they have to have 20th century prices.

0:35:070:35:11

When these come up for auction, I think they're going to be

0:35:110:35:15

priced in the region of about 120-180,

0:35:150:35:21

that sort of price range.

0:35:210:35:24

That's including the small glass as well.

0:35:240:35:26

-Would you be happy to part with them for that figure?

-Yes.

-Yes.

0:35:260:35:31

Have you lots of ornaments and things?

0:35:310:35:33

Not a lot, cos I collect either Bristol Blue or Blue Mountain.

0:35:330:35:39

If you sell these, you might buy more Bristol Blue or Blue Mountain?

0:35:390:35:42

-It's our 50th wedding anniversary next year.

-How nice! What are you going to do?

-I don't know.

0:35:420:35:48

-but this will go towards a holiday fund or something.

-That's a good idea.

0:35:480:35:51

I hope you do better than I've stated.

0:35:510:35:53

If I had thought about value, I would have thought 50-100.

0:35:530:35:57

-Less than what you're saying.

-Shh!

0:35:570:35:59

-That's quite good.

-Hush my mouth!

-It's better than we expected.

0:35:590:36:05

There you are.

0:36:050:36:06

We've now found our final four items to take off to auction.

0:36:060:36:10

It's time to say farewell to Buckland Abbey,

0:36:100:36:13

our magnificent host location for today.

0:36:130:36:16

We have had a marvellous time here,

0:36:160:36:18

but, as we head off to the sale room to put those valuations to the test,

0:36:180:36:21

here's what we're taking with us.

0:36:210:36:23

It's time for Barry's German bisque doll to find a new home.

0:36:230:36:28

David surprised Lynne with his valuation

0:36:280:36:32

for her decorative French firearm.

0:36:320:36:34

Judy's elegant candle snuffers are sure to appeal to the silver

0:36:340:36:38

and Art Nouveau collectors alike.

0:36:380:36:40

And finally, Christine

0:36:420:36:44

and David were delighted with the estimate for their glass goblets.

0:36:440:36:48

Back to the auction room, let's find out

0:36:510:36:53

if the auctioneer Anthony Eldridge

0:36:530:36:55

concurs with David's valuation of the pistol.

0:36:550:36:59

I think this could be a bit special.

0:36:590:37:01

It's the nicest example of a revolver or pistol

0:37:010:37:04

that I've seen for a long time.

0:37:040:37:06

David has put £2,500-3,000 on this.

0:37:060:37:10

I think he's spot on with his estimate, very realistic estimate.

0:37:100:37:14

It could do a little bit better.

0:37:140:37:16

-We'd plump for a reserve of a little bit lower, at 2,000.

-It is,

0:37:160:37:20

for its time and day, something quite special.

0:37:200:37:23

It looks like the bling of all revolvers, doesn't it?

0:37:230:37:25

I think, when you start to research something like this,

0:37:250:37:29

this is when it tells you it's an unusual item.

0:37:290:37:31

There is little available.

0:37:310:37:32

Would you say there weren't that many of these made?

0:37:320:37:35

I would say there were virtually none of this particular one

0:37:350:37:37

made in this way.

0:37:370:37:39

I think it is, if not unique, it is very unusual.

0:37:390:37:43

So we just need a few people who are interested in arms

0:37:430:37:46

and militaria to bid against each other.

0:37:460:37:48

This is a one-off. It could really fly.

0:37:480:37:51

That's our job and, hopefully, we've done it well

0:37:510:37:54

and we should have plenty of people here for it.

0:37:540:37:56

We should hit the target later in the programme,

0:37:560:37:58

so whatever you do, don't go away, this could get very interesting.

0:37:580:38:01

First under the hammer, it's the baby doll.

0:38:030:38:07

It belongs to Barry, but it's not exactly a boy's toy.

0:38:070:38:11

-Not at all.

-It's not yours, is it?

-No.

-It's Alfie's.

0:38:110:38:14

His little grandson.

0:38:140:38:16

He was a little bit disappointed to see it disappear, so fingers crossed.

0:38:160:38:20

-It has to go.

-I'm on a win-win, cos if it comes home, he's happy.

0:38:200:38:24

If it sells, the daughter's happy.

0:38:240:38:26

Let's find out what happened. Here we go. This is it.

0:38:260:38:30

Next is lot 178. It's a doll,

0:38:300:38:31

fully marked on the back of the head

0:38:310:38:34

and I'm bid £50 for it.

0:38:340:38:37

-Against you all at 50.

-Sold it.

0:38:370:38:40

2, 5, 8, 70. At £70.

0:38:400:38:42

72, in the room now, at £72. I'll take 5. At £72.

0:38:420:38:48

-Finished at £72.

-It's gone. It's gone at £72.

0:38:480:38:53

-Fine.

-Happy?

-In one respect, yes.

0:38:530:38:56

-In one respect, no.

-Poor Alfie.

0:38:560:38:58

A diplomatic situation going on.

0:38:580:39:01

His third birthday's in two weeks so I'm sure he'll get a nice present.

0:39:010:39:04

Winners all round.

0:39:040:39:06

Next up, David and Christine's 19th century goblets.

0:39:060:39:09

-Good to see you. I've got to say, you look very smart.

-Thank you.

0:39:110:39:15

-They're co-ordinated beautifully.

-Exactly.

0:39:150:39:18

-Why are you selling these?

-They just sit on the shelf.

0:39:180:39:21

-They're not sentimental or anything like that.

-Just fed up with them.

0:39:210:39:27

This is a typical lot to flog. Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:39:270:39:32

Lot 585 is a pair of 19th century goblets. There they are.

0:39:320:39:38

-I'm bid £80 against you all.

-It's a good opening bid.

0:39:380:39:42

-At £90. 100, 105, 110, 15.

-Commission bid.

0:39:430:39:49

5, 135, at 135, I'm still against you all in the room.

0:39:500:39:55

You're done at 135.

0:39:550:39:57

Well done, David and Christine. £135.

0:39:580:40:02

We were all a bit worried at the very last minute.

0:40:020:40:05

-I know.

-That's what auctions can do for you.

0:40:050:40:08

And that's why I never tire of them.

0:40:080:40:11

Let's see what's in store for our next item.

0:40:110:40:14

Hopefully, we can light the room up with a pair of silver-plated

0:40:140:40:17

candle holders with snuffers.

0:40:170:40:19

They belong to Judy, who mixes with A-list celebrities.

0:40:190:40:22

-I do.

-Tell me all about Brad Pitt. Did he say anything to you?

0:40:220:40:27

-No. We were just filming.

-Is he is good looking in the flesh?

-Oh, yes.

0:40:270:40:32

-You like him as well, don't you?

-I wouldn't say no.

0:40:330:40:36

THEY LAUGH

0:40:360:40:38

I like these candle holders.

0:40:380:40:39

They're missing the shades, but they've got the snuffers

0:40:390:40:41

and the snuffers sometimes go walkies.

0:40:410:40:44

So we could get the top end here. Let's find out what the bidders think. Here we go.

0:40:440:40:48

Lot 363, it's a pair of plated candle holders.

0:40:480:40:53

Several bids for them. I'm bid £62.

0:40:530:40:57

-Straight in.

-At 68 now. Still against you all. At £68.

0:40:590:41:05

At 68, I'll sell them. Quite sure, at 68?

0:41:050:41:07

Maiden bid. Straight in, straight out. Hammer's gone down.

0:41:070:41:12

£68. Anthony did his stuff.

0:41:120:41:15

He worked his magic, just like Brad Pitt would have done.

0:41:150:41:19

-Certainly has.

-Can you compare the two?

0:41:190:41:22

-Not really.

-We'll take Anthony cos he's working wonders for us.

0:41:220:41:28

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:41:280:41:31

That brings us to our final item, Lynne's decorative pistol.

0:41:310:41:36

Tension is building cos this is the one we've been waiting for.

0:41:360:41:39

I'm talking about that 19th century French revolver.

0:41:390:41:41

It's quality throughout.

0:41:410:41:43

-Lynne, what do you reckon?

-I don't know. I'm very apprehensive.

0:41:430:41:47

-Are you nervous?

-Yes.

0:41:470:41:48

We are as well, but I had a chat to Anthony earlier

0:41:480:41:51

and he said this has been viewed, handled by the gun specialists,

0:41:510:41:54

militaria and arms collectors, but they haven't given anything away.

0:41:540:41:58

It could literally fly out. It could go off with a bang.

0:41:580:42:03

Next is lot 158,

0:42:030:42:05

the fine-quality French percussion six-shot single action revolver.

0:42:050:42:10

Lot of interest in it. I'm bit £3,700.

0:42:100:42:17

-It's gone. £3,700.

-At £3,700, anything in the room at £3,700.

0:42:170:42:23

-At 3,700, then.

-That hammer is going down.

-No, no.

0:42:230:42:28

Anything on the phone at £3,700?

0:42:280:42:32

3,800, 3,900, 4,100. At 4,100.

0:42:320:42:39

At 4,100. It's against all the telephones.

0:42:400:42:43

At £4,100, then. Finished at 4,100.

0:42:440:42:47

-Gosh, that hammer has gone down.

-How do you feel?

-You were right.

-Wow.

0:42:500:42:54

Your first auction!

0:42:540:42:56

-Thank you.

-That's what it's all about.

0:42:560:42:58

We promised a big surprise and we didn't let you down.

0:42:580:43:01

I hope you've enjoyed the show.

0:43:010:43:03

Sadly, we've run out of time, but from Lynne and David here,

0:43:030:43:06

what an experience and what a day!

0:43:060:43:08

Join us again soon.

0:43:080:43:09

Email [email protected]

0:43:240:43:27

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:270:43:30

Paul Martin and the team visit historic Buckland Abbey in Devon. Expert David Barby is blown away by a French revolver and Catherine Southon becomes attached to a bisque baby. One of these items causes a stir at auction. Paul studies an ancient maths book and is taken for a ride at The Heritage Fairground Centre.


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