Coventry Flog It!


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Coventry

Antiques series. At Coventry Transport Museum, Paul Martin is in the driving seat and experts James Lewis and Claire Rawle are along for the ride.


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Where I'm standing today is totally unique.

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Over there are the remains of a 12th-century cathedral,

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created by none other than Lady Godiva and her husband.

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Over here, the bombed-out remains of a medieval cathedral

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and over here, one of the country's most modern cathedrals.

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Only one city can boast three cathedrals, and that's Coventry.

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Welcome to Flog It!

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Today, we're at the fantastic Coventry Transport Museum,

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home to 240 cars and 94 motorcycles

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and hundreds of people laden with antiques and collectables,

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all here to see our experts and get a valuation.

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And if you're happy with the valuation,

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what are you going to do?

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ALL: Flog it!

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But it didn't stay dry for long.

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Armed with an umbrella and a smile, James Lewis and Claire Rawle

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go in search of antiques that will get them misty-eyed.

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And being British, they couldn't help but mention the weather.

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-What have we got?

-A sewing machine...

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-A what?!

-A sewing machine.

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I thought you said a swimming machine!

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-Quite a good idea in this weather!

-Yeah, just the job.

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There's already a lot of traffic queueing up

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to find out whether they'll be flogging it at auction.

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So, let's get off to a speedy start.

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It's time to get these people inside, into the warm,

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and get on with the valuing.

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In fact, it's 9:30, the countdown has already begun. Look.

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THEY CHEER

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-Are you ready...?

-BUZZER

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Are you ready to go inside?

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-ALL: Yes!

-Come on, then!

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At last, shelter from the rain

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comes in the form of Coventry Transport Museum.

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Over 850 valuations will take place on these tables

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in the next eight hours.

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And here's a peek of what we'll see today,

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and not everything is as it appears.

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The Olympic flame has arrived at Flog It!

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Well, the torch, at least.

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Used in the 1948 Games, this is sure to set the auction room on fire,

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but will it get bronze, silver, or stacks of gold?

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And what is the pleasant surprise in store for the readers of this book?

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And at auction, things are getting tense.

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-I'm shaking!

-I can see you standing there, like this...

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Well, our experts' motors are certainly running

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here at the valuation tables.

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We're surrounded by cars and antiques

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and it looks like James Lewis is our first expert to the tables.

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Let's take a closer look at what he's spotted.

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Well, Joy, I have to tell you, I have always been a book lover.

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Not normal books, but this type of book. What a fantastic object!

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I can just imagine somebody sitting back in their study

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in late Victorian or Edwardian England, pretending to work,

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the wife is saying, "Now then, George,

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"you're not having a whisky again, are you?"

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And he says, "No, no, no.

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"I don't have any whisky in here... apart from in there."

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What a wonderful way of hiding a bit of tipple in your study!

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I absolutely love it.

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It has the novelty factor, the fun factor,

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it's useful, and it's an antique that looks the part, as well.

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Is it something that you've drunk from in your years?

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-I don't think I fancy drinking out of it.

-Why not?

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It smells a bit musty!

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It wouldn't smell musty by the time you've had a good old malt in there!

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So, tell me, how did it come to be in the family?

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Well, it belongs to my father, and he worked in London.

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-He worked in hotels.

-OK.

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And he often used to get the bus, the Green Line bus,

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near a shop that we called the second-hand shop.

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Whether he got it from there, I don't know,

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I'm not sure where he got it from, but he used to play tricks on us

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and say, "I've got a good book here."

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Particularly if he got...if somebody else came to the house, you know.

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-Did he use it?

-Not that I'm aware of.

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So, your mother wasn't a hard-nosed drink stopper?

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-And he was more a red wine man, anyway.

-Was he?

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Oh, yeah, that wouldn't be good for red wine.

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Well, let's have a look at it.

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The whole thing is bound in what would originally have been

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a royal blue Morocco leather.

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And then it's detailed and stamped in gold here,

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and the thing that I love about it is the author is James Dixon.

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And James Dixon was a silversmith,

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working in Sheffield throughout the 19th century.

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If we turn there, that gives it away.

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We've got James Dixon and Sons of Sheffield and, I should think,

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that would have been made in England about 1910, something like that.

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The fact that it says Made In England

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would indicate it's slightly later,

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but the overall look is very much an Edwardian look.

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So, do you think it's silver all the way down,

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-or is it just the neck that's silver?

-Yeah.

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HOLLOW KNOCKS

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So, there's a very large, rectangular...

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Somebody that liked a drink.

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It says, doesn't it? 24 ounces. 24 ounces of whisky in there.

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-Oh, my goodness!

-My goodness.

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That would sort you out for the night.

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So, anyway, it's a great object.

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I love it, and it's the sort of thing that you would like to see

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in a gentleman's library, say, something like that.

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Value? £100-£150.

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-Something like that.

-Yeah.

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-Is that all right?

-Yeah, that's fine.

-Good.

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I think it will do very well indeed.

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Mmm, that made me quite thirsty!

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Now, for more practical silver.

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Gwen, this is very pretty. A dear little purse.

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How did you come by it?

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Well, my great aunt, her name was Gladys Fletcher,

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and I was the only one in the family that had the same initial

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-before I married...

-Oh, that was handy.

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-So, you were given it because you had the same initial?

-Yes.

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It's a really, really pretty item, this purse. It's so sweet.

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But what do you do with it today?

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-You couldn't get very much in it, could you?

-No.

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You could maybe squeeze your credit card in,

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but you wouldn't get your phone in there.

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So, sadly, it hasn't got a practical use these days.

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However, it's so, so decorative,

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I think a collector would want it to put in a cabinet.

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Now, you know it's silver, because it's got the assay marks on it,

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it was assayed in Birmingham in 1917.

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So, quite an interesting time, really.

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It was actually made at the time of the Great War,

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it's still got that late Edwardian look to it...

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and then you've got the little suspension chain,

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and this is called a little finger ring,

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because you'd actually put it on your finger

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and carry it in that way.

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And if we have a closer look at it,

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obviously, you've got a little button there which you press,

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and then you open it up

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and it's beautifully fitted inside in leather.

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Now, it could easily have been used as a card case,

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because people had visiting cards in those days,

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and when you went round to visit,

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you left your card to show you'd been there,

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and it was all part of social etiquette and visiting,

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and then, of course, we find the initials that were hiding.

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So, there they are, the initials that meant you were given it.

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It really is very sweet.

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Now, the other items we have here - a manicure set.

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Very often, they were given as gifts in a fitted case,

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and I would think these probably originally came from a fitted case.

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People don't use them,

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but they tend to sell these days for the silver that's in the handles.

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Obviously, we got a set of three, and then a funny little extra one.

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-So, it's something you've decided to part company with?

-Yeah.

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-Well, it's better than keeping it in a drawer, isn't it?

-Yes.

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When it's sold,

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are you going to splash out on anything in particular?

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-Well, we're going to Disneyland Paris in the summer, so...

-Oh, wow!

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-..it will go towards that.

-Right, so, we need to talk about value on them.

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I would suggest selling them as a group,

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because the main value is going to be with the purse,

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rather than the manicure set.

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So, I think we're looking at an estimate of 70 to 90,

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-if that's all right with you?

-Fine, yes.

-Good.

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And a reserve...of £70,

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with perhaps a bit of discretion,

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so that if the auctioneer gets within 10%, they can be sold.

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-Does that sound all right to you?

-That's absolutely fine.

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Excellent. Well, we'll put them in, we'll do our very best

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to get you on one of those really good rollercoaster rides in Disney.

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Sad.

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The Transport Museum celebrates Coventry's motoring history,

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and one man is just as interested in the city's past.

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Martin, of all the official jewels

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that you could possibly bring along today... These are fabulous!

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-Not only that, they're Coventry, as well.

-Well, yes.

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This is the nearest I'll get to wearing the civic regalia.

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These are mayor and mayoress jewels, presented to the mayor for one year.

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The leading maker of official jewels, as they were called,

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-was a firm called Fattorini.

-Right.

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And they made a lot of pieces that were hallmarked in Birmingham,

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so not too far away from here.

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Now, I've had a look. They're not Fattorini, unfortunately,

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but they're still wonderful quality.

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If we take this one to start with, the mayoress's piece...

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It's solid nine-carat gold,

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and then it's set with these freshwater seed pearls.

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The centre is enamelled and then applied again in gold

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with, it looks like, an Indian elephant.

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What was the logic of an elephant to Coventry?

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Well, the elephant was a symbol of strength in heraldry.

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OK. Let's move now to the mayor's jewel.

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I mean, here we have the sceptre and the sword.

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Within the outside, we have, alternating,

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rose-cut diamonds with green enamel leaves.

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So, both nine-carat gold,

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one set with diamonds, one set with fresh water seed pearls...

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1948/49, so just after the war,

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but they've got a really limited market.

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That's what you have to remember.

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If you found a jewel of this quality that wasn't an official piece,

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that was just pretty, then it would be substantially more valuable.

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How did they come to be in your possession?

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Well, I'm very proud of my city,

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-and so I collect lots of things to do with Coventry.

-OK.

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And a friend rang me up one day and said,

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"I think you might be interested in these..."

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And now I think it's time to pass them on to someone else.

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OK. So what did they cost you, 30 years ago?

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I can't remember exactly.

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-Around about 250 to 300...

-OK.

-..something like that.

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Yeah, OK. So, ideally, we certainly want to get the money back.

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-I'd love that.

-30 years ago brings us back to 1982/83...

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-'80-ish.

-So, early '80s.

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You actually bought these

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at the peak of the previous gold market,

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but that will sort of justify the valuation that I'll give you,

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which isn't that much bigger than it was 30 years ago.

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Now, we're back up to £300-£500, something like that.

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I think they'll certainly sell well,

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and I hope they will find a new home in Coventry

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-and somebody who has loved them as much as you do.

-So do I.

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It's a very good read and an even better tipple,

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the Pleasant Surprise hip flask

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could reach the top end or end up in the drink.

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They don't make manicure sets like these any more,

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but will Gwen's silver set make the £70 reserve?

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And Martin has had these mayoral jewels for over 30 years,

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but now it's time to sell.

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Will their provenance do Coventry proud into sale room?

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Just 19 miles from Coventry

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is the historic town of Stratford-upon-Avon.

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The river Avon is 75 miles long,

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and its gentle current makes it a perfect place for an afternoon row.

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And today, we're docking at Bigwood Auctioneers,

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where Christopher Ironmonger is the man on the rostrum.

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You can find anything at auction, from taxidermy to teacups.

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But beware, there is commission rates to pay,

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and it does vary from saleroom to saleroom.

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Here, it's on a sliding scale.

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The seller's charge is 15% up to £1,000,

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12.5% between £1,000 and £2,000,

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and 10% over £3,000.

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And right now, we have a little surprise for you.

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Yes, it's that hip flask disguised as a book.

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It belongs to Joy, and not much longer, I would imagine,

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-because I think this is lovely.

-It's great fun.

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We're looking at £100-£150. I think you're spot on with the value.

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So, why are you selling it?

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Well, I decided I wanted to come to 'Flog It!'

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cos I've been once before and thoroughly enjoyed myself

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and enjoyed myself this time.

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It belonged to my dad, you see. He would have so enjoyed being here.

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-Oh, bless.

-It was lovely.

-Here we go.

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The James Dixon and Sons EPNS spirit flask

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tooled in the form of a book. It's got "A Pleasant Surprise" on it.

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There we are, the registration marks, etcetera.

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And I've got an opening bid on the book, a commission bid of £85.

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At 85. At 90, do I hear it? 90, 90, 90? 100?

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100, 100. 110. 110.

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Good, we're getting the top end.

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140? 135. 140?

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140, 140? 145? 145.

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150? 150. 155?

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150 in the front row. At 150.

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Do you want 160, up there?

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That's a good, good sale.

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£150, gentleman's bid, are we done?

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-GAVEL BANGS

-There we go. Well done, you.

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-Well done, James.

-Thank you.

-Thank you for bringing that along as well.

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-Don't forget, there is a seller's commission to pay here.

-Yes, OK.

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-But otherwise... Well done, you.

-Thank you very much.

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-And it was a good experience, wasn't it?

-It was.

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It was a lovely experience, thank you all very much.

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Well, I think congratulations are in order right now.

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I've just been joined by Gwen and our expert Claire,

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but it's Gwen's 44th wedding anniversary.

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-Is there a special name for that?

-Not that I know of.

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-No, not that I know of either. Do you know?

-No.

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44 years, that's a triumph.

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I know you've brought your husband along, and he's over there.

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Hello, there! Waiting in the wings.

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We're just about to put the silver purse with the manicure set

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under the hammer at £70-£90. Why are you selling this?

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Just because it was just in a drawer, so, you know...

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-Best to go to a collector.

-Never even looked at, so...

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-Best to go to a collector, and I'm sure it will, actually.

-Yeah, yeah.

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Silver's good at the moment, isn't it? So...

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-It will sell.

-It's popular.

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Now, I have the silver purse, Birmingham 1917,

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and you've got the manicure implements etcetera.

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Who's got £60 to get me going? 50 over there.

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At 50, 50, 50, 55, 60,

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65, 70, is it?

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65 at the back of the room.

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-At 65. 70.

-It's gone.

-Five, Sir?

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70, here at 70, at the front of the room.

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At 70, it's going to be sold at 70. Is there any...? 75?

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-Last chance at £70.

-GAVEL BANGS

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Spot on, there. Well done, Claire.

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Yeah, that was a good trade lot, that one.

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You know, that will be split up and moved into different places,

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but it will definitely find a good home with collectors.

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-That's good.

-Well done.

-Thank you.

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-And is this your first auction experience?

-It is! I'm shaking!

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It is! I can see you standing there like this...

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No need to be nervous, Gwen!

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So, to our next lot.

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We've got a pair of nine carat gold civic badges going under the hammer

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for the mayor and the mayoress of Coventry.

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-A lot of local interest, hopefully, Martin.

-I hope so.

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-Should be, shouldn't it?

-I hope so.

-Yeah. How did you come across these?

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Well, I'm very keen on Coventry, having been brought up there,

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and I couldn't resist them 30 years ago to add to my own collection.

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-Did you buy them in auction?

-No, I bought them from a friend.

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OK. Good things?

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-Very.

-Unusual.

-Not very commercial.

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But, gold is doing very well.

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-I'm just hoping they'll make above the scrap value.

-Oh, yes.

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Well, let's find out. They're going under the hammer right now.

0:15:470:15:50

We've got the diamond rose cuts etcetera,

0:15:550:15:57

seed pearls in little cases there.

0:15:570:15:59

Anyway, I've got a commission bid,

0:15:590:16:01

I can start straight in at £500 on the book.

0:16:010:16:03

We're straight in! 500.

0:16:030:16:06

It's gone up to 6.

0:16:060:16:07

600 in my book. I've got 650.

0:16:070:16:10

700, 750? I've got 800, 850?

0:16:100:16:13

800 on the book. At 800, 850, is it?

0:16:130:16:16

850, 900, 950.

0:16:160:16:18

900 with me on the book. At 900, do you want 50? You're out.

0:16:180:16:21

-At £900, are we done?

-GAVEL BANGS

0:16:210:16:24

-Happy?

-Of course, very good.

-Very good, £900.

0:16:240:16:28

Back to our valuation day and to a museum that is embracing

0:16:340:16:37

the old and the new, the slow and fast.

0:16:370:16:40

And Claire was certainly quick to spot a good find.

0:16:400:16:44

You have brought in a lovely postcard album.

0:16:450:16:48

This is something very dear to my heart,

0:16:480:16:49

because I've always had a special interest in ephemera.

0:16:490:16:52

This is something that has come through the family, is it?

0:16:520:16:55

This postcard album belonged to my auntie,

0:16:550:16:57

and when she died in the late '80s, I inherited a lot of her things.

0:16:570:17:02

Unfortunately, it has just been sort of tucked away somewhere.

0:17:020:17:06

When we brought it out we were really fascinated to see the postcards.

0:17:060:17:09

You can see her name, Beth Cadbury, on all the postcards.

0:17:090:17:13

Right, so she's a Cadbury, now. Are we talking chocolate Cadburys?

0:17:130:17:16

-We are talking chocolate Cadburys, yes.

-Excellent.

0:17:160:17:18

Of course, there was a huge interest in collecting postcards

0:17:180:17:22

in this period, because this is an early 20th-century album.

0:17:220:17:25

Ranging from the Edwardian period, sort of 1910,

0:17:250:17:30

let's have a quick look through. It's really quite a nice collection.

0:17:300:17:33

A few have come out. The trouble with these old albums is the paper gets quite brittle.

0:17:330:17:37

-Very fragile.

-As you can see, some really pretty cards.

0:17:370:17:41

They're lovely, the chromo-lithographic ones.

0:17:410:17:45

-It's just knowing which ones are...

-The popular ones. People collect different things.

0:17:450:17:49

Some people prefer transport, some people prefer Christmas cards.

0:17:490:17:52

So, they appeal to a wide range of people which is good,

0:17:520:17:55

because it opens up the market for you. So, really, a very nice album.

0:17:550:18:00

-Now, have you ever had it valued in the past at all?

-No, no.

0:18:000:18:03

Oh, right, so you sort of...

0:18:030:18:05

I've no idea what, if it's worth anything at all, but it's just

0:18:050:18:08

so lovely, and we haven't really got room in our little house.

0:18:080:18:11

The only way to look at them is to frame them.

0:18:110:18:13

And you can't frame loads of postcards.

0:18:130:18:15

No. It's always the problem with things in albums.

0:18:150:18:17

Bearing in mind we're in a transport museum,

0:18:170:18:19

I thought, I bet they haven't got this in here!

0:18:190:18:22

The Irish donkey cart.

0:18:220:18:23

I think it opens up, doesn't it?

0:18:230:18:25

Yes, that's right. It will open up.

0:18:250:18:27

It'll all drop out, like in a concertina.

0:18:270:18:29

And I thought that was rather sweet, as well,

0:18:290:18:32

the sort of children pulling the little cart.

0:18:320:18:35

One of the good things about it, it's all to one person.

0:18:350:18:38

It's a very personal collection, so to a collector,

0:18:380:18:41

I think it would sell well.

0:18:410:18:43

I think I would certainly put about £40-£60 on it,

0:18:430:18:45

but I wouldn't be surprised to see it make more than that.

0:18:450:18:48

And I think we ought to put a reserve on it.

0:18:480:18:51

-If you would be happy with a reserve of £40?

-Yes.

0:18:510:18:53

-Does that sound all right to you?

-That's fine.

0:18:530:18:55

And have you got an idea what you're going to put the money towards?

0:18:550:18:59

We're taking the grandchildren away at Easter, so...

0:18:590:19:02

-Down to the New Forest. They're mad on ponies!

-Oh, brilliant.

0:19:020:19:06

Well, I have hopes for this.

0:19:060:19:08

And I hope it goes towards

0:19:080:19:09

the beginning of a new hobby for the grandchildren.

0:19:090:19:12

OK.

0:19:120:19:13

And, for something never before seen on "Flog It!", an Olympic torch.

0:19:130:19:19

Paul, I have to say, there are certain things in history

0:19:190:19:23

that everybody wants to get their hands on.

0:19:230:19:26

I think the World Cup is one.

0:19:260:19:28

And I think very close behind that is an Olympic torch.

0:19:280:19:33

What's it doing here in the centre of Coventry?

0:19:330:19:36

Well, it's been gathering dust for the last 40 years in my loft.

0:19:360:19:40

Not doing anything with it, but with the Olympics

0:19:400:19:42

still in everybody's mind, I thought it was a good time to, perhaps, sell.

0:19:420:19:46

How is it in your loft? Do you have Olympic athletes in the family?

0:19:460:19:49

Well, my father used to run, but I'm sure he would have told me

0:19:490:19:52

-if he had been a stage bearer in the Olympics.

-Gosh, yes.

0:19:520:19:55

We kept a pub, and it probably came into his possession

0:19:550:19:58

from someone coming into the pub and perhaps selling it some time ago.

0:19:580:20:01

So, do you think someone's paid off their bar bill with this?

0:20:010:20:04

Swapped it for a pint of beer, or paid off their slate?

0:20:040:20:06

-It could have been something like that.

-Gosh!

0:20:060:20:08

He gave it to me as part of my 21st birthday present.

0:20:080:20:12

I was more interested in the stereo that I got at that time.

0:20:120:20:15

And then, this has just gathered dust and kicked around in the loft.

0:20:150:20:18

I've got a feeling there will be more demand for this than there will be for your old stereo.

0:20:180:20:23

You may be right!

0:20:230:20:24

This was obviously for the London Olympics of 1948.

0:20:240:20:29

The torch was designed by Ralph Lavers. And he had them cast in aluminium.

0:20:290:20:34

Of course, in the 1940s,

0:20:340:20:37

aluminium was still a very fashionable material,

0:20:370:20:39

which is why it would have been used for a modern Olympiad.

0:20:390:20:43

There were 20 of them made, and each person would have kept

0:20:430:20:46

their individual torch as a souvenir of their leg.

0:20:460:20:50

And of course, the people that carried them

0:20:500:20:53

were past Olympiads, gold medallists, silver medallists.

0:20:530:20:57

I think the design is an interesting one.

0:20:570:20:59

It looks remarkably like a toilet plunger,

0:20:590:21:02

when you hold it the other way up.

0:21:020:21:04

But, the thing that I find interesting about, it's got

0:21:050:21:09

a cavity here, which is obviously where the flame has been held.

0:21:090:21:12

But, I think that should contain an inner section.

0:21:120:21:15

It must've done. So, I think there's an inner section missing.

0:21:150:21:19

But, having said that, what a wonderful thing to own.

0:21:190:21:24

I'd love to own one of these.

0:21:240:21:26

It's the sort of thing that evokes lots of emotions,

0:21:260:21:30

and when you're talking about emotion, figures go out the window,

0:21:300:21:34

and your heart kicks in, rather than your head.

0:21:340:21:37

But, it's a great time to sell it.

0:21:370:21:40

-We should put an auction estimate of £600-£1,000.

-Gosh!

-All right?

0:21:400:21:44

Yeah, yeah.

0:21:440:21:46

That's not bad for something that looks like a toilet plunger, is it?

0:21:460:21:50

HE LAUGHS Certainly isn't, no!

0:21:500:21:52

Now, just time to race back to Claire's final valuation,

0:21:530:21:57

and she's got a confession.

0:21:570:21:59

Turning to these, I do have to admit to you I'm

0:22:000:22:02

slightly out of my comfort zone with this type of pottery and porcelain,

0:22:020:22:06

so tell me the history of them, how you came by them.

0:22:060:22:09

We actually bought these at auction. We were looking at Moorcrofts.

0:22:090:22:15

They didn't sell in the antiques sale

0:22:150:22:17

because they didn't reach their reserve,

0:22:170:22:19

so I asked Tony to have a look at them because they appeared in

0:22:190:22:22

the next week's sale,

0:22:220:22:24

and he agreed with me that they were worth investing in.

0:22:240:22:27

-Why are you selling them?

-We both quite like the newer designs.

0:22:270:22:32

Moorcroft have got some really good designers now,

0:22:320:22:35

Rachel Bishop, Perry Goodwin. We like the bolder colours.

0:22:350:22:39

-They've got a new one out, which is called the Female Form.

-Oh, right.

0:22:390:22:43

And it stands at about 28 inches high. Big! But it's £4,200.

0:22:430:22:51

We are just saving up a pot of money towards that.

0:22:510:22:54

Very nice thing to have, though. Obviously, this is much earlier.

0:22:540:22:58

This dates to the early part of the 20th century,

0:22:580:23:00

and you can see that in the design, really.

0:23:000:23:02

It's the sort of Florian Ware, the MacIntyre, was the factory,

0:23:020:23:06

and this was a typical design that was done at that time.

0:23:060:23:10

And you have got the semi-tube lining which is more obvious.

0:23:100:23:14

Yes, and it is a typical colourway this, where you have got

0:23:140:23:18

the lovely blues and green against the creamy white background.

0:23:180:23:21

But, these are lovely. And they are so bright and so clean,

0:23:210:23:24

as though they haven't been used, so a lovely feel inside.

0:23:240:23:28

Because, if we take a look, you've got the factory mark underneath.

0:23:280:23:32

-The design itself just sings out, doesn't it?

-Recognisable, isn't it?

0:23:320:23:35

Yes. Out of a lot of items of ceramic at the moment

0:23:350:23:39

Moorcroft has continued to be very collected

0:23:390:23:42

and actually quite expensive.

0:23:420:23:45

So, you want to put them in a sale,

0:23:450:23:46

have you got an idea what you would like for them?

0:23:460:23:49

I watch "Flog It!" Every day.

0:23:490:23:51

Oh, right, excellent. Well done, well done!

0:23:510:23:54

So you've seen a bit of this going through, over the years.

0:23:540:23:56

-Quite a bit going through and you can keep an eye on the prices that way, can't you?

-Yes, yes indeed.

0:23:560:24:01

I mean, these, I think, would do well,

0:24:010:24:03

so I don't know if you felt round about the £600

0:24:030:24:07

would be, sort of, the lower end?

0:24:070:24:10

-I don't know how you feel about that.

-Yeah, that's fine.

-Good.

0:24:100:24:12

So we'll do a firm 600. Six to eight. And really hope they fly away

0:24:120:24:17

-and then you can put the money towards your female form.

-Yes.

0:24:170:24:20

They once belonged to a Cadbury,

0:24:230:24:25

and they certainly are a sweet piece of history.

0:24:250:24:27

This little light of Paul's is sure to brighten up the auction,

0:24:310:24:33

but just how much will it sell for?

0:24:330:24:36

And Moorcroft is a superior ceramic,

0:24:390:24:42

but will the current market allow it to make the £600 reserve?

0:24:420:24:46

Back a Bigwood's, I caught up with auctioneer

0:24:540:24:56

Christopher Ironmonger to see if the Olympic torch

0:24:560:24:59

is going to get gold.

0:24:590:25:01

Look at that, Christopher. Maybe I should be running along doing that.

0:25:020:25:06

Flying the flag for Bigwood's.

0:25:060:25:09

Well, this belongs to Paul.

0:25:090:25:11

Now, he has picked the right year and the right country to sell this.

0:25:110:25:14

-He has indeed.

-This is the year of the Olympic Games.

0:25:140:25:17

Now, this is the Olympics of 1948.

0:25:170:25:20

James, our expert has put £600 to £1,000 on that.

0:25:200:25:25

Well, I am confident that it'll go.

0:25:250:25:27

Quite interestingly, it was known as the Austerity Games

0:25:270:25:29

because it wasn't that long after the War,

0:25:290:25:31

so probably this is a fairly simplistic design compared to

0:25:310:25:35

the Olympic torches that I think we are going to see this year,

0:25:350:25:37

which are fairly elaborate.

0:25:370:25:39

We've already got some phone lines booked,

0:25:390:25:41

we've got quite a bit of interest in it.

0:25:410:25:42

I'm confident that we'll well exceed the estimate.

0:25:420:25:45

Let's hope we can break a record with this one.

0:25:450:25:47

We will certainly do our best.

0:25:470:25:50

But first, a smaller historical record.

0:25:500:25:53

Meg and Keith, the postcard album is just about to go under the hammer.

0:25:540:25:59

Now, I know this was a personal collection sent to your aunt,

0:25:590:26:02

-wasn't it?

-Yes, she collected it.

0:26:020:26:04

And there is not a lot of money involved in this. £40, maybe £60.

0:26:040:26:08

-Well, look, good luck. Good luck.

-Thank you.

0:26:080:26:10

That's all I can say, because I wouldn't sell this.

0:26:100:26:12

Would you if it was your own?

0:26:120:26:14

Well, maybe no. I know, but you have got other things.

0:26:140:26:16

-They'll probably go to a good home.

-A collector?

-Yes.

0:26:160:26:20

Incidentally, the first postcard was sent in London and it was

0:26:200:26:24

hand-painted and it had a Penny Black on it, and that was in 1840.

0:26:240:26:28

Shame that is not in this collection, isn't it?

0:26:280:26:30

-I was going to say, "I didn't notice that one."

-No, nor did I.

0:26:300:26:32

That would've been slipped out.

0:26:320:26:34

-You'd have saved that one, wouldn't you?

-Yes.

-Yeah.

0:26:340:26:36

Early 20th century postcard album,

0:26:360:26:39

principally compiled of cards sent to Ms Beth Cadbury

0:26:390:26:42

of Rose Hill, Worcester.

0:26:420:26:43

And I can't open the bidding at £50.

0:26:430:26:45

On the books at 50, with commission at 50.

0:26:450:26:47

60 over there.

0:26:470:26:48

I've got 70 with me. At 70. And 80.

0:26:480:26:51

-And 90. And 100. And 110.

-Wow.

-120 is it?

0:26:510:26:53

It's gone big time.

0:26:530:26:55

Are you done at 110?

0:26:550:26:57

Bid's with me on the book.

0:26:570:26:58

You are out at the back. 110 it is.

0:26:580:27:00

-Sold.

-Good.

-And a great result.

0:27:000:27:03

We see it time and time again on the show,

0:27:030:27:05

postcard albums always sell well.

0:27:050:27:07

Thank you so much for coming in. There is commission to pay

0:27:070:27:09

and I know you are sharing the money out with the grandkids, aren't you?

0:27:090:27:13

-Yes, we're taking them on a holiday.

-Who have we got behind you?

0:27:130:27:16

-This is Georgie and this is Abby.

-Hello, Abby. Hello, Georgie.

0:27:160:27:19

-Are you going on holiday straightaway?

-Yes.

0:27:190:27:21

The car is parked outside.

0:27:210:27:23

Well, it doesn't get more immediate than that, does it?

0:27:230:27:25

-Where are you going, may I ask?

-New Forest.

-Oh, how lovely.

0:27:250:27:29

-With all the ponies.

-Yes.

0:27:290:27:31

Well, if you're going to buy Moorcroft,

0:27:380:27:40

you've got to buy the early stuff - McIntyre Moorcroft.

0:27:400:27:42

And that's my favourite and yours. That is real, real quality.

0:27:420:27:45

Tony and Teresa, it's great to see you.

0:27:450:27:47

-Sounds like a pop duo, doesn't it? Tony and Teresa, TNT.

-That's right.

0:27:470:27:52

Dynamite! Well, let's hope this one goes off with an explosion.

0:27:520:27:55

-I hope so.

-Why are you selling this? This is absolute quality.

0:27:550:27:59

-I would like a more modern piece.

-You like your modern pieces.

0:27:590:28:02

-I do, indeed.

-Do you? How long have you had this then?

0:28:020:28:04

A few years. We bought it for an investment.

0:28:040:28:07

And how much did you pay for it?

0:28:070:28:09

-600.

-600. Well, hopefully, hopefully, we can get your money back.

0:28:090:28:13

We have enjoyed it £600 worth.

0:28:130:28:15

You've had £600 worth of smiles out of it.

0:28:150:28:18

Now, have you seen anything in the auction that you like?

0:28:180:28:21

Because I just noticed you're holding a bidding paddle.

0:28:210:28:24

-What are you buying?

-There is a piece of Moorcroft over there.

0:28:240:28:27

-Piece of Moorcroft. Hey, well...

-That I may have missed.

0:28:270:28:30

But you are selling Moorcroft, that's not that modern.

0:28:300:28:33

No, I know, but it is a vase, not a teapot.

0:28:330:28:36

Well, look, let's sell the teapot first, shall we?

0:28:360:28:38

It is going under the hammer now.

0:28:380:28:39

Early 20th century Moorcroft McIntyre and Co.

0:28:390:28:41

teapot and hot water pot

0:28:410:28:43

with the Florian Ware blue poppy pattern. Rather nice, isn't it?

0:28:430:28:47

What are my bids for this? Who has got 500 to get me going?

0:28:470:28:50

400 then? 400 on bid. 400 it is.

0:28:500:28:53

At 400. 420 now?

0:28:530:28:55

At 400. 420 is it?

0:28:550:28:57

420. 440? 440. 460.

0:28:570:29:01

He has got a commission bid on it, he's looking at the books.

0:29:010:29:03

-Is he?

-Yeah, looking down.

0:29:030:29:05

480? 480. 500?

0:29:050:29:07

At £480. Are you done at £480?

0:29:070:29:11

-We are not going to sell it.

-500 is it? Last chance at 480.

0:29:110:29:15

No-one wanted it today, it's as simple as that.

0:29:150:29:18

-I'll have to like the teapot.

-I think you will.

0:29:180:29:20

You know you said you were going to bid on a bit of Moorcroft,

0:29:200:29:23

-you don't have to now, do you?

-I'll keep that one.

0:29:230:29:25

That bit of Moorcroft is going home. And that's a better piece.

0:29:250:29:28

-It is obviously meant to stay with you.

-Obviously, yes.

0:29:280:29:30

-Not disappointed.

-No, you're still smiling.

-Yes.

0:29:300:29:34

And it just goes to show, there are no guarantees at auction,

0:29:350:29:38

even with big names like Moorcroft.

0:29:380:29:40

And flying the flag for team GB, we have Paul Eastwood

0:29:400:29:44

and Mr James Lewis.

0:29:440:29:46

The Olympic torch is about to go under the hammer.

0:29:460:29:49

I had a chat to the auctioneer, Christopher, yesterday.

0:29:490:29:52

And he's very enthusiastic about it.

0:29:520:29:54

He agreed with the valuation, but he said it should do the top end.

0:29:540:29:58

And we both said, you are in the right place at the right time.

0:29:580:30:01

Have you purposely saved it for this year?

0:30:010:30:03

-Did you think about selling it last year?

-No.

0:30:030:30:05

-Last year I thought about making a table lamp out of it.

-Did you?

0:30:050:30:10

-I'm glad I didn't.

-No, exactly!

0:30:100:30:12

Because it is a great time to sell it,

0:30:120:30:14

purely because you have got instant PR for this.

0:30:140:30:17

It depends whether the missing burner will really put

0:30:170:30:20

a lot of people off.

0:30:200:30:21

So, that is why I've conservatively estimated it.

0:30:210:30:23

Yeah, it might put the academics off,

0:30:230:30:25

but I don't think it will put the general collectors off.

0:30:250:30:27

-Hopefully not.

-No, they'll overlook that,

0:30:270:30:29

because it looks architecturally really, really good.

0:30:290:30:32

It is going under the hammer right now, here it is.

0:30:320:30:35

Games of the 14th Olympiad, held in 1948,

0:30:350:30:39

very appropriate coming up this year.

0:30:390:30:41

And I start off with commission bids on the book

0:30:410:30:44

and I'm going to start it at 1,050.

0:30:440:30:47

1,050.

0:30:470:30:49

-1,050.

-Well, that's our top end, isn't it?

0:30:490:30:53

1,100 there.

0:30:530:30:54

1,150 I've got.

0:30:540:30:55

1,200? 1,200.

0:30:550:30:58

And that clears my commission bids. At 1,200.

0:30:580:31:00

Look, there's a couple people on the phone now.

0:31:000:31:03

It is out of the room, it is backwards and forwards

0:31:030:31:05

to the phones.

0:31:050:31:06

14?

0:31:060:31:07

Let's go in hundreds. 15 now.

0:31:080:31:10

-I don't believe it.

-15. 16.

0:31:100:31:12

17.

0:31:120:31:15

18.

0:31:150:31:17

19.

0:31:170:31:19

2,000.

0:31:190:31:21

Go 22.

0:31:220:31:23

24.

0:31:250:31:26

26.

0:31:270:31:29

28.

0:31:290:31:31

3,000.

0:31:320:31:34

32.

0:31:350:31:36

34?

0:31:380:31:39

-32.

-I just love these moments.

0:31:410:31:44

At 3,200. Any further advance?

0:31:440:31:47

It is going to be sold. £3,200.

0:31:470:31:50

-Yes, hammer's gone down.

-Well done.

0:31:500:31:52

-Thank you very much!

-£3,200!

0:31:520:31:56

-Brilliant.

-What a wonderful way to end today's show.

0:31:560:32:00

What a lovely surprise. Thank you so much, Paul, for bringing that in.

0:32:000:32:03

Enjoy the money, won't you? Enjoy the money. Well done.

0:32:030:32:06

Well, sadly, we've run out of time here.

0:32:060:32:08

What a marvellous time we've had at Stratford-upon-Avon

0:32:080:32:11

and in Coventry.

0:32:110:32:12

I hope you have enjoyed it. Join us again soon

0:32:120:32:14

for many more surprises, but until then, it's goodbye from all of us.

0:32:140:32:18

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:32:270:32:30

Today's Flog It! comes from the Coventry Transport Museum with Paul Martin is in the driving seat and experts James Lewis and Claire Rawle along for the ride.

James spots a remarkable item, and we find out how much a 1948 London Olympic torch fetches at auction.

Paul also takes time out to explore Coventry's architecture appreciating the medieval buildings that survived the Blitz and the controversial modern developments.