Exmouth Flog It!


Exmouth

Flog It! has its beach hat on as it heads to the coastal town of Exmouth in Devon. Presenter Paul Martin is ably assisted by Will Axon and Christina Trevanion.


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Transcript


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Exmouth has had a long reputation as the place to relax and recover,

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due to the belief that the salty seawater has restorative qualities.

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Since the 18th century, this resort has been a popular destination for tourists

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and today it's proving even more popular.

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That's because we're in town! Welcome to Flog It!

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We've come to Exmouth Pavilion for our valuation day.

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There are plenty of people waiting patiently,

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hoping they are one of the lucky ones to go off to auction

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and they've got a real treasure in these bags and boxes.

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It could be you, it could be you.

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We've got a wonderful team of exports headed up by Mr Will Axon. Already he's found a wonderful bowl.

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And the beautiful Christina Trevanion,

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hard at work, searching for the best items to take off to auction.

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'Will is on the look out for things quirky and curious

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'and it looks like he's found one example.'

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LAUGHTER

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-It reminds me of the old Easter Island figures.

-I've used it for years as a doorstop.

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As a doorstop. Poor little fella.

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He's probably some rare tribal artefact and he's propping your door open.

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LAUGHTER

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'And Christina is prepared to seek high and low for quality...that's if she can get up!'

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Ooh, it's hard to stand up!

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-Yes, of course you can.

-CHEERING

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-Thank you so much.

-Right. Let's get on with it.

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'As people and their objects pour through the doors, we're bracing ourselves for exciting finds.

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'Coming up on today's show, Will have an open mind to what he values.'

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They are without doubt bayonet light bulbs with a crown on top.

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'Some of our owners doubt their antique is going to sell.'

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I love how you brought your bag to bring it home in!

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'And I become a sculptor's apprentice.' Hey, look at that. That is fabulous, isn't it?

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'But now there are antiques to value

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'and Christina is kicking off proceedings

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'with John and a promisingly large collection in a rather nice bag.'

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John, you've brought me Pandora's box.

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HE LAUGHS Yes, more like it.

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This wonderful box full of silver and some silver plate that we can't fit on the table.

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Tell me, where has this come from? Who was JJS?

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That was my wife's side of the family,

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which was... "J" was for Julia,

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That was her great-great aunt Julia.

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-Ah, so this is your wife's?

-That is my wife's.

-But she knows you brought it?

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-She definitely does.

-Good.

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I do particularly love this box.

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The content is fabulous and we will come on to that in a minute.

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But you've got this wonderful leather exterior, navy leather.

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The gilt-tooling initials on here and we open it up.

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This fabulous, luxurious, watered silk interior,

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which, unfortunately... Obviously, Julia used it quite prolifically,

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because the lining is suffering slightly, but if we look on the inside of the lid,

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we've got this lovely mark for Asprey,

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who were really just one of the most sumptuous retailers available in London,

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and still going today. We've got "Asprey", a registered number and "London".

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It's really nice to have that label.

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It will certainly add to the value. And within the box, we had this silver dressing table set,

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which is really nice to have as such a complete unit.

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We've got this initial "J". Was this also for "Julia"?

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That was correct. It was all for Julia.

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So it's the same sort of date, isn't it?

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So that would make sense, because you've got this decoration,

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which is quite Art Deco, so 1927, and this I would say is a similar sort of date.

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It's nice to have the button hook and also the shoehorn.

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Really nice to have such a complete set and all silver-backed.

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Now, completely different, we've got these five spoons,

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which are by Peter and Ann Bateman.

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The Batemans really are very collectable, particularly Ann.

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And the American market really does like Ann Bateman,

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because she was a female silversmith.

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But they did do quite a lot.

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They were fairly prolific. They're not particularly rare.

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It's a completely different date. Poor old Aunt Julia obviously wasn't around when these were made,

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because these are hallmarked 1797.

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We've got sugar tongs, which, funnily enough,

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different date and the date letter is obscured,

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so it's difficult to tell, but also by Bateman.

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You've got some nice, bright cut decoration on the side of those.

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So very much a period late 18th century, early 19th century.

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Then we've got all sorts of mismatched silver.

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You've got a fish knife, butter knife and various spoons.

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And the silver plate,

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-which there is a quantity of, but we can't fit it on the table.

-SHE LAUGHS

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I think at auction we are going to be looking in the region of £150, £250.

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So I think an estimate of 150 to 250

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and a reserve of 150.

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Silver price at the moment is quite buoyant,

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so that may be quite a conservative estimate.

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And just tell me why you're selling these things.

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-It has been put away in a cupboard in my actual dressing room...

-Oh, right!

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..not my wife's, and it's about time it got moved out.

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-And I said to her....

-You need some space.

-That's it.

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-I need space!

-Thank you so much for bringing it in.

-Thank you.

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'There are plenty of things to value, but one item caught my attention,

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'so I've popped outside to find out more about it with Devon local Diana.'

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-How did you come by this?

-We got it when we got engaged.

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My mother-in-law said that in the cellar, underneath their house, which was the air raid shelter,

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was all the furniture from their London home and we could have the lot.

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So what have you done with it? Have you had your jewellery in it and used it?

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-My keys.

-Keys.

-And my television licence.

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HE LAUGHS

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-Little things like that.

-Important things. You know where to find them. They get lost.

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-Exactly.

-Do you know much about it?

-Nothing.

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It is an apprentice piece.

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This was made by somebody learning the trade, a cabinet-maker,

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standing at the bench, under instruction for four to five years during his apprenticeship.

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He had to make things like this before they'd let him loose on the real thing -

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a full-size chest of drawers.

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What it does is take in two or three different skills.

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It takes in the basic woodworking skills of proportion.

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Yes? But also look at the dovetails. It takes in the joints.

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Those are wonderfully cut little dovetails, done by hand with the tenon saw.

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It also teaches the apprentice how to use veneers.

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If you look, this is a softwood. It's a very light, cheap wood.

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But it has been covered with a very thin veneer. Can you see that veneer?

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-Just there.

-Yes.

-That's a Cuban mahogany veneer glued on to the pine carcass.

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This has got everything. It's a three-drawer configuration.

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-Tapering drawers, can you see that?

-Yes.

-They graduate.

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I've never noticed that before.

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It terminates on these lovely splayed feet, which have this wonderful decorative apron.

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So there's a lot going on.

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It's got its original paint on the back, painted to look like mahogany. You can see, a cheap carcass back,

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because that's not going to get seen, it's not a face side.

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So it was only the face sides and the ends that you'll find in this Cuban mahogany.

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Sadly, one of the drawer knobs is missing, but the rest are original. Little ivory ones.

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-Little turned button knobs.

-Never had that one.

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Always gone.

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-A little bit of damage to the top drawer.

-I noticed that.

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I tell you what, it's exceptionally honest,

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because no-one's tried to repair it,

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no-one is going to knock you for a little bit of damage like that.

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I think it could do the £200 mark.

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-Really?

-Yes.

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But I think we've got to be sensible and pitch it at £120 to...

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-..160.

-Right.

-With a reserve of 100.

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-Lovely.

-Is that OK?

-That's fine.

-So we're talking round figures.

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-If it doesn't reach £100, it goes home.

-It comes home.

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All right, let's put it into auction. Let's sell it.

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'Back in the Pavilion, Will has three carvings to contend with, brought in by George.'

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Thank you for coming along and bringing these items to show us.

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What interested me was you've got three different points in the world.

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How have you come by these ivories

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and collected them as a group?

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I bought them from an old lady I've known for quite a long time

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with two more pieces that I kept.

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-Unfortunately, she passed away recently.

-Sorry to hear that.

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I thought to myself I would sell them.

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OK. Let's have a look at them in more detail.

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-Let's start with this chap at the back.

-The Buddha.

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Exactly. A sort of seated Buddha, or one of the many incarnations of Buddha

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in various stages of enlightenment, I think.

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Probably coming from China.

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I would imagine carved Chinese ivory, maybe Canton, that sort of area.

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Maybe made for export, for domestic consumption.

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There was a lot of ivory from Canton exported into Europe, because it was fashionable at the time.

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Then if we move to the front, we've got this chap.

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You know who he is, I know who he is. Ganesh, the Hindu god.

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But, again, nicely carved. But, then, Indian ivory, almost certainly.

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-So we've got China, India, and what about this fellow?

-That's St George.

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St George and his dragon. Even though he's lost the top end of his lance,

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-he may have had a standard on the end.

-With a flag or something.

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-Exactly. When you look at the detail, it's intricately carved.

-Definitely.

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They were all bought in India.

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The lady they belong to originally,

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-her husband was manager of the Dum Dum factory in India.

-Really?

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She sailed out when she was 20 and she died when she was 96.

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Right. Early 20th century.

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Which again ties them in nicely with regards to the provenance.

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Obviously, with ivory, even worked ivory,

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anything pre-1947 is OK to sell,

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-but anything post-1947 is illegal.

-Yes.

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It's not legal to sell. So we are in safe waters.

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Obviously, on Flog It! we've to think about value.

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-Have you had any idea? What did you pay for them?

-£100.

-For the five?

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-For the five.

-OK, that's good going.

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I think you did well. But I don't want to overprice them.

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Would you be willing at a 200 to 300 estimate? That would mean reserving them at 200.

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I would like a reserve of 250.

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Let's agree. £250. Shall we have discretion on that?

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-So if they get to 230, 240, rather than not sell them?

-Yes, 30, 240

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-would be my limit.

-OK. Let's do it.

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These will go on the catalogue, online. I am sure they will be picked up.

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They'll be catalogued by the saleroom in Exeter.

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-Really, it's just going to be what happens on the day.

-Who's in the room.

-Who's in the room.

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That's it. We have found our first items to take to auction.

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This is where it gets exciting, because anything could happen

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and here's our experts to give you a quick reminder of all the items they are taking along.

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What a box of treasure that John brought in.

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We've got this wonderful Asprey's box

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and silver from the 18th century to the 20th century.

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There is something here for everybody.

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I've got to put this into auction, because it's a nice example of an apprentice piece.

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It's top drawer.

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I like the fact that these ivories have come from different corners of the world

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to me in Exmouth. And look at the detail of the carving.

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Let's hope the bidders appreciate it, too.

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I guess this is the moment we've all been waiting for.

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It's auction day. We're guests of Bearnes, Hampton & Littlewood, where the commission

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is 16.5 percent plus VAT, so do factor that into your costs.

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My advice is pick up a catalogue on the way in.

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All the information is in it.

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But these commissions vary from saleroom to saleroom.

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As you know, valuing antiques is not an exact science.

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You know how it goes. Our experts are feeling nervous.

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Our owners are feeling nervous. I'm nervous. It's OK for you,

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you can sit back and enjoy this. Put your feet up!

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'Chris Hampton is the auctioneer, so let's kick things off.'

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100?

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You've got that silk-lined Asprey case that John brought in,

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-but it belongs to wife Heather, who is with us today.

-Hello.

-Thank you for coming in.

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-You've decided to sell this because it's been in a cupboard. It's not on display.

-No.

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And it was just taking up space in your shoe cupboard.

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-Is that where it was?!

-That's right. Down at the bottom.

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Hopefully, we can turn that into more jewellery.

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-That's right.

-More jewellery for Heather.

-You want to buy some jewellery?

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Good luck. Here we go.

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The Asprey stitched, blue-leather travelling case

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with contents, silver-backed hand mirror, brushes, comb,

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button hooks. All the lot together.

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£100 is bid.

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And 10. 120.

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130. 140. 150.

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At 150. Where's 160?

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-We're there now.

-At £150.

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-60 will you?

-Come on.

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Selling, then. At £150. All done?

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There you are, straight in and out. Blink and you miss it.

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£150. The hammer's gone down.

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-That's good, isn't it?

-Yes.

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'There were some nice pieces in that lot, but the money will be better used

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'when they head to jewellery shop!

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'Time for a miniature chest.'

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OK, it is my turn to be the expert. Let's see if this is top drawer.

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-I've been joined by Diana and her daughter.

-Hello.

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-Let's hope we get the top end of the estimate.

-Certainly, yes.

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Let's find out what the bidders think. Here we go.

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The miniature chest of three graduated long drawers.

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Nice little chest there. At £75.

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At £75.

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At 75. 80. 5.

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At £85.

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Where's 90?

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At £85.

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-Are you all done?

-It's not going to sell.

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No more?

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-It didn't sell.

-Never mind.

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-I don't believe that.

-Never mind.

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-You are not upset?

-No, no.

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It'll go back and take all of my bits and pieces.

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-Aw.

-HE LAUGHS

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Put your jewellery in it. Your bits and bobs. Postage stamps

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and elastic bands. Thank you for looking after mum.

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-Couldn't do without her.

-Ah, bless!

-Couldn't do without her.

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'It's George's ivory trio under scrutiny now.

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'The question is, will they make the reserve?'

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You never know, this could fly out the room.

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We're looking at 250 to 350.

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Hopefully, yes, yes.

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Chinese artefacts are hot to trot right now.

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-Really?

-They really are.

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You've just caught us talking about our next lot.

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Whether or not we get top end is another thing. There are a lot of people

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who aren't sure about their Chinese art and artefacts.

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-They take a gamble.

-That's right. We have the Chinese Buddha.

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-Yes.

-Then we've got the Indian ivory and what I hoped might have been European ivory.

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-The detail on the carving.

-This is it. Really nice stuff.

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-That's why I'm not worried. I can take it home.

-Exactly.

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Let's see if we've got a touch of the Orient here in the West Country,

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that's worth an awful lot of money.

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We'll find out right now.

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Lot 480 is a Chinese carved-ivory figure of a seated Buddha,

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a carved ivory figure of the Indian god Ganesh,

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and a carved group of St George slaying the dragon.

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£250.

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-At 250, 260.

-Straight in.

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280. 290. 300.

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And 20? At £320.

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At £320 with me.

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-Very good.

-Selling at £320.

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Are you all done? At 320.

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-The hammer's gone down.

-Good estimation.

-It was very good.

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That's very kind of you both.

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-You've got to be happy with that.

-I am.

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I wouldn't have let it get any less then the reserve I put on it,

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because they are too nice.

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-Yes. Quality.

-A couple of other people agreed with you, George.

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Exactly.

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Well, so far so good. That's the end of the first visit to the saleroom.

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We are coming back later in the show.

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Don't go away, because there could be one or two big surprises.

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You know I love horses, so while we were in the area,

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I thought I'd check out what equine art was available.

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Take a look at this and I hope you enjoy it.

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I'm in the beautiful Devon countryside just outside of Newton Abbott to meet a woman

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who has made her career out of a fusion of art and nature.

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These wonderful equine beauties have been her inspiration.

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Heather Jansch has always surrounded herself with horses,

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drawing and painting them frequently.

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Although she studied fine art at Goldsmith's College, she left before finishing,

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finding her own style back in the paddocks.

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I absolutely adore horses.

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I have three. There is something so magical about them.

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It's not surprising artists through history have found them a source of inspiration,

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because they want to harness that beauty,

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but also the power and all of that energy.

0:19:170:19:19

What makes Heather's work so desirable to me and many others?

0:19:190:19:25

The answer lies in her sculpture garden and with the artist herself.

0:19:250:19:29

-Hello.

-Hello, Paul, pleased to meet you.

0:19:320:19:34

-What a fabulous place.

-Thank you.

0:19:340:19:36

It really is. How did the idea for driftwood sculptures come about?

0:19:360:19:40

-Entirely accident.

-Was it?

0:19:400:19:42

Absolutely, yes. My son was then about ten years old.

0:19:420:19:47

And I'd gone out without lighting the wood burner.

0:19:470:19:51

When I came back, he'd lit the wood burner by chopping up

0:19:510:19:55

a piece of ivy that had been lying around in my workshop.

0:19:550:19:57

Yes.

0:19:570:19:58

It was one of those pieces that had grown around a pole and was twisted.

0:19:580:20:02

The section left behind was that long.

0:20:020:20:06

The perfect size to fit into a copper wire sculpture I was working on.

0:20:060:20:12

-That was the eureka moment.

-Really?

-Yes, I went cold.

0:20:120:20:15

I thought, "Where can I get more?" I just knew it was driftwood.

0:20:150:20:19

-So I was in the car, burning rubber next day.

-Beachcombing.

-Yes.

0:20:190:20:23

I guess you have to be disciplined working with driftwood.

0:20:230:20:26

You can only do what the shape dictates you to do.

0:20:260:20:28

Yes. That is part of the fascination.

0:20:280:20:31

It's like a three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle.

0:20:310:20:34

You never quite know what you'll end up with.

0:20:340:20:36

These stand outside all year, getting more and more weathered and textured...

0:20:360:20:40

-They do.

-..as they age.

0:20:400:20:43

-Driftwood will weather...

-Of course it will.

0:20:430:20:45

..really quite quickly if it gets too wet for too long, so what I do

0:20:450:20:50

is supply them with waterproof rugs.

0:20:500:20:52

If it's going to be a long wet period, people put a rug on them and take it off when it's dry.

0:20:520:20:57

Like you would a normal horse.

0:20:570:20:58

And, in that case, it will last for indefinitely.

0:20:580:21:01

Heather also uses more durable oak for larger pieces

0:21:010:21:06

and some are even cast in bronze.

0:21:060:21:09

Do you draw a study or make a small mannequin, so you know exactly how it will go?

0:21:100:21:16

No, I just take a decision about what sort of size it is going to be.

0:21:160:21:20

-What sort of thing it is going to be doing.

-OK.

0:21:200:21:24

Then, really, I draw with steel. So I work with my assistant, who does the welding.

0:21:240:21:29

With thin pieces of wire. I say, "Let's have a bit here, a bit there."

0:21:290:21:32

-It grows quite quickly.

-So that's the superstructure that carries the weight

0:21:320:21:36

-and the general framework of the driftwood?

-That's right.

0:21:360:21:39

-Do you give all your horses a name?

-Yes.

0:21:390:21:41

-Do you?

-Each horse has to have a name, otherwise you can't differentiate between them.

0:21:410:21:46

How many have you made?

0:21:460:21:48

Of the life-size pieces, I don't suppose it's more than about 25.

0:21:480:21:52

-In general, all the smaller ones?

-Probably not more than 100.

0:21:520:21:56

They take quite a long time to make.

0:21:560:21:59

And there is nobody doing it. Only me. It seems.

0:21:590:22:03

OK, this would be a one-year-old foal. How long would that take?

0:22:030:22:06

I can't actually remember, because what happens is I have probably four or five pieces

0:22:060:22:10

of different sizes on the go at the same time.

0:22:100:22:14

-If I run out of material...

-It doesn't fit that, it goes on to the next. That's a good way of working.

0:22:140:22:19

The longest it has taken is probably three years, from start to finish, on one of the very big ones.

0:22:190:22:25

So 16.2, or something like that.

0:22:250:22:28

I quote a three-year waiting list, because it allows me the time to make sure they're right.

0:22:280:22:33

I like to walk past them every day. Because once they've gone, that's my reputation gone with them.

0:22:330:22:38

So they don't go until I'm sure they're right.

0:22:380:22:41

'Heather's horses can look very different according to their location.

0:22:420:22:47

'She's even experimented with other strong, natural figures,

0:22:470:22:51

'including this stag.'

0:22:520:22:54

The driftwood pieces have something wilder about them.

0:22:550:23:00

Particularly the heads,

0:23:000:23:02

which are more about the relationship between space and wood,

0:23:020:23:08

in an abstract sense, than they are about a literal translation of wood into horse.

0:23:080:23:15

Whereas the bigger pieces are more classical.

0:23:150:23:18

You can tell whether they are a thoroughbred or an Arab.

0:23:180:23:23

Anyone who knows horses can.

0:23:230:23:24

Yes, I've noticed that walking around.

0:23:240:23:27

-Do you want an apprentice?

-Yes, do!

0:23:270:23:29

-I'd love to be. I'd love to come down here and work on one of these.

-You can have a go in the workshop.

0:23:290:23:34

-Yes, please.

-There's a big horse we're halfway through doing.

-Gosh, can I?

0:23:340:23:39

We can go and play together in the workshop.

0:23:390:23:41

Lovely studio.

0:23:470:23:49

-I don't know about lovely.

-Oh, it is. What light, as well.

0:23:490:23:52

I guess the mirror comes in handy so you can see sculpture all around.

0:23:520:23:56

-It's essential.

-It's essential, isn't it?

0:23:560:23:59

Because we can't always get far enough away to look at it,

0:23:590:24:02

if the weather is inclement.

0:24:020:24:04

When it's like this, I can walk out of the door and get a long view on it.

0:24:040:24:09

How can I help? What can I do?

0:24:090:24:10

-I'm just...

-A section here is missing.

-Yes.

0:24:100:24:13

I'm just about to try to find a way into the neck

0:24:130:24:17

and through into the head.

0:24:170:24:18

You know, about this long that has a bit of a twist.

0:24:180:24:21

That looks quite nice. Is that any good?

0:24:210:24:23

-It is quite interesting.

-Will it go there? Not really.

0:24:230:24:26

I don't know.

0:24:260:24:28

Not quite.

0:24:280:24:29

-So similar.

-Have you tried that one?

0:24:290:24:32

No, let's look at that one.

0:24:320:24:33

It all looks the same, doesn't it?

0:24:330:24:35

-I bet you pick the same thing about ten times!

-Actually, I don't,

0:24:350:24:38

I've got quite a good memory like that.

0:24:380:24:40

Let's have a look.

0:24:400:24:42

-Is that the ear?

-Actually, look at that.

-Hey, look at that.

0:24:450:24:48

Huh.

0:24:480:24:50

-That is fabulous, isn't it?

-It will need a bit of shaping.

0:24:500:24:53

If you can pass me up a piece of wire.

0:24:530:24:56

-And can you tie it around here?

-Yes.

-Tie it quite tight. Twist it round.

0:24:580:25:03

It's quite therapeutic.

0:25:030:25:05

It can be really therapeutic, or it can drive you mad.

0:25:050:25:09

Oooh! LAUGHTER

0:25:090:25:11

I guess, once the final sections are in place

0:25:110:25:14

and the screws are in place. you take wire that is visible off?

0:25:140:25:17

Yes. The wire comes out.

0:25:170:25:19

We do what we call tacking, so once I'm fairly sure a piece is in the right position,

0:25:190:25:25

I get my assistant to drill a hole and put a screw in.

0:25:250:25:29

When I'm certain of it, the screw comes out

0:25:290:25:33

-and it is recessed and finished with wood.

-Plugged?

0:25:330:25:35

No, just a wood filler.

0:25:350:25:38

But mixed with a stain, so it's the right colour.

0:25:380:25:41

-There's a lot of process that go on.

-Loads.

0:25:410:25:44

It's not like let's just put it together with a bit of driftwood.

0:25:440:25:47

Do you stand back and go, after three hours working,

0:25:470:25:50

and go, "No it's not right, I'm taking it off again"?

0:25:500:25:53

-Yes. I've known to completely deconstruct them before now.

-Really?

0:25:530:25:57

'Heather loves working within the landscape.

0:25:590:26:01

'Where her gardens were once a backdrop for the driftwood horses,

0:26:010:26:05

'they are now a sculptural project in their own right.

0:26:050:26:08

'And she's let me skip studio work to explore the valley.

0:26:080:26:12

'Heather clearly has green fingers, as well as a talent for sculpture.

0:26:130:26:17

'This garden is beautiful.'

0:26:170:26:19

Walking through the wooded valley of Heather's grounds,

0:26:200:26:23

you can see what's inspired her main body of work.

0:26:230:26:27

Trees everywhere in their living organic form that are naturally

0:26:270:26:31

growing with twists and turns on every branch.

0:26:310:26:35

Vying for sunlight, competing against their neighbours. And everywhere you look,

0:26:350:26:40

there are interesting vistas that surprise you from out of nowhere.

0:26:400:26:44

It is the perfect place for an artist to live and work.

0:26:440:26:48

This is great. I like this.

0:26:520:26:54

Look at that canopy of woodland.

0:26:560:26:58

Heather's sculptures are absolutely incredible. She's a genius.

0:27:030:27:06

Her work encompasses artistic creativity with technical prowess, passion,

0:27:060:27:11

patience and love of horses.

0:27:110:27:15

Look at what she's created. When you see them outside, they belong outdoors in the landscape.

0:27:150:27:20

They don't look out of place.

0:27:200:27:22

You can view them through all the seasons and they'll look wonderful.

0:27:220:27:25

If you turn your back on them for too long, they might just gallop away!

0:27:250:27:29

So Sheila and Roland, but you prefer to be called Bubbles.

0:27:430:27:46

-Yes.

-All right, we will call you Bubbles for today.

0:27:460:27:49

All right?

0:27:490:27:51

You brought in this rather wonderful Royal Doulton jug, which is huge.

0:27:510:27:55

Who carried it here?

0:27:550:27:56

I did, mostly.

0:27:560:27:58

You carried it, Sheila? Bubbles, what were you thinking?

0:27:580:28:01

-Eh?

-What were you thinking, Letting Sheila carry it all this way?

0:28:010:28:05

-I've got a job to walk...

-Ah!

-..without that as well!

0:28:050:28:08

I think you're probably right.

0:28:080:28:10

He leaves shopping bags all over the place.

0:28:100:28:13

LAUGHTER

0:28:130:28:15

-Tell me, where did you get it from?

-His mother had it

0:28:150:28:19

for quite some years and when she died, we inherited it.

0:28:190:28:24

So how long have you had it?

0:28:240:28:26

-Since 1974.

-OK.

0:28:260:28:29

When you originally had it, did it come with a certificate?

0:28:290:28:33

Somewhere or other it got mislaid.

0:28:330:28:35

Because it did originally come with a certificate. They all did.

0:28:350:28:40

It's a Royal Doulton commemorative jug.

0:28:400:28:43

A Dickens commemorative jug and it is what they call the Dickens Master of Smiles and Tears jug.

0:28:430:28:49

And it's wonderful because it's relief-moulded with figures from Dickens' literature.

0:28:490:28:56

And around the top, we've got London scenes from where the stories took place.

0:28:560:29:01

It really is rather lovely. We know who did it, because they've signed it.

0:29:010:29:07

We can see at the bottom here it is signed "Noke".

0:29:070:29:10

-Noke.

-Noke. N-O-K-E.

0:29:100:29:12

Charles Noke was a modeller and designer for Royal Doulton

0:29:120:29:16

in the early part of the 20th century.

0:29:160:29:19

He was one of their unique designers. He was quite innovative.

0:29:190:29:23

This was unusual for its time, so it doesn't surprise me that Noke has put his name to it.

0:29:230:29:30

If we look at the bottom, it actually tells us all about itself.

0:29:300:29:36

We've got this wonderful mark that says, "The Dickens jug."

0:29:360:29:39

And the title - "Master of Smiles and Tears

0:29:390:29:45

"with the magic of his created personality. This is jug no 64."

0:29:450:29:50

So it's number 64 from an edition of 1,000.

0:29:500:29:53

So it's great that it's actually quite early in the production run.

0:29:530:29:58

I think collectors will find that quite appealing.

0:29:580:30:01

If we tip it back up, here we go.

0:30:010:30:04

I've had a good look over it and it doesn't look as if there are any chips or cracks or any damage.

0:30:040:30:11

Bearing in mind it's pre-war, it's really impressive.

0:30:110:30:14

So I think it's lovely.

0:30:140:30:16

We have had a little look on the internet

0:30:160:30:19

to see if we can find any comparable prices.

0:30:190:30:21

Obviously, there were 1,000 made.

0:30:210:30:25

Through time, obviously, some have been sold in the past.

0:30:250:30:29

They make anywhere in the region of £250-£300.

0:30:290:30:34

So I think, at auction, that's the sort of figure will be looking at.

0:30:340:30:38

250 to 350. With a reserve of 250.

0:30:380:30:44

-Are you happy with that?

-Yes, yes.

0:30:440:30:46

-Is that all right?

-I think so.

0:30:460:30:48

Let's see if we can find someone to treasure it for the next 40, 50 years.

0:30:480:30:52

Yes. Mm.

0:30:520:30:54

'And before the sun goes down, we've got time for one more valuation.

0:30:540:30:58

'It's going to be a quirky one.

0:30:580:31:01

'Will's with Nesta and her light bulbs.'

0:31:010:31:04

These are something I've never seen before. What can you tell me about them?

0:31:050:31:09

I was given them in the '60s, about '68.

0:31:090:31:12

-My husband had a big electrical contract.

-Yes.

0:31:120:31:15

They were doing up this mansion that the Americans had lived in, in Berkshire.

0:31:150:31:19

-Very nice.

-The builders finished.

0:31:190:31:21

He got the electrical contract and he went in to get bits like kettles

0:31:210:31:26

and irons and toasters.

0:31:260:31:28

So he was clearing the electrical bits out?

0:31:280:31:30

Yes. He went into the wholesaler and saw these in a box.

0:31:300:31:35

He said, "Being as you've given me a big contract, you can take two."

0:31:350:31:38

Well, listen, I am amazed they've survived in such good condition.

0:31:380:31:43

Let's just hold one up. They are, without doubt, bayonet-fitted light bulbs

0:31:430:31:49

with a crown on top.

0:31:490:31:51

I've done research on these

0:31:510:31:53

and I suspect they were made for the coronation of George VI in 1937.

0:31:530:32:00

Would have been the coronation of Edward VIII, but he abdicated,

0:32:000:32:03

so these were produced in 1937 to celebrate the coronation.

0:32:030:32:08

So, really, as a pair of glass light bulbs, they've survived well.

0:32:080:32:14

-Plus they've been to South Africa and back.

-No!

0:32:140:32:17

What are you doing carting these halfway around the world?!

0:32:170:32:20

I moved to South Africa in '68. We came back in '79.

0:32:200:32:26

-They stayed with me all the time.

-I bet you never unpacked them in South Africa.

-I looked at them.

0:32:260:32:32

But they were wrapped up in Christmas paper.

0:32:320:32:35

-Have they ever been used?

-No. But they do go, because I tried them this morning.

0:32:350:32:39

They still actually work?

0:32:390:32:41

-Yes, they actually light up.

-That's amazing.

0:32:410:32:44

I wish we had a lamp to actually put them on.

0:32:440:32:47

-I reckon splendid colours would issue from here.

-They are pretty, lit up.

0:32:470:32:50

This is all hand-painted.

0:32:500:32:53

Someone sat there along a conveyor belt, colouring them in.

0:32:530:32:57

So, interesting. I did a bit of digging around, looking at auction records.

0:32:570:33:03

-I was quite surprised that they don't make that much money.

-No.

0:33:030:33:08

I would suggest that we are looking, for each of them,

0:33:080:33:11

a sensible estimate would be £10 or £20 for each.

0:33:110:33:15

I'm thinking let's put them in the catalogue with an estimate of £30-£50.

0:33:150:33:19

-You're not going to want them back if they don't sell?

-No.

0:33:190:33:22

Let's go no reserve. Shall we live dangerously?

0:33:220:33:24

A guaranteed sale. You're not taking them home.

0:33:240:33:27

We'll see what they make. I look forward to seeing you again at the auction.

0:33:270:33:31

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:33:310:33:33

'It's time to close the doors at Exmouth, but not before

0:33:330:33:36

'we hear why Will and Christina chose their final items.'

0:33:360:33:40

This Doulton jug is probably one of the largest collector's jugs I've seen. It's magnificent.

0:33:420:33:47

And in great condition, which is what Doulton collectors really want.

0:33:470:33:51

It's not always about value on Flog It!

0:33:510:33:53

I picked these out because they caught my eye.

0:33:530:33:55

Fingers crossed they light up the saleroom.

0:33:550:33:57

'At the sale in Exeter, there's no time to waste.

0:34:020:34:05

'Chris Hampton is today's auctioneer and he's got a traditional antique to sell.'

0:34:050:34:09

You're probably thinking, what the Dickens is next? I can tell you. It's that commemorative jug.

0:34:100:34:16

We have a jug and we have wonderful expert Christine.

0:34:160:34:19

Unfortunately we do not have our owners.

0:34:190:34:22

Hopefully, Sheila and Roland will turn up as we are speaking.

0:34:220:34:26

But if not, it's going ahead. You can't stop an auction, that's for sure.

0:34:260:34:31

We're looking at £250-£350 and it's going under the hammer now.

0:34:310:34:35

Lot 360 is the Royal Doulton Charles Dickens jug. £200.

0:34:360:34:41

At £200. 200. Where's 10?

0:34:420:34:46

-Somebody is bidding.

-Yes.

0:34:460:34:48

230. 240.

0:34:480:34:50

250?

0:34:500:34:51

260. New place. 270.

0:34:530:34:55

280. 290. 300.

0:34:550:34:58

310.

0:34:580:35:00

-320. 330.

-We're getting the top end.

-That is good.

0:35:010:35:05

360. 370.

0:35:050:35:07

380. 390.

0:35:070:35:10

400.

0:35:100:35:11

£400.

0:35:110:35:12

-Roland would be enjoying this.

-I know. He would, wouldn't he?

0:35:120:35:16

410, telephone bid. 420.

0:35:160:35:19

We're on the phone now.

0:35:190:35:21

£420.

0:35:210:35:23

-Brilliant.

-I'm selling, then.

0:35:230:35:25

Last chance. At £420.

0:35:250:35:27

-430.

-(He's back.)

0:35:270:35:29

440.

0:35:290:35:31

One more? 450.

0:35:310:35:33

-No, he is out.

-Bo, he's still bidding.

0:35:330:35:36

470. No?

0:35:360:35:38

At £460. Selling at £460.

0:35:380:35:42

-What a fabulous result.

-Yeah.

-I just wish they were here.

0:35:420:35:47

I really do.

0:35:470:35:49

Oh, that's a shame. Maybe it was difficult to park. I don't know.

0:35:490:35:53

-Nevertheless...

-That is a buoyant result.

-If you have anything like that, we'd love to see it,

0:35:530:35:57

especially if you want to sell it. Bring it to a valuation day.

0:35:570:36:01

That's where your journey starts

0:36:010:36:03

and you can join us in another saleroom somewhere else in the country.

0:36:030:36:06

You can pick up details on the BBC website.

0:36:060:36:09

Just log on to...

0:36:090:36:11

Follow the links. The information will be there.

0:36:110:36:13

Hopefully, we will be in a town close to you soon.

0:36:130:36:17

'It's a shame Roland and Sheila missed seeing their jug sell,

0:36:170:36:21

'but, hang on, look who's arrived a bit too late.'

0:36:210:36:24

-We've sold your jug, haven't we?

-Hello. Hello.

0:36:240:36:29

-How much?

-How much do you think?

0:36:290:36:31

-I don't know.

-Come on. Top end?

0:36:310:36:33

-Or lower end?

-Top end.

-Lower end.

0:36:330:36:35

Oh! A split decision there.

0:36:350:36:38

We actually made £460.

0:36:380:36:41

-SHEILA GASPS

-Oh, my word!

0:36:410:36:43

Is that all right?!

0:36:430:36:44

-So it hasn't been too disappointing missing it.

-Disappointed?

0:36:440:36:48

Cor! You've knocked 50 years off me.

0:36:480:36:52

Ah! Bless you, Roland.

0:36:520:36:54

I love how you brought your bag to bring it home in.

0:36:540:36:58

-HE CHUCKLES

-'A fantastic result.

0:36:580:37:00

'And less for Sheila to carry home.

0:37:000:37:03

'Next up, Nesta's crown-shaped novelties.'

0:37:030:37:07

We have two bayonet-fitting light bulbs.

0:37:070:37:09

Yes! Light bulbs, but with a difference. Made for Edward VIII.

0:37:090:37:12

It never happened for him. Made for George VI, really. Nesta, good luck.

0:37:120:37:17

No reserve. This is it. And I love these.

0:37:170:37:20

Two George VI coronation bayonet-socket light bulbs

0:37:220:37:26

in the form of crowns.

0:37:260:37:28

There we are. £20 for them?

0:37:280:37:31

20. 20 is bid. Thank you.

0:37:320:37:34

-£20. At 20.

-And they work.

0:37:340:37:38

Novelty items. At £20. And two, if you will.

0:37:380:37:41

22.

0:37:420:37:45

25. At £25.

0:37:450:37:47

Selling them, then, at £25. Last chance.

0:37:480:37:52

-Well, they've gone.

-Never mind.

0:37:520:37:54

-They've sold.

-We always said they

0:37:540:37:56

weren't going to be worth a fortune.

0:37:560:37:58

I have some comparables. I'd never seen them sold before.

0:37:580:38:00

I found comparables that had. They were around that sort of figure.

0:38:000:38:05

It's all right. At least is not on your shoulders if they break.

0:38:050:38:08

It's someone else's problem.

0:38:080:38:09

-Better than being stuck in a drawer.

-Yes, for sure.

0:38:090:38:12

We don't want things in drawers. They should be on display for everyone to enjoy.

0:38:120:38:16

-Good luck. Thank you for coming in.

-Thank you.

0:38:160:38:18

Not a huge figure for Nesta,

0:38:180:38:20

but what an original lot to have seen on the show.

0:38:200:38:23

And that brings us to the end of our show.

0:38:230:38:25

We've had a wonderful time here in Exeter. I hope you've enjoyed the show.

0:38:250:38:28

There'll be plenty more surprises to come so stay tuned. Until then, goodbye.

0:38:280:38:32

Flog It! has its beach hat on as it heads to the coastal town of Exmouth in Devon. Flog It! is top billing at Exmouth Pavilion as lots of people turn up to get their treasures valued by a team of experts. Leading the band of professionals is presenter Paul Martin, ably assisted by Will Axon and Christina Trevanion.

They are spoilt for choice with what comes in through the doors, with Paul finding a great example of a miniature wooden chest of drawers, Will getting flummoxed about the value of a lace making machine and Christina having a full table of silver to contend with.

Plus, Paul takes some time out in the Devon countryside to help a talented artist make her driftwood horse sculptures.


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