Oxford 8 Flog It!


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Oxford 8

Antiques series. Paul Martin presents from the Oxford Union, where Christina Trevanion uncovers a famous fake and Mark Stacey receives a religious education.


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Today, we're in a place dubbed

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the last bastion of free speech in the world.

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This place is famous as a forum for debating controversial issues.

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And no doubt, we'll have one or two good points to talk about today

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over the items we find. This is "Flog It!"

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For this programme,

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we've come to the most famous debating room

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outside of Westminster,

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the hallowed chamber of Oxford Union.

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The Union's core principle is free speech

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and it was founded at a time when universities banned students

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from talking freely about politics and religion.

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Malcolm X came here to debate civil rights...

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The most cosmopolitan and progressive parts of it...

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And Teddy Kennedy arrived under a hail of protest to discuss Vietnam.

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Well, let's hope our "Flog It!" audience aren't as rowdy today.

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We are literally surrounded by history here today

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at the Oxford Union.

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Malcolm X made his famous speech in 1964

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when he demanded black empowerment by any means necessary.

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Let's hope we find some wonderful political memorabilia.

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Come on, then.

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And our experts on the campaign trail are Christina Trevanion,

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our silver-lounged jewellery expert.

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Ooh!

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All that glitters. I like it.

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And our very own formidable debater Mark Stacey,

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who seems to me in need of a little light refreshment.

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Oh, you've drunk it all.

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Not very much fun, is it? We need a little tipple,

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being outside in this cold, don't we?

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Call to order.

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I believe this house has large queues of people all waiting

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to have their antiques valued by our experts.

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So, without further ado, let's see what Oxford has to offer.

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Coming up in today's show...

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Has Christina uncovered a famous fake?

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You think it's Serves.

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Yes. Is it not?

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While Mark gets a bit of a religious education.

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So, who was Charles Spurgeon?

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And I turn the clock back to the Cold War protests

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at Greenham Common.

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Did they change history?

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NEWS REPORTER: They arrived in their thousands by coach, by car

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and even on foot.

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Well, everybody's now safe and seated inside

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and our expert first out on the blocks is Christina.

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Let's take a closer look at what she spotted.

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So, June, I'm assuming you're a Libran,

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because opals are the birthstone for Libras.

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-No, I was born in November.

-Ah! A little bit late, then?

-Mm.

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I've never understood why two separate...

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-These are love tokens from past admirers...

-Oh, my goodness!

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-Ages... Ages past.

-Ooh!

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And they both bought me these stones at separate times,

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-which is extraordinary.

-Oh, really?

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And I've never expressed a desire for opals.

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So, have you ever worn them?

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I've just tried them on and thought, "They're really not me."

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"Thanks very much, but you obviously don't know me."

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-Quite.

-That's why they are past admirers.

-Exactly. Exactly.

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Well, a lot of people are very suspicious about opals.

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Like I say, they were...

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Or they are the birthstone of Librans and traditionally,

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it said that Librans are the only ones that can wear them,

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which, frankly, is bunkum.

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They have been historically linked with bad luck due to a book

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that Walter Scott wrote

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where he had his main character wearing an opal talisman

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-and she promptly, I think, dropped down dead, sadly.

-OK.

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So, they've been associated with quite bad luck

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since the 19th century.

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I think they are beautiful, and I've got quite a few opals,

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mainly because I went over to Australia and picked up...

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Cos they are the native stone of Australia.

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Oh, are they? I didn't know that.

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So, I had a bit of a tourist moment

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and bought myself an opal in Australia!

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This one here...

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or this pair here is set in nine carat,

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and they're obviously a pear shape

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with this little wire work surround in a...

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If we pick one up, you can see it's quite a drop.

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-And it's just quite a nice effect when you turn your head.

-Yes.

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They sort of almost quiver. They're quite sweet.

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And they are from, I think, about 1975, I think.

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-So, with that sort of tally with the right date?

-Yes.

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And then we've got this little cluster,

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which is almost quite a Tudor-y looking setting here.

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Garnets in the middle

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and I think these are also stamped nine carats on the back.

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So, very, very sweet.

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Difficult thing to value

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because like I say they've got this reputation and opals are...

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They're not as commercial as, say, diamonds

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or some of the other harder stones.

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If we were to put them into auction, we would put them in as one lot.

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-Right.

-So, we've put them together and I would probably be looking

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somewhere in the region of £80 to £120, something like that.

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And hoping to get the sort of £100 region.

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-How would you feel about that?

-That sounds fine.

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Would we look at a reserve or not on that?

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If we could, possibly a reserve of sort of 80. How would you feel?

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-That's fine.

-Is that all right?

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If we put 80 firm and then the auctioneer sort of can't go

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-any lower than that.

-Yes.

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Well, let's hope we get some divine inspiration for our earrings,

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-shall we?

-Let's hope we do.

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Our next item is a rather unusual bust of a gentleman who

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preached divine inspiration every Sunday from the pulpit.

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This was a man not afraid to speak his mind -

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the Baptist Charles Spurgeon.

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Mark should like this one.

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You've brought this rather interesting

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Parian ware bust into me.

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Now, what can you tell us about it?

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My mother owned this all of my life.

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And I think she used to go around and, on occasions,

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heard Charles Spurgeon actually preaching.

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-So, she might have met him.

-At some of his meetings, yes.

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-He was known as the Prince of the Preachers.

-Oh, right.

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So he was very popular in his day.

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-And he looks a terribly Victorian gentlemen.

-Oh, absolutely, yeah.

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And being a preacher, of course, he would've felt at home here,

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-in a debating chamber.

-That's right.

-Wouldn't he?

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Similar to the gentleman across there.

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-He looks very Victorian as well, doesn't he?

-Yeah.

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And why have you brought it in to show to us today, David?

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Well, it's not something that we feel we need to keep any more.

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And times are hard...

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Maybe time for somebody who collects Parian ware

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-to have it.

-Absolutely, yes.

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It's known as Parian ware after the Island of Paros.

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Oh, right.

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Because of course, when you first see them, they look like marble.

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-Yes.

-And that's where they mined marble.

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And they are often fully signed.

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We know this one is by a firm called Robinson & Leadbeater,

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and I think it was designed by one of their sculptors called Acton,

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J Acton, around about 1878.

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So it is a nice, proper antique item.

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Now, they used to be popular many years ago.

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The market for Parian ware is much more realistic these days.

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And it does depend on the model.

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You know, if you get one of the very big models of a glamorous

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looking young lady, who is semi-draped,

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showing a little more than she should be showing...

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-Right.

-..then it is a little bit more popular.

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This is more of an academic figure.

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This is for someone who has got a nice Victorian house who

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wants to create a sort of library or something like that.

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Having said all that, I think he would sell at auction.

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I think years ago,

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something like this would have made £80 to £100.

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Today, we've got to be a little bit more realistic, I think.

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I'd like to put it in with an estimate of around £30 to £50.

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-Would you be happy with that?

-Yeah, that's fine.

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Would you want to put a reserve on it or would you

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-just like to see what happens?

-No, I don't, because I... No.

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Well, I've done enough preaching, now it's off to the auction for us,

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-isn't it?

-OK.

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Welcoming our next guest is Christina Trevanion,

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who's discovered a piece by a famous female potter.

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Welcome, Julian and Paris.

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Thank you for coming in today and for bringing this beautiful

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Charlotte Rhead vase. Which belongs to you, Julian.

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Did you inherit the piece?

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-From his nan.

-From your nan, OK.

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And was she a Charlotte Rhead collector?

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-She collected lots of things.

-She did? Oh, brilliant.

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Well, she obviously had a very, very good eye cos this is

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a particularly beautiful piece.

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-Do you like it?

-Nice design, nice shape.

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Brilliant, it is. It is a beautiful design.

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And Charlotte Rhead really came from an entire dynasty of Rhead family

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ceramics specialists.

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And they worked for a lot of different Staffordshire companies.

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But she really is the most famous of her brothers and her sisters,

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who were also in the industry.

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If we look on the bottom - we'll have a look at its bottom here -

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it's actually got TL5 - Tube Line 5.

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And this pattern is quite a prolific pattern.

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It has got oranges and lemons

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and it is a continuous band all the way around.

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So if we keep looking, it is all over decorated.

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And collectors do love that.

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What are your valuation expectations for it?

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Because she did produce quite a lot of them, they are quite prolific.

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Four years ago,

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we saw on the computer, online, one for about £120.

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About £120,

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which would be a fairly accurate open market valuation for it.

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I was thinking, I had in my head,

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cos I've sold quite a lot of these before,

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and they've made in the region of about £80 to £120.

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So, I would be happy to put an £80 reserve on it,

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with an estimate of 80 to 120.

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How do you feel about that?

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-Fine.

-Excellent. Brilliant.

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Well, let's put it to auction at 80 to 120,

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and hopefully, we'll get some more for you.

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Thank you ever so much for bringing it in today.

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-It has been a pleasure to meet you both.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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Mark Stacey is faced with a menagerie.

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-Hilary.

-Mark.

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-You've brought in a collection of toys.

-I certainly have.

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I love the little seal here with

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its...balancing, the circus scene.

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Oh, they're fabulous, all of them.

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-And you've got a little dog and a little mouse, haven't you?

-Yes.

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And the dog's tail goes round and the seal balances everything, so...

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-Now, these weren't yours, were they?

-No, they belonged to my uncle.

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And he was quite well-known long ago.

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His name was HN Charles

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and he designed the very first MG.

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-Did he really?

-Yes, the MG car. Yeah.

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-Gosh.

-These were his childhood toys.

-Oh, wow.

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And they were just handed to my parents.

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-And my mother handed them to me, so...

-Oh, gosh.

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But they've been in my loft, I'm afraid, for about 15 years.

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-Gosh, well, they're fascinating, aren't they?

-Yeah.

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I mean, if you think of the sort of toys kids play with these days...

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-Yes.

-..these are quite primitive in a way, aren't they?

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They are. Very primitive. But I mean, they're...

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-I love the fact that...

-They're fun.

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-This one I particularly like cos you have the box for it.

-It's lovely.

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Yes. Bit battered, I'm afraid.

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-Bit battered, but it's there.

-Yes.

-That's the nice thing.

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-This one is German.

-Yes.

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-And there's a Schuco one.

-There's a Schuco, the mouse, I think.

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-And there's another German...

-Another German one.

-..dog.

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And I think, when we're selling something like this,

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-it's nice to sell them as a little group lot...

-Yes, I think so.

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..because there will be specialist collectors at this event...

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-Yes, yes.

-..you know, who would like these...

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-Absolutely.

-..as an example of the toy.

-Yes.

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I would have thought these are early 20th century - 1910, 1920...

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-Yes, about that.

-Something like that.

-Yes.

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-I can do a seal impression, you know?

-Really?

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-Would you like to see it?

-Yes.

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HE YELPS REPEATEDLY

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SHE LAUGHS Very good.

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-Oh, dear.

-Now, I must stop fooling around as we need to know a price,

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-don't we?

-Yes, we do, please.

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-I think if we put £80 to £120 on the little group...

-Yeah.

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-..with an £80 reserve.

-Yes.

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-So, we've protected it.

-And then market the Schuco and the names.

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Oh, yes. They'll put the names in.

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My cat quite likes the mouse, but I haven't let him play with it.

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Quite wise, quite wise. Well, that's wonderful.

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I look forward to seeing you at the auction.

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-Yes, I look forward to seeing you too, Mark.

-Thank you.

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And here's hoping Mark demonstrates his seal impersonation again.

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Before we head off to auction,

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there is something I would like to show you.

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I'm a bit of a rowing fan and I couldn't come here

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and not spend a day with the Oxford boat crew.

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After all, the University boat race is the oldest amateur rowing event

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in the world.

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0800 hours,

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barely light,

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bitterly cold.

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The Oxford boat crew are already preparing to get on the water.

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I'm here at a chilly Westminster pier, on the Thames,

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to meet the hard core chosen few.

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Those students who are competing for the chance to row

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in the most prestigious boat race in the world.

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HE TALKS THROUGH MEGAPHONE

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I watch the University boat race every year,

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so this is quite special for me

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to get a peek behind the scenes at the training.

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My father was a keen rower as a college student,

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and that's where he met my mother, when she was a cox.

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And throughout my father's

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professional teaching days in the sciences,

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he always helped out in his spare time on the weekends

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and in the evenings with the Twickenham Rowing Club.

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He absolutely loved this sport and he taught me to row.

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So this is wonderful for me, revisiting the River Thames.

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Gosh, they look fit, don't they?

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There's not an ounce of fat on those guys.

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HE LAUGHS

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The boat race is still proudly an amateur event,

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but what constitutes an amateur these days?

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None of the rowers are paid, but sponsorship is lucrative.

0:14:450:14:49

They are at the top of their game,

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and even boast an Olympian in their ranks.

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Constantine Louloudis is competing to be part of the Oxford squad,

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but rowing in the men's eights in the London Olympics.

0:15:000:15:03

You got a bronze, and what an emotional experience.

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Were there tears crossing the line?

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Ah, there were, there were. I mean, they were sort of...

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-For different reasons?

-Yeah, physical pain, and then,

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you know, the emotion of it.

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Um, you know, we'd all invested so much,

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-there was a lot of emotion running high.

-Sure.

0:15:150:15:17

A lot of time and effort.

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You know, you're studying, what are you studying at the moment?

0:15:180:15:20

-I'm studying Classics.

-So not only are you dedicated to the sport,

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but you've got to be dedicated to, obviously,

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getting the grades and putting in the time.

0:15:250:15:28

Yeah, yeah, when I came back to Oxford,

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a lot of people said, "Oh, well, life must be a lot easier now."

0:15:290:15:32

But, actually, the lifestyle of being a student athlete

0:15:320:15:34

is a lot more stressful, trying to balance the two.

0:15:340:15:37

Is the training on an international level

0:15:370:15:39

more physically and mentally demanding?

0:15:390:15:40

Um...yes.

0:15:400:15:42

Yeah, it's... There's...

0:15:420:15:44

there's more mileage, you've got to complete it at a higher intensity,

0:15:440:15:48

you're trying to keep up with the top guys, and they set the pace.

0:15:480:15:51

And, you know, they really are world-class.

0:15:510:15:54

Mentally, it's...

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You get home at three or four, even on a full day,

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then you've got nothing else to do, whereas when you're at university,

0:15:580:16:01

you get home and you're working, you know, into the night.

0:16:010:16:04

Sure, making the time up from studies.

0:16:040:16:05

Yeah, you don't get a moment's rest during term time.

0:16:050:16:08

Um, so I suppose there are two sides to it.

0:16:080:16:10

On the whole, the student athlete lifestyle is pretty demanding.

0:16:100:16:13

-RADIO ANNOUNCEMENT:

-'Attracts 250,000 people

0:16:130:16:15

'to the banks of the Thames each meeting.'

0:16:150:16:17

It's a far cry from when the boat race started in 1829,

0:16:170:16:21

when Oxford challenged Cambridge

0:16:210:16:23

to an impromptu rowing race in Henley.

0:16:230:16:25

'The premier event in boat racing.'

0:16:260:16:28

It soon became an annual event, attracting international coverage.

0:16:280:16:32

'Hundreds of thousands braved the drizzle

0:16:320:16:34

'to see the shells battle it out over a choppy 4.25-mile course.

0:16:340:16:38

'Oxford pulls close to Cambridge at Hammersmith Bridge,

0:16:380:16:41

'but that's as close as the Old Blue gets to victory.

0:16:410:16:44

'The Cambridge crew, boasting an ex-Yale Man, Harold Barn,

0:16:440:16:47

'at number six position, is level-headed,

0:16:470:16:49

'as they battle stiff winds and the rough water.'

0:16:490:16:53

The race has become ferociously competitive.

0:16:530:16:55

Overall, Cambridge currently lead Oxford by 81 to 76,

0:16:550:17:00

with one dead heat.

0:17:000:17:01

Over the years, there's been mutinies, sinkings,

0:17:020:17:05

and in 2012, a protest swimmer disrupted the proceedings

0:17:050:17:09

halfway through the race. It had to be restarted.

0:17:090:17:11

What has changed though is the training regime.

0:17:110:17:14

Olympic techniques have been adopted to push these guys

0:17:140:17:17

to their absolute limits.

0:17:170:17:19

The tipping point came in the 1960s,

0:17:210:17:23

which heralded a new approach for athletes.

0:17:230:17:26

Before then, professional sportsmen often smoked, drank heavily

0:17:260:17:30

and ate bad food -

0:17:300:17:32

but the '60s ushered in a new era.

0:17:320:17:34

Dan Topolski

0:17:350:17:36

rowed in the 1967 and the 1968 boat race for Oxford,

0:17:360:17:41

and went on to pioneer professional coaching techniques

0:17:410:17:44

for his amateur squad.

0:17:440:17:45

Rowing was very much, in this country,

0:17:460:17:48

was very much in the doldrums.

0:17:480:17:49

You know, the Germans were way ahead of us, and almost every other nation

0:17:490:17:53

was ahead of us in terms of the physical preparation of a crew.

0:17:530:17:57

Not having sort of, eight pints of Guinness the night beforehand.

0:17:570:18:01

Stuff like that, bag of chips.

0:18:010:18:03

Look at footballers, you know,

0:18:030:18:04

-when the foreign managers came into football.

-Yeah.

0:18:040:18:07

You know, the training started becoming much, much more intense,

0:18:070:18:10

-the diet became much more thoughtful.

-Mm.

0:18:100:18:13

It all changed, really.

0:18:130:18:14

And the change was sort of gradual, but much more scientific.

0:18:140:18:19

We made things much, much more competitive within the group.

0:18:190:18:21

That moved everything along into a much more...I suppose,

0:18:210:18:25

a more professional approach.

0:18:250:18:27

-Yes, yes.

-But it was still amateur.

0:18:270:18:29

So, I was making sort of changes on my sense of what it was like.

0:18:290:18:33

So I had to be nutritionist, I had to be psychologist,

0:18:330:18:36

I had to be all of those things.

0:18:360:18:39

Now, we've got specialists in all those fields.

0:18:390:18:42

It takes seven months of training to whittle down the final eight

0:18:460:18:50

who eventually wear the dark blue

0:18:500:18:52

of Oxford on the day.

0:18:520:18:54

Seven months of hard core training for one race.

0:18:540:18:58

Question is, how much do these students put themselves through,

0:18:580:19:01

mentally and physically, for what is essentially, still, an amateur race?

0:19:010:19:06

The man in charge of training and selection today is Sean Bowden,

0:19:070:19:10

the Oxford coach since 1998.

0:19:100:19:14

He was poached from Cambridge

0:19:140:19:16

after their successful run of wins in the early '90s.

0:19:160:19:20

Can you talk me through some of the training you go through here?

0:19:200:19:22

Yes, well, the boat race is a 17, 18-minute race,

0:19:220:19:25

so there's a huge endurance component to that,

0:19:250:19:27

so a lot of our training is working on that sort of physical capacity,

0:19:270:19:30

that aerobic engine.

0:19:300:19:31

You know, a simple thing - people would just work off heart rates

0:19:310:19:34

-and say, "Well, we work at 75% of our maximum heart rate."

-Mm.

0:19:340:19:37

And that's a very crude way of doing this.

0:19:370:19:39

And by going through a sort of blood analysis and

0:19:390:19:41

a whole series of tests, we are able to hone that much more accurately.

0:19:410:19:45

Sure. And there's only one race, isn't there? Let's face it.

0:19:450:19:48

There's a lot of training for this one race.

0:19:480:19:50

What about nerves that day beforehand?

0:19:500:19:52

If you weren't nervous before a big race,

0:19:520:19:54

you're probably doing it wrong.

0:19:540:19:55

And the trick is to make sure you've rehearsed these things.

0:19:550:19:58

We go through a number of -

0:19:580:20:00

I suppose you'd loosely call psychological ploys or tactics

0:20:000:20:04

to bring the team together as strong as we can.

0:20:040:20:08

Dealing with the nerves and going, "Look, we're ready for this."

0:20:080:20:11

-"And we want it."

-Yes.

0:20:110:20:12

-Well, there's no doubt they want it. That's the easy bit.

-Yeah.

0:20:120:20:15

The races in the last few years

0:20:210:20:22

have all been decided in the last 60 seconds.

0:20:220:20:25

That's a testament to how fit these boys are.

0:20:250:20:29

If you've got the right mental determination,

0:20:290:20:31

when your body is screaming, "I cannot give any more,"

0:20:310:20:34

your brain kicks in and takes over and makes you do it.

0:20:340:20:37

And there's no better example than looking at the finish line.

0:20:370:20:40

The victorious team look like they can walk on water,

0:20:400:20:43

they can do it all over again.

0:20:430:20:44

The defeated team are slumped in the boat,

0:20:440:20:47

their bodies are lifeless and mentally, they're destroyed.

0:20:470:20:51

It's clear that it's not just about the physical

0:20:510:20:54

when it comes to training these days, even at amateur level.

0:20:540:20:58

The mental approach is just as important.

0:20:580:21:01

The adoption of these state-of-the-art training techniques

0:21:010:21:04

means that the line between Olympic, professional and amateur

0:21:040:21:08

is a blurred one.

0:21:080:21:09

But by their own admission, the crew are striving for perfection.

0:21:090:21:14

How many times do you do this?

0:21:140:21:16

-Twice a day.

-Right.

0:21:160:21:18

Is he looking at each one of you individually

0:21:180:21:21

and looking at your stroke and...?

0:21:210:21:22

-Easiest way to explain it is - rowing is never perfect.

-Yeah.

0:21:220:21:25

You're always trying to get that perfection.

0:21:250:21:28

And each day, you're just honing it that little bit.

0:21:280:21:30

-You know, making those mistakes just that little bit smaller.

-Sure.

0:21:300:21:34

Well, I'm excited!

0:21:340:21:36

And I'm exhausted, as well - I wasn't doing anything!

0:21:360:21:39

HE LAUGHS

0:21:390:21:40

We won't find out who makes the final eight until the day.

0:21:430:21:47

It's hard to think that half of those chaps won't make the cut.

0:21:470:21:52

Some of them here will be making history

0:21:520:21:54

in the next University boat race.

0:21:540:21:56

What a privilege.

0:21:560:21:58

Well, we've had a marvellous day here at the Oxford Union so far -

0:22:100:22:13

we've seen all manner of things come through the door.

0:22:130:22:16

Let's hope our experts, our very own talking heads,

0:22:160:22:19

are on the money with those valuations.

0:22:190:22:21

It's time to put them to the test.

0:22:210:22:23

We're going through to the auction room for the first time,

0:22:230:22:26

and here's a quick recap of what's going under the hammer.

0:22:260:22:28

We have Jean's opal love tokens from past admirers,

0:22:280:22:31

which failed to impress.

0:22:310:22:33

And David's rare Baptist bust, which turned Mark's head.

0:22:340:22:38

Or will it be the unique collection of childhood toys

0:22:410:22:43

which appeal to the auction room?

0:22:430:22:45

That circus seal with the original box

0:22:450:22:47

will surely generate some interest.

0:22:470:22:51

And not forgetting Julian's Charlotte Rhead vase.

0:22:510:22:54

Which one of them will triumph in the arena of the auction?

0:22:540:22:57

Our sale today comes from Newbury, near Reading.

0:22:590:23:03

At £1,100, make no mistake...

0:23:030:23:05

Our very own auctioneer, Thomas Plant,

0:23:070:23:09

has set up home on a former RAF base, Greenham Common.

0:23:090:23:12

It has its own story to tell - but more of that later.

0:23:120:23:16

Next, it's those 20th-century toys -

0:23:160:23:18

but it looks like Mark's been stood up.

0:23:180:23:21

Unfortunately, we do not have the owner - Hilary.

0:23:210:23:24

But we do have the items,

0:23:240:23:25

so let's play.

0:23:250:23:27

Hilary's not here, she's ill, is she?

0:23:270:23:29

-No, she can't make it today.

-Bless her.

0:23:290:23:30

But I tell you something, there's always a buyer

0:23:300:23:33

for quality wind-up toys.

0:23:330:23:34

-There is.

-And I like the seal.

-Oh, the seal's wonderful, actually.

0:23:340:23:37

-And it's got its original box with it, actually...

-Yes, it has.

0:23:370:23:40

-A bit tatty, but it...

-But it's nice though,

0:23:400:23:42

-it's nice to have that sort of thing.

-Yes.

0:23:420:23:44

-I totally agree with the 80-120.

-So we're confident?

0:23:440:23:46

I'm confident.

0:23:460:23:47

Let's put it to the test, shall we? Let's hand things over to Thomas.

0:23:490:23:52

NEB tin plate clockwork circus seal

0:23:520:23:54

with a 1930s tin plate clockwork terrier.

0:23:540:23:57

Circus seal's got the box. Lovely little lot, this one.

0:23:570:24:00

Start the bidding with me at £40.

0:24:000:24:02

40, 45.

0:24:020:24:03

50, 55.

0:24:030:24:05

60, 65. Go on.

0:24:050:24:07

-Come on, come on.

-Go on, one more.

0:24:070:24:09

75. One more and it's yours.

0:24:090:24:10

You can take it home today.

0:24:100:24:12

-Go on.

-Go on.

0:24:120:24:13

Just one more.

0:24:130:24:14

-Please.

-One.

0:24:140:24:16

Oh, peer pressure. We've done well.

0:24:160:24:18

We've done... Poor woman.

0:24:180:24:19

At £80, clockwork toys. Is there any advance at 80?

0:24:190:24:22

At 80 it is, and I sell to the lady at 80.

0:24:220:24:25

No regrets.

0:24:250:24:27

That's good, the hand's gone down.

0:24:270:24:28

Hilary will be pleased.

0:24:280:24:29

We just got it away,

0:24:290:24:31

thanks to us heckling

0:24:310:24:32

that lady over there.

0:24:320:24:34

-We made her pay an extra £5 for it.

-But she's still smiling.

0:24:340:24:36

Then it sealed the bid. There was a reserve at £80.

0:24:360:24:39

Oh, I see what you did there. "Sealed" the bid.

0:24:390:24:41

HE LAUGHS

0:24:410:24:42

Right now are Jean's opal earrings,

0:24:420:24:45

a favourite of Christina's. It's just a shame she cannot bid.

0:24:450:24:48

Jean, I've got my fingers crossed for you.

0:24:480:24:50

-Good luck.

-Thank you very much. I think I need it.

0:24:500:24:53

And I must say, you look fabulous. You don't need

0:24:530:24:55

it. You don't need it. You've got style, lady!

0:24:550:24:57

-Hasn't she?

-She has.

0:24:570:24:59

We're about to sell the two pairs of gold and opal earrings.

0:24:590:25:03

Let's hope they are all in vogue and it's not running hot and cold.

0:25:030:25:06

Because we need some kitchen taps, or is it bathroom taps?

0:25:060:25:09

-Bathroom taps.

-So, you are doing a bit of DIY?

0:25:090:25:11

I am indeed. I'm looking forward to it.

0:25:110:25:13

-I like these, I think they've got style.

-Yeah.

0:25:130:25:15

Opals, not everyone's cup of tea,

0:25:150:25:17

so let's just hope that doesn't put too many people off

0:25:170:25:20

and we get some Librans in the saleroom.

0:25:200:25:22

I'd like them to go to somebody who really loves them.

0:25:220:25:24

-Cos you don't wear them any more.

-I don't. They are not really me.

0:25:240:25:27

No. Do you know, I can see that. I can see that.

0:25:270:25:31

-Anyway, good luck. This is it.

-Thank you.

0:25:310:25:33

Next up is lot number 90.

0:25:330:25:35

This is two pairs of gold and opal earrings, the drops here.

0:25:350:25:38

Start me off here at £65. At 65.

0:25:380:25:41

At 65, the bid is with me here at 65.

0:25:410:25:45

At 65. 70. 75.

0:25:450:25:48

-80. And I'm out at 80. Lady's bid at £80.

-Well, we've sold them.

0:25:480:25:52

-Yep, £80.

-£80 against you all...

0:25:520:25:55

-Jean, the hammer has gone down. We just did it, £80.

-Wonderful.

0:25:550:25:59

Those taps will be mine.

0:25:590:26:00

Yay!

0:26:000:26:02

From plumbing to Parian ware, it's that bust next.

0:26:030:26:07

Will the Prince of Preachers fetch a princely price?

0:26:070:26:10

Going under the hammer right now, we've got a Parian ware bust

0:26:100:26:13

of Thomas Haddon Spurgeon, belonging to David.

0:26:130:26:15

And in fact, David has brought along a book which accompanies the bust.

0:26:150:26:19

That's correct.

0:26:190:26:20

-It tells us all about the Prince of Preachers.

-Absolutely.

0:26:200:26:23

-As he was known.

-Indeed, you are right, Paul.

0:26:230:26:25

Why have you decided to sell it now?

0:26:250:26:27

We've got no direct connections with it any more

0:26:270:26:30

and there is a Spurgeon Society that is current at the moment,

0:26:300:26:34

-so somebody might be interested in moving it on to them.

-Sure.

0:26:340:26:37

And it is beautifully made.

0:26:370:26:39

It is by a good maker, so it is very well modelled.

0:26:390:26:41

-It is beautifully modelled.

-No reserve, mind you.

0:26:410:26:44

-I know, that's dangerous.

-Always a bit of a worry.

0:26:440:26:46

Was that your idea or Mark's idea?

0:26:460:26:47

We both agreed. Joint, wasn't it?

0:26:470:26:51

-I can't be blamed for this, Paul.

-No.

0:26:510:26:53

Well, I'm sure Thomas will not let this go for £5.

0:26:530:26:58

Lot number 210, the Robinson & Leadbeater

0:26:580:27:00

Parian ware bust of Charles Spurgeon,

0:27:000:27:03

and I've got bids here with me starting straight in at £35.

0:27:030:27:07

-Great.

-Wonderful.

-Straight in at the top end, there you go.

0:27:070:27:09

At £35, the Parian bust.

0:27:090:27:12

At £35, is there any advance?

0:27:120:27:13

At £35. That is my top bid at 35.

0:27:130:27:17

40 if you want it.

0:27:170:27:18

At £35 against you all...

0:27:180:27:20

Selling then.

0:27:200:27:21

That's a great result.

0:27:210:27:23

You know, I wouldn't mind owning that for £35.

0:27:230:27:25

I would love it for £35.

0:27:250:27:27

It is a nice little thing. Especially with that book.

0:27:270:27:30

I'm sure Charles Spurgeon's book has a few revelations.

0:27:320:27:35

But now it is time for a real "Flog It!" favourite.

0:27:350:27:38

Well, going under the hammer right now,

0:27:400:27:42

we've got a Charlotte Rhead jug.

0:27:420:27:43

It is a great name in ceramics.

0:27:430:27:45

Charlotte Rhead is up there with the best.

0:27:450:27:47

Belonging to Julian, who is standing right next to me,

0:27:470:27:50

with his interpreter, Jean.

0:27:500:27:51

Julian's hoping to put the money towards a trip

0:27:510:27:53

to New York for his 40th birthday.

0:27:530:27:56

Good luck with that. Great to see you both.

0:27:560:27:59

Good to see you both again.

0:27:590:28:00

-It's very exciting.

-I like this a lot.

-Yeah, absolutely.

0:28:000:28:03

And it belonged to your grandmother, didn't it, Julian?

0:28:030:28:06

-Yes.

-That's right.

0:28:060:28:07

So, do you think we'll have her blessing to sell it today?

0:28:070:28:11

-Oh, yeah, I think she'll be very pleased.

-Brilliant.

0:28:120:28:15

I'm sure she'd be happy that I'm going to use

0:28:150:28:18

the money for a holiday to New York.

0:28:180:28:20

Well, look, good luck.

0:28:200:28:21

Let's hope we get the top end of the estimate and a little bit more.

0:28:210:28:25

-Fingers crossed.

-Fingers crossed.

0:28:250:28:27

Here we go. Let's hand the proceedings over to Thomas Plant.

0:28:290:28:32

An Art Deco pottery jug by Charlotte Rhead.

0:28:320:28:35

Good-looking lot, this one.

0:28:350:28:37

I start the bidding with me, straight in at £85 with me.

0:28:370:28:39

Oh, brilliant!

0:28:390:28:41

-Wow. That's good.

-Fantastic.

0:28:410:28:42

Is there any advance at £85?

0:28:420:28:45

90. 95. 100. And ten.

0:28:450:28:47

-120. 130.

-It's just such a great name.

0:28:470:28:51

Everybody is out at 130?

0:28:510:28:52

-Wow.

-With me, on the book at 130. I sell, then, £130...

0:28:520:28:57

-Yay!

-Yes, the hammer has gone down.

-Brilliant. Congratulations.

0:28:570:29:00

-Brilliant.

-That's marvellous news.

-Fantastic.

0:29:000:29:02

That'll help towards the trip.

0:29:020:29:04

-Yeah.

-Yeah, definitely.

0:29:040:29:06

I've got hands everywhere.

0:29:080:29:10

Last chance, then.

0:29:100:29:12

Free speech is a central tenet of Oxford Union,

0:29:130:29:16

everyone has the right to express their opinion.

0:29:160:29:19

In 1981, a group of women expressed their opinion

0:29:190:29:22

in a rather dramatic way.

0:29:220:29:24

This was a debate that the whole world would sit up

0:29:240:29:27

and take notice of, and it happened literally right here,

0:29:270:29:30

because the auction room is built on the site of Greenham Common.

0:29:300:29:34

In 1981, 36 women and four babies in pushchairs

0:29:420:29:46

set out from the city hall in Cardiff

0:29:460:29:49

to walk to Greenham Common RAF base.

0:29:490:29:53

They had one aim - to reach the American air base,

0:29:530:29:56

which was situated here, on Greenham Common.

0:29:560:30:00

It was a 120-mile walk, but they were determined.

0:30:000:30:02

They were on a mission to protest.

0:30:020:30:04

The reason being, American nuclear warheads were stored here,

0:30:040:30:08

on this site -

0:30:080:30:09

and behind this door lies the command centre.

0:30:090:30:12

This is where the protesters were desperate to get access to,

0:30:200:30:23

and they actually did make it on the base,

0:30:230:30:26

when security guards mistook them for cleaners.

0:30:260:30:29

But once their protest began in earnest, relations soured.

0:30:290:30:33

'Despite the rain and the bitter cold, they arrived by coach,

0:30:360:30:39

'by car and even on foot.

0:30:390:30:41

'Their aim was to stress as powerfully as possible

0:30:420:30:45

'that in their view, the cruise missile is not a deterrent,

0:30:450:30:48

'it's a weapon of death.'

0:30:480:30:50

In the volatile political landscape of the 1980s,

0:30:540:30:56

opinions polarised over nuclear issues.

0:30:560:30:59

And Greenham Common became a symbolic battleground.

0:30:590:31:02

Now, many people believed cruise missiles were a deterrent

0:31:020:31:05

against a nuclear attack from Russia,

0:31:050:31:08

while many other people believed they were a force of destruction

0:31:080:31:11

in their own right.

0:31:110:31:13

Ordinary women felt they had no choice

0:31:140:31:17

but to leave their families and homes behind.

0:31:170:31:19

They came to Greenham to protest,

0:31:190:31:21

as they believed Armageddon was imminent.

0:31:210:31:25

We had been told we're stuck with this reality,

0:31:250:31:28

where war is acceptable, war is a way of solving the world's problems.

0:31:280:31:32

And that is simply not good enough.

0:31:320:31:35

This is not even war what they're promising now,

0:31:350:31:37

it's extermination.

0:31:370:31:39

Of us, of everybody.

0:31:410:31:43

Every living thing.

0:31:430:31:45

Jean Hutchinson was one of the founding mothers of the camp.

0:31:460:31:49

It was actually her family who persuaded her to take a stand.

0:31:490:31:53

My son said, "It's about time that you got down there and found out,

0:31:540:32:00

"and I'll do the cooking for the family."

0:32:000:32:02

I arrived with a tent and put it up. So we were all in tents.

0:32:050:32:09

'They'd been living in the most primitive conditions

0:32:090:32:12

'outside the main gate for 15 months. Tonight, however,

0:32:120:32:15

'police reinforcements have been called to Greenham.'

0:32:150:32:19

The Council liked to evict us a lot.

0:32:210:32:24

We had to be very close, because we had to come onto this ground

0:32:240:32:29

and coordinate a nonviolent, direct action.

0:32:290:32:34

'Women had gathered to form a human blockade.

0:32:350:32:38

'They stood in the path of a military convoy

0:32:380:32:40

'and refused to move.'

0:32:400:32:41

# Whatever happened to dear old Lenny? #

0:32:410:32:46

Jean soon found that the authorities adopted a zero-tolerance policy.

0:32:460:32:50

Yes, we all went to prison several times, of course.

0:32:500:32:54

# Whatever happened to the heroes? #

0:32:540:32:58

A pattern was set up -

0:32:580:33:00

nonviolent, direct action, court, prison.

0:33:000:33:04

It was thought of as all part of getting rid of the cruise missiles.

0:33:040:33:09

This weapon is massively destructive -

0:33:120:33:15

16 times Hiroshima bomb.

0:33:150:33:18

The Greenham Common women captured the interest of the media

0:33:230:33:26

by chaining themselves to the perimeter fence,

0:33:260:33:28

demanding an open debate with government on nuclear armament.

0:33:280:33:32

They didn't think it was democratically right

0:33:320:33:34

that Margaret Thatcher's government would just let the Americans

0:33:340:33:37

bring their nuclear missiles into the country.

0:33:370:33:40

Greenham became a permanent encampment.

0:33:440:33:47

Jean lived here for 18 years. Conditions were primitive.

0:33:470:33:50

There was no electricity, no running water -

0:33:500:33:53

but by the mid-1980s, more than 1,000 women had joined her.

0:33:530:33:58

'Thousands of women and small children

0:33:580:34:00

'spread out around the base, joining hands to surround it completely.'

0:34:000:34:04

'They believe their protestors made deployment of crews

0:34:040:34:08

'too sensitive politically and too unsafe.'

0:34:080:34:10

But there is another view from inside the base.

0:34:150:34:18

Phil DeMonte used to work for the US government

0:34:180:34:21

and was based behind the wire at Greenham from 1988,

0:34:210:34:25

where things looked very different.

0:34:250:34:28

They used to get on the base quite regular. It was massive base.

0:34:280:34:31

Cut a couple of holes through the fence, climb over the fence.

0:34:310:34:34

They couldn't stop them getting on the base -

0:34:340:34:35

but the secure areas, they never got into.

0:34:350:34:37

I appreciate the fact that they were protesting,

0:34:390:34:41

and that's one of the liberties that we do have is the right to protest.

0:34:410:34:44

But when they actually started cutting down fences

0:34:440:34:46

and damaging property and interfering with convoys,

0:34:460:34:49

by throwing paint balls, etc, that put people's lives in danger

0:34:490:34:52

and that actually cost money to the British taxpayer.

0:34:520:34:54

I mean, realistically, in the event of the missiles

0:34:550:35:00

actually having to be deployed on a real footing,

0:35:000:35:03

I really don't think they would have got anywhere near the systems

0:35:030:35:06

or the convoys or the base.

0:35:060:35:08

This is a unique view inside the decontamination chamber

0:35:190:35:22

which was only accessible in a state of high alert.

0:35:220:35:25

Scarily, survival time in the event of a nuclear attack

0:35:250:35:28

outside of this chamber was just 14 seconds.

0:35:280:35:32

Now, that's just 14 seconds

0:35:320:35:33

to decide what to do with the rest of your life.

0:35:330:35:36

So you can understand why this was an issue

0:35:360:35:39

so many people had to take a stand on.

0:35:390:35:41

The whole world held their breath as Reagan and Gorbachev

0:35:470:35:51

sat down at the table to discuss nuclear disarmament.

0:35:510:35:55

The historic INF Treaty, signed in 1987,

0:35:560:36:00

effectively ended the Cold War

0:36:000:36:02

and the life of the nuclear weapons stored here at Greenham.

0:36:020:36:06

Now that the missiles have gone, 30 years since protests began,

0:36:080:36:12

is there any common ground?

0:36:120:36:15

Jean and Phil, I've brought you together here in the Peace Garden.

0:36:150:36:18

Can you see it from each others' point of view now?

0:36:180:36:21

-I applaud what they've done 18 years standing out here.

-Yeah.

0:36:210:36:25

But what I cannot condone and never can condone -

0:36:250:36:28

when fences were ripped down and property destroyed

0:36:280:36:31

as well as interfering with military operations.

0:36:310:36:34

I can't condone that.

0:36:340:36:36

-Well.

-HE CHUCKLES

0:36:360:36:38

-We took...

-What are you going to say to that, Jean?

0:36:380:36:40

We took nonviolent direct action.

0:36:400:36:42

The whole place is freed up

0:36:420:36:45

from more than 100 weapons

0:36:450:36:47

that could have - if used - killed a million people.

0:36:470:36:51

And you really feel that your actions here

0:36:510:36:54

had a direct result in the fall of communism?

0:36:540:36:56

Women on this spot

0:36:560:36:59

knew that it was possible to defeat cruise missiles.

0:36:590:37:03

So the cruise missiles themselves deployed in the field

0:37:030:37:06

had nothing to do with the signing of the INF Treaty,

0:37:060:37:08

-that's what you're telling me?

-You can't say that your people

0:37:080:37:11

were working for multilateral disarmament and then...

0:37:110:37:13

Yes, they were. You think that wasn't Ronald Reagan's stance?

0:37:130:37:16

Speak softly but carry a big stick.

0:37:160:37:18

He had the weapon systems ready.

0:37:180:37:19

"Now do you want to sit down and talk?"

0:37:190:37:21

I can see...I can see now that opinions are still divided

0:37:210:37:24

and they haven't really changed

0:37:240:37:25

and I don't think they will, will they, Phil?

0:37:250:37:27

-We had a job to do.

-You had a job to do.

-And we had a job to do.

0:37:270:37:30

The publicity was on this side of the fence

0:37:300:37:32

but the history was made on that side of the fence.

0:37:320:37:34

We can all safely say history was definitely made here.

0:37:340:37:37

Yes, we had the missiles destroyed.

0:37:370:37:39

Well, that got quite heated.

0:37:430:37:44

It just goes to show you that 30 years on,

0:37:440:37:46

issues such as this can still prompt debate.

0:37:460:37:50

But at the end of the day, that's what it's all about -

0:37:500:37:53

freedom of speech.

0:37:530:37:54

This was the reason that Oxford Union was created.

0:37:540:37:57

Welcome back to our valuation day venue, the Oxford Union.

0:38:110:38:14

There's still a great buzz in the room

0:38:140:38:15

and plenty more antiques to find to take off to auction.

0:38:150:38:18

So, from the best seat in the house, the president's chair,

0:38:180:38:22

it's over to the hot seat in the house, Christina's chair.

0:38:220:38:24

Let's go and take a closer look at what she's spotted.

0:38:240:38:27

So, Joy, you've brought this beautiful box in to me today.

0:38:300:38:33

Tell me where it came from.

0:38:330:38:35

-It came from Lord and Lady Baldwin's estate.

-Right.

0:38:350:38:40

He'd died and his wife lived there for a little while afterwards

0:38:400:38:45

and she found the place was too big,

0:38:450:38:46

so they had a massive auction which I attended.

0:38:460:38:50

My parents worked for Lord and Lady Baldwin.

0:38:500:38:53

-When did you buy it?

-1975.

0:38:530:38:56

-And what did you pay for it then?

-£50.

0:38:560:38:58

-And you think it's Sevres?

-Yes.

0:38:580:39:01

Is it not?

0:39:010:39:02

-I'm afraid it's not.

-Oh.

0:39:030:39:06

We've done a little bit of research and although the top is lovely,

0:39:060:39:09

we're going to have a look at its bottom

0:39:090:39:10

-because that's the bit that tells us everything, isn't it?

-Of course.

0:39:100:39:13

So if we turn it over here,

0:39:130:39:15

we've got this lovely sort of entwined Ls mark

0:39:150:39:19

-which, you're absolutely right, is a Sevres mark.

-Mm.

0:39:190:39:23

But there was a factory based in Paris called Samson.

0:39:230:39:26

Oh, I see.

0:39:260:39:27

Now, Samson started in the 1830s

0:39:270:39:29

and he started by producing imitation Sevres works basically.

0:39:290:39:36

And he was a great imitator and a great copier.

0:39:360:39:39

And he never set out to deceive anybody,

0:39:390:39:41

he just made replacements for things that were broken

0:39:410:39:44

-and things like that.

-Mm-hm.

0:39:440:39:45

But he actually became very well-known in his own right.

0:39:450:39:48

-And this is a Samson box.

-Well, how strange.

0:39:480:39:51

I'm wondering if Lady Baldwin knew that.

0:39:510:39:55

-You never know. It is a difficult one to spot.

-Mm.

0:39:550:39:58

Especially because this is such a typical Sevres view.

0:39:580:40:02

Yes, I knew that.

0:40:020:40:03

This sort of Watteau-esque lovers frolicking in a French garden

0:40:030:40:06

in very much the 18th-century style, is typical Sevres, isn't it,

0:40:060:40:09

with this wonderful blue Mazarin ground.

0:40:090:40:13

And we open it up. We've got this lovely ormolu setting

0:40:130:40:16

-and inside, lovely gilt interior.

-It's beautiful, isn't it?

0:40:160:40:19

Very beautiful.

0:40:190:40:21

And I think this is quite a late one.

0:40:210:40:22

This is a late 19th-century example.

0:40:220:40:25

I don't think it is the 1830 that we'd like it to be.

0:40:250:40:29

And as such, really that is going to be reflected

0:40:290:40:32

in the auction estimate.

0:40:320:40:33

Yes, I do understand that.

0:40:330:40:35

But I think at auction we might be looking

0:40:350:40:37

-somewhere in the region of sort of £60-£80.

-Mm-hm.

0:40:370:40:40

How would you feel about selling it at that sort of level?

0:40:400:40:43

-Um, that's difficult.

-It is difficult, isn't it?

0:40:430:40:46

I don't have any daughters, but I do have two lovely daughters-in-law

0:40:460:40:50

and I was wondering about giving it to one and thinking,

0:40:500:40:55

-I've got nothing to give to the other one that's similar.

-Hmm.

0:40:550:40:58

Um, now...

0:40:580:41:00

I'll sell it.

0:41:000:41:02

-You'll sell it.

-Yes.

-Are you sure?

0:41:020:41:03

-Yes.

-OK.

0:41:030:41:05

-And they'll get the money.

-Good. That's a very good idea.

0:41:050:41:08

-So if we put an estimate of £60-£80...

-Yes.

0:41:080:41:10

-..and a reserve of 60...

-Yes.

-..and see how we get on.

0:41:100:41:13

-Yes, that's fine.

-Yeah?

-Mm-hm.

-Brilliant.

0:41:130:41:16

Well, we look forward to it.

0:41:160:41:17

Let's hope we can make slightly more than that for you.

0:41:170:41:20

Oh, never mind.

0:41:200:41:21

-Thank you for bringing it in.

-Thank you.

0:41:210:41:23

£50 back in the early '70s was quite a lot of money.

0:41:230:41:27

It just proves that you have to look closely

0:41:270:41:29

when buying at local auctions.

0:41:290:41:31

Now it's time to leave the lively excitement of our "Flog It!" crowds

0:41:340:41:37

for a bit of quiet.

0:41:370:41:39

We are in the cathedral of learning after all.

0:41:390:41:41

This was the original debating chamber until 1878.

0:41:420:41:46

It's hard to imagine but, back then,

0:41:460:41:48

Oxford University was very restrictive.

0:41:480:41:50

The culture was the graduates were there to be taught,

0:41:500:41:53

not to think for themselves.

0:41:530:41:55

And there was very little in the way of books

0:41:550:41:57

other than the textbooks the college provided.

0:41:570:42:00

So the students were very keen to start up their own library,

0:42:000:42:03

and I think they've jolly well succeeded, don't you?

0:42:030:42:07

I mean, this is just marvellous.

0:42:070:42:09

From the wonders of books to the beauty of bronze,

0:42:120:42:14

Mark Stacey has unearthed something Bergmann.

0:42:140:42:17

What an extraordinary group of figures you've brought in.

0:42:200:42:23

Have you had them a long time?

0:42:230:42:24

My wife's mother said that they were bought by her father,

0:42:240:42:28

so, my wife's grandfather.

0:42:280:42:30

So a wee while ago?

0:42:300:42:32

-Probably a long time ago.

-Yes.

0:42:320:42:33

I mean, the minute I saw them, I thought only of one thing.

0:42:330:42:38

-Yes.

-That they were, of course, Austrian.

0:42:380:42:41

Ah.

0:42:410:42:42

Cold painted bronze, which means that the painting

0:42:420:42:45

and the decoration is painted on after they were actually...

0:42:450:42:50

-come out of the mould.

-Sure.

0:42:500:42:51

And I hoped they would be by one maker...

0:42:510:42:55

a chap called Franz Bergmann.

0:42:550:42:57

And the answer to my question is on here.

0:42:570:43:00

And we've got a little shape number here.

0:43:000:43:03

Then we've got a word that says "geschutzt"

0:43:030:43:05

which is Austrian or German for "register".

0:43:050:43:08

Can you see that little vase there?

0:43:080:43:10

-Oh, yes.

-With the B in the middle?

-Yes.

-That stands for Bergmann.

0:43:100:43:14

Franz Bergmann. That's his mark.

0:43:140:43:15

-Right.

-And it's really nice to see.

0:43:150:43:17

-So it's confirmed what I thought they would be.

-Yes.

0:43:170:43:21

-And they would date to around about

-1900. Yes.

0:43:210:43:25

So they're going to... They're well over 100 years old.

0:43:250:43:29

He specialised in this type of work

0:43:290:43:31

and produced a wide range of animal figures and bird figures.

0:43:310:43:35

Produced a lot of Arabian-type scenes

0:43:350:43:38

with Arabs drinking coffee,

0:43:380:43:40

-carpet sellers, this sort of thing.

-Mm.

0:43:400:43:43

But these are Africans, aren't they?

0:43:430:43:46

Well, we always assumed they were sort of Zulus.

0:43:460:43:49

-Yeah, Zulus with their shields.

-Yeah.

0:43:490:43:52

There's a huge collector's market for Franz Bergmann's works

0:43:520:43:55

but I've not seen a little group like this

0:43:550:43:57

and I think they're absolutely charming.

0:43:570:44:00

I would say, as they're damaged, put them in as a little group.

0:44:000:44:03

-Yes.

-And I would like to put an auction estimate on them

0:44:030:44:06

of £400-£600.

0:44:060:44:08

Right.

0:44:080:44:09

But I think they might make a bit more on the day.

0:44:090:44:13

Would you be happy to put them in at that?

0:44:130:44:15

-Um, yes, I have my wife's permission.

-You do?

-Yes.

0:44:150:44:18

You're not going to get into trouble with 'er indoors?

0:44:180:44:21

-I don't think so, no.

-Oh, good. I'm sure you won't.

0:44:210:44:23

-We'll put a reserve of course.

-Yes.

-We'll put a reserve of £400 on them.

0:44:230:44:28

There's two types of reserve, you can have it fixed,

0:44:280:44:31

-which means that we won't sell them below 400.

-Yes.

0:44:310:44:34

Or you can have it discretionary,

0:44:340:44:36

which gives the auctioneer 10% on the day.

0:44:360:44:39

What do you think your wife would be comfortable with?

0:44:390:44:43

Um, let's say fixed.

0:44:430:44:45

-Shall we say fixed?

-I would say fixed anyway.

0:44:450:44:47

Let's say fixed because actually, I think we're going to be OK.

0:44:470:44:51

And they'll go to a collector who loves these type of things.

0:44:510:44:54

They've been in a box, I must confess.

0:44:540:44:55

Oh, no. Oh, no, they can't live in a box.

0:44:550:44:57

-They're much too nice for that.

-That's right.

0:44:570:44:59

I think someone who appreciates them should...

0:44:590:45:01

I'm glad we've got them out of the box

0:45:010:45:03

and we're going to give them a chance

0:45:030:45:05

of finding a home where they're going to be loved and cherished.

0:45:050:45:07

-Good.

-Thanks for bringing them in, Michael.

0:45:070:45:10

Here's hoping those beautiful Bergmann bronzes

0:45:100:45:12

never have to be boxed up again.

0:45:120:45:15

And now, our final item of the day could be the most lucrative.

0:45:160:45:19

And who better to evaluate it than our very own jewellery expert

0:45:190:45:23

Christina Trevanion?

0:45:230:45:25

Zena, what a sparkler.

0:45:250:45:27

I love it. You've brought this beautiful ring in to us today.

0:45:270:45:31

It's absolutely stunning.

0:45:310:45:32

Can you tell me a little bit about it?

0:45:320:45:34

The original ring was given to me by an ex-boss when she retired.

0:45:340:45:40

She gave me the option of a few items which I'd like to have

0:45:400:45:43

as a thank you, and I chose the ring -

0:45:430:45:45

-but it was set in white gold at the time.

-Right.

0:45:450:45:48

It was a very small ring but a square setting

0:45:480:45:52

and it looked more like a ring out of a cracker.

0:45:520:45:55

-Oh, right.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:45:550:45:56

So I had it reset in 18 carat gold.

0:45:560:45:59

So you must have worked incredibly hard

0:45:590:46:01

-because it's a beautiful ring and a very, very generous present.

-Yes.

0:46:010:46:04

Very generous present.

0:46:040:46:06

-So you've had it put into quite a traditional setting really.

-Yes.

0:46:060:46:08

And it's very, very similar to my engagement ring.

0:46:080:46:11

-I'm thinking about swapping them.

-No. No, no, no, no.

0:46:110:46:14

Slightly bigger than my engagement ring!

0:46:140:46:16

But this is a very, very traditional setting.

0:46:170:46:19

-And did you wear it when it was...?

-I did, yes. I used to wear it

0:46:190:46:22

-but the insurance value was rather high.

-Right.

-Um,

0:46:220:46:26

and I put it in the safe and now I don't wear it, so...

0:46:260:46:30

It's a bit ridiculous paying the insurance for it.

0:46:300:46:33

It does seem that way, doesn't it?

0:46:330:46:34

So let's see if we can find a mutually agreeable value

0:46:340:46:37

and then perhaps you can use the money

0:46:370:46:39

towards something that you will wear.

0:46:390:46:40

Obviously it's a diamond ring set in, what looks to be,

0:46:400:46:44

a platinum, little coronet setting and then 18 carat yellow gold hoop.

0:46:440:46:50

We've got a diamond solitaire, a brilliant-cut diamond here

0:46:500:46:54

and we grade diamonds on what we call the four Cs,

0:46:540:46:58

so cut, clarity, colour and obviously carat weight,

0:46:580:47:01

what every girl wants to know really is, how big is it?

0:47:010:47:05

And in all four of those aspects it really does score quite highly.

0:47:050:47:09

It's a great colour. It's a nice white colour.

0:47:090:47:12

Clarity, there are a few little inclusions there.

0:47:120:47:15

A lot of people quite sweetly call them birthmarks

0:47:150:47:18

-because that's how the diamond would have formed.

-Right.

0:47:180:47:20

But this is quite clear.

0:47:200:47:21

And carat weight, we've worked it out at about a carat.

0:47:210:47:25

-Have you...?

-Should be 1.1.

0:47:250:47:27

-1.1 carat.

-Is that what they graded it at?

-Yes. BOTH:

-On the insurance.

0:47:270:47:31

-Yes.

-Which is great cos that means it's over a carat

0:47:310:47:33

which really does make quite a difference

0:47:330:47:35

-when you get over that one carat mark.

-Yes.

0:47:350:47:38

So, value-wise, at auction

0:47:380:47:42

I would be quite cautious

0:47:420:47:44

because of the current economic market we're in

0:47:440:47:47

and maybe go somewhere in the region of sort of 1,000-1,500,

0:47:470:47:50

-something like that.

-Mm-hm.

0:47:500:47:52

-How would you feel about that?

-Yes, fine.

-Is that all right?

-Yes, yes.

0:47:520:47:55

So if we put an auction estimate of 1,000-1,500

0:47:550:47:59

and perhaps a reserve of 1,000,

0:47:590:48:01

-cos I don't think it needs to go for any less than that.

-No.

0:48:010:48:03

-No, I wouldn't want it to.

-No.

0:48:030:48:04

Cos it really is rather beautiful.

0:48:040:48:06

-And what would you use the money for?

-For a holiday, I think.

0:48:060:48:08

Cos you're quite an intrepid traveller, aren't you?

0:48:080:48:11

-Yes.

-Globe trotted by the sounds of it.

0:48:110:48:14

THEY LAUGH

0:48:140:48:15

Well, we haven't seen the Northern Lights yet,

0:48:150:48:17

-so I'd like to do a cruise to the Northern Lights.

-Fantastic.

0:48:170:48:19

So next year is supposed to be a good year.

0:48:190:48:21

It would be quite appropriate really from a sparkler

0:48:210:48:23

-to sparklers in the sky.

-It would, wouldn't it?

-Yes!

-True.

0:48:230:48:26

Chris, what a fabulous pair of

0:48:310:48:33

tin plate cars you've brought in.

0:48:330:48:35

-They're lovely, aren't they?

-Where on earth did you get them from?

0:48:350:48:38

They came from my grandmother's.

0:48:380:48:40

I don't know why they were there,

0:48:400:48:42

because my grandmother had two girls.

0:48:420:48:44

And when we were children, we never saw them.

0:48:440:48:47

I never saw this until it came out of the house

0:48:470:48:50

and they were going to send it to a jumble sale

0:48:500:48:53

and I thought, no, that's too...

0:48:530:48:55

You know, it just appealed to me.

0:48:550:48:57

-I think it's charming.

-And I was teaching at the time when I thought,

0:48:570:49:00

well, I can use it for storytelling...

0:49:000:49:02

-Oh, of course.

-..or something like that.

0:49:020:49:05

So, I took it back with me.

0:49:050:49:07

I'm so pleased you did,

0:49:070:49:09

cos I wouldn't have had the chance of looking at them...

0:49:090:49:11

-SHE LAUGHS

-..if you'd let them go to the

0:49:110:49:13

charity shop.

0:49:130:49:14

-They're great fun. They're very nostalgic.

-Yes.

0:49:140:49:16

-People of a certain age will certainly remember these.

-Yes.

0:49:160:49:20

-This one, I think is the earlier one.

-Yes.

0:49:200:49:23

Um, this one, feels instinctively to me as if it might be a 1930s one.

0:49:230:49:28

-Yes, that was what I was thinking, yes.

-With the colours.

0:49:280:49:30

And the little boot opens up in the back, there.

0:49:300:49:33

-This one, I think is much more 1950s.

-Yes, I agree.

0:49:330:49:38

That sort of awful, grey colour that cars used to be after the war.

0:49:380:49:41

Yes, it was black or grey, wasn't it?

0:49:410:49:43

Yes. It's no wonder this car is in such fabulous condition,

0:49:430:49:47

because, look, it's with its box.

0:49:470:49:48

-Yes.

-And even that's in great condition.

0:49:480:49:51

-Well.

-So, you've been very good keeping it like that.

0:49:510:49:54

Have you ever thought of the value?

0:49:540:49:56

I have no idea what the value was.

0:49:560:49:58

You haven't been on that t'internet...

0:49:580:50:00

-No, no, I haven't.

-..searched around and thought, "Oh."?

-No.

0:50:000:50:03

In terms of value, I've sort of pondered over this.

0:50:030:50:06

Cos I don't like to be thought of as cliche.

0:50:060:50:08

-But I am going for the auctioneer's cliche on this, I'm afraid.

-Yes.

0:50:100:50:14

You know what's coming, don't you? 80 to 120.

0:50:140:50:17

-That's, that's...

-We'll put a reserve, of course, of £80.

0:50:170:50:21

-Right.

-I think they might make a bit more than that.

-I hope so.

0:50:210:50:23

I think they will.

0:50:230:50:25

I'd like to see them making maybe 150 or so on the day.

0:50:250:50:28

-That'll be great.

-But I think we've got to tease those bidders in.

-Yes.

0:50:280:50:31

-Would you be happy with that, Chris?

-Yes, that'll be fine.

0:50:310:50:34

I'd rather they go to somebody

0:50:340:50:35

that's going to really appreciate them than

0:50:350:50:37

just sit around in my loft.

0:50:370:50:38

Well, that's very sensible, actually.

0:50:380:50:40

-And I think whoever does buy them is going to enjoy them.

-Yes.

0:50:400:50:44

Well, our experts have been working flat out here at the Oxford Union.

0:50:490:50:52

You've just seen the items, you've heard what they've had to say,

0:50:520:50:54

you've probably got your own opinions, but right now

0:50:540:50:57

we're going across to the auction room to put them to the test.

0:50:570:51:00

And here's a quick recap of what we're taking with us.

0:51:000:51:02

Will Michael's Bergmann bronze captivate the crowds?

0:51:040:51:07

Or will it be Zena's diamond solitaire ring

0:51:100:51:13

which sparkles in the eyes of the bidders?

0:51:130:51:15

Will it be those amazing motorcars

0:51:210:51:23

that fire the enthusiasm of our auction room?

0:51:230:51:25

But first, it's that Sevres box.

0:51:280:51:30

Joy got a shock on the valuation day

0:51:300:51:31

when Christina revealed

0:51:310:51:33

her antique box was actually a later reproduction.

0:51:330:51:37

But can we still turn her a little profit?

0:51:370:51:39

£85. 90. 95.

0:51:430:51:46

100 and I'm out.

0:51:460:51:48

Thomas is back in action on the rostrum.

0:51:480:51:50

-Against you all.

-Here's hoping he can weave his magic.

0:51:500:51:54

And now, for our next item just about to go under the hammer.

0:51:550:51:57

It belongs to Joy, and unfortunately, she cannot be with us

0:51:570:52:00

but her little porcelain box can.

0:52:000:52:01

-And it's going under the hammer.

-It is, yes.

0:52:010:52:04

-Big grin on your face.

-Yeah. It's Samson. She thought it was Sevres.

0:52:040:52:07

-So, Samson box.

-Which is a copy really of...

0:52:070:52:10

-They were the best in...

-Of the best.

-Yeah, exactly.

0:52:100:52:12

And they did a lot of Meissen, Sevres reproduction wares.

0:52:120:52:15

-So hopefully... Hopefully, hopefully.

-Hopefully.

0:52:150:52:17

-Fingers crossed.

-Yeah, bless her.

0:52:170:52:19

-She bought it for £50 over 30 years ago.

-Thinking it was the real thing.

0:52:190:52:23

-Thinking it was the real McCoy, so let's hope.

-Let's hope

0:52:230:52:26

we can get her money back. It's going under the hammer. Good luck.

0:52:260:52:28

Here we go.

0:52:280:52:29

19th-century Samson porcelain box and cover.

0:52:290:52:32

There we are. With gilt metal rims.

0:52:320:52:34

I can start the bidding with me here at £45 with me.

0:52:340:52:38

-At £45 for the box.

-45.

0:52:380:52:40

-Well. Come on, Thomas.

-And 50. And 55 with me.

0:52:400:52:43

At 55 against you all.

0:52:430:52:44

Is there any advance at 55?

0:52:440:52:46

And 60 and I'm out.

0:52:460:52:47

-At 60.

-Ooh, that's better.

-It's in the room at 60.

0:52:470:52:50

Last chance then, at £60.

0:52:500:52:52

-At £60. Oh, joy! Joy for Joy.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:52:520:52:57

Hammer's gone down and we've sold it.

0:52:570:52:58

-I hope you're "en-Joying" this moment.

-Brilliant.

0:52:580:53:00

-Phew, that was a relief.

-Yeah, it was.

0:53:000:53:03

No more Joy jokes, I promise.

0:53:030:53:05

It's time to wheel out those motorcars.

0:53:050:53:08

These are boys' toys, but girls can play with them too, can't they?

0:53:080:53:11

Yes, we used to, I think.

0:53:110:53:12

And we've got a classic 80 to 120 on.

0:53:120:53:15

It's an auctioneer's classic.

0:53:150:53:16

80, you've heard that many times since you've come here.

0:53:160:53:19

Yes, I've heard that before.

0:53:190:53:20

But in fact, it's the right estimate.

0:53:200:53:22

-You know, it covers you at both ends.

-Yes, it does, it does.

0:53:220:53:24

-I mean, these are great fun, actually.

-Yes.

-They really are.

0:53:240:53:27

And not so much play things today, but as collector's items.

0:53:270:53:30

-Yes.

-Yes, it's a nice thing to be able to pass onto somebody

0:53:300:53:33

that's going to, you know, appreciate them.

0:53:330:53:35

-And look after them.

-Yes.

0:53:350:53:37

Anyway, talking about cost and what's it worth,

0:53:370:53:39

let's put it to the test, shall we?

0:53:390:53:40

Let's get the top end of that 80 to 120.

0:53:400:53:43

-You and your top end.

-I'd like that.

0:53:430:53:45

Next lot is a Victory Austin,

0:53:470:53:49

a 4050 Cambridge saloon car

0:53:490:53:52

with the box and the template Citroen. There we are.

0:53:520:53:55

I can start the bidding with me here straight in at £65.

0:53:550:53:58

With me, with me at 65.

0:53:580:54:00

-Come on, come on.

-Come on.

0:54:000:54:01

£65. Is there any advance? 70. 75.

0:54:010:54:04

Go on.

0:54:050:54:06

75 with me. Madam, if you want it, it's 80.

0:54:060:54:09

£80 and I am out.

0:54:090:54:11

At £80 on the reserve, at 80 we sell.

0:54:110:54:12

-Are we there?

-We've got the reserve.

-Oh, it's going up.

0:54:120:54:15

85 new place.

0:54:150:54:16

Gentleman's bid at £85. Against you all at 85.

0:54:160:54:20

Last chance at 85.

0:54:200:54:21

GAVEL BANGS

0:54:210:54:22

£85.

0:54:220:54:23

-It was touch and go to start with.

-It was, but that's very good.

0:54:230:54:27

-It found its level.

-Yes.

-We just got above the lower end.

0:54:270:54:29

Yeah, we didn't race away, but we got there. We got there in the end.

0:54:290:54:32

That's fine.

0:54:320:54:33

-Are you happy?

-Yes, absolutely.

-Job done.

0:54:330:54:36

Up next, there's a bit of a dispute in the saleroom.

0:54:370:54:41

Going under the hammer right now, one of my favourite lots

0:54:410:54:43

of the sale that belong to Michael who's right next to me.

0:54:430:54:45

It's a group of three Bergmann cold painted bronzes.

0:54:450:54:48

Masai warriors.

0:54:480:54:49

And these really are flavour of the month.

0:54:490:54:52

They are really nice. I don't know why you're selling them.

0:54:520:54:54

I'd like to find out.

0:54:540:54:56

Well, they're a bit fussy for us

0:54:560:54:58

-and a bit British Empire, too.

-Right, OK.

0:54:580:55:01

It's all the rage right now, though.

0:55:010:55:03

-Well, Bergmann is a very big name, Paul, isn't it?

-Hmm.

-Very big name.

0:55:030:55:06

Let's find out what auctioneer Thomas thinks.

0:55:060:55:08

We've got a big crowd here and hopefully

0:55:080:55:10

we're going to get them away at the top end. This is it.

0:55:100:55:12

345, a group of three 19th-century Viennese cold painted

0:55:120:55:16

tribal figures - Bergmann style.

0:55:160:55:18

There we are.

0:55:180:55:19

But they're not Bergmann style, they are Bergmann.

0:55:190:55:21

Start the bidding with me at £200.

0:55:210:55:22

Start the bidding with me at £200 for the Masai figures.

0:55:220:55:25

At 210.

0:55:250:55:26

220. 230. 240. 250.

0:55:260:55:30

250. 250 I have.

0:55:300:55:32

With me here at 250.

0:55:320:55:33

Against you all 250. 260.

0:55:330:55:36

-270. 280. 290.

-This is a surprise, Paul.

0:55:360:55:39

-300.

-It's a slow climb, though. We're getting there.

0:55:390:55:41

340. 360. 380 with me.

0:55:410:55:44

If you want it, it's 400.

0:55:440:55:46

At 400 and I'm out. At 400 I have.

0:55:460:55:49

At £400. It's in the room at 400.

0:55:490:55:51

Make no mistake.

0:55:510:55:52

And I'm selling at £400.

0:55:520:55:55

-GAVEL BANGS

-400.

-Well, they've gone.

0:55:550:55:57

They've gone at £400, right on the lower end of the estimate.

0:55:570:56:00

-Are you happy with that?

-Um, not totally

0:56:000:56:03

because of the "Bergmann style" description.

0:56:030:56:05

-Announcement.

-Yes. Yes.

0:56:050:56:07

Do you feel that slightly killed it off a little bit?

0:56:070:56:11

Uh, well, I don't really know.

0:56:110:56:13

I think it's because some of them need a little bit of restoration

0:56:130:56:16

and that does add to the cost when you're buying something, you know?

0:56:160:56:19

Because you need to take it to a skilled person.

0:56:190:56:22

I'm glad we fixed a firm reserve of 400 on them

0:56:220:56:25

because it meant we protected them.

0:56:250:56:27

It's a shame that those bronzes didn't go for more

0:56:270:56:30

but Mark is right -

0:56:300:56:32

they did have some damage which maybe put the collectors of.

0:56:320:56:35

There's always an element of risk at auction,

0:56:350:56:37

that's why we fix a reserve.

0:56:370:56:40

But here we are at the last lot of the day

0:56:400:56:42

and I'm keen to show Christina that I have been paying attention.

0:56:420:56:45

Colour, cut, clarity, carat.

0:56:460:56:48

Yes, you know what I'm talking about - Zena's sparkler.

0:56:480:56:51

THEY LAUGH

0:56:510:56:53

Hi, Zena, it's great to see you again.

0:56:530:56:55

-Who have you brought along with you?

-This is David, my husband.

0:56:550:56:58

-David.

-How do you do?

-Pleased to meet you.

0:56:580:56:59

Of course, with those four Cs,

0:56:590:57:01

there is one more C to go with them, isn't there?

0:57:010:57:04

Costly...Christina!

0:57:040:57:06

THEY LAUGH

0:57:070:57:08

-You beat me to it.

-The fifth C!

0:57:080:57:10

-Well, you both sparkle. The six Cs, now.

-I'm seriously impressed.

0:57:100:57:13

I've taught you something.

0:57:130:57:15

-You have, haven't you?

-Yeah. Wow.

0:57:150:57:16

We're putting this to the test. It's going under the hammer right now.

0:57:160:57:19

-Good luck, everyone.

-Good luck.

-Here we go.

0:57:190:57:22

Next lot is the diamond solitaire ring. The diamond solitaire.

0:57:220:57:25

1.1 carat.

0:57:250:57:26

Lovely ring this one here.

0:57:260:57:27

Start me here at £800.

0:57:270:57:29

At 800. At 800.

0:57:290:57:30

At £800, solitaire diamond. 800.

0:57:300:57:33

820. 850. 880.

0:57:330:57:36

900. 920.

0:57:360:57:39

950. 980.

0:57:390:57:41

1,000 and I'm out.

0:57:410:57:42

It's reached its reserve. Brilliant.

0:57:420:57:44

Is there any advance at £1,000?

0:57:440:57:46

At £1,000 it's in the room.

0:57:460:57:48

And 1,050.

0:57:480:57:49

1,050. Late legs but it's there.

0:57:490:57:53

And £1,100. At £1,100 are we all done?

0:57:530:57:56

At £1,100, make no mistake.

0:57:560:57:57

-Yes, the hammer's gone down.

-Brilliant.

-In estimate.

0:57:570:58:00

-Well done, everyone. Well done.

-Congratulations. That's fantastic.

0:58:000:58:04

A few successes and a few debates at auction, hardly a surprise

0:58:040:58:07

given our choice of venue - Oxford Union.

0:58:070:58:09

We've had a fascinating day here.

0:58:090:58:12

If you'd like to take part in the show

0:58:140:58:16

and you've got unwanted antiques and collectables

0:58:160:58:18

you'd like to sell, bring them along to one of our valuation days.

0:58:180:58:21

Details you can pick up on our BBC website.

0:58:210:58:23

If you don't have a computer,

0:58:230:58:24

check the details in your local press

0:58:240:58:26

and maybe we can help you to flog it.

0:58:260:58:29

Paul Martin presents from the historic Oxford Union, once dubbed 'the last bastion of free speech in the western world'.

Paul is joined by experts Christina Trevanion and Mark Stacey. Together the team pick out a selection of interesting antiques and collectables to be sold at the local auction house. Christina uncovers a famous fake, while Mark receives a religious education after discovering a rare Baptist bust.

Paul also delves into the history of our auction site, which is built on top of the infamous Greenham Common.