Preston Flog It!


Preston

Paul Martin and experts David Fletcher and James Lewis visit Preston, where James is shockingly cheeky about some Clarice Cliff, and David has a eureka moment about a clock.


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Transcript


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The red telephone box is a great British icon. You could say it's a national treasure

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but they are disappearing fast, but not here on the streets of Preston.

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There's not just one, there's two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight

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and there's one more further down.

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There's nine in such a short section of pavement.

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You could say here in Preston the street are literally lined with antiques.

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Welcome to Flog It!

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This part of south Lancashire

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is one of the most densely populated regions in Europe.

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So we should have a full house here today.

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Judging by the size of this magnificent queue, we're halfway there.

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Of course, all of these wonderful people have turned out to ask our experts that all-important question.

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-Which is?

-What's it worth?

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-And if you're happy with the valuation, what are you going to do?

-Flog it!

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The experts charged with valuing today's valuables are the jubilant, James Lewis.

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That's quite nice. 1895, 1910.

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And the dapper, David Fletcher.

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This could be worth £80 to £100.

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Items are coming in two by two today.

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In each case, one is worth considerably more than the other.

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These clocks may look pretty similar, but when it comes to value they're in different leagues.

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Both 19th-century, both French but for every 40 or 50 of those,

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you will see one of these.

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Of these three miniatures,

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one is worth twice as much as the other two.

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And do two diamonds equal twice the profit?

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That is one heck of a size. It even fits me!

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Stay tuned and all will be revealed.

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Everybody is safely seated inside and in wonderful spirits.

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You see this chap grinning away. I think you've got a real treasure in there.

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-What have you brought?

-I've got the wife!

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He's got his wife!

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Let's find out who are the lucky ones going through to auction.

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I'm going to grab this spare seat and watch our experts do the work

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and it looks like David Fletcher's first at the blue Flog It tables.

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Let's take a closer look at what he's spotted.

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Well, he spotted Joan.

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-You look to me as if you are someone about to give up smoking.

-No.

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I've never smoked in my life. They certainly have no relation to me.

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-Nothing to do with me, guv.

-No, no, no.

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They come from a great aunt

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-and I believe they were given to her by a gentleman friend.

-Really?

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But we really don't know any more than that.

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This is a Vesta case, as I'm sure you know.

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Designed to store red-headed matches, which were called Vestas.

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This, of course, is a cigarette case.

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This little star, this gilt metal pendant is not really related

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to the other two items, except it has the same monogram

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as the cigarette case does.

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Which is the fascinating thing about it.

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There's something here, isn't there? Something going on here.

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This Vesta case was hallmarked in Birmingham.

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There's a little X, which is the date letter, which tells us that

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it was assayed in 1897.

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-We have a date on the badge of 1889.

-Yes.

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They're very closely related.

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-But, this cigarette case wasn't assayed until 1925.

-No.

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-Nearly 30 years later.

-Yes.

-Grandly chased in the Rococo manner.

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Very strange, something that was made in the 20th century,

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-should have Georgian style decoration, but it does.

-Yes.

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Let's put two and two together and hope that we don't come up with 15.

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The gilt metal pendant, "presented to Dr Spencer

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-"by the inhabitants of Medomsley Parish, County Durham."

-Mmm.

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Let's say that Dr Spencer arrives in that village in 1889

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and he is presented that by the villagers.

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Let's assume that he retires in 1925

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and is presented with this as a retirement present.

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Not good that a doctor should be smoking but in those days they didn't worry about things like that!

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And, this maybe was something that he wore

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when he arrived in the parish, on his watch chain at that time.

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I think, we've come up with some sort of relationship between these three items.

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It fascinates me what the history of that is. There seems to be no way of finding out.

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The monogram clearly says HC. That's not in dispute.

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-The monogram on these two items is the same. They must belong to the same family.

-Yes.

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-We have three items here, I think, with the total value of at least £40.

-Right.

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And, depending on whether that tests as gold,

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or depending on whether it comes up possibly as silver gilt,

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I think it's just a gilt base metal, myself.

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-We're going to be looking something in the region of £60.

-Right.

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-We're not going to set the world alight.

-No.

-I think an estimate of £40 to £60.

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I think we should put a reserve on them, say £40.

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-That's absolutely fine.

-Good. OK, we'll go ahead on that.

-Thank you very much.

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That's one down and several more to go.

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It's that man again.

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James is next with the golden clocks.

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Graham, you've brought along two totally contrasting examples of carriage clocks.

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Do you know the difference between a carriage clock

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-and a carriage timepiece?

-I don't.

-It's only a clock if it strikes or if it chimes.

-OK.

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If it doesn't strike or chime, it's a timepiece.

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These have got gongs on the back. Normally they have a gong or a bell.

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Both are 19th-century, about 1870-ish, for this one,

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and 1890-ish, for that one.

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Both French. However, that one seems to have gone through the wars a little bit more.

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This case is as good as I've ever seen.

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A little button to push there on the side. That opens that up.

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The clock itself just sits in the velvet-lined interior.

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If you didn't want to have it out, you would literally just remove

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the sliding leather panel from the front,

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put it in the back and there we go.

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Nice and safe.

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The thing that makes this one so much better than that

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-is simply this little tiny button on the top.

-OK.

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That's known as the repeater. That is a lovely quality clock.

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-Where did they come from?

-They were passed down to me by my late father,

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-who by trade was an horologist.

-OK.

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He had a passion for fixing clocks.

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Was this his favourite clock?

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I think he placed more value on that one, over that one.

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Why sell them?

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It's something, to be honest, that's neither my brother or myself are interested in.

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-They don't really hold sentiment. We've got lots of clocks in the house.

-Yes.

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Basically, he said when I pass on, just sell the pair of them

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-and make use of the money the best you can.

-Well...

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-When it comes to value, I would expect that to make somewhere between 70 and £100.

-OK.

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This one, very different.

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I would say an auction estimate of £400 to £600

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and we ought to protect it with a reserve.

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-A reserve of 380.

-OK.

-It won't make that, it'll make more, I'm sure.

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Oh, James, you're putting your neck on the line there.

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Now, let's see what David's turned up or should I say, "tuned up".

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-Have you been busking to the queue outside?

-I haven't, no.

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-Are you a banjo player?

-I would like to learn to play the banjo.

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-I got that as a gift off a friend of mine to learn to play it.

-Right.

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But, I never got around to it.

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I have since bought a new one, a five string one.

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-OK, how are you getting on now?

-I'm still trying.

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-You say this was given to you by a mate?

-Yes, by an old friend of mine, yes.

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He was given it by a man that used to play it in an orchestra in New York, back in 1924.

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-Really? It's got quite a pedigree then.

-It's quite an old one, yes.

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I won't attempt to play it because I'm absolute rubbish, I'm afraid, at anything musical.

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It was evidently made by a firm called Souza

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and made expressly for Oliver Ditson,

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who clearly were the retailers.

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Now, Souza was a factory, I think, established, or a workshop I suppose,

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rather than a factory in the late 19th century.

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Of course, in the late 19th century into the early 20th century banjo bands were a big thing.

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Popular entertainment in the days before TV.

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There are many recordings that exist of banjo bands.

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Sometimes, I think, making the most awful racket.

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Do you have any idea what it might be worth, or do you want to sell it anyway?

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-I just want to sell it really. I haven't a clue what it's worth, to be honest with you.

-OK.

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I think that we could expect to get £50 or £60 for this.

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I think we should estimate it at a bit less than that, £30 to £50.

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I would really like to sell it without reserve,

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if you are happy with that.

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-Yes.

-If that's OK with you.

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A rare bit of downtown New York, Speakeasy time.

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Everybody has been working flat out, we have now found our first items to take off to auction.

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Let's put those valuations to the test.

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While we make our way over to the saleroom, here's a recap

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just to jog your memory of the items going under the hammer.

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David valued Joan's mixed silver at a good starter price of £40 to £60.

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Graham's cashing in his clocks. James has split them into two lots

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valuing the first at £70 to £100

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and the earlier one at £400 to £600.

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Tony's banjo is a bargain at David's estimate of £30 to £50.

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Today's auction comes from the heart of Knutsford,

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courtesy of Frank Marshall in this lovely old Victorian school building.

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Now, it looks pretty deserted outside, where are all the people?

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Let's hope it's rammed and packed inside, full of bidders, wanting our items.

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Let's go inside and catch up with our owners.

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# They call it Nutbush City limits... #

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Our auctioneer today is Mr Nick Hall.

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..at 95. Come on, make 100.

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The room is packed waiting for the auction to begin.

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Seller's commission here is 15%, including VAT.

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And, going under the hammer right now,

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a mixed lot of silver belonging to Joan.

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Not a great deal of value, £40 to £60.

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But, curios, interesting things. I like the Vesta.

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-It's a classic collector's lot.

-Yes.

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Going under the hammer, right now.

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Lot number 555, the late Victorian hallmarked silver Vesta case

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and two other items, nice little silverware.

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Where are we going to go? £50? 45? 40, then.

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Thank you, sir, 40 I'm bid. 45?

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Well, they are sold.

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I've got bids in the room, 50 here. 50 online and 5. 55, now.

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-60, new bidder.

-That's good.

-Top estimate.

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70 now. 70 bid. 75?

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75, I've got. The final bidder at 75, on the left. Anyone else?

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At £75, all done, if you're sure. Sold!

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-We're very happy with that.

-That's brilliant. I didn't expect that.

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-It's a nice starter lot for someone.

-It is.

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And a nice little profit for Joan.

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Now it's Graham's carriage clocks which has been split into two lots.

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Any surprises coming up for us, James, do you think?

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I don't think so, they're fairly standard auction fodder.

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-Obviously, the second one is much better than the first.

-Yes.

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If the second one makes anything over £400, I think that's a great result.

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-Yes.

-He'll be happy as well.

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Let's find out what the bidders think, shall we?

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Right now, it is down to this lot in this packed room. Watch this.

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Lot 25 is the early to mid-20th century carriage clock.

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A lot of interest in this. Where are we going to start, 80?

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Surely at £80. 70, 60, 50... Where is 50? Thank you, online at 50.

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5, 60. We're climbing online.

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65, 70, 5, 80 now. 85, 90.

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All online at 90. 5, 100 110.

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We're getting there. Look the smile has come.

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120 online. At 125, 130 online.

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-We are there, we're done, at 130, I sell.

-Gone!

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£130. We're happy with that result. Here is the second one.

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Hopefully, £400 plus.

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A nice little clock again, late 19th century, French.

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Brass, bamboo effect case.

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By Henri Jacot, this one, a good maker as well.

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I've got commission interest and starting at 280.

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280 only bid on the book. For 280. 290 is online. I've got 300.

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320, 340, 360, now.

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380. 400. 420... Phone bidder and Internet.

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We've got two people fighting it out at home.

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You can buy from the comfort of your sitting room.

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On the phone at 480, now. 500 here. 500. I have 500. Are you in?

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No, you're out. It 500 back online. Fresh blood at 520 now.

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A nice little clock, don't let it go for the sake of a bid. 540.

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-560. It's a good one.

-Graham is enjoying this.

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-You are, aren't you?

-Are you finished? It's 560 in the room.

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All done, last call at 560. I sell. Yours sir, 560.

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You got to be happy. There is commission to pay, don't forget.

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It's 15%.

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-Great result.

-It was a good result.

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If you got anything like that and you want to sell it, we would love to see you.

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Bring it into one of our valuation days.

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You can pick up details on the website.

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Log onto bbc.co.uk/flogit.

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Follow the links, all the information will be there.

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Come on, dust it down and bring it in.

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James was spot-on there, let's see how David fares with Tony's banjo.

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-Tell me, you did play this, didn't you?

-I did.

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-I used to tinker about with it.

-It's been loved, it's been used a lot.

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-Let's face it, hasn't it?

-Yes.

-We'll find out what it makes. There's no reserve, so fingers crossed.

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Lot 145 is the 20th century Souza's make four-string banjo.

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A nice little lot, an unusual lot. Fairly rare as well.

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I'd like to start the bidding at £50. Straight in at £50.

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50 bid, thank you. And five against you.

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Still in, sir. 60. 5. 70. 5.

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80. 5. 90. 5. 100. 5.

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110 with you, sir, right at the back.

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I've got a £120 online bidder. 130. Still climbing online at 130.

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This has surprised me.

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Don't stop now. At 140. Come on,

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pluck another string, keep going at 140.

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Very, very good.

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160 online. Could go busking

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at lunchtime and get your money back.

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-160.

-160 against you.

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If you're sure. Online. I'm selling. At £160.

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Yes! How about that?! What a crescendo at the end. £160.

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-Gosh, that was sweet music, wasn't it?

-Lovely.

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Somebody, well, three or four people, really, really wanted that.

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Duelling bidders bring us to the end of our first group of items.

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We'll be back at Frank Marshall's later on in the program.

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You know I love my fine art,

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and the sign of a good painting is how long it grabs your attention for.

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That's exactly what happened to me.

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When I was up here filming, we went to a local country estate

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and I came across one of the Great British Masters' works.

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It literally had me staring for hours.

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Transported me to the most beautiful places.

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Take a look at this.

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For the bright young dandies of the 18th century,

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the Grand Tour was the highlight of their cultural education.

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And if they were lucky enough they would bring home a painting

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by one of the Grand European Masters.

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But we had our own Masters, too.

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And one of them stood right here where I am some 200 years ago

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and painted that scene behind me.

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The building in the distance is Tabley House,

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and the artist who captured the scene was Joseph Mallord William Turner.

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Painted in 1808, and titled "Tabley, A Windy Day",

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It's the highlight of a unique collection of British art

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created by Sir John Fleming Leicester in the early 1800s.

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In a moment we'll be taking a closer look at it,

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plus a lot of other hidden masterpieces,

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hung here in the original rooms they were purchased for.

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Turner's prodigious talent was becoming the talk of the town,

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and his vigorous, romantic paintings were creating a real buzz.

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Back then, the current owner of Tabley House was a chap called Sir John Leicester.

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He was fast establishing himself as a collector and patron of British art.

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He was keen to nab himself a Turner or two for his collection.

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It was Sir John's father, Sir Peter Leicester,

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who built Tabley in the 1760s.

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He designed the house in the fashionable neo-Palladian style,

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with its impressive Doric portico and its elegant curved stairs.

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The local red sandstone of the columns and the stonework

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was originally painted a pale grey, giving a pleasing contrast to the brickwork.

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But it's Sir John's gallery of British art that is its unique legacy.

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Turner may be the most famous painter represented here,

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but there are many other paintings worth coming to see.

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To show me the highlights of this collection is art historian

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Peter Cannon Brookes.

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Peter, I've just walked around The Mere, but I couldn't quite make the view Turner had,

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so I think he's used artistic licence.

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He has indeed. He's moved the tower very substantially indeed.

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He's also made it rather grander than it is.

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But what a marvellous painting.

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Talk me through it. This is early, mature Turner.

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This is the early, mature Turner, yes.

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He is arguably our greatest English painter.

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And this wonderful response to the atmospheric conditions,

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to the park and the house in the background and the water,

0:19:000:19:04

it's very remarkable indeed.

0:19:040:19:06

He started off his life as a topographical watercolourist.

0:19:060:19:09

But he really comes into his own just before 1800.

0:19:090:19:12

There's a lot of foreground interest. I just love that choppiness.

0:19:120:19:15

-I love the figures in the boat.

-It includes the painter himself.

0:19:150:19:19

And he has painted himself in there.

0:19:190:19:20

-Because Turner came here basically to fish.

-Did he really?

0:19:200:19:24

-Not to paint, yes.

-So obviously he was a client to start with.

-Yes.

0:19:240:19:27

-Was he a good friend of Sir John's or was it a working relationship?

-It's a working relationship.

0:19:270:19:32

I think that he was the best client of Sir John Leicester

0:19:320:19:37

in the second decade of the 19th century.

0:19:370:19:39

And at the peak period

0:19:390:19:41

Turner had sold 11 paintings to Sir John Leicester.

0:19:410:19:44

-That is a fine painting.

-One of my favourites, certainly.

0:19:440:19:48

And mine, I think.

0:19:480:19:49

Talk to me about this one above the fireplace.

0:19:490:19:53

This sumptuous painting is by William Dobson,

0:19:540:19:57

Britain's finest baroque portraitist.

0:19:570:20:00

This is one of his best and most ambitious portraits.

0:20:000:20:05

It's powerful brushwork, strong colours.

0:20:050:20:09

It's the English baroque as against Flemish baroque.

0:20:090:20:11

Exactly. Talk me through the picture. What's going on and who is it?

0:20:110:20:15

Here is the military commander, the first Lord Byron.

0:20:150:20:18

He was the victor of the Battle of Roundway Down,

0:20:180:20:21

one of the very few that the Royalists won in the early stages of the Civil War,

0:20:210:20:24

holding his commander's staff.

0:20:240:20:27

What's he pointing at?

0:20:270:20:28

He's not really pointing at anything. This is a rhetorical gesture of command.

0:20:280:20:32

And it goes with the costume.

0:20:320:20:34

He's wearing his buff coat with his steel cuirass over it

0:20:340:20:38

because he is a military man in command.

0:20:380:20:41

His cavalry in the bottom right-hand corner,

0:20:410:20:43

this is the notoriously ill-disciplined English Royalist cavalry

0:20:430:20:49

commanded by Prince Rupert.

0:20:490:20:51

-They tended to treat the cavalry charge like a fox hunt.

-Did they?

0:20:510:20:55

They were off!

0:20:550:20:56

There's a bit of a double take then!

0:20:560:20:59

With a growing collection of fine British art,

0:21:010:21:04

Sir John needed somewhere equally impressive to display it.

0:21:040:21:08

-Very nice space.

-Generous space.

0:21:080:21:12

Created out of three rooms.

0:21:120:21:14

That was the drawing room. This was the octagonal library.

0:21:140:21:19

And that was the bedroom with a little bit of closet alongside.

0:21:190:21:22

-It's got a good feel about it, hasn't it?

-Hmm.

0:21:220:21:25

-Is that Sir John above the fireplace?

-It is indeed.

0:21:250:21:29

But thereby hangs a tale.

0:21:290:21:32

Because Sir John's face was painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds,

0:21:320:21:35

but the rest of the portrait was an absolute disaster area

0:21:350:21:38

because Reynolds was going blind and he refused to take delivery of it.

0:21:380:21:42

-Did he really?

-Yes.

0:21:420:21:43

When Reynolds died he bought it from the state sale

0:21:430:21:47

and handed it over to James Northcote, who one of Reynolds' assistants.

0:21:470:21:52

But within a few months before his death

0:21:520:21:54

he was created the first Lord of Tabley

0:21:540:21:57

and so he had repainted again.

0:21:570:21:58

This time in his peers robes,

0:21:580:22:01

by the studio of Sir Thomas Lawrence and by Simpson.

0:22:010:22:06

What a lovely tale.

0:22:060:22:07

And of course, facing him here at the other end of the room, that's his wife, isn't it?

0:22:070:22:12

That's his wife. That's Georgiana, painted by Sir Thomas Lawrence.

0:22:120:22:15

Absolutely marvellous example of his work.

0:22:150:22:18

There she is floating in the clouds as hope.

0:22:180:22:21

She was the granddaughter of Sir William Chambers.

0:22:210:22:23

She was a member of the royal circle because Chambers was George III's favourite architect.

0:22:230:22:28

-And one of Lawrence's masterpieces.

-She's a beautiful lady.

0:22:280:22:33

-Yes, she was very young.

-Was she?

-She was only 16.

0:22:330:22:36

But then Sir John Leicester had a taste for young ladies.

0:22:360:22:39

-Was that socially acceptable?

-Amongst Regency rakes, yes.

0:22:390:22:44

But this house was not a respectable house

0:22:440:22:47

for about 10 years in the beginning of the 19th century.

0:22:470:22:50

Is that because respectable ladies wouldn't visit here...

0:22:500:22:53

Because he had a string of mistresses residing.

0:22:530:22:56

-And there wasn't a respectable lady to receive them.

-Exactly.

0:22:560:23:00

Thank you so much for talking to me. It's been a pleasure meeting you and showing me around.

0:23:000:23:04

This is definitely well worth several more visits.

0:23:040:23:07

Indeed, yes. There are many treasures to be found and enjoyed.

0:23:070:23:10

The main thing is to enjoy them.

0:23:100:23:12

And I certainly have.

0:23:130:23:15

Do you know, I can just imagine some of the soirees

0:23:210:23:24

that would have taken place in this magnificent building.

0:23:240:23:28

Artists, patrons and poets all enjoying themselves

0:23:280:23:31

to the sound of this wonderful early keyboard music,

0:23:310:23:35

played here on this virginal beautifully by Charlotte Turner.

0:23:350:23:40

Tabley House and its contents are a testament

0:23:400:23:42

to home-grown creativity and the talent of our forbearers.

0:23:420:23:46

And it shouts out loud and clear that Brit art is not a recent phenomenon.

0:23:460:23:50

If you're serious about British art and British history,

0:23:500:23:53

this place is definitely well worth a visit.

0:23:530:23:56

Welcome back to our valuation day and to St John's Minster.

0:24:050:24:09

Let's now catch up with our experts and see what else they can find.

0:24:090:24:13

And continuing with our art theme, David's discovered some mini masterpieces.

0:24:130:24:17

-Hello, Aideen.

-Hello, David.

-That's a lovely name.

-Thank you.

0:24:190:24:23

-Which part of the world are you from?

-I come from County Tipperary in Ireland,

0:24:230:24:26

but I've been in England about 53 years.

0:24:260:24:30

-Have you? But you haven't lost that lovely accent.

-No, we don't, thank you.

0:24:300:24:35

Now, three lovely items here. They are all of wonderful quality.

0:24:350:24:39

Particularly the largest of the three.

0:24:390:24:43

A portrait of a young lady painted, I would have said, in about 1820,

0:24:430:24:48

at the beginning of the 19th century.

0:24:480:24:50

-There is something of Jane Austen about it.

-There is.

0:24:500:24:54

If we look at the back we can see two locks of hair beautifully arranged,

0:24:540:24:59

tied with simulated pearls and gold threads.

0:24:590:25:05

And I suspect that those will be locks of hair

0:25:050:25:09

taken from the subjects.

0:25:090:25:12

We can't be certain of that, of course,

0:25:120:25:14

but she has got lovely curly hair,

0:25:140:25:16

so it would make sense, wouldn't it?

0:25:160:25:18

Now, we don't know who this lady is,

0:25:180:25:21

but we do know who one of these chaps is.

0:25:210:25:24

And this is Colonel John Montgomery, MP.

0:25:260:25:29

-Ballyleck, is that?

-Yes, that's right.

0:25:290:25:32

-County Monaghan.

-Correct.

0:25:320:25:34

So, he would have come from Northern Ireland?

0:25:340:25:37

Unlike you?

0:25:370:25:38

-And he looks a very self-important man, doesn't he?

-He does.

0:25:400:25:43

As you'd expect.

0:25:430:25:44

He's an MP, so he is important.

0:25:440:25:47

-Scowling just a little bit.

-Yes.

0:25:470:25:49

But wearing a beautiful red coat,

0:25:490:25:52

and I think that is something which makes this picture very commercial.

0:25:520:25:55

This chap...

0:25:550:25:57

We don't know who he is, either.

0:25:570:25:59

But he appears to be an Army officer.

0:25:590:26:02

Again, resplendent in red, gold...

0:26:020:26:04

Hair just sort of slicked back a bit.

0:26:050:26:08

Very sophisticated young man.

0:26:080:26:11

These, I think, are both a little bit later than the female...

0:26:110:26:14

-Oh, are they?

-..Than the female portrait.

0:26:140:26:17

Tell me why, if your mother gave them to you, are you thinking of selling them?

0:26:170:26:21

-Well, it's just tucked away, and nobody sees them.

-No.

0:26:210:26:24

And I think she's absolutely beautiful,

0:26:240:26:26

and I think perhaps to sell it on,

0:26:260:26:29

because somebody else can appreciate that beauty.

0:26:290:26:32

-Yes, yes.

-And the military ones, again, I'm not a collector.

0:26:320:26:36

It would be lovely to think it went back to a member of the family.

0:26:360:26:39

I'd love to see that.

0:26:390:26:40

Let's think about values.

0:26:400:26:42

I would be inclined to place an estimate on this of £4,600.

0:26:420:26:46

Oh, right.

0:26:460:26:47

OK? And a reserve of 400.

0:26:490:26:51

Right, thank you.

0:26:510:26:52

Now, the auctioneers, I think,

0:26:520:26:54

should be asked to sell these as a separate lot,

0:26:540:26:58

and I would be inclined to go for

0:26:580:27:01

-£200-300...

-Yes.

0:27:010:27:03

..With a reserve of £200 on those.

0:27:030:27:05

And they're going to sell well, I'm sure.

0:27:060:27:10

These highly-valued miniature portraits allowed people

0:27:110:27:14

to keep images of loved ones on them at all times,

0:27:140:27:17

and they were popular right up until the late 19th century,

0:27:170:27:21

with the invention of photography.

0:27:210:27:23

Now over to James, who's found a box.

0:27:230:27:25

Let me take you back to the 19th century, when this was made.

0:27:270:27:31

Imagine you were a middle-class gentleman

0:27:310:27:33

in the 1860s, 1870s,

0:27:330:27:36

no television, no electricity.

0:27:360:27:39

This is the sort of thing that would have been the video player

0:27:390:27:44

or CD player of its day.

0:27:440:27:45

And it is a wonderful quality musical box,

0:27:450:27:49

made in Switzerland around 1860, 1870.

0:27:490:27:52

Is it something that's been in the family a long time?

0:27:520:27:55

Well, I've had it for about...

0:27:550:27:57

Getting on for 30 years.

0:27:570:27:58

-It was left to me from an uncle.

-OK.

0:27:580:28:01

He was a very Victorian-type person.

0:28:010:28:04

-He actually collected musical boxes like this...

-Ah, did he?

0:28:040:28:07

..Polythons, grandfather clocks.

0:28:070:28:09

In fact, he was so Victorian,

0:28:090:28:11

he wouldn't have an electric clock in the house!

0:28:110:28:13

Really?!

0:28:130:28:14

-He used to call them "slaves".

-Oh, really?!

0:28:140:28:17

So those were banned from the house. When he died, he left me two articles. This is one of them.

0:28:170:28:22

Is this something you've played and enjoyed?

0:28:220:28:24

No, not really. It's just stuck away in an attic.

0:28:240:28:27

If you look just in there,

0:28:270:28:30

you see there's a section of the steel comb

0:28:300:28:32

with those little teeth missing?

0:28:320:28:34

Yeah, at the top.

0:28:340:28:35

And, at some point, that's been damaged,

0:28:350:28:37

and that's not a cheap thing to put right.

0:28:370:28:39

It can be done, though.

0:28:390:28:41

So, whenever we're looking at one of these musical boxes,

0:28:410:28:44

the first thing is the more airs - or the more tunes - it plays,

0:28:440:28:47

the better.

0:28:470:28:49

So, here we have the list of airs,

0:28:490:28:51

and we can see that this plays eight.

0:28:510:28:53

Sometimes you get 12 or more.

0:28:530:28:55

So, it's not bad,

0:28:550:28:57

but it's not the very best.

0:28:570:28:59

This top is veneered in rosewood.

0:28:590:29:01

The crossbranding is in kingwood,

0:29:010:29:04

and then we have little boxwood stringing

0:29:040:29:06

flanking either side of the kingwood,

0:29:060:29:09

and that's what we call a "musical trophy".

0:29:090:29:12

And that would have been vibrant when it was new.

0:29:120:29:16

It would have been bright colours.

0:29:160:29:18

It would have been greens and reds, and browns as well.

0:29:180:29:21

Because the front isn't looked at quite so much as the top,

0:29:210:29:25

they've kept the rosewood,

0:29:250:29:26

but they've transfer printed instead of inlaid,

0:29:260:29:29

made it a bit cheaper. So, why do you want to sell it?

0:29:290:29:32

Basically, because it's just stored away.

0:29:320:29:35

I'm a bit afraid that it will deteriorate over the years,

0:29:350:29:38

and I would rather let it go to somebody

0:29:380:29:40

that's actually going to appreciate it or even do it up.

0:29:400:29:44

When it comes to value,

0:29:440:29:45

I would say an auction estimate of...

0:29:450:29:47

..250-£350...

0:29:480:29:52

and a reserve of 200.

0:29:520:29:53

-How does that strike you?

-I'd be happy with that, yes.

-Yeah?

0:29:530:29:58

Should have done this before I valued it, really!

0:29:580:30:01

MUSICAL BOX PLAYS

0:30:020:30:04

That's not bad.

0:30:060:30:08

As long as it strikes the right tone at the auction, I think we'll do well.

0:30:080:30:12

# I can hear music... #

0:30:120:30:13

And now, Husnain has come along with a very British past time.

0:30:140:30:19

You are far too young to have collected these.

0:30:190:30:21

Yep, definitely.

0:30:210:30:22

I found these when I moved house.

0:30:220:30:25

And are you interested in this collection, or not?

0:30:250:30:29

Umm... not really, cos I don't know much about trains,

0:30:290:30:32

and I don't really know to put them all together as well.

0:30:320:30:35

When you say you found them in a house, what does that mean?

0:30:360:30:39

-We decided to buy a new house.

-OK.

0:30:390:30:42

And we were cleaning out the attic and everything,

0:30:420:30:44

and we found a train set.

0:30:440:30:46

I asked the owner if he wanted it, if it belonged to him.

0:30:460:30:48

He said it didn't belong to him, probably the person that had it before.

0:30:480:30:52

Exactly.

0:30:520:30:53

-And he goes, "You can keep it".

-Yep.

0:30:530:30:55

Just left it in the garage, and it's just been gathering dust.

0:30:550:30:59

Right. It's not really a set.

0:30:590:31:01

But we'll think of it in terms of being a group or a collection,

0:31:010:31:04

really, of individual items,

0:31:040:31:06

all of which were made by Meccano,

0:31:060:31:09

using the brand name

0:31:090:31:11

which everyone will be familiar with, I'm sure - "Hornby".

0:31:110:31:14

The doyenne of British toymakers...

0:31:140:31:16

Right, OK.

0:31:160:31:17

..Really through the 20s and 30s, and up until the 1950s.

0:31:170:31:21

This group would have been manufactured, probably,

0:31:210:31:24

just before - or just after - the Second World War.

0:31:240:31:27

We're looking at something which is 60, 70 years old.

0:31:270:31:31

It's good to have two locomotives.

0:31:310:31:33

-They're always worth more than the...

-The carriages.

0:31:330:31:36

..The carriages, exactly.

0:31:360:31:38

This locomotive has a tender with it as well.

0:31:380:31:41

It's good to have the buffers,

0:31:410:31:43

and it's rather nice to have the signal here.

0:31:430:31:46

But the item I like most, I think, really, is the carriage here,

0:31:460:31:49

which is working in the sense that it tilts

0:31:490:31:52

either way like that,

0:31:520:31:54

and it has, best of all,

0:31:540:31:55

the name "McAlpine" printed along the side.

0:31:550:31:58

It's going to appeal to people who are interested in advertising items,

0:31:580:32:02

as well as people who are interested in, you know,

0:32:020:32:05

locomotives and rolling stock.

0:32:050:32:06

Have you any idea what it might be worth?

0:32:060:32:08

Umm... I was thinking about...

0:32:090:32:11

..50-100 or something.

0:32:120:32:14

I think it's worth a bit more than that, really.

0:32:140:32:17

I think we're going to get the best part of 100,

0:32:170:32:20

maybe even £150 for this.

0:32:200:32:21

Yeah, yeah.

0:32:210:32:23

Well, they can only make a profit.

0:32:230:32:25

Finally, James has been lured by some glittering rocks.

0:32:270:32:30

Well, Enid, they say that the diamonds are a girl's best friend,

0:32:320:32:35

-don't they?

-They do!

0:32:350:32:37

-Are you coming to sell your best friends?

-'Fraid so, yes.

0:32:370:32:40

What's the history behind this?

0:32:400:32:42

It was my aunt's, my mother's sister's.

0:32:420:32:45

It wasn't her original engagement ring.

0:32:450:32:48

They did get robbed,

0:32:480:32:50

and her husband bought her that to replace

0:32:500:32:52

her original engagement ring.

0:32:520:32:53

-Ah, OK. I bet it was nicer than the original!

-Yes.

0:32:530:32:56

There's not many first newlyweds can afford a ring like that!

0:32:560:33:00

I've always loved it. I think it's a beautiful ring,

0:33:000:33:03

but I've perhaps worn it once.

0:33:030:33:05

I'm always frightened of losing it,

0:33:050:33:07

so I've always kept it in a safe place, really.

0:33:070:33:11

It's a lovely ring.

0:33:110:33:13

Whenever we're looking at a diamond ring,

0:33:130:33:15

you look for the clarity of the stone,

0:33:150:33:18

the colour of the stone, and the size of the stone.

0:33:180:33:22

And those three things combine to make the value.

0:33:220:33:25

The colour is good.

0:33:250:33:27

It's nice and white.

0:33:270:33:28

It needs a bit of a clean, but not too bad.

0:33:280:33:30

A little bit of washing-up fluid,

0:33:300:33:33

and a very soft toothbrush would do that.

0:33:330:33:35

Gently, gently, gently.

0:33:350:33:38

-You see the little teeth there?

-That's right, yes.

0:33:380:33:40

Some of them are right over the diamond,

0:33:400:33:42

others are just wearing a little bit thin.

0:33:420:33:45

And sometimes you see a ring that's just held in by the grime,

0:33:450:33:48

and the teeth over the diamond have actually worn away completely.

0:33:480:33:52

Now, that one, look,

0:33:520:33:54

all the claws are really nice and proud,

0:33:540:33:56

and hold it in place,

0:33:560:33:58

but here,

0:33:580:33:59

only just touching the edge of the diamond.

0:33:590:34:02

So, that's been worn away quite a lot. But, my goodness!

0:34:020:34:05

I've got fingers like big, fat pork sausages and it even fits me!

0:34:050:34:10

That's one heck of a size.

0:34:100:34:13

Yes, she was a big lady when she was younger.

0:34:130:34:15

Now, there's a very basic... Now, where is it?

0:34:150:34:18

Somewhere here in one of my pockets is that. A very basic gauge.

0:34:180:34:24

You hold that over the stone.

0:34:240:34:27

It tells you that stone is over half a carat

0:34:270:34:30

but less than three quarters of a carat.

0:34:300:34:33

So, the two of them are about 1.25 carats.

0:34:330:34:37

Age wise, 1930s.

0:34:370:34:40

And a ring like that with good-sized diamonds, fashionable, made in platinum,

0:34:400:34:46

£600-£1000.

0:34:460:34:48

Are you happy with that?

0:34:480:34:50

Well, I'm really reluctant to see it go but I've decided. So, yes.

0:34:500:34:54

I wouldn't be 100% happy to see that sell at 600, I have to say.

0:34:540:34:59

-Why don't we up it a bit? Let's stick 800 on it.

-Right.

0:34:590:35:03

-A firm reserve, no discretion because when it's gone, it's gone. You know?

-Yes.

0:35:030:35:10

So, 800 reserve, 800-1,000 estimate so if it doesn't make 800 you have it back.

0:35:100:35:14

-That's fine.

-Brilliant!

0:35:140:35:16

So, it's off to auction we go and here's a quick rundown of what we're taking with us.

0:35:160:35:22

David split Aideen's miniatures into two lots

0:35:240:35:28

valuing the military men at £200-£300

0:35:280:35:32

and the unknown beauty at £400-£600.

0:35:320:35:36

James has put an estimate of £250-£350 on Alan's music box.

0:35:380:35:43

Husnain's train set was valued at £100-£150 and finally,

0:35:430:35:50

Enid's double diamond ring attracted an estimate

0:35:500:35:53

of £800-£1000 from James.

0:35:530:35:57

Let's find out what auctioneer Nick Hall thinks of Enid's ring.

0:36:010:36:05

This platinum diamond ring belongs to Enid. It was her aunt's.

0:36:050:36:08

It's too big for her.

0:36:080:36:10

She wants to sell it and we've got a valuation of £800-£1000.

0:36:100:36:15

It's a nice thing and we do very well with good jewellery here.

0:36:150:36:18

We're in the so-called Golden Triangle, a very wealthy area.

0:36:180:36:22

Our jewellery sales do exceptionally well. We have tweaked the estimate slightly.

0:36:220:36:26

We haven't changed the lower figure, just expanded the upper figure.

0:36:260:36:30

-We've put 800 -1,200 on it.

-You're expecting a bit more?

0:36:300:36:33

My feeling from selling a lot of rings of this type,

0:36:330:36:37

-it should just push over the thousand mark so we've reflected that in the estimate.

-That's good.

0:36:370:36:42

Two good-sized stones as well,

0:36:420:36:44

about a three quarter carat on each stone so that's what I would expect.

0:36:440:36:48

-Fingers crossed.

-Absolutely.

-We'll find out in a moment.

0:36:480:36:51

Whatever you're doing, don't go away. There could be one or two surprises.

0:36:510:36:55

55. Any online?

0:36:560:36:58

I can't bear the suspense.

0:36:580:37:00

Neither can Enid. It's coming up right now.

0:37:000:37:03

-Enid, are you getting excited?

-Very.

-So am I.

0:37:040:37:07

-It's been a long wait.

-It has.

-But it is now your moment.

0:37:070:37:10

We're about to put the diamond ring under the hammer. Who've you got with you?

0:37:100:37:14

-This is Tony, my husband.

-Pleased to meet you.

-How do you do.

0:37:140:37:17

The auctioneer agrees with your valuation and said we could get the top end

0:37:170:37:21

plus a little more and that's what it's about. A bit of sparkle in the sale room!

0:37:210:37:25

Lot 702, the diamond and platinum set two-stone crossover ring.

0:37:250:37:30

I'll start the bidding at it £800.

0:37:300:37:33

800 I have. The bid is with me. 850?

0:37:330:37:38

Thank you. 900, 950, 1,000.

0:37:380:37:41

This is exciting, it really is!

0:37:410:37:43

1,100. At £1,100. The bid's with me.

0:37:430:37:47

1,150, 1,200, 1,250.

0:37:470:37:50

At 1,250. 1,300.

0:37:500:37:53

At £1,300. The bid is online.

0:37:530:37:54

-That dazzling!

-At £1,300.

0:37:540:37:58

Make no mistake, selling online at 1,300.

0:37:580:38:00

-Yes! £1,300!

-That's wonderful!

0:38:000:38:02

-What do you think?

-Fantastic!

-That is fabulous, isn't it?

0:38:020:38:06

A great result. There is commission to pay.

0:38:060:38:09

15 %, OK? Nevertheless, there's still a lot of money to spend.

0:38:090:38:13

Are you going to treat yourselves?

0:38:130:38:15

A meal for the family, hopefully, yes.

0:38:150:38:18

The rest I will put towards my Graceland fund.

0:38:180:38:22

-Are you an Elvis fan? I'm a big Elvis fan. You as well?

-Yes.

0:38:220:38:26

# I'm all shook up ...#

0:38:260:38:28

And who isn't?

0:38:280:38:30

Husnain's turn now with his lucky find.

0:38:300:38:33

We're just about to put the train set under the hammer which was inherited, basically.

0:38:330:38:38

-Found in a house that you moved into.

-Yes.

-A lovely story.

0:38:380:38:41

-You're a student. What are you studying?

-Accountancy at the University of Bradford.

0:38:410:38:45

-So you have a good head for figures?

-Hopefully.

0:38:450:38:48

What did you think about David's figures of 100 and £150? Happy?

0:38:480:38:51

Yes, I'm happy with that valuation. It's a reasonable price.

0:38:510:38:55

It's not bad for finding something, let's face it!

0:38:550:38:57

We'd all like that.

0:38:570:38:58

Good luck.

0:38:580:39:00

Lot 121 is a quantity of Hornby 'O' gauge clockwork railway items.

0:39:000:39:06

Where can we start? £100?

0:39:060:39:08

Surely £100. 80? 50? Where's 50?

0:39:080:39:12

At 40, bid. 45, 50, 60, 60 I have.

0:39:120:39:17

At £60. And five, 70.

0:39:170:39:20

At £70. I need a bit more.

0:39:200:39:22

Not quite there yet. I need more. At £70 only. Online has gone, OK.

0:39:220:39:27

At £70, the highest we've got. I can't let it go at £70.

0:39:270:39:31

All sure?

0:39:310:39:32

Last chance.

0:39:320:39:33

I'm afraid that's unsold, that lot, sorry.

0:39:330:39:36

-No! That's it! It didn't sell.

-Close but not close enough though.

0:39:360:39:40

It lives for another day and another saleroom.

0:39:400:39:43

Where are the train spotters when you want them, eh?

0:39:430:39:47

Oh, well. Let's see if Alan's music box has more luck.

0:39:470:39:51

We've seen these on the show before. I'm talking to Alan and it's the lovely cylindrical musical box.

0:39:520:39:57

There are lots of collectors.

0:39:570:39:59

-Mechanical music always sells well, doesn't it?

-Yes.

0:39:590:40:02

-They've got a few in the sale today so fingers crossed.

-Good luck.

0:40:020:40:07

It's going under the hammer. What do the bidders think?

0:40:070:40:10

Lot number 134 is the 19th century, Swiss eight air music box.

0:40:100:40:16

A pretty one, this. I can start the commission at a low 145.

0:40:160:40:21

At 145.

0:40:210:40:22

-That's a bad start.

-Where is more? 150, 160 now. You bidding online?

0:40:220:40:27

170.

0:40:270:40:29

I have 190 against you. 200.

0:40:290:40:31

-The bid is online, commissions are out.

-200 is just sold.

0:40:310:40:34

Yes, just made it.

0:40:340:40:37

I'm selling at £200. It's going.

0:40:370:40:40

-At least it sold.

-No one in the room.

0:40:400:40:42

That's a shame but anyway, it's gone and we've sold it for £200.

0:40:420:40:46

There's commission to pay but it's a bit of spending money.

0:40:460:40:49

-It is.

-Good job we put that reserve on, wasn't it?

-It was.

-Yeah.

0:40:490:40:53

And that's just what they're for. A reserve protects your items from going for less than they're worth.

0:40:530:41:00

Now, who's this vision in pink?

0:41:000:41:03

Love what you're wearing. Love the colours. Look at this! All this season's, isn't it?!

0:41:030:41:09

-Aideen, it's great to see you.

-And you. Thank you.

0:41:090:41:12

We've got the miniatures coming up now. We split them into two lots.

0:41:120:41:17

The group of gentlemen going under the hammer first at £200-£400.

0:41:170:41:20

Then that beautiful lady, £400-£600.

0:41:200:41:23

You are in the right place at the right time to be selling miniatures

0:41:230:41:26

because they are in vogue right now.

0:41:260:41:28

The auctioneers have done some research and it turns out

0:41:280:41:31

that John Montgomery inherited his father's estate because

0:41:310:41:35

his brother was disinherited because he married an Englishwoman.

0:41:350:41:40

It so happens that that Englishwoman was Lady in Waiting to George II's wife.

0:41:400:41:45

-So, there's a lovely story there.

-I'm very excited.

0:41:450:41:48

Let's enjoy this moment, shall we? Here it is.

0:41:480:41:51

-Lot 101. Online interest and commission interest.

-That's great.

0:41:510:41:55

I can start straight in here at £200.

0:41:550:41:59

Thank you, 220, 240, 260, 280.

0:41:590:42:04

300, 320, 340, now.

0:42:040:42:08

Got 360 online. 380, 400.

0:42:080:42:11

-We're nearly at that top end.

-410 I have. 420 back online.

0:42:110:42:16

It's online at £420. Commission's out, you're out.

0:42:160:42:19

Online bidder it is selling, if you're all done, at £420.

0:42:190:42:23

Well done. Top end of the valuation. OK, that's the first one down.

0:42:230:42:29

Now the second one. We're looking at £400-£600.

0:42:290:42:31

Number 102. A nice little portrait miniature.

0:42:310:42:35

More commission interest.

0:42:350:42:36

I'll come in straight mid-estimate in at 500 with me here.

0:42:360:42:39

Where's the room? At 500,

0:42:390:42:41

20, I'll take. 540, 560. I've got 580.

0:42:410:42:45

Another online at 600 now.

0:42:450:42:46

-Yeah!

-We got the top end!

0:42:460:42:48

620, 640, 660.

0:42:480:42:52

She is worth it!

0:42:520:42:54

Online bidding at the moment at 680. 700. Still climbing.

0:42:540:42:58

Don't let it go.

0:42:580:43:00

At £700. Last chance.

0:43:000:43:03

I'm selling at £700. All done and dusted?

0:43:030:43:07

-It's yours!

-Wow! How about that?

0:43:070:43:09

£700. I knew we'd have a surprise today.

0:43:090:43:11

-That's a grand total of £1,120.

-I am amazed.

-Yes, so am I.

0:43:110:43:17

We knew there'd be a surprise! I hope you enjoyed it.

0:43:170:43:19

Sadly, that's the end of the show. I know you've had a wonderful day.

0:43:190:43:23

-Absolutely.

-I hope you enjoyed watching.

0:43:230:43:25

There's always something to learn in an auction room.

0:43:250:43:28

Join us next time. Until then, goodbye.

0:43:280:43:30

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:480:43:50

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:500:43:52

Paul Martin and experts David Fletcher and James Lewis visit Preston in Lancashire on the hunt for antiques.

James is shockingly cheeky about some Clarice Cliff, whilst David has a eureka moment about a clock.

Paul gets a personal cooking lesson and learns more about Lancashire's food heritage and the Preston Guild.


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