Saltaire Flog It!


Saltaire

Presenter Paul Martin is joined by experts Michael Baggott and David Barby in the village of Saltaire in West Yorkshire. Their finds include a set of spoons and a bracelet.


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Transcript


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The name of this village would make a good answer to a crossword

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because it combines the name of the founder, Salt,

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with the river that runs right through the heart of it, Aire.

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Yes, today we're in West Yorkshire,

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in the pretty, industrial model village of Saltaire.

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Welcome to Flog It!

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Our venue today is the Victoria Hall, a grade II listed building.

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It retains all the original grandeur it had

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when it was first built in 1869 by philanthropist Sir Titus Salt

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as a cultural centre for the people of Saltaire.

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Now this is what I love to see, hundreds of people

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all laden with bags and boxes full of unwanted antiques and treasures.

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Now, it may have just started to rain,

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but hasn't dampened our spirits, we've all got smiles on our faces

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and somebody here in this queue has got a real treasure

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and they don't know it yet, but it's our experts' job to find it.

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And, of course, they've all come here to ask our experts

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that all-important question which is...

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ALL: What's it worth?

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-And when they find out they are going to flog it.

-Flog it!

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HE LAUGHS

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-THEY LAUGH

-Yeah, well done!

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Well, the beautiful Victoria Hall is rapidly filling up with people...

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-HE LAUGHS

-..and here to answer that all-important question,

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our experts David Barby and Michael Baggott.

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Later, they uncover precious metals including gold...

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Lorna, just tell me, what's it like to be a walking bank?

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LORNA LAUGHS

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..and silver.

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Good grief, what an attractive set of spoons!

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But also, more utilitarian base metal in the form of Dinky Toys.

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Part of my childhood, yes.

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Which of these will realise the best price at auction?

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Stay tuned to find out.

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Starting the day for us is Michael,

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who looks thrilled by his first find.

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Jennifer, thank you for bringing in

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what looks like a very exciting closed box.

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-Yes.

-I love closed boxes!

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Let's open it up and see what we've got.

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Good grief!

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Not quite every colour of the rainbow, but we're doing well!

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What an attractive set of spoons. Now, where did these come from?

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Well, they were a wedding present to my parents in 1932.

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-Good grief.

-Yes, yes.

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-Did they ever use them? I mean, they look...

-I don't think so, no.

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I mean, this is the way with wedding gifts,

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that you're presented with these fabulous fine quality items

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and you might use them once, when the person who gave them to you

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first comes round after you're married, then they go in the box.

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-Yes.

-These are intriguing.

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-Did your family have any connection with Norway at all?

-No, no.

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-I ask that because, obviously, we've got, in the lid of the box, here...

-Yes.

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-..David Andersen Oslo.

-Yes, yes.

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The firm of David Andersen

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specialised in doing this really lovely quality enamel work

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-on silver gilt.

-Yes.

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-What's very interesting is none of these spoons are import marked.

-Oh?

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-So, strictly speaking, if someone had brought these in to sell...

-Yes.

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..they would have gone through

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and been tested to be up to sterling standard and had import marks added,

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which is why I just wanted if they possibly had a Norwegian friend

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-who might have just stuffed them into a bag and come over...

-I don't know!

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It's intriguing, actually.

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Sadly, because they didn't do that,

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-we don't have a date letter on them.

-No.

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They can't be any later than 1932, when they were given,

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and typically you would expect to see these spoons

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-from about 1920 onwards...

-Right.

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-..in these very bright '20s, sort of, jazz age colours.

-Yes, yes.

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So, if we say, about 1925 in date, I think that's fine.

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Well, it's very unusual to see a big set of 12 like this, norm...

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-Is it?

-Yes, normally they're sets of six

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and, you know, one will have had the enamel smashed off the back of the bowl

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and then, of course, nobody wants them

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so I think that's a really tidy little set.

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I like them very much, but they're just put away in the drawer

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because I'm frightened to use them!

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So, you decided to bring them along to Flog It! to sell?

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-Any idea what they might be worth?

-No.

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They are, they are solid silver and enamel so have a stab in the dark.

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-£100?

-That's, that's quite a good start!

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THEY LAUGH Sorry, is it too much?

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Do you know, I think they must be worth, MUST be worth

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-£120-£200 for the set.

-Yes.

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-And I think we have to put a fixed reserve of £120 on them.

-Right.

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-So, I hope we send them off to a good home at the auction.

-I do as well!

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-We'll keep our fingers crossed for a nice price, shall we?

-Yes, yes, yes.

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That's marvellous. If they don't go we can have a cup of coffee or a cup of tea,

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-depending how we feel on the day!

-Yes!

-Thanks very much indeed.

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Thank you.

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What a delightful set. Surely someone will scoop them up?

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Next, I found Christine sitting in the queue

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with a lovely little painting.

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Christine, OK, how long have you had this?

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Well, my parents had it since the 1970s

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and before that it was my grandmother's

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and she would have had it since about the 1920s.

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-Oh, really?

-Yes, yes.

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Can you remember seeing this on the wall as a little girl?

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I can, yes, yes...

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because my grandmother had two boys

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and she always thought she'd love to have a little girl

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-and so she used to call that, "My little girl".

-Ah!

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Well, you've done a little bit of research, haven't you?

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And you know it's Simon Glucklich,

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he's a Polish artist, born in southern Poland in 1863.

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And look, this is dated 1899,

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-so he's, sort of, in his 30s when he's painting this.

-Yes.

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Looking at this canvas, you can see it was always painted to be circular, can't you?

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-So, it's in its original frame. Can you see that?

-Yeah.

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-You can see the canvas disappearing underneath the square edge of the frame.

-Yes.

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And I think this is in exceptional condition,

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albeit a little bit dirty from being in a smoky parlour.

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But, erm, he started in Munich

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and his pictures are in many museums throughout Central Europe -

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Germany, Vienna, France.

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We did a price guide search on other canvases this size by this artist.

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-Yes.

-And...some of them have realised, in auction, 1,200, some 1,500.

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So, bearing in mind its condition,

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it needs a little bit of conservation work,

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-it needs cleaning by a specialist.

-Yes.

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But otherwise, it's very, very good.

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Let's put it into the auction at a value of £6-£900, tempt people in.

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-Right.

-Tempt men, say, "Look, this is a sleeper,

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"this is fresh to the market, it's dirty, it's, it's got a crispiness about it

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"which I want to enjoy uncovering and telling the story further."

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Well, let's get it into the sale, £6-£900, fixed reserve at five.

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-And, Christine, see you there.

-OK, then.

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What a nice thing and the artist has a good name.

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Next, Mr Barby has found someone with a familiar name.

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-Now, you've got a very good name, haven't you?

-Yes.

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-David.

-Yes.

-Indeed.

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-Same as me, do you love it?

-A fine name.

-Yes, it's a fine name!

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-A fine name.

-I like this particular object you've brought along.

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Has it been in your family for some length of time?

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-Well, I know that it's been mine to 50 years.

-Right.

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Prior to that I can only trace it back, probably, another 50,

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from the old lady who gave it to me.

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Did you know immediately what it was?

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I knew it was to take a watch...

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-Right.

-..but that's about as much as I did know

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and it did, when it first came to me, it didn't have a watch in it.

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And you put a watch in.

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And then my wife's father's watch came up, so, in it went.

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That's why we have disparity in the actual dates.

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The watch is 1920s, but this lovely carved case in limewood

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dates from around about the, sort of, 1840, 1850 period.

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-Which is a shock to me.

-If you consider that period,

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wealthy tourists would travel into Germany, Bavaria, Austria

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and they would buy this. First of all as a souvenir

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cos there's a terrific amount of history of woodcarving in that area,

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but this had a purpose

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because from this little, sort of, unusual shaped box,

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you open it up like that, it folds under,

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-and then it becomes a little stand for your pocket watch.

-A stand?

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So, first of all, this is a travel case

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and you took your pocket watch off your chain

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and then you mounted it here and put it close to your bed.

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-The bedside table.

-Absolutely.

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So, you can see, by lighting a candle,

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what time it was in the middle of the night or what have you.

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The watch is not original.

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This one is a typical workaday silver cased watch.

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White enamel face, Roman numerals, a second hand -

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-I can see that it is still going.

-It's still going, yes!

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-So, you've wound it up.

-Oh, yes.

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And then, right at the very back, if I just open this up.

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There we are, we have the marks for Birmingham

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and the V stands for 1920.

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So, this is a silver cased pocket watch, which has a value...

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Combine the two...

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and it makes it a more interesting purchase at auction,

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-but it's a little bit tighter fit there.

-It is.

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And I think somewhere along the line that case has been strained

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because there is slight damage just at the side, there, can you see?

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-Yes.

-Where something has been pushed in.

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-I think I'm responsible for that, to be honest.

-Did you force it?

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Well, I can remember, before the watch met it,

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the little locking pin clicked in and it doesn't any more.

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-Well, you've probably diminished the value of that by half.

-I thought so.

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-Because of that damage.

-That damage.

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-And I think the total value may be £40, £50.

-Really?!

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But, allowing for the damage, and to attract people to buy this,

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-I think we need to reserve a £40 with discretion.

-With discretion.

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-So, if it gets to 38, BANG!

-It's gone.

-The hammer comes down.

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-David, I think we should close on that note.

-Thank you so much.

-Thank you very much.

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Interesting item, I bet David is kicking himself about the damage.

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'Well, we've been working flat out.'

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We found our first three items to take off to auction.

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You know how this works, we put those valuations to the test.

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Let's up the tempo and hopefully have one or two surprises.

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While we make our way over to the saleroom, here's a quick rundown,

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just to jog your memory of all the items we're taking with us.

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Michael spotted these unusual, highly decorative,

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Norwegian silver spoons.

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Then I spotted Jennifer's portrait of a girl,

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which also comes from the continent.

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And, by coincidence, David Barby's find, a Bavarian carved watch stand,

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which comes from across the channel as well.

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But, for now, our items are making a short trip across to the sale.

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And this is where all our items are going under the hammer today.

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This is what we've been waiting for, this is where it gets exciting.

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Don't go away because somebody is going home with a lot of money.

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Today we are the guests of the Calder Valley Auction Rooms

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and I tell you what, there is one big atmosphere in this room.

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Something's going to fly away, I don't know which it is yet,

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that's the beauty of auction. Stay tuned and you'll find out.

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-AUCTIONEER:

-30. Number 30, 240...250...

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There is a standard seller's commission here of 15% plus VAT

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and auctioneer Ian Peace is wielding the gavel for us.

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£80 at the back of the room...

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First and the hammer, the Bavarian watch stand and watch.

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-Good luck, David.

-Oh, thank you.

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Good luck, David. I'm surrounded by Davids!

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-Are you called David? You might be!

-HE LAUGHS

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Going under the hammer right now,

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we've got a Bavarian fob watch stand and fob watch,

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which you have owned for a good 50 years.

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-A good 50 years and a few!

-And a few more?

-And a few more.

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-Why, why are you selling now, may ask?

-And not...40 years ago?

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-Well, you were coming to Saltaire...

-Yes.

-..like so many other people,

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we thought, "What the Dickens can we take?"

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So, up we picked it and my wife brought the little silver watch.

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It's a nice thing, I think we shouldn't have any problems.

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-I hope so, yes.

-He we go, let's find out.

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The 91, the Bavarian carved wood fob watch stand

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with the silver pocket watch, Birmingham 1920.

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What am I bid for this? £50? 40? 30.

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£30, we're in the bidding.

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Nice watch holder.

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30 I am bid, at 30. And five.

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40. At £40, at £40.

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-Anybody else, now, £40?

-Come on, well, we're there.

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-It's worth more than that.

-Lot 91 at £40, at the back.

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For £40, the hammer's gone down.

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-Look, we did it.

-It's what we thought, isn't it?

-Yes.

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Yes, you did, you thought that, yes. Straight in and straight out,

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somebody wanted that and nobody else did.

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-It's gone, hasn't it? That's fine.

-Well, that was straightforward.

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Now, for something that's caught my eye.

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Right now it's my turn to be the expert.

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I've just been joined by Christine. Hello, there.

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And we talking about that wonderful oil on canvas by Simon Glucklich.

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The portrait of a young girl, absolutely stunning.

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-We've got a fixed reserve, haven't we?

-Yes.

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-£500, I think.

-Yes, that's right.

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-Thank goodness, it's not going to go for a penny less.

-No.

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I'm nervous and I'm excited, how are you feeling?

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I'm a bit nervous as well.

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-I'm losing my voice, I've got so excited lately.

-HE LAUGHS

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I really am! Does wear you down sometimes, doesn't it?

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I think this is real quality,

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and as I always say, quality sells, but it is subjective.

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I like it, you may not like it. Let's find out what this lot think.

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-Here we go. Hold tight!

-Oh! SHE CHUCKLES

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Simon Glucklich, portrait in oils. Right, I say 500, four...

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£300, £300, to open £300.

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£300, 325 anywhere? 300, 325, 350.

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-At £350...

-It's not going to sell, is it?

-No.

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..375, 400, at 400.

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At 400, any further advances, 400? At 400.

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At 400, I'm afraid we're NOT on the market for 400,

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are there any further bids at 400?

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That's unsold.

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-It's going home.

-It's meant to come home with me.

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-Yes.

-I wouldn't do anything with it.

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I wouldn't get it cleaned. I would just look after it for a few years.

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-Then, put it back in another saleroom, OK?

-Yes.

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-Enjoy it for a couple of years and do that.

-I will.

-Promise me?

-Yes.

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Let somebody else have the enjoyment of bringing it back to life and spending money on it.

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I'm so surprised that didn't go but Christine has a good painting,

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so she should try again.

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Remember the charming Norwegian spoons? Well, they're up next.

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Something for all you art deco lovers right now.

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Jennifer's 12 silver spoons.

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You're considered lucky to be born with a silver spoon in your mouth,

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but you could have 12 right now if you're right here ready to buy.

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They could go for about £10 each, which is about right, isn't it?

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£10 each is nothing for silver and enamel spoons, so we'll do that.

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We might get to the top end of it - £15 a spoon.

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But that's the price for them.

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But it's definitely something for those art deco lovers, isn't it?

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It's just gorgeous. The quality as well.

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Let's find out exactly what they're worth.

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Let's see what this lot here in the saleroom make of these? Good luck.

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210 - The 12 early 20th-century Norwegian silver coffee spoons

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by David Andersen.

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A lovely set there. I'm going to open the bidding at £120.

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Straight in!

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£130. 140. At 140.

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150. 160.

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-170. 180.

-Straight in!

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-£180.

-Up to £15 each now!

-£200 here.

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£200. 210.

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-I have 220 on commission.

-These are highly sought after.

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-Maybe they're going back to my flat!

-I'm out at £230.

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-All on the hook.

-At £230 in the room. 230.

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-That's a cracking result!

-Top price for those.

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-Fantastic! It's nice...

-It's not the melt value.

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That's a good price for a quality object.

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It's nice to have a set of 12.

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-Well done.

-Thank you.

-Great to meet you as well.

-Excellent.

0:17:090:17:14

You can't go wrong with art deco at the moment. It's really in vogue.

0:17:140:17:18

That's the end of our first visit to the auction room today.

0:17:250:17:28

We're coming back later in the show, but so far so good.

0:17:280:17:31

We've just enjoyed three lovely old antiques and collectables.

0:17:310:17:34

And now for something completely different.

0:17:340:17:36

I'm off to explore a little bit of modernism just down the road in Wakefield. Take a look at this.

0:17:360:17:41

I'm standing outside of Britain's major new art gallery, the Hepworth Wakefield,

0:17:560:18:01

which is sited on the River Calder at the southern gateway to the city.

0:18:010:18:04

Right here, I'm walking between this wonderful bronze installation

0:18:040:18:08

by renowned sculptor, Barbara Hepworth.

0:18:080:18:11

It's titled, 'The Family Of Man'.

0:18:110:18:13

But I'm not here just to celebrate her incredible work,

0:18:130:18:16

but also the architecture that's designed to house this wonderful collection.

0:18:160:18:21

Barbara Hepworth is now considered to be one of the foremost artists

0:18:230:18:26

of the modern movement in Britain.

0:18:260:18:29

She famously worked from her St Ives studio in Cornwall

0:18:310:18:34

from the outbreak of the Second World War

0:18:340:18:37

right up until her death in 1975.

0:18:370:18:39

But she began life in the North of England.

0:18:410:18:43

It was from the girls' high school here in Wakefield

0:18:440:18:47

that Barbara went on to win the scholarship

0:18:470:18:49

that took her to the Leeds School of Art in 1919.

0:18:490:18:53

It was there that she found herself working alongside Henry Moore,

0:18:530:18:57

one of the other giants of 20th Century sculpture.

0:18:570:19:00

The gallery celebrates the region's heritage

0:19:050:19:07

as the birthplace of modern British sculpture

0:19:070:19:11

through the artists Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth.

0:19:110:19:14

Designed by David Chipperfield Architects, it houses 10 galleries.

0:19:160:19:20

Six for permanent collections and four for temporary exhibitions.

0:19:200:19:25

It's a crucial part of Wakefield's regeneration strategy.

0:19:250:19:28

It's doing really well so far, winning the 2011 British Design Award

0:19:280:19:32

and achieving the first year's target

0:19:320:19:34

of 150,000 visitors through the door in the first three months.

0:19:340:19:38

A fitting home for the wonderful artworks it was designed for.

0:19:400:19:44

Well, I absolutely love this space.

0:19:480:19:51

It shows us Barbara Hepworth's work

0:19:510:19:53

alongside her contemporaries, such as Henry Moore.

0:19:530:19:56

But wow!

0:19:560:19:58

Wow! Wow! Wow!

0:19:580:20:00

Nothing in this building is square. It's not really what it seems.

0:20:000:20:04

It's as if you've got the box and you sort of gone like that.

0:20:040:20:07

The ceilings come down at different angles and they stop short of another wall.

0:20:070:20:11

You have to come here to witness it yourself.

0:20:330:20:37

Here, look, Henry Moore, one of Barbara's contemporaries.

0:20:370:20:41

This is so typical of his signature pieces.

0:20:410:20:44

Abstract form derived from the human body.

0:20:440:20:47

It gives us all the guiding principles of modern sculpture. Truth to the materials.

0:20:470:20:52

The piece of stone, or the wood in this case,

0:20:520:20:55

dictates its shape or form.

0:20:550:20:57

Isn't that lovely? Absolutely lovely.

0:20:570:20:59

And here, look, a bit of work by Barbara Hepworth.

0:20:590:21:02

This piece is titled, 'Mother And Child'.

0:21:020:21:07

Look at that. Isn't that incredible?!

0:21:070:21:10

There is something so elegant about this.

0:21:100:21:15

It's soft, it's warm. It makes me want to hold my tummy.

0:21:150:21:19

It's beautiful. Absolutely beautiful.

0:21:190:21:22

I have always loved the joy of carving

0:21:420:21:46

and the rhythm of movement that grows in the sculpture itself.

0:21:460:21:49

When I am carving, or when I am listening to someone else calving,

0:21:510:21:56

I know what is happening, not by what I see, but what I hear.

0:21:560:22:00

She wasn't a great collector,

0:22:190:22:21

but she's picked these items along her incredible journey in life,

0:22:210:22:24

that have given her ideas and inspiration.

0:22:240:22:27

Things like this little terracotta figure.

0:22:270:22:30

Look at that. Isn't that beautiful?

0:22:300:22:32

And in this kind of non-realistic art,

0:22:390:22:43

the artist is free to follow his imagination

0:22:430:22:47

and to create precisely to his will.

0:22:470:22:50

What one does springs from a profound response to life itself.

0:22:520:22:59

But it's this room that holds the absolute heart to the collection

0:23:110:23:14

and probably the key reason for building the Hepworth Wakefield.

0:23:140:23:19

What we have here is a collection of Barbara Hepworth's working models

0:23:190:23:23

for her bronze sculptures.

0:23:230:23:26

They were gifted to the gallery by the Hepworth family.

0:23:260:23:29

They're known as the Hepworth Plasters

0:23:310:23:34

as the majority of these are made in plaster.

0:23:340:23:36

But Hepworth also used aluminium for some of her prototypes,

0:23:360:23:40

such as the famous Winged Figure, that you might recognise.

0:23:400:23:43

Barbara Hepworth liked to make all her prototypes exactly the same size as the finished article.

0:23:510:23:56

You'll find this on the flagship store of John Lewis on Oxford Street.

0:23:560:24:02

The next time you're on Oxford Street, please do look up and take a look

0:24:020:24:06

because it is absolutely stunning.

0:24:060:24:09

It looks stunning here as well because you've got natural light

0:24:090:24:12

flooding down on this, so it's constantly changing.

0:24:120:24:15

That's what sculpture should do.

0:24:150:24:17

It should have a dynamic that varies all the time. Isn't that great? So clever.

0:24:170:24:22

Sculpture, rock, myself and the landscape.

0:24:240:24:29

I, the sculptor, am the landscape.

0:24:310:24:33

Barbara Hepworth always said it was her memories as a child,

0:24:450:24:48

travelling through the Yorkshire moors with her father in the car,

0:24:480:24:52

and her appreciation for the landscape, that inspired her to sculpt.

0:24:520:24:58

I think she'd have been delighted to know that a great body of her work

0:24:580:25:02

is being displayed in a superb building in the town of her birth.

0:25:020:25:08

All I can say to you is, wherever you live in the United Kingdom,

0:25:080:25:11

jump in the car or get on a train and come to this gallery

0:25:110:25:13

because you too will also be delighted.

0:25:130:25:16

Not far away in Saltaire, there is still a queue.

0:25:310:25:34

Welcome back to Victoria Hall, our valuation day venue in Saltaire.

0:25:350:25:39

There is still a crowd outside. There are hundreds of people inside.

0:25:390:25:43

We have our work cut out today.

0:25:430:25:45

Now let us catch up with our experts

0:25:450:25:47

and see what else we can find to take to auction.

0:25:470:25:50

It looks like David has struck gold.

0:25:510:25:53

Lorna, tell me what is it like to be a walking bank?

0:25:550:26:00

I don't think it's a walking bank because it's always in the drawer.

0:26:000:26:05

-Do you not wear it?

-No. Not now.

0:26:050:26:08

-These are lovely, lovely, lovely sovereigns.

-Yes, they are.

0:26:080:26:12

-They start around 1906 and go through to around 1927.

-Yes.

0:26:120:26:15

You've got gold dollars there and mounts and goodness knows what.

0:26:150:26:18

And a pound note wrapped up in a little Perspex container.

0:26:180:26:22

-The actual chain is nine carat rose gold.

-Yes.

0:26:240:26:28

That is why it has that slight coppery look

0:26:280:26:31

but it is in fact nine carat gold.

0:26:310:26:33

The most valuable element certainly

0:26:330:26:36

is the mounted sovereigns here.

0:26:360:26:39

This is incredibly valuable.

0:26:390:26:41

-There is even a 22 carat gold wedding band.

-Yes.

0:26:410:26:45

-Who did that belong to?

-Me.

-Why have you put it on a bracelet?

0:26:450:26:48

I'm not with my husband any longer, you know, and I did get a new one.

0:26:480:26:52

Right.

0:26:520:26:53

But I put it on there just as a keepsake.

0:26:530:26:56

-I think that is a good idea. And now you are flogging it?

-Yes.

0:26:560:27:00

I shall ask no more questions on that score.

0:27:000:27:03

-Did you ever wear this?

-Yes. A lot.

0:27:030:27:06

What did you wear it with and what sort of period?

0:27:060:27:08

I was in my 20s when I first got it and every Saturday night

0:27:080:27:12

we used to go out for a meal and I would wear it.

0:27:120:27:14

Goodness me. You were very sensible in buying gold sovereigns.

0:27:140:27:19

-That's right.

-Did you buy them individually

0:27:190:27:22

or did you buy the whole bracelet as one item?

0:27:220:27:24

-They were bought individually.

-All bought individually. The difficulty is

0:27:240:27:28

when we have coins put into mounts like this it converts it from

0:27:280:27:32

being a value of the coin and then it comes as a piece of jewellery.

0:27:320:27:36

-Yes.

-Because it wears differently.

-I see.

0:27:360:27:38

If you have a coin in your pocket it would wear

0:27:380:27:41

against the cloth and handling against other coins.

0:27:410:27:44

When you wear this you take the highlights off

0:27:440:27:47

-because it is rubbing against a certain piece of costume.

-I see.

0:27:470:27:50

But it is immaterial to a certain extent

0:27:500:27:53

-because the value of the metal has gone up terrifically.

-Yes.

-Why are you selling it now?

0:27:530:27:59

I would think I can't give it to one daughter

0:27:590:28:02

because I've got three so I thought if I sell it I would split

0:28:020:28:05

the money between the three of them and they won't be falling out over it.

0:28:050:28:08

That is a good point.

0:28:080:28:10

-Would you reserve anything for yourself?

-No.

0:28:100:28:13

I did take four off and gave one to each of my grandchildren to

0:28:130:28:16

make a necklace of.

0:28:160:28:17

-You had four more on there?

-Yes.

-Heavens.

-Yes, I did.

0:28:170:28:22

I bet it jangled as you went along?

0:28:220:28:24

Yes they were heavy.

0:28:240:28:25

Let's talk in terms of value.

0:28:250:28:27

If we take the whole item without valuing the coins separately,

0:28:270:28:31

because each coin has a different value,

0:28:310:28:33

I think at auction this would go between £1,200 and £1,500.

0:28:330:28:36

-Yes.

-That is based on gold bullion or gold scrap value.

0:28:360:28:41

-which exceeds the actual value as a piece of jewellery.

-I see. Yes.

0:28:410:28:46

-12, 1,500. It could, do not get too excited, go up to 1,800.

-Yes.

0:28:460:28:52

So there is a lot of money there to divide amongst your children.

0:28:520:28:56

-Thank you very much.

-Thanks very much.

0:28:580:29:00

-Nice to have met you.

-A pleasure.

0:29:000:29:02

I am glad to hear Lorna's grandchildren were given

0:29:040:29:06

a sovereign each.

0:29:060:29:08

What has Michael found? Let's find out.

0:29:140:29:16

Darren, thank you for bringing along

0:29:160:29:19

this really charming little plate today.

0:29:190:29:22

Are you a big porcelain collector?

0:29:220:29:25

I am actually but mainly

0:29:250:29:27

of Shelley, Clarice Cliff type of thing.

0:29:270:29:30

How did this interloper break into all that?

0:29:300:29:33

It was a gift that was given to me approximately 20 years ago.

0:29:330:29:38

It's here today, so without offending the person who gave it to you...

0:29:380:29:43

What we normally do with ceramics is turn them over

0:29:430:29:46

and that tells us everything.

0:29:460:29:47

That's deeply unhelpful, isn't it? No mark of any form.

0:29:470:29:51

What it does tell us though is we've got this blue glaze

0:29:510:29:56

-pooling around the edge.

-OK.

0:29:560:29:58

So we know it is an earthenware body and it's pearlware.

0:29:580:30:00

Pearlware is basically creamware to which a blue tint was added

0:30:000:30:04

-to just make it appear a little bit whiter...

-Right.

0:30:040:30:08

..or pearlish.

0:30:080:30:09

We've got a transfer-printed design of, sadly, an unnamed stately home.

0:30:090:30:14

The nice thing is normally these things are circular

0:30:140:30:18

-with a gadrooned edge or a reeded edge.

-OK.

0:30:180:30:20

But this is beautifully shaped, so we have the scalloped edging

0:30:200:30:24

and then we have this rim that folds back on itself

0:30:240:30:28

and these very crisply modelled flowers.

0:30:280:30:31

All of that in style is very late William IV, early Victorian.

0:30:310:30:36

In the absence of any mark, I think we can say 1825 up to 1840...

0:30:360:30:41

Really? That old?

0:30:410:30:43

-..as a date.

-OK.

-On to value now. It isn't desperately valuable.

0:30:430:30:48

Had it been named, say a view of Chatsworth,

0:30:480:30:52

then we might be £30-£50, something along those lines.

0:30:520:30:56

-As it stands, it's going to be in the region of £20-£40.

-OK.

0:30:560:31:03

Would you be brave and put it in possibly without reserve?

0:31:030:31:08

Absolutely, yes. I have had a great day. Whatever we get for it would be super.

0:31:080:31:12

It is going to go, isn't it? We're not talking fortunes.

0:31:120:31:15

-If you are happy to risk it with me...

-I will take that chance. I am more than happy.

0:31:150:31:19

You can always give me a slap

0:31:190:31:21

if it goes for a pound!

0:31:210:31:23

I'm sure it won't.

0:31:230:31:24

-We'll see how it does on the day.

-Super.

0:31:240:31:26

-That'll be great.

-Thanks very much.

-Thank you.

0:31:260:31:29

I don't recognise that house but let us know if you do.

0:31:290:31:33

David has found a fabulous collection of early Dinky toys as his final item.

0:31:380:31:42

-It's Alwyn isn't it?

-Alwyn.

-And Joan.

-Joan.

0:31:440:31:47

Is this part of your youth, your childhood?

0:31:470:31:51

-It's part of my childhood, yes.

-Every birthday and Christmas?

0:31:510:31:54

Birthday and Christmas sort of thing, yes.

0:31:540:31:57

They seem to be, this little collection here,

0:31:570:32:00

in almost immaculate condition.

0:32:000:32:02

-Furthermore you have got the original boxes.

-Yes.

0:32:020:32:06

That is so important when selling Dinky toys. That adds so much value.

0:32:060:32:12

-The quality of these toys was extraordinary, was it not?

-Yes.

0:32:120:32:15

They were precision models.

0:32:150:32:17

To produce them as toys for children is extraordinary,

0:32:170:32:21

even down to the rubber wheels that you could remove

0:32:210:32:23

-and get replacements.

-These are all originals.

0:32:230:32:26

These are all original? That's incredible.

0:32:260:32:29

-They were expensive toys.

-Very.

0:32:290:32:31

Very expensive. I could never afford to buy these as a youngster.

0:32:310:32:35

-What's that?

-Eight and six.

-Eight and six.

-That was a lot of money.

0:32:350:32:39

-It was four shillings.

-Yes. That was a meal out for four.

0:32:390:32:42

Let's have a look at these first of all.

0:32:450:32:47

These date from the early period, 1950s. A Foden 14-ton tanker...

0:32:470:32:53

-Yes.

-..which is a very nice example.

0:32:530:32:56

That is not in pristine condition but you've got that box

0:32:560:32:59

and it clearly stated the number of that model which is 504.

0:32:590:33:04

And underneath that particular vehicle will be stamped that number.

0:33:040:33:08

So it matched up beautifully.

0:33:080:33:09

If we're thinking in terms of a price at auction for that article,

0:33:090:33:14

they have been going between £100-150.

0:33:140:33:18

That model. That one's slightly rubbed, so I think we've got to think in terms of about £60-80.

0:33:180:33:25

On that particular model.

0:33:250:33:27

When we're looking at this one, this is the Foden Flat Truck and the same price applies to this.

0:33:270:33:34

We've got to think in terms of again about 50, maybe £60.

0:33:340:33:38

-Are you happy with these so far?

-Yes, I'm very happy.

0:33:380:33:41

The one I like, which you can actually operate, the pulley works.

0:33:410:33:46

This is the Dinky Service Breakdown Van. That is particularly good.

0:33:460:33:52

These I've seen before between £40 and £60, that sort of price range.

0:33:520:33:58

I've left this one, which is the Lyons Swiss Rolls, to the last.

0:33:580:34:02

This is a Guy Van with the original box

0:34:020:34:06

and they've been making a terrific amount of money.

0:34:060:34:10

So a price range of £400-600 has been achieved in the past.

0:34:100:34:15

I'm going to be quite conservative and say round about 200 on this.

0:34:150:34:20

-Saving up for his retirement!

-Saving up for your retirement! Are you retired?

0:34:200:34:24

-I've been retired for some time.

-Oh, right. So what are you going to do with the money?

0:34:240:34:30

-It will go to general living expenses, I'm afraid.

-Why "afraid"?

0:34:300:34:34

Pension's not really all that good.

0:34:340:34:38

-We might have an extra meal out instead of one a month.

-Oh, dear!

0:34:380:34:42

Bread and jam!

0:34:420:34:45

The heart bleeds. You've moved into somewhere exciting.

0:34:450:34:49

You've moved into a river dwelling.

0:34:490:34:52

-Does it float?

-It floats.

-Oh, yes. It floats.

0:34:520:34:55

-So you go from canal to river to sea?

-We are.

0:34:550:34:58

-And the boat is called Itchy Feet.

-You're constantly on the move.

0:34:580:35:02

I love that! I love that! Well, I hope this aids your journey.

0:35:020:35:07

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:35:070:35:09

Not bad prices. If you have anything like that in the loft, bring them along.

0:35:090:35:14

We've now found our final three items to take off to auction,

0:35:170:35:21

so it's time to say goodbye to our host location, Victoria Hall,

0:35:210:35:25

but we've got to put those valuations to the test and hopefully some will fly through the roof.

0:35:250:35:31

There could be a big surprise. We're going to the auction room.

0:35:310:35:34

Here's a quick rundown of what we're taking.

0:35:340:35:37

Gold is going through the roof, so Lorna's bracelet will do well.

0:35:380:35:43

Darren's Staffordshire plate is around 200 years old,

0:35:450:35:48

so it's going to be a bargain.

0:35:480:35:51

And David has split the Dinky Toy collection into two lots.

0:35:510:35:54

First a group of three

0:35:540:35:57

and then the Guy Van, which is in such good condition.

0:35:590:36:04

So we're back at the auction room for our final three lots.

0:36:070:36:11

The sale is just about to start, but a little tip - if you are buying

0:36:130:36:17

or selling at auction, especially if you want to buy, make sure you get

0:36:170:36:21

a good seat, down the front, so the auctioneer can see you.

0:36:210:36:24

And pick up one of these at the office,

0:36:240:36:27

a registration form is required to pick up a bidding card like that.

0:36:270:36:31

Lot number 137, make sure the auctioneer can see it.

0:36:310:36:35

Then he will take your bid. If he misses it, you don't stand a chance.

0:36:350:36:40

Also, there is commission to pay. Here, it's 15% plus VAT, but check the details in the catalogues

0:36:400:36:45

of the auction room because it can vary. And good luck!

0:36:450:36:49

Now, the Dinky Toys are up for sale, so there is everything to play for.

0:36:560:37:00

Going under the hammer right now, some boys' toys.

0:37:020:37:05

Something for the boys. Boxed Dinky toys, lorries and trucks belonging to Alwyn and Joan.

0:37:050:37:10

-Hello there.

-Hi.

-These are great.

0:37:100:37:13

-The boxes are there. I threw all my boxes. Did you?

-Never.

0:37:130:37:17

My father couldn't afford toys like that. STIFLED LAUGHTER

0:37:170:37:22

-Really?

-It was just after the war. Hard times.

0:37:220:37:25

-Don't ask which war!

-Anyway, condition is great, it's all there.

0:37:250:37:30

Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:37:300:37:33

Lot 382. The boxed Dinky Toy, Foden Flat Truck with chains.

0:37:330:37:38

Right, couple of hundred.

0:37:380:37:40

150. 100 to open the bidding. £100? £80 there.

0:37:400:37:45

90, at 90. At 100. 110?

0:37:450:37:48

-110, 120. 130?

-Come on, need a bit more.

0:37:480:37:53

140, there. 140. 150, madam? 150.

0:37:530:37:57

160. £160. Are you all finished? £160.

0:37:570:38:01

At the back, £160.

0:38:010:38:04

-Hammer's gone down. £160. Had a reserve at 140, didn't we?

-Yes.

0:38:050:38:10

-Just tucked it in there. Happy?

-Yes. Very good.

0:38:100:38:13

The next one's just going under the hammer now.

0:38:150:38:19

This is the dark blue one, the Lyons one.

0:38:190:38:21

£200-400, we're looking for. Fingers crossed.

0:38:210:38:24

Dinky Super Toys Lyons Guy Van, lovely condition, lot 388.

0:38:250:38:30

Right, 300. 200.

0:38:300:38:32

£200, I've £150. 150. 160, do I see?

0:38:320:38:37

150, 160, I have 170.

0:38:370:38:40

170, 180?

0:38:400:38:43

190 here. £190. £200, bid.

0:38:430:38:47

-We're in.

-210, do I see?

0:38:470:38:49

£200?

0:38:490:38:51

210.

0:38:510:38:54

210. 220.

0:38:540:38:55

230. 240.

0:38:550:38:59

250. 260.

0:38:590:39:02

At £260. Are you all done at £260? First and last time.

0:39:020:39:08

Yes! The hammer's gone down. Brilliant. That's more like it.

0:39:080:39:12

£260. That's a grand total of 420.

0:39:120:39:15

-Is that correct?

-Yes.

-It is, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:39:150:39:18

-I had to think about that for a minute.

-We'll have that one.

0:39:180:39:21

-I can see your eyes going like cash registers!

-Kerching!

0:39:210:39:25

Good sale! Next, the little bit of history.

0:39:250:39:29

It's just about to go under the hammer. We're talking about the Staffordshire plate.

0:39:290:39:34

We're looking for £20-40, but you have had this for 20 years, I gather.

0:39:340:39:39

-I've had it for about 20 years. It's been in the basement.

-That's sad.

0:39:390:39:43

It's been in the basement. Is that because you don't really like it?

0:39:430:39:46

-I do like it.

-You should have it on display.

-I should have done.

0:39:460:39:51

But I have other things on display, so...limited space.

0:39:510:39:55

You've missed your opportunity now! There's no reserve. It's gone.

0:39:550:39:59

-It's going.

-I know.

-Say goodbye to it.

-It's a shame.

0:39:590:40:02

For me, it's got everything going for it, except it's transfer.

0:40:020:40:06

The shape's lovely. It's a nice scene, a country home.

0:40:060:40:10

Let's find out what they think. That's what it's all about.

0:40:100:40:13

Country house transfer print, £30. 30. 20.

0:40:130:40:18

20. Opening at £15. At 15.

0:40:180:40:21

At 15? £10 then. Ten to open, thank you.

0:40:210:40:25

Right, OK. We're in.

0:40:250:40:28

£10 and 12.

0:40:280:40:30

At £12. Any further bids?

0:40:300:40:32

In the centre there, at £12. Have you all done? It's going for 12.

0:40:320:40:37

Come on, a bit more. Well, it's gone £12.

0:40:370:40:40

It's not quite the lowest price we've ever had on Flog It, not quite.

0:40:400:40:44

We were getting there. I thought for a minute!

0:40:440:40:47

Gosh! It is a good time to buy things right now.

0:40:470:40:51

If you've got £12 to spend, you can buy a Staffordshire plate. It's as simple as that. A bit of history.

0:40:510:40:57

Someone will buy that at a fair for 20 and cherish it.

0:40:570:41:00

-We'll go through all this again in 20 years' time.

-Yeah.

0:41:000:41:04

-It's been a good day. I've enjoyed it.

-Pleasure to meet you. Love the jacket as well. Really nice.

0:41:040:41:09

I think Darren came along for the experience, as much as anything.

0:41:090:41:14

And why not? Now, we're back on serious ground.

0:41:140:41:18

Lorna and David, thank you for joining me. We're just about to put the charm bracelet under the hammer.

0:41:180:41:23

We should be all right with the gold, even though prices have dropped slightly.

0:41:230:41:28

We took that into consideration.

0:41:280:41:30

-You always factor in the commission.

-I try to.

0:41:300:41:34

Fingers crossed. Let's find out what the bidders think. It's going under the hammer right now.

0:41:340:41:39

And 295 is the 9 carat gold charm bracelet. There we are.

0:41:390:41:45

All the coinage. An opening bid of £800, please? £800, I'm bid.

0:41:450:41:49

Thank you.

0:41:490:41:51

£800. £800. At 800.

0:41:510:41:54

900? £900. 900, 950. 1,000.

0:41:540:41:58

And 50. £1,100. And 1,150.

0:41:580:42:02

We're getting to the lower end now.

0:42:020:42:05

At £1,200. At 1,200. I'll take 25 if it helps.

0:42:050:42:09

1,225? 1,225.

0:42:090:42:11

1,250.

0:42:110:42:13

-1,275.

-1,275!

0:42:140:42:17

At £1,300. Bid there.

0:42:190:42:20

At £1,300. We're selling at 1,300.

0:42:200:42:24

Last time, 1,300.

0:42:260:42:28

How about that! Spot on! Right in the middle, David.

0:42:290:42:33

-Thank you.

-You're happy, aren't you? £1,300. That will go a long way.

0:42:330:42:38

It will, yes. It's for Linda, Denise and Tracy.

0:42:380:42:41

-Well done.

-Thank you.

-Super Gran!

0:42:410:42:44

What a lovely lady.

0:42:450:42:47

£215 bid. £215.

0:42:500:42:53

That's it. It's all over. We've had a fabulous day here.

0:42:560:43:00

I hope you've enjoyed it. If you've got any antiques you want to sell, we would love to see you.

0:43:000:43:05

Bring them along to one of our valuation days and it could be you in the next auction room,

0:43:050:43:10

but from the Calder Valley, from all of us here, it's goodbye.

0:43:100:43:15

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:200:43:24

E-mail us at [email protected]

0:43:240:43:27

Presenter Paul Martin is joined by experts Michael Baggott and David Barby in the village of Saltaire in West Yorkshire. Michael is bedazzled by a rainbow-coloured set of silver spoons, while David is charmed by a gold bracelet. Meanwhile, Paul enjoys a visit to the new Hepworth museum in Wakefield.


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