Saltaire Flog It!


Saltaire

Paul Martin is joined by experts Michael Baggott and David Barby in Saltaire in West Yorkshire. The finds include four Lalique-style light shades and a 19th-century clock.


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Transcript


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Today, we're in West Yorkshire in the pretty and historical village of Saltaire.

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It was created as a model village in 1853

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by Yorkshire industrialist Sir Titus Salt,

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and it has a rich history of architecture and culture,

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so it seems to be the perfect place to meet up with all the locals

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and look at their unwanted antiques. Welcome to Flog It!

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And this is where it all starts, a Flog It valuation day.

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And we are certainly blessed with a wonderful location -

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the grand, the very imposing Victoria Hall.

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At nearly 150 years old,

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it looks as beautiful today as it did back then.

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In fact, the whole village is totally alluring.

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It's a magnet for artists, poets, writers, musicians and, of course, today,

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hundreds of people laden with bags and boxes full of antiques.

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The lucky ones will go to auction and earn a small fortune.

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They've all come to ask that all-important question - what's it worth?

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-And when they find out, what are they going to do?

-ALL: Flog it!

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But first, we have to find it.

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And wasting no time getting stuck in are our experts,

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Michael Baggott and David Barby.

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Hugely knowledgeable in the antiques trade,

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I doubt their professional eye will miss anything of interest.

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This one guy that can remember all the letters and the dates.

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-Apart from that one!

-That is an achievement!

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Today's programme is full of fabulous items from all over the globe,

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but can you work out which one of the following ISN'T European?

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There four Lalique-style light shades,

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this late 19th-century clock

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or these porcelain scent flasks?

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Everybody is now safely seated inside, and I must say,

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the interior of this building is as spectacular and magnificent

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as the exterior, built in 1869.

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They certainly don't build things like this today, do they?

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Let's hope we can find some antiques worthy of such a venue.

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It looks like Michael has made a fantastic start. He's spotted a real gem. Take a look at this.

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-John, thank you very much for coming along today.

-You're welcome.

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-It was David who called me over in the queue earlier.

-It was.

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-He showed me this lovely purse...

-Mm-hmm.

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..and then this wonderful little fellow inside it. But where did you get them from?

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You don't look like the sort of man that has a lady's purse!

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No. They came in a box of equipment which was going to our charity,

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-the Marie Curie one.

-These were in the bottom of the donation box?

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Yes, in the bottom, in a plastic bag, along with that.

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-So when your eye spied these...

-I thought, "That's too good for the shop."

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-The glint of silver alerted you.

-The weight of it alone.

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-That's a very good point.

-It's very heavy for what it is.

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We'll look at the purse first. Basically, we've got a ladies evening bag.

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If you could afford it, in the early part of the 20th century,

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you would have a mesh bag made out of solid silver.

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Most of these aren't made in this country.

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-This meshwork is a bit too fine and delicate.

-It's very delicate.

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It was a speciality of French and German silversmiths.

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So we've got here a solid silver frame mount.

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Because it was imported, we've got the import marks for London,

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-and the date letter for 1918.

-1918.

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We do, I think, go mainly by the weight of this.

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I think we're about four ounces, three to four ounces.

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-On the kitchen scales, it was about four ounces.

-Scales in my fingers, what can I say?

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-What's more interesting is what was in it.

-That was in.

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-Do you know what that is?

-It's a Vesta.

-It is, it's a Vesta case.

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-Basically, a case for matches.

-Mmm.

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People wonder, "Why do you have cases for matches?"

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They had a tendency to go off,

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-and you'd be lucky to get out...

-Set your jacket on fire.

-Exactly!

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So, as a safety feature, they put them in metal tins, and, of course...

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-Logically.

-..as soon as you do that, as soon as it becomes an accessory,

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you want to decorate it, and make it into various novelties.

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We've got, "Guild of St Aloysius, St Cuthberts."

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-So it's obviously had...

-Church connections along the way.

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Church connections, or an association. And we've got, "souvenir" on the top.

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We have got hallmarks there, which are very nice.

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-No maker's mark, sadly, which is a little unusual.

-It's a shame.

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But we've got the hallmarks for Birmingham 1890.

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Now, there is something unusual about those marks.

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-1890 was the year when the duty on silver was abolished.

-Oh, right.

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To show that the duty had been paid, you would have the sovereign's head,

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-George III, William IV, Victoria.

-Queen Victoria.

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It's marked there.

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Because this was the year when they abolished it,

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we know that those marks are only in use up to the 1st May, 1890.

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It probably won't make a great deal of difference to the value but it's just quirky.

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What probably will make a difference to the value is the split.

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Absolutely! That instantly takes some of the value off, not a lot, I hope.

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It's not all of it but it's a little job that needs to be done.

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-I think, at auction, we would put these in together.

-I would think so.

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If they part on their separate ways after the auction,

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all the better for that.

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Let's put them in at £80 to £120.

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I reckon that at 40 to 60 and I reckon that at 40 to 60.

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-It all the profit, that's what it's going to.

-It's all for the hospice?

-Absolutely.

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-Thanks very much indeed, John.

-Thank you for that.

-It's a pleasure.

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It's a great cause and the more we can bag in the saleroom, the better.

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In the meantime, let's trot over to David Barby.

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-Mary?

-Yes.

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-I've always liked Beswick figures.

-Yes.

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Is this part of your collection you've got tired of, or what?

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No, it's a one-off. It was my step-mum's. She had it for a long time.

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-She passed away in the year 2000.

-And you've had it ever since?

-Yes.

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Do you not like it?

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Yeah, I do like it, but it's not to my decor

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and I don't want it to get damaged.

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-It's too nice for it to be damaged by the children.

-It is a very nice model.

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Beswick are very good, particularly the modelling of horses.

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-I'm just going to check that it is Beswick.

-It is.

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Yeah, there's the mark.

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-It's not often you see them reclining like this.

-No.

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This is a dappled mare, or stallion. That's rather a nice position.

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Very attentive, as though he's just caught a noise or something like that.

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His ears are upright. It's a very well-observed sculpture.

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-I like the colouring as well and the fact that it's table level.

-Yes.

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Or cabinet level. I've seen cabinets chock-a-block with these horses,

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they look very good.

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-The value of these depends on the appeal at the time of auction.

-Yeah.

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If you've got a lot of farmers in, they will bid high. Horses, very, very popular.

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Pigs are popular and sheep, anything to do with domestic animals

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and the horse is a domestic animal.

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So there's a wide interest, a wide market. Everything has its price.

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These figures are well documented,

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depending on whether they're cracked or damaged or chipped.

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This one's in lovely condition.

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I think at auction this will sell somewhere between £50 and £90.

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That sort of price range.

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They have made considerably more.

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-I'm just allowing for the state of market.

-Yeah.

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-Would you be happy at that?

-Yeah.

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I think we need to put a reserve.

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Let's guard it from going below a figure that we really want

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and put a reserve price at £50.

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-Is that acceptable?

-That's fine.

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-Can I say £50 with discretion?

-Yeah.

-OK. So if he gets 48, the hammer will come down.

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-Yeah, that's fine.

-OK. I think it's important not to lose a purchaser.

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If you get £50, what are you going to do with it?

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-I'm going to buy some ladies.

-Some ladies?

-Yes.

-Doulton ladies?

-Yes.

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Now is the time to buy, particularly at auction,

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because prices are not as high as a few years ago.

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There might be Doulton ladies at the sale when you sell this.

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I'll be looking.

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Well, it appears Michael was also looking and spotted some first.

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John, I can really have no complaint today

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because you've brought me four scantily-clad ladies.

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Where did you get them from?

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I was working on the house due for refurbishment

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and they were in boxes that were going in the skip.

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I delved into it and found one, delved a bit further and found the four glass things.

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I looked a bit further and found these and I thought...

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-Those must go with those?

-No, I didn't.

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-I brought them home, tried to fit them together and realised...

-Bingo?

-Yeah.

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It's scandalous that at any time these were heading for a skip.

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First of all, well done for stopping them going in there,

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because what a terrible loss.

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You got these home, they are signed here

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Muller Fres Luneville.

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Did you look that up, or do any work on that?

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-When I got them, I took them to a local antiques dealer to find out...

-What they were.

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He told me that Muller Fres was Muller Brothers.

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-Luneville was light city...

-Absolutely.

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And they were Art Nouveau, probably 1930s-ish.

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Near enough, near enough. I can fill it out a little bit more.

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You've got the fantastic glassworks run by Emile Galle.

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And Muller brothers, before they set up on their own,

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worked for Galle, but they left him in about 1905

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and were working through the '20s and '30s and I think they closed in 1937.

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So, basically, you've got something that's very much like,

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if anyone seen any Lalique on Flog It, it's very much in his style.

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We've got press moulded glass, which is given this contrast

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by this acid etching

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and we've got the acid etched signatures on each one.

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And lovely that we've got the original mounts.

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Whilst they trained under Galle and his wonderful techniques

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and learnt their craft there,

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by the time these were produced, which I imagine is about 1925,

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Lalique is the most fashionable glassmaker in France.

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He's the one they're imitating.

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Possibly, in some respects, surpassing.

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The figures are beautifully thought out and made.

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I think we've basically got two pairs, rather than a set of four.

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This one sadly has had a bit of damage here,

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but when that is mounted in the frame and on the wall,

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I don't honestly think that'll make a great deal of difference.

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Right, now we know all about them, it's really a question of what they're worth.

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You took them to an antiques dealer to find out what they were in the first place.

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He must have made you an offer, John. What did he say?

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He offered me £75 each for them.

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I think, at the time, that was probably quite a fair offer,

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although these things were very popular ten years ago.

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Bearing in mind the bit of damage here,

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I want to be a little bit more cautious

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and say £250 to £350 at auction

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with a fixed reserve of £250.

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I think that really is good value for whoever's looking to buy them.

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Maybe they'll go on from that.

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Why now have you decided to part with them?

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When I got them, we were doing a restoration at home

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and I thought possibly we may use them.

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We finished the restoration and never used them

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and they've just sat in that box.

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That box that might one day make it back into a skip unless we get them into the auction.

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-Yeah.

-Let's put them into the sale and hopefully they will fly on the day.

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-Thank you so much for bringing them in.

-My pleasure.

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It's a hive of activity down there.

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We certainly have been very industrious.

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We've now found our first three items to take off to auction.

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Let's up the tempo. Let's put those valuations to the test.

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While we make our way to the saleroom, here's a run-down,

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just to jog your memory of all the items going under the hammer.

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Michael got the ball rolling with the evening bag

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and Victorian Vesta case, both donated to a charity shop.

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Any profits go to a good cause.

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Next, the Beswick horse should have no problem galloping to its top estimate.

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And, finally, these glass light shades caught Michael's eye

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and I've no doubt they'll find some admirers in the saleroom.

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It's auction time, and we're just outside Halifax, at Calder Valley auctioneers

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with auctioneer Ian Peace.

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It is a jam-packed saleroom.

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Take a look at this - hundreds of people, you just cannot move.

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There's not a seat to spare. Any moment now, the auction will start.

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Ian Peace will take to the rostrum and sell the lots.

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Stay tuned, don't go away. This could get exciting.

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First up hoping to seduce the bidders are those desirable light shades.

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It's great to see you, John. I've been thinking about these ever since yesterday

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when I chatted to the auctioneer. Ian fell in love with them, I like them...

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Obviously, great subject matter but it's pure quality. Pure quality.

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Not quite sure if the brackets were made for them. They look like a rough cast.

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-They do, but remember they're experts in making glass, not metal mounts.

-OK.

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They do fit when they are up on the wall.

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-The thing is, they're very stylish.

-Very architectural as well.

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Get a set of two or four in a row, and you've got this stunning look.

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Found in a skip! That's unbelievable.

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Let's find out what the bidders think. We know we'll get the top end.

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This could get exciting. Stay tuned, here we go.

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Shades there, what am I bid for this lot here, ladies and gentlemen?

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I've got two commission bids and I'm going to start this at £200.

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At £200.

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At 225 and £250.

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We're in.

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At 275, I have 300 here.

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At £320.

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At £340 on commission.

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At 360 in the room.

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At £360. At 360.

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Are there any further bids? At £360.

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Come on, we can go a bit.

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All done?

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-They've gone. £360.

-Got those away.

-Got them away. Well done, Michael.

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Well, they certainly attracted a lot of interest

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and it's a good job John didn't sell them for the £300 he was offered.

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Next up, it's our old friend, Beswick.

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-It's got to go, hasn't it?

-Yes.

-It does. It doesn't fit the decor.

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That's what everybody's been saying.

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They're talking about that Beswick horse.

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Mind you, Beswick is contemporary,

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it does work with some modern situations.

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I can understand why people want to get rid of Victorian mirrors and over-the-top things

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but there is a big market for Beswick horses.

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-We've seen it on the show before. Mr Barby, what do you think of this one?

-I rather like this.

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Unusual because it's reclining - that's probably going to sell it - as opposed to reclining.

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-He looks good. I know you want to put the money towards some figurines.

-Yeah.

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Fingers crossed, we need as much money as possible. This is it, let's see what this lot think.

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The Beswick model of a Shire mare.

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Shall we say 50? £40.

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-£40, thank you very much.

-40, straight in.

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I'll go in fives, 45, 50, and 5, 60, and 5, 70.

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75 at the back of the room.

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-80, fresh bidder.

-That's good.

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Right over there at £80. Are there any further bids?

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You're back in, 85, thank you.

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-That's good, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-£85, then, on my left.

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-Top end, well done.

-That just shows how popular Beswick is.

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It always is. There's a big market for it.

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Well done on the valuation as well.

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It's a minefield, valuing Beswick, we've seen it on the show before.

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You could have a different colour, grey, and it might not sell.

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It could be a black mare and they fetch three times the money.

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-Look, it's gone, you're happy.

-Yes.

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-You can get some figurines, hopefully.

-Yes.

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Well, so far so good. Let's hope that continues with John's charity lot.

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Next up, something that's been found in a charity shop.

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It's a ladies evening bag with Vesta case.

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-It's been brought in by John. Did you find this yourself?

-I did.

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A box of stuff came to the hospice and in the bottom was a plastic bag with this.

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I thought, "It's too good to put on the stall."

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We would have probably got £4 or £5.

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It's a good trade lot, silver purse, silver Vesta.

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Nice things at antiques fairs.

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-There should be two or three bidders.

-Yeah.

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-We'll see the middle or maybe the top end.

-OK.

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-Oh, that's good.

-It's positive, isn't it?

-Absolutely.

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It's a good time to sell silver as well, the prices are high.

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Here we go. This is it.

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And the silver mesh ladies mesh evening bag

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and it's with a Victorian silver oval Vesta case.

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What am I bid for this lot here?

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100? 80? 50, I have.

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We're in.

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Low start, but it will climb.

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£70. 80, do I see? At 70 and 80.

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Oh! That's better.

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90, madam, £90. £100.

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That's even better.

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£100, any advance on 100?

0:17:200:17:22

£110 there. 120.

0:17:220:17:26

They like it, that's the main thing.

0:17:260:17:29

I think it's reached its value.

0:17:290:17:31

First and last time...

0:17:310:17:32

-Good result.

-Well done.

0:17:320:17:34

That's a pleasure.

0:17:340:17:35

Thankfully, the money is all going back to charity.

0:17:350:17:38

And thanks to you, you spotted it.

0:17:380:17:40

A lot of these things do sneak out, don't they?

0:17:400:17:42

It costs us £9,000 a day to keep the hospice open.

0:17:420:17:45

-Does it really?

-It does.

-So every penny helps.

-Of course it does.

0:17:450:17:48

So that's it for our first visit to the saleroom.

0:17:490:17:52

Now, one of the ways auction houses earn their money is to try

0:17:520:17:56

to authenticate items before they go under the hammer.

0:17:560:17:59

It takes expertise and detective work and it's not as easy as you might think.

0:17:590:18:03

I've come to Temple Newsam in Leeds to discover for myself

0:18:050:18:08

just how tricky certifying antiques can be,

0:18:080:18:12

particularly in one of my favourite areas, furniture.

0:18:120:18:17

For me, there's one name that always tops the list when it comes to good design and cabinet making.

0:18:170:18:22

That name is as popular today as it was two and a half centuries ago -

0:18:220:18:26

the legend, Thomas Chippendale.

0:18:260:18:28

Chippendale was born in West Yorkshire in 1718.

0:18:300:18:35

His wood furniture design and craftsmanship soon became renowned nationwide,

0:18:350:18:39

like these examples at Harewood House.

0:18:390:18:43

His name is famous throughout the world

0:18:430:18:45

but his work can be more difficult to identify than you may think.

0:18:450:18:49

Even if you have got £1 million to spend,

0:18:490:18:51

it doesn't guarantee you'll get a genuine, authenticated piece.

0:18:510:18:56

Take this exquisite Harrington commode, for example.

0:18:560:19:00

It recently sold at Sotheby's for over £3.5 million -

0:19:000:19:05

a world record for any piece of English furniture.

0:19:050:19:08

Even with a price tag like that, is not guaranteed to be by Thomas Chippendale.

0:19:080:19:14

Rather, it was described as, "Almost certainly crafted by him."

0:19:140:19:18

However, this Rococo rosewood bookcase at Dumfries house

0:19:180:19:22

is authenticated as a Thomas Chippendale piece.

0:19:220:19:26

It was estimated in 2007 by Christie's at £4 million.

0:19:260:19:30

It's thought that if sold at auction it could triple that estimate

0:19:300:19:34

which would make it one of the most valuable pieces of furniture in the world.

0:19:340:19:38

So how do you spot the genuine article?

0:19:380:19:42

It's estimated there are around 600 authenticated pieces

0:19:420:19:46

of Thomas Chippendale's work surviving in the world today.

0:19:460:19:50

When I mean that, I mean works made by Thomas Chippendale

0:19:500:19:54

during his lifetime from his workshops in St Martin's Lane, London.

0:19:540:19:58

Add to that, of other craftsmen working around the country

0:19:580:20:01

who merely emulated his work.

0:20:010:20:04

Take these four chairs as an example.

0:20:040:20:07

One of them is the odd one out and it's really difficult to tell.

0:20:070:20:11

All of them are beautiful works from the 18th century and are based on a Thomas Chippendale design.

0:20:150:20:20

One of them isn't a genuine Chippendale, but which one?

0:20:200:20:24

Well, there are clues.

0:20:240:20:25

So, looking at this chair now, typical latticework back.

0:20:270:20:31

Obviously, the Chinoiserie period.

0:20:310:20:33

Wonderful carved cresting on the back rail.

0:20:330:20:36

Good, deep colour to the mahogany. Cuban mahogany, only the best.

0:20:360:20:40

This was quarter sawn, the heart wood, very expensive to use

0:20:400:20:44

because there was a lot of waste. Thomas's chairs were expensive in their day.

0:20:440:20:49

Wonderful carved open splat backs as well, which Thomas Chippendale was renowned for.

0:20:490:20:55

A little bit of French influence from the Rococo, the early period, here.

0:20:550:20:59

High cab leg, crisp carving,

0:20:590:21:00

terminating in a wonderful dancing hoof foot.

0:21:000:21:05

Look at the broadness of the seats, no expense spared

0:21:050:21:08

because these chairs were made for wealthy gentleman.

0:21:080:21:12

Gentleman, who had made it in life.

0:21:120:21:14

They were rich, they were portly, so it had to take their weight and their abuse.

0:21:140:21:18

I love this chair with this splat back look, that lyre.

0:21:180:21:22

That's taken a great deal of skill to do.

0:21:220:21:24

A bit of neoclassical influence -

0:21:240:21:26

the little roundel with the beads, typical of Thomas Chippendale.

0:21:260:21:30

The C scroll here and that whole Robert Adam thing coming into play,

0:21:300:21:34

the grand tour.

0:21:340:21:36

We've got these neoclassical columns, fluted legs,

0:21:360:21:39

terminating on a block foot.

0:21:390:21:41

That looks like the pillar of a Roman temple.

0:21:410:21:44

This chair, lastly - it's got a lovely splat back.

0:21:440:21:48

It's a smaller proportion than the rest of the chairs.

0:21:480:21:51

It's slightly lighter in hue.

0:21:510:21:54

I would say that's not Cuban mahogany.

0:21:540:21:56

I would say the proportions aren't generous enough for Thomas Chippendale.

0:21:560:22:01

They are mean, slightly pinched.

0:22:010:22:02

So, for me, that one is the odd one out.

0:22:020:22:05

I tell you what, it is so difficult to tell.

0:22:050:22:08

So why is there furniture in the style of Chippendale

0:22:090:22:12

but not actually made by him?

0:22:120:22:14

It's all because of a book he published in 1754

0:22:150:22:18

called The Gentleman And Cabinet Maker's Director.

0:22:180:22:21

It was extremely influential and a real marketing coup -

0:22:230:22:26

the first book to be published with deluxe furniture designs.

0:22:260:22:30

The rich could choose which designs they wanted

0:22:300:22:33

and place an order, or any decent furniture maker could copy them.

0:22:330:22:37

It was such a hit, two more editions followed.

0:22:370:22:39

Here at Temple Newsam, they have some wonderful authenticated examples of his work.

0:22:410:22:46

Some are owned by the house and others by the Chippendale Society.

0:22:460:22:50

The star piece is this writing table.

0:22:500:22:53

I caught up with Ian Fraser, the in-house furniture expert...

0:22:530:22:56

..who is also the Chippendale Society's honorary conservator,

0:22:590:23:02

and fellow furniture enthusiast, to tell me more about it.

0:23:020:23:05

-Ian, hello.

-How do you do?

0:23:090:23:11

I couldn't come to Temple Newsam without speaking to you

0:23:110:23:14

-and seeing this magnificent desk.

-It's good, isn't it?

0:23:140:23:17

It really is the Holy Grail. How did it arrive here?

0:23:170:23:20

Harewood House, when it was still a private house, they sold it.

0:23:200:23:23

I guess perhaps the Lordship needed the money.

0:23:230:23:26

It came up for auction in 1963

0:23:260:23:30

and it was acquired for Leeds City Art Gallery for display at Temple Newsam house.

0:23:300:23:34

It's got that country house, lived-in look.

0:23:340:23:36

-It's lost a lot of the colour on the marquetry.

-It has. Inevitably, it has.

0:23:360:23:40

It's lost the greens and the reds but I don't mind that.

0:23:400:23:43

-How do you know it's a genuine Chippendale, are there receipts?

-There are, at Harewood house.

0:23:430:23:48

This is part of Chippendale's greatest commission for Harewood House.

0:23:480:23:52

They have the documentary evidence. That's why we know it's Chippendale.

0:23:520:23:56

-Absolutely no question.

-Do you know what year this was made in?

-1772, I think.

0:23:560:24:02

The height of the neoclassical period.

0:24:020:24:04

-You can see it's neoclassical, can't you?

-Yes.

0:24:040:24:07

-The wonderful applied architectural detail.

-Swags and pinion, yeah.

0:24:070:24:12

-Have you worked on this at all?

-I have done some remedial works to it.

0:24:120:24:16

Lifting veneers, putting them back down.

0:24:160:24:19

It was interesting because we were able to see

0:24:190:24:22

some of the original colours

0:24:220:24:23

when we turned the veneers over.

0:24:230:24:25

You can learn so much just from looking at the joints.

0:24:250:24:29

The quality of the cabinet making is outstanding, it really is.

0:24:290:24:32

Do the drawers slide as beautifully as they did...?

0:24:320:24:35

-Yes, you're welcome to try it if you like.

-Pull one out for me.

-We can try.

0:24:350:24:40

-Yes, they do...

-Have a dovetail.

0:24:410:24:44

Let's take it out completely

0:24:440:24:46

and you can see the quality of the dovetail joints there.

0:24:460:24:49

Yeah. Look at that. The dovetails, yeah.

0:24:490:24:52

-It's just outstanding quality.

-Cut with a fine tenon saw.

0:24:520:24:56

-You're from Canada, aren't you?

-That's right.

0:24:560:24:59

What do you think about Chippendale?

0:24:590:25:01

-Does he make the grade over there?

-Oh, absolutely.

0:25:010:25:04

I mean, the name of Thomas Chippendale is synonymous with fine craftsmanship and design.

0:25:040:25:09

It is incredible. If you're into cabinet making

0:25:090:25:12

and find craftsmanship like this...

0:25:120:25:15

He was light years ahead.

0:25:150:25:16

-It's a religious experience, isn't it?

-Approaching it, yes.

0:25:160:25:20

The books were the key to his success.

0:25:250:25:27

They reached a wider audience and he became a household name.

0:25:270:25:31

He was really clever. He didn't just target the gentleman of the house,

0:25:310:25:35

he targeted the ladies, making smaller, delicate pieces of furniture for them.

0:25:350:25:39

In short, he was a marketing genius

0:25:390:25:41

and he didn't mind other craftsmen copying him.

0:25:410:25:45

He even advertised the fact, and that is why today we see

0:25:450:25:49

so many pieces of furniture of the Chippendale style

0:25:490:25:52

and of the Chippendale period.

0:25:520:25:54

But unless you have a piece of furniture that's made by Thomas Chippendale

0:25:540:25:58

in his workshops in St Martin's Lane in London,

0:25:580:26:01

with documented evidence and a bill of sale,

0:26:010:26:04

you will never know for sure if it's the genuine article.

0:26:040:26:08

Welcome back to Victoria Hall,

0:26:160:26:18

our valuation day venue here in Saltaire.

0:26:180:26:20

I must say, there's still a crowd outside. The room is full inside.

0:26:200:26:24

We really do have our work cut out today.

0:26:240:26:27

But right now let's catch up with our experts

0:26:270:26:29

and see what else we can find to take off to auction.

0:26:290:26:32

And David is up first with Catherine and her son Harry.

0:26:320:26:37

I'm always surprised when people want to sell medals,

0:26:370:26:42

because they are part of your history.

0:26:420:26:45

In particular, for people like Harry's age,

0:26:450:26:48

because he might want to ask you in years to come,

0:26:480:26:51

"What did my grandfather do? "What did Great-grandfather do?"

0:26:510:26:55

-Yeah.

-What can you show him from that period?

0:26:550:26:58

Do these belong to your family?

0:26:580:26:59

They did, but they weren't immediate family.

0:26:590:27:02

It was my grandfather's father's...

0:27:020:27:05

-Was it grandfather's father's...?

-Grandfather's brother's wife's brother.

-That's it.

0:27:050:27:10

SHE LAUGHS

0:27:100:27:11

So very distantly related.

0:27:110:27:13

I can understand why you wanted to sell these. They are interesting.

0:27:130:27:18

They are part of our history and I like the idea that someone

0:27:180:27:22

is going to obtain that and these medals

0:27:220:27:24

and melt them into a collage with a description of the history of this particular gentleman

0:27:240:27:31

who died during the war and you've got this preserved for posterity.

0:27:310:27:35

How did you get hold of them?

0:27:350:27:37

It was my mother that's given them to myself and my brother.

0:27:370:27:40

-You know, she did say to sell them if we wished.

-Right.

0:27:400:27:44

I think they're going to make an interesting sum.

0:27:440:27:47

What is so interesting is this gentleman here.

0:27:470:27:51

Joseph Johnson Greenwood.

0:27:510:27:54

He was only 19 when he died.

0:27:540:27:57

That's right, yes.

0:27:570:27:59

He died in modern day Iraq - it was called Mesopotamia -

0:27:590:28:03

at a town called Amara.

0:28:030:28:05

-This is all detailed for posterity in war records.

-Yes.

0:28:050:28:10

-We know also that he died at a hospital camp.

-Yes.

0:28:100:28:13

But all that is left of that gentleman is this bronze disc here

0:28:130:28:17

which was awarded, or sent,

0:28:170:28:19

to all the families that lost loved ones at the front.

0:28:190:28:25

-Right.

-That is why it was sent.

0:28:250:28:27

In addition, there are two medals here.

0:28:270:28:31

The Victory For Civilisation medal,

0:28:310:28:34

and this is the Military Medal here.

0:28:340:28:37

To accompany those medals, we've also got the certificates

0:28:370:28:40

which were sent in the box.

0:28:400:28:42

Those were sent together with ribbons so they could be worn.

0:28:420:28:45

-These were all sent posthumously.

-Yes.

0:28:450:28:49

-Because he had died by the time these medals were struck.

-Yes.

0:28:490:28:53

From his person, we have this almost Bakelite tag.

0:28:530:28:58

So, if he was found, many years later, from his remains,

0:28:580:29:02

that tag would have survived and we could tell who he was.

0:29:020:29:06

And stamped into that we have the name "Greenwood, The King's Own".

0:29:060:29:10

Somewhere along the line, he acquired this one here,

0:29:100:29:15

which is War Munitions Volunteers.

0:29:150:29:18

One wonders whether, in fact, he was given that because he volunteered underage.

0:29:180:29:24

Oh, right, yes.

0:29:240:29:25

Or whether he got through into the Army because he was a volunteer.

0:29:250:29:29

Let's talk about valuation money.

0:29:290:29:32

We're selling a little bit of English history here.

0:29:320:29:36

There are collectors out there of militaria and in particular medals and medallions.

0:29:360:29:41

When these go up for sale, with all the documentation,

0:29:410:29:44

I think someone will pay between £100 and £120.

0:29:440:29:48

I think we need to put a reserve on it

0:29:480:29:50

and it has to be either close to, or on £100, with discretion.

0:29:500:29:55

Right.

0:29:550:29:56

-Is that going to be invested in Harry?

-Of course!

0:29:560:30:01

All I can see is ice creams!

0:30:010:30:03

I feel very privileged to have handled these

0:30:030:30:06

-and looked at the documentation. Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:30:060:30:10

It's always a poignant reminder to what previous generations sacrificed

0:30:100:30:14

when we see medals like that on the programme.

0:30:140:30:16

Let's check in with Michael, who's found something from a bit further afield.

0:30:200:30:24

Angela, Andy, thank you for bringing along these exquisite little vases.

0:30:240:30:29

Is it a case of one each? Who do they belong to?

0:30:290:30:33

-We haven't discussed that, have we?

-I think we'll share them, yes.

0:30:330:30:36

Marvellous. Where did they come from?

0:30:360:30:38

They were from my grandmother. My mother then inherited them

0:30:380:30:41

and then subsequently they came down to me.

0:30:410:30:43

I heard that my grandfather collected antiques.

0:30:430:30:46

They weren't antiques - they were probably new when he collected them,

0:30:460:30:50

in the early part of the 20th century.

0:30:500:30:53

About 1900, 1910?

0:30:530:30:55

I would imagine that was about the period when he acquired these.

0:30:550:30:58

If I could build a time machine and go back to buying then,

0:30:580:31:01

that would be absolutely wonderful.

0:31:010:31:03

-Are they treasured things?

-I've always liked them, really.

0:31:030:31:08

We did have a valuation done on them about six years ago.

0:31:080:31:12

-Right.

-They said that because there was some slight damage

0:31:120:31:16

on one of the necks and on the base of one of them,

0:31:160:31:20

they would probably be valued around £200 to £400.

0:31:200:31:24

That's a help for me, anyway.

0:31:240:31:26

That was at the time, but I really don't know.

0:31:260:31:30

We've got these two lovely designs. Angela, which is your favourite?

0:31:300:31:34

Definitely that one.

0:31:340:31:36

-Andy, which one do you prefer?

-I prefer the other one.

0:31:360:31:39

I mean, I have to say, whilst the quality of this is breathtaking,

0:31:390:31:43

-there is something in the aesthetic there that I love.

-So delicate.

0:31:430:31:47

I'm with you on that, Angela.

0:31:470:31:49

It's this attention on small items that appeals to the Japanese market as well.

0:31:490:31:54

You've got the cherry blossom here or sakura.

0:31:540:31:57

You've got probably another indigenous Japanese flower here.

0:31:570:32:01

You've got these little covers

0:32:010:32:05

and hopefully, we've got... Yes, signatures.

0:32:050:32:08

We've got a seal mark. That's the stylised signature of the artist.

0:32:080:32:13

We've got...

0:32:130:32:14

Again, another one. That appears to be a different mark.

0:32:140:32:18

It's a bit more finely executed.

0:32:180:32:20

-Does that mean it's different maker?

-Possibly, there's a potter that has produced this form

0:32:200:32:26

but independent artists decorated them in a different way.

0:32:260:32:29

-Oh, right.

-Yes.

0:32:290:32:31

These things were made at the end of the 19th century

0:32:310:32:34

for the Western market.

0:32:340:32:37

When your grandfather bought these, they probably came in little fitted pine or cherry wood cases.

0:32:370:32:42

You would actually have more information about the vases

0:32:420:32:45

decorated onto the front.

0:32:450:32:47

-As is the way...

-They would be discarded.

0:32:470:32:50

We being vulgar Westerners,

0:32:500:32:51

we chuck the boxes away and put them on the mantelpiece.

0:32:510:32:55

The Japanese aesthetic is to keep these things in the boxes

0:32:550:32:58

because they believe the more you look at an item,

0:32:580:33:02

the more it devalues it aesthetically.

0:33:020:33:05

It's the whole ritual of taking an item out in an box.

0:33:050:33:10

It would have a silk cord around it. You would unwrap it,

0:33:100:33:13

and you would take your vase out, your friend would look at it,

0:33:130:33:16

and then it would go back and live in the box.

0:33:160:33:18

So, without the boxes and with the chips...

0:33:180:33:21

And believe you me, Japanese collectors do not like imperfection in any way or form,

0:33:210:33:27

-no matter how small those chips are, they will fixate on them.

-Yes.

0:33:270:33:31

Still, I think they're lovely.

0:33:310:33:33

I think they're probably the most beautiful bit of Oriental porcelain we've ever had on Flog It.

0:33:330:33:38

The problem is the market has gone down slightly

0:33:380:33:42

in the last six or seven years.

0:33:420:33:45

Japanese things used to be what everybody wanted and now it's Chinese things.

0:33:450:33:50

Having said that, your initial valuation,

0:33:500:33:52

even given the little bits of damage, was probably quite low.

0:33:520:33:56

So let's give them a go.

0:33:560:33:58

Let's say £300 to £500.

0:33:580:34:01

-Yeah?

-Let's put a reserve, with a little bit of discretion,

0:34:010:34:04

-so let's fix it at, say, 250.

-Yes.

0:34:040:34:07

-Which is more than the original valuation.

-Yes.

-Let's see if a couple of people

0:34:070:34:11

fall in love with them.

0:34:110:34:12

I know today I certainly have. Thank you so much for bringing them in.

0:34:120:34:16

Thank you.

0:34:160:34:17

-It's Jeff and Jane?

-Yes.

-Do you jointly own this?

0:34:230:34:27

Is it a family heirloom? From which side?

0:34:270:34:30

-It was given to Jane.

-Yes.

-Given to you by whom?

0:34:300:34:32

By an eccentric uncle.

0:34:320:34:34

-An eccentric uncle?

-Yes.

0:34:340:34:36

-It is a bit of an eccentric clock, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:34:360:34:39

-Is this all that he left you?

-He actually gave me it before he died.

0:34:390:34:43

But he did leave lots of very interesting things.

0:34:430:34:46

The things I'm looking for are the missing objects,

0:34:460:34:51

two vases or candlesticks either side.

0:34:510:34:54

Then that would complete the garniture de cheminee.

0:34:540:34:58

In other words, a clock with two side pieces.

0:34:580:35:02

-Do you have those at home and not recognised what they were?

-No.

0:35:020:35:06

It would be nice if we had the complete set. Now we're just looking at an unusual clock

0:35:060:35:10

and this would have been sold around 1870, 1880.

0:35:100:35:15

What I like about this, first of all, it's a time piece

0:35:150:35:18

with a conventional movement, probably by Japy Freres.

0:35:180:35:21

Just think of the house that would have come from.

0:35:210:35:24

Either a French property, or it's been imported into England,

0:35:240:35:27

and this would have been standing, together with the two side pieces,

0:35:270:35:31

on a walnut credenza,

0:35:310:35:33

a rather ornate piece of furniture, for display.

0:35:330:35:36

Because this is a display piece.

0:35:360:35:39

What I like about it is the components.

0:35:390:35:42

We have blue and white ceramic and these gilded metal sections

0:35:420:35:45

which at some time or other have been lacquered.

0:35:450:35:48

We're not running into a vast amount of money.

0:35:480:35:51

What I like about the ceramic is it is a copy

0:35:510:35:55

of a type of ceramic that existed

0:35:550:35:59

during the 17th and 18th century in Holland, Delft.

0:35:590:36:04

We are looking back to the 18th century for inspiration

0:36:040:36:08

for this ceramic piece.

0:36:080:36:10

It looks slightly Oriental and that's because Oriental porcelain

0:36:100:36:14

was being imported into Europe and the Europeans copied the Oriental pieces.

0:36:140:36:18

The actual movement itself is eight-day and it strikes on a bell.

0:36:180:36:24

That's a good quality movement. The actual face itself is decorated

0:36:240:36:29

with a sort of rose lancet design in the middle.

0:36:290:36:33

Then you have all this decorative elements of lion heads

0:36:330:36:37

and ring handles mounted on this.

0:36:370:36:39

It's made to look more expensive,

0:36:390:36:42

more luxurious than actually it is.

0:36:420:36:46

If you look at it, it goes against all the dictates of modern fashion.

0:36:460:36:50

Modern fashion is minimalism and this is certainly not minimalistic.

0:36:500:36:55

We've got to aim it at a sensible figure to appeal to a wide market.

0:36:550:37:00

I'm thinking, in terms of the price range, of about £200 to £300.

0:37:000:37:05

Hopefully, more up to about £400.

0:37:050:37:08

-Would you be happy at that sort of price range?

-Yes.

0:37:080:37:11

I think we ought to put a reserve on this of £200. OK?

0:37:110:37:15

-We've got to protect your uncle's memory.

-Yes.

0:37:150:37:17

Our experts are now making their final choices of the day

0:37:210:37:24

and I have to say a big thank you to everybody who's turned up

0:37:240:37:28

and a fond farewell to this magnificent venue, Victoria Hall here in Saltaire.

0:37:280:37:32

We do have to put those items under the hammer. Let's up the tempo.

0:37:320:37:36

We're going over to the Calder Valley right now

0:37:360:37:38

and here's a quick recap of what we're taking.

0:37:380:37:41

David reminded us all how important our social history is

0:37:410:37:46

with a collection of World War I medals.

0:37:460:37:49

Michael sniffed out two beautiful Japanese porcelain scent flasks.

0:37:500:37:54

And finally, this superb ostentatious 19th-century clock.

0:37:560:38:01

So we're back at Calder Valley auctioneers

0:38:070:38:10

and taking to the rostrum for us again is auctioneer Ian Peace.

0:38:100:38:14

Before we unleash the bidders, I had a chat with Ian

0:38:140:38:17

to get his take on the sweet little Japanese scent bottles.

0:38:170:38:20

Thank you for this, this is one of our lots coming up in the sale tomorrow.

0:38:200:38:24

Double gourd scent bottles, Japanese, early 20th century.

0:38:240:38:28

Michael has put £300 to £500 on them, with a fixed reserve of £250.

0:38:280:38:34

Are we still on the money?

0:38:340:38:36

No, since the original filming they have been increased to £300.

0:38:360:38:39

I think that's a little bit high.

0:38:390:38:41

Are the marks definitely Makuzu?

0:38:410:38:43

We can't be certain. They are of that style.

0:38:430:38:45

-There's a slight variation in each vase.

-OK.

0:38:450:38:48

-There is not enough there to actually attribute to...

-Makuzu. Right.

0:38:480:38:53

-But we are on the money, still? £300 to £500?

-Bottom estimate.

0:38:530:38:56

That's OK, we can work with that. That's what auctions are all about.

0:38:560:39:00

People get excited, they bid each other up,

0:39:000:39:02

and before you know where you are, you've got a surprise. It could be the top end. Stay tuned.

0:39:020:39:07

So now it's sale day.

0:39:070:39:08

The room is packed and our next lot under the hammer are the medals.

0:39:080:39:12

We've got one bronze memorial plaque and some medals brought in by Catherine and her son,

0:39:120:39:17

who can't be with us today because he is at school.

0:39:170:39:20

-These have been in the family quite a long time, haven't they?

-They have, yes.

0:39:200:39:23

Let's find out what the bidders think. These things normally sell well. Here we go.

0:39:230:39:27

The First World War medals, together with the bronze death plaque.

0:39:290:39:33

May I say 60? 60 I have.

0:39:330:39:35

£60, thank you. 60, 70 do I see?

0:39:350:39:39

At 70 here, then. At 80, at 90, 100.

0:39:390:39:44

110, 120, 130, 140. £140 bid.

0:39:440:39:49

£140 bid. At 140 on my left.

0:39:490:39:53

-150...

-That's good, that's a late bidder.

-160.

0:39:530:39:57

£160 all settled.

0:39:570:40:00

£160, the hammer went down. It was a very quiet hammer, going down.

0:40:000:40:04

It wasn't the normal knock we have. It was £160.

0:40:040:40:08

-I think it was the Iraq connection that made the difference.

-Do you?

-Yes.

0:40:080:40:12

-Happy with that?

-Very, yes.

-You've got to be happy with that?

0:40:120:40:15

-Yes.

-Well done.

-Is it going to Harry?

0:40:150:40:17

It will be going towards the trip that we're going on together.

0:40:170:40:20

For Harry. Harry, I hope you're watching this.

0:40:200:40:23

Good luck at school as well. Keep studying.

0:40:230:40:25

Next it's time for Jeff and Jane's flamboyant clock.

0:40:280:40:32

Good luck, good luck. Why are you selling this clock?

0:40:320:40:35

It doesn't really go with our decor, really.

0:40:350:40:38

-It's a lot to look at, isn't it?

-I think so.

0:40:380:40:40

-It's a shame we haven't got the complete set.

-Yes.

0:40:400:40:43

The garniture de cheminee - we haven't got the two vases.

0:40:430:40:45

-Then it would look great, wouldn't it?

-Splendid, yes.

0:40:450:40:48

A striking clock, put it on a plinth in a house, it would look marvellous.

0:40:480:40:52

-It's coming up now.

-Let's find out what all the bidders in the room think, shall we?

0:40:520:40:56

The late 19th century continental porcelain mantel clock.

0:40:570:41:02

Right, a couple of hundred, 150.

0:41:020:41:03

£100, 100.

0:41:030:41:06

At 110, 120, 130...

0:41:060:41:09

This guy's keen.

0:41:090:41:11

150, 160, 170, 180.

0:41:110:41:14

-I think it's going.

-190.

0:41:140:41:16

-It's going.

-190...

0:41:160:41:19

Are we all done at 190?

0:41:190:41:21

-One more go.

-At 190, 200 do I see?

0:41:210:41:23

We're just short of the reserve at 190. 200 I can take.

0:41:230:41:28

Is there a bid of 200, if not, at £190...

0:41:280:41:30

Not sold.

0:41:300:41:33

He didn't sell it for the sake of £10.

0:41:330:41:35

-I would have sold that.

-So would I.

0:41:350:41:37

-I would have used my discretion. Would you have done?

-I would.

0:41:370:41:40

I'm not so bothered, it will go back on my piano.

0:41:400:41:43

Thank you for putting smiles on our faces, anyway.

0:41:430:41:46

It was a lovely thing. Really nice.

0:41:460:41:48

-Pleasure.

-Never mind.

-We nearly did it, we nearly did it.

0:41:480:41:51

And now for our final lot - the Japanese scent bottles.

0:41:520:41:56

I wonder how Michael will react when I tell him what the auctioneer said.

0:41:560:42:00

Andrew and Angela, good luck. I've been looking forward to this.

0:42:000:42:03

And, Michael, it's good to see you again.

0:42:030:42:06

The Japanese scent bottles, absolutely beautiful.

0:42:060:42:09

I had a chat to the auctioneer yesterday.

0:42:090:42:11

He said not quite an identical pair

0:42:110:42:13

and not possibly by the maker you thought.

0:42:130:42:16

They're individual vases but they've been put together.

0:42:160:42:19

-They are by Makuzu Kozan...

-Right.

0:42:190:42:22

..under the workshop run by his stepson, Hanzan.

0:42:220:42:25

Because they're so small, they've signed them

0:42:250:42:27

with the two-character seal mark instead of the standard four.

0:42:270:42:31

See, he does know his stuff. I had a chat to the auctioneer and I was thinking,

0:42:310:42:35

"Will this affect the value?" Ian said "No." He's still happy with the 300 to 500.

0:42:350:42:39

He was more cautious on the lower end.

0:42:390:42:41

Let's find out what this lot here think, shall we? Good luck.

0:42:410:42:44

A fine pair of early 20th century porcelain gourd-shaped scent flasks.

0:42:450:42:50

150, anywhere? At £100 to open.

0:42:500:42:52

-100, I have. 125.

-150, 175...

0:42:520:42:57

Oh, we're bit low yet.

0:42:570:42:58

210 here. 220, if you like. 210.

0:42:580:43:02

At 210. Any advance at 220? 230...

0:43:020:43:07

There's a bid on the book, look.

0:43:070:43:08

250 here.

0:43:080:43:10

And 60, 260. 270, any further bids?

0:43:100:43:13

Going then at £270.

0:43:130:43:16

He's using the discretion.

0:43:160:43:18

At £270, then. First and last time.

0:43:180:43:21

You're both right. Ian said yesterday the lower end,

0:43:230:43:26

but we're happy.

0:43:260:43:27

-Michael's happy. Yes?

-Yes, oh, yes.

0:43:270:43:30

It's always the thing. Had they not been chipped,

0:43:300:43:33

then they appeal to a totally different Japanese domestic market.

0:43:330:43:37

-Anyway, that made great telly. Is it, isn't it? Is it?

-It is.

0:43:370:43:41

And we did the business.

0:43:410:43:43

That's it, it's all over. Another day in another saleroom for Flog It.

0:43:460:43:51

We've had a bit of a mixed day, some highs and lows but at least

0:43:510:43:55

everybody has gone home happy, and that's what it's all about.

0:43:550:43:58

I hope you enjoy the show. See you next time for some more surprises.

0:43:580:44:01

Until then, from the Calder Valley, it's goodbye.

0:44:010:44:04

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:44:260:44:29

Flog It! is in West Yorkshire in the historic village of Saltaire. Presenter Paul Martin is joined by experts Michael Baggott and David Barby.

Michael lights up when four Lalique-style light shades catch his eye, while David goes over the top with a superbly ostentatious 19th-century clock. With all this excitement about, presenter Paul indulges his passion for furniture design; he discovers just how difficult authenticating a piece by the master of English furniture design Thomas Chippendale actually is.


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