Blackpool 2 Flog It!


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Blackpool 2

Antiques series. Paul Martin presents from Blackpool Tower Circus with experts Anita Manning and James Lewis, and the team uncovers a tribal mask and a tea set.


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SPOOKY MUSIC

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Today we are exploring the spooky side of Lancashire

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with tales of ghosts and witches.

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Let's hope there's nothing scary about what our experts

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have to say when it comes to valuing antiques.

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Welcome to "Flog It!"!

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SINISTER CACKLE

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Can someone let me out?

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We will be back at Lancaster Castle later on in the show,

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but right now we are off to the location for today's valuations.

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We are in Blackpool,

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one of the UK's most popular holiday destinations.

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It originally became fashionable in the 1800s,

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when the opening of the railway meant that workers

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from the cotton mills of Lancashire

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could escape the grime of the cities for a bit of sea air.

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The town still attracts over ten million visitors each year,

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who come to be thrilled and scared by the attractions,

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including the country's tallest rollercoaster ride

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and today's venue, the Tower Circus.

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But it's not about the tourists today.

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We're here to do some business and, of course,

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it's about the good people of Blackpool and the surrounding areas.

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They have turned up en masse, laden with unwanted antiques

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and collectables, all hoping to make a small fortune in auction.

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Our experts are already hard at work in the queue.

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There's Anita Manning over there. There's James Lewis.

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All hoping to find the best items.

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Of course, this lot have one question on their lips

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and they are dying to say it, aren't you?

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-Come on!

-ALL: What's it worth?

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We've got the crowd, they've got their items,

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all we need now are our experts.

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When I was a wee girl I wanted to run away to the circus.

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-Did you?

-And today I'm doing it. You're going to take me?

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-I'll carry you off!

-SHE LAUGHS

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Here's a couple of items that are getting carted off

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to the auction in today's show.

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Which of these will make thousands later on in the programme?

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The silver snuffbox with the intriguing inscription,

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or this Royal Doulton Spook figure?

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Find out later on.

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CIRCUS MUSIC

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There has been a circus on this site since it first opened in 1894.

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And the four corners of the room I'm standing in today are actually

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part of the superstructure, they're made up of the legs of the tower.

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This is one of the legs, which rises 500 feet above me in the air.

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There's another one over there and there and there.

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Fingers crossed we have some high-flying results

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in the auction room today. First, we need some antiques.

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Let's join up with our experts and look at their first finds.

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And as the crowd settle in, James has made a head start

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with a spooky-looking mask that's a long way from home.

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Anybody who knows me knows I am an Africa nut.

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I've been to Tanzania

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and I have spent time with the tribe who made this mask,

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called the Makonde.

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They are northern Tanzania and Mozambique.

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They are the most amazing people with, in my opinion,

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-the most ferocious masks on the planet.

-Yeah.

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So, what is a fantastic mask like that doing here today?

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-It was a find off the internet.

-Right, OK.

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And it was so unusual and the markings on it, I found it bizarre.

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And being a full helmet rather than just a mask...

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Did you buy it because you had an interest in African art

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or just because you thought it strange?

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We had the staff and that, didn't we?

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And we got a couple of the normal wooden masks that everybody gets.

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-Yeah.

-But it's just so unusual and to have the hair

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on the top and everything, it's a bit freaky.

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-And you know it's real hair?

-BOTH: Yes.

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There are different designs that you find on different masks

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for different purposes.

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These type of helmet masks were used in marriage ceremonies,

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in death ceremonies, funerals,

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but also for fertility,

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for wishing a new season of a fertile harvest.

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Some of the masks are denoting female, some male.

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The rarer ones are the female ones. This is a male.

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The teeth, they are actually pierced.

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The mask was designed to be worn like that and some masks,

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you would look through the mouth, use it as eye slots.

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I think this one would have been worn more like that.

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So it is one of the only masks that was worn on the top of the head

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rather than like that.

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Inside you see white wood under the dark staining.

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-That dark staining is made to look older than it is.

-Right.

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And this is very light.

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They often were light but...

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..made for the tourist market.

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The masks that were made to be used in their own ceremonies,

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19th century and earlier, are massively in demand,

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worth sometimes tens of thousands of pounds.

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The ones that are made for the tourist market

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are a totally different thing. But there we are.

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The staff, it's not so exciting.

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It's a bit of hardwood.

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It's probably Ghanaian. North-west African.

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Probably a tribal chief's staff, or meant to be.

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But again, it's made for the tourist market rather than for their own.

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-So, shall I ask what you paid?

-Well, we would rather keep that one quiet.

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-Oh, really?

-Especially if my wife's watching.

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-Definitely.

-Do you think you might have paid a bit too much?

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A little bit too much, yes!

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Well, I reckon at auction -

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you might have bought a bargain, you don't know -

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£60 to £100, as an estimate.

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-You paid too much, didn't you?

-Yes!

-Your face!

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I'm sorry. You never know.

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It might absolutely fly and do really well.

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But if it does, then you will have done really, really well.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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From a "Flog It!" first to a "Flog It!" classic. Over to Anita.

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Tina, welcome to "Flog It!"!

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It's lovely to have you along and thank you

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-for bringing in our old favourite, Clarice Cliff.

-Yes.

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We see lots of Clarice on the programme.

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Some people love it, some people hate it. I love it. What about you?

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I absolutely love Clarice Cliff. I have done now for 30-odd years.

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-How did you come by this lot?

-It was from a house clearance.

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My mum helped our old neighbour clear her sister's house

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and this was part of some pottery

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that she put in the back of the cupboard.

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When I discovered this was Clarice Cliff when I was about 18,

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this started my collection.

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-So, this started a love affair with Clarice Cliff's work?

-Yes.

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-Yes, it did.

-So, why have you brought this in today?

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I mean, I've got some of these pieces out of newspaper

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-that has got the 2001 date on.

-You haven't had it out since then?

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-No. No.

-So it's time to pass it on.

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I just love it and I think that somebody else will as well.

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I mean, I love Clarice Cliff.

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She was a poor girl who became enormously successful

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in her designs in the pottery trade.

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Wonderful, wonderful designs which were ground-breaking.

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This little coffee set is the Sundew pattern

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and it was done for the 1930s.

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We've got six cups, six saucers, a coffee pot here, sugar,

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cream and a little jam dish.

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But I did notice, Tina, that we have some damage on the coffee pot.

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That's right.

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So that's the only thing that worries me a little bit, the crack.

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And it's quite a substantial crack

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which goes the full length of the pot.

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But we still have our six cups and saucers,

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we still have our sugar and cream and we still have our jam pot.

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Estimate on this, I would say maybe £150 to £200.

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It would be more if we had, you know...

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-if everything was in good condition.

-I know. I realise.

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-Would you be happy to pass it on at that price?

-Yes.

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-Shall we go for it?

-Absolutely.

-OK.

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-£150 to £250. Keep it wide.

-Yeah.

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With a reserve of maybe round about 130 on it.

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-Yes. I agree with that.

-We'll do that.

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-Thank you again for bringing it along.

-You're welcome.

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These are two of the most unusual things

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that I have ever seen on the "Flog It!" tables.

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I THINK I know what they are. I'm sort of 99% there.

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-What do you know about them?

-Not a great deal.

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They are a family heirloom

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and I've been asking people do they know what they are and they say no.

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I haven't seen anything quite like them for probably 25 years.

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My last family holiday with parents was to go to the Somme battlefield.

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My dad is a great sort of military historian.

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And we would walk the battlefields and try and work out

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-where the trench lines were and all that sort of thing.

-Right.

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As a sort of an eagle-eyed collector, I was ferreting around,

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trying to find interesting things to pick up, and one of the things

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I picked up was one of these, or something very similar.

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I think what we have here are a pair of World War I

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-shell case fuses.

-Fuses? Honest?

-From the pointed end of the shell.

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-Oh.

-There we have a hole at the end

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and then a spiral to contain something.

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-I think it's a wire, a fuse wire.

-A wire? Oh!

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There is a gap at the bottom

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and then there is a little hole that comes out either at zero -

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which I presume is zero seconds -

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-or 49, for 49 seconds.

-Right!

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And that is a bit of a guess, but I think that's what they are.

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Now, the fact that they are First World War

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would indicate that they were probably put together in this form

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by probably somebody in the trenches.

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If you think in terms of an infantryman 100 years ago

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on the front-line battlefields,

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we often see the scenes of them going up over the edge and fighting,

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but the truth was, 95% of their time

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was literally sitting in the trenches,

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waiting - cold, damp, bored,

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and up to their knees in mud with very little to do.

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So they made things known as trench art, and they made snuffboxes

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out of bits of brass shell case,

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they made fire implements for them for stoking the fire and tongs

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and also things like desk weights.

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And it wouldn't surprise me if these were made

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-by an infantryman in the trenches 100 years ago.

-Could be right. Yeah.

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So, now the final thing to try and work out is a valuation.

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It's a little bit like that.

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-I've not sold them before.

-No.

-But...

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-..I think £30 or £40.

-OK. That's fine.

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-Would that be all right for you?

-Yes.

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Somebody might love them.

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Somebody might, love. Let them enjoy them.

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Anita has found a classic timepiece.

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-Carol, Eric, welcome to "Flog It!".

-Thank you.

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It's lovely to have you along.

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Especially in this most fantastic and wonderful circus ring.

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-Do you come from Blackpool?

-I do, yes.

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-And what about you, Eric?

-I originate from Yorkshire. I've been in...

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-Right.

-How did you two get together?

-We met when I was 16, Eric was 17.

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And we started going out together

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and we went out together for a couple of years.

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And then, unfortunately, we parted company because we fell out.

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-SHE GASPS

-Whose fault was it?

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-His.

-CHUCKLES

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-So what happened?

-Well, we parted company,

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and 50 years later, we met again,

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after our husband and wives had died.

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About five or six years ago.

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And then you fell in love with her all over again.

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Oh, yes.

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-CHUCKLES

-Right, let's get back to antiques.

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-Yes.

-This is a watch of some style.

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Tell me, where did you get it?

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It was a present, originally, from my first wife.

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I used to wear it, originally, but as time went on,

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I got a little older

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and I get a little bit frightened of wearing things.

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No, I can understand that.

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-So, how long have you had it?

-Somewhere in the region of 15 years.

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About 15 years.

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This is a Rolex which is really the Rolls-Royce of watches.

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And this is a Rolex Oyster.

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The Rolex company was founded in about, I think it was 1905, 1906,

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by a German, but the company existed in London.

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By 1908, 1909, it was one of the most famous watch companies

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in the world and renowned for the precision

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of these wonderful machines.

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And the Rolex Oyster, which first came out in 1926,

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was the first waterproof watch.

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This is a later Rolex Oyster, but still a wonderful piece.

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-Mm-hm.

-And I love these watches.

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This one is in stainless steel.

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And we also have the original box and that is good,

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with the Rolex logo and this little crown here.

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And we have the box to put the box in!

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OK, I think this will do well at auction.

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It's in beautiful condition, it's been well-kept.

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I tend to be a wee bit conservative in my estimates,

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but I would like to put it in maybe £500-£700.

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Would you be happy to put forward...

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-Yes.

-With that estimate?

-Yes.

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-And would you like us to put a reserve on it, Eric?

-Yes, please.

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-Yes.

-We'll put it at the lower estimate

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with a wee bit of discretion.

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-Would you be happy with that?

-Yes.

-Absolutely.

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Well, let's hope that this Rolls-Royce of watches

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just rolls away and makes a terrific price.

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I'm sure it will. Thank you, Eric, for bringing it in.

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-Thank you, so much.

-Thank you very much.

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Before we head off to auction, I'm going to explore a local landmark.

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Browsholme Hall is one of over 5,000 listed buildings in Lancashire.

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But what makes this one more special

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than most is it's the oldest surviving family home in the county,

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having been passed down through 14 generations of the Parker family.

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It's estimated that over 90 of Lancashire's historic stately homes

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have been lost over the last century,

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having either been demolished

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or left to fall into a state of disrepair.

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Browsholme Hall, however, is one of the county's proud survivors

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and it's been in the same ownership for the past 500 years.

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Now, that is an impressive claim to fame,

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only made possible by the courage,

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the conviction and the incredible antiques of its inhabitants.

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The house was built in 1507

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by Edmund Parker, using money that he inherited.

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Through the years, each generation

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has made its own mark on the building

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and that's continuing today with the current owners

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and members of the family.

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And I'm here to take a look around.

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But first, I want to introduce you

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to two men from the Parker family tree

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who I believe have been instrumental in cementing the ancestral roots

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of Browsholme Hall over the last five centuries.

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And we're going to start with the first gentleman.

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The current owner.

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Hello, pleased to meet you.

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-Welcome to you, Paul.

-What a lovely day, as well.

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Robert Parker was left the house and its collection of antiques

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aged just 19 when he inherited it from a distant relative.

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And whilst most people at that age would have sold up and spent

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the money on partying, Robert chose to stick to his family roots

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and has lived here ever since.

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This is a marvellous house.

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What was the house like, when you inherited its?

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Well, when we first came here,

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we found a house that was almost unliveable in.

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The water supply was poisonous, the electricity supply was dangerous,

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there were no kitchens, no bathrooms.

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So not something you could comfortably move into, by any means.

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Right. Obviously, all of your ancestors

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have had a fabulous eye for antiques.

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They are great collectors. Is it something you have inherited?

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And who do you think was the main man?

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The rooms that you will see today are really the creation of

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Thomas Lister Parker, who is one of the early antiquarians.

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Unusual at the beginning of the 19th century,

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to actually start admiring what went before,

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rather than collecting new and modern things...

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-From the day?

-From the day.

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So the room as you see it today is his creation.

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What had accumulated in this house in 300 years before he inherited it.

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Do you mind if I take a look around?

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Because, really, this is my kind of thing, this period, the 1600s.

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-Can I be nosy?

-Absolutely delighted.

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-OK, thank you.

-Thank you.

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Thomas Lister Parker owned the house from around 1796 to 1824

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and it was he who first discovered

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all the collections stored in Browsholme's attic.

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Whilst generations before had obviously acquired the items

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over the years, they had certainly not appreciated them.

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Luckily, Thomas had an eye for antiques and

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he went on to buy many more.

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Most of the items here in this room were bought by the family

0:18:500:18:54

centuries ago to be used, practical pieces of kit which have now

0:18:540:18:58

become precious antiques for us to enjoy today.

0:18:580:19:01

The first thing that grabs my attention

0:19:010:19:03

is this huge great big dresser.

0:19:030:19:05

It is a dresser? No, it's not.

0:19:050:19:07

If you look closely, you can see it is in fact four separate chests.

0:19:070:19:11

These tests were made for the family in the 1600s

0:19:110:19:14

and they are beautifully carved.

0:19:140:19:17

But Thomas, in the 1800s, put them all together to make this dresser,

0:19:170:19:21

to make something practical, to display all of these antiques on.

0:19:210:19:25

And it is absolutely remarkable.

0:19:250:19:29

Just look at this. This is a panel from a local abbey.

0:19:290:19:32

But it just shows the wonderful carving

0:19:320:19:34

of the secular work of the monks.

0:19:340:19:36

This is classical Renaissance at its very best.

0:19:360:19:38

And here, look, if you look closely,

0:19:380:19:40

you can see St Catherine of Alexander.

0:19:400:19:43

So we are talking around circa the year 250.

0:19:430:19:46

You associate Catherine with the Catherine wheel,

0:19:460:19:48

this is the term we know - the Catherine wheel.

0:19:480:19:51

How did that come about?

0:19:510:19:52

Well, she was persecuted for their religious beliefs,

0:19:520:19:55

tied to a wheel and beaten to death.

0:19:550:19:57

Horrific, what went on back then.

0:19:570:19:59

Another of Thomas's purchases was this painting,

0:20:020:20:05

which shows the hall as it looked when he was alive.

0:20:050:20:08

This watercolour is by John Butler,

0:20:100:20:12

a renowned watercolour artist back in the 1800s.

0:20:120:20:15

He specialised in interiors and he helped the family out quite a lot.

0:20:150:20:18

This was done in 1807, but if you look at the hall,

0:20:180:20:22

as it was back then, you can see a lot of the pieces of furniture

0:20:220:20:25

and artefacts are still here today, some 200 years later.

0:20:250:20:30

And I've spotted these chairs, see, there's quite a few of them.

0:20:300:20:33

There's two here, look.

0:20:330:20:34

But look at the abuse somebody has given this chair over the centuries.

0:20:340:20:38

They've obviously enjoyed sitting in it,

0:20:380:20:40

and they have adapted it to be turned into a rocking chair

0:20:400:20:43

for extra comfort.

0:20:430:20:44

But that gives us a fascinating insight,

0:20:440:20:46

not just into the antiques and the architecture of the house,

0:20:460:20:49

but of what the things were used for.

0:20:490:20:51

The social history of the family, work rest and play.

0:20:510:20:54

Thomas Lister Parker was a great patron of the arts,

0:20:560:20:59

spending huge sums of money on collections of paintings.

0:20:590:21:03

But in 1824, he spent up and ran out of money

0:21:030:21:06

and was forced to sell the house he loved so much.

0:21:060:21:10

Although, luckily enough, it stayed in the family,

0:21:100:21:12

when his cousin bought it.

0:21:120:21:14

Gosh, I absolutely love this house.

0:21:140:21:17

I wish I was born a Parker!

0:21:170:21:19

You know, every room you walk into,

0:21:190:21:21

it embraces you, it does have a magnificent family feel about it.

0:21:210:21:26

And that is so important.

0:21:260:21:28

This staircase is another feature...

0:21:280:21:30

installed by the ever-present Thomas Lister Parker,

0:21:300:21:33

and it dates back to the early part of the 1800s.

0:21:330:21:36

But that stained glass window there on the landing,

0:21:360:21:39

or elements of that, date back even further.

0:21:390:21:42

He put this together in the 1800s, really as a montage,

0:21:420:21:46

as a piece of colour, something to enjoy,

0:21:460:21:48

not for religious purposes, but really for antiquarian purposes.

0:21:480:21:51

And I can point out some of the early pieces here.

0:21:510:21:55

This little picture of Christ, that dates back to around 1250.

0:21:550:22:00

Here, this little panel, that's around the mid-1500s.

0:22:000:22:03

That is the Tudor Rose, look, Henry VIII.

0:22:030:22:06

And here, I quite like that.

0:22:060:22:08

That's sort of what the pagans really worship,

0:22:080:22:10

and that's the Green man.

0:22:100:22:11

Look at that, isn't that lovely? That's, again, from the 1500s.

0:22:110:22:16

Beautifully detailed.

0:22:160:22:18

And being a family home, obviously enjoyed by everybody,

0:22:180:22:21

even the youngsters would like to look at this window.

0:22:210:22:23

But these bars have been added for protection, really,

0:22:230:22:26

to stop them from getting too close

0:22:260:22:27

so they don't poke their fingers through the glass.

0:22:270:22:31

Sensible.

0:22:310:22:33

It's easy to see why Thomas's collection attracts

0:22:330:22:36

thousands of visitors each year.

0:22:360:22:38

But some of his items haven't proved popular

0:22:380:22:40

with the later generations of the family.

0:22:400:22:43

The clock on the east wing dates from 1816

0:22:430:22:47

and although it's been restored,

0:22:470:22:48

earlier residents chose not to repair the mechanism

0:22:480:22:51

because it has an extremely loud tick

0:22:510:22:54

which makes it impossible for people in the rooms below to sleep.

0:22:540:22:57

What an incredible house!

0:22:590:23:02

Actually, I should rephrase that,

0:23:020:23:03

and say what an incredible home because that's what it is.

0:23:030:23:06

The building is not just of historical interest

0:23:060:23:09

and significance, but also its contents.

0:23:090:23:11

They have been in the same family for 14 generations.

0:23:110:23:14

They have been looked after and cherished and is a wonderful insight

0:23:140:23:17

into the Parker family social history.

0:23:170:23:19

It's their heritage, they have protected it and looked after it.

0:23:190:23:22

And it's good to see a building used for the same purpose

0:23:220:23:25

that it was built for.

0:23:250:23:27

A family home.

0:23:270:23:28

Things have got off to a flying start here at the Tower Circus.

0:23:350:23:37

I'm just watching Anita Manning, one of our experts, hard at work there.

0:23:370:23:41

We are ready for our first trip to the auction room, but before that,

0:23:410:23:44

here's a quick recap of all the items going under the hammer.

0:23:440:23:47

Phil and Sean are hoping their mask doesn't scare off the bidders.

0:23:470:23:52

There's that Clarice Cliff tea set, brought along by Tina.

0:23:540:23:57

And there's the classic wrist watch along with its original packaging.

0:23:590:24:03

And Stella is hoping her artillery fuses go with a bang.

0:24:060:24:10

We are leaving Blackpool and heading a few miles down the coast

0:24:120:24:14

to Lytham St Annes,

0:24:140:24:16

where it's time to put our first lots under the hammer.

0:24:160:24:19

And the man in charge of today's proceedings

0:24:190:24:21

is auctioneer Jonathan Cook.

0:24:210:24:23

The auction house is packed and ready to go.

0:24:230:24:26

Let's get moving with our first lot.

0:24:260:24:28

Fingers crossed, Stella.

0:24:280:24:30

-Is this your first auction?

-Yes.

-Is it really?

-I've never been.

0:24:300:24:33

-Gosh. Are you nervous?

-Yes, I am.

-Got your hands behind your back.

0:24:330:24:36

Whatever you do, don't do that! You might buy something!

0:24:360:24:39

These two fuses from the First World War,

0:24:390:24:41

that's what's going under the hammer right now.

0:24:410:24:44

-Not a great deal of money, James, is there?

-No.

0:24:440:24:46

They are unusual things, things you don't see a lot of at auction.

0:24:460:24:50

There are a lot of militaria collections out there

0:24:500:24:52

and I'm sure these will find a new home.

0:24:520:24:54

Good luck, both of you. Let's put it to the test.

0:24:540:24:57

Lot 80. World War I trench art.

0:24:570:25:00

A pair of brass and copper shell tops.

0:25:000:25:02

Converted to paperweights.

0:25:020:25:05

A bid's there at £20 on the internet, at 20.

0:25:050:25:07

It's all down to the bidders now.

0:25:070:25:09

£20. On the net at 20. Are we all sure at 20?

0:25:090:25:13

Any further interest?

0:25:130:25:15

£20. 22. 24.

0:25:150:25:18

At £24. Any further interest on 24?

0:25:180:25:21

-On the internet at 24.

-There's no hands in the room.

0:25:220:25:25

At £24. Selling away at 24. All finished? At £24.

0:25:250:25:32

-It sold. You were right.

-Absolutely.

-Spot on, James.

0:25:340:25:36

They are not easy things to sell, are they? Who wants them?

0:25:360:25:39

-Paperweights.

-Yeah.

-There's only so many paperweights you can have.

0:25:390:25:45

Thanks for bringing them in because it was an interesting talking point

0:25:450:25:48

and that is what it's all about. It teaches us new things,

0:25:480:25:51

cos I'd not seen these before, you'd not seen them.

0:25:510:25:54

We know what they're worth and we know what they are.

0:25:540:25:56

That's all right, love. That's fine.

0:25:560:25:58

We love seeing trench art on "Flog It!"

0:25:580:26:01

but often the priceless stories behind them

0:26:010:26:03

aren't reflected in their value at auction.

0:26:030:26:06

We've come downstairs for our next lot,

0:26:060:26:08

the wooden helmet and staff brought along by Philip and Sean.

0:26:080:26:12

Philip has some mobility problems

0:26:120:26:14

and there are a lot of steps to the auction room,

0:26:140:26:16

which is on the first floor above us, so we've set up a live link

0:26:160:26:19

to the auction room down here

0:26:190:26:22

so we can watch it on this monitor and follow all of the action

0:26:220:26:25

and hear what is going on.

0:26:250:26:26

-So are you excited, boys?

-Very. Apprehensive.

0:26:260:26:28

-Apprehensive.

-We are going to put that valuation to the test.

0:26:280:26:31

-That's what auctions are all about.

-Yeah. It's a great lot.

0:26:310:26:34

We haven't got much tribal art in this sale

0:26:340:26:36

but it's live on the internet.

0:26:360:26:38

What we're watching here on the internet

0:26:380:26:40

is what thousands of people across the world are watching as well...

0:26:400:26:43

Thank goodness to modern technology. Here's the action now.

0:26:430:26:47

Let's follow it. This is our lot coming up right now. Good luck.

0:26:470:26:50

Lot 180. Tribal art, possibly Makonde.

0:26:500:26:53

Together with the carved staff.

0:26:530:26:56

Bid's there at £40 on the net. Any advance on 40?

0:26:560:26:59

At £40. Any advance on 40?

0:26:590:27:02

At 42. £42. Any advance on 42?

0:27:020:27:05

At 44. 46.

0:27:050:27:08

At 48. 50.

0:27:090:27:12

55. 60. 65.

0:27:120:27:16

70. 75.

0:27:160:27:18

-80.

-£80.

0:27:180:27:20

-85.

-This is getting better.

0:27:200:27:23

At £90 in the room. Any advance on 90?

0:27:230:27:27

At £90. Gent's bid at 90. Are we all done at 90?

0:27:270:27:30

At £90. Sell away at 90.

0:27:300:27:33

It seems to have settled at 90.

0:27:330:27:36

-I think it's settled now. It's found its level at £90.

-£90.

0:27:360:27:38

No further interest.

0:27:380:27:39

He's sold.

0:27:410:27:43

-£90. Well done.

-Thank you.

0:27:430:27:47

Another lot making its estimate.

0:27:470:27:49

Time is up now for that classic wristwatch.

0:27:490:27:52

Eric and Carole, why are you selling this?

0:27:520:27:55

Em...well, I don't wear it that much, to be honest with you.

0:27:550:27:59

It's been in the safe most of the time.

0:27:590:28:01

I just thought it was time to go.

0:28:010:28:03

-But you've got another watch?

-I've got another watch.

0:28:030:28:06

Well, look, good luck. I mean, the thing is,

0:28:060:28:08

with its original box, it's much more sellable, isn't it?

0:28:080:28:11

The box is very important,

0:28:110:28:12

it's showing us the design features of that time

0:28:120:28:16

and the collectors of vintage items will love that.

0:28:160:28:19

I've got high hopes on this one,

0:28:190:28:21

I think this could do the top end, perhaps a little bit more.

0:28:210:28:24

-Let's hope so.

-You know, it's a good thing. OK?

0:28:240:28:26

Fingers crossed, everyone, let's put it to the test. Here we go.

0:28:260:28:29

Rolex Precision Oyster gents' stainless-steel vintage wristwatch,

0:28:290:28:33

circa 1960. Oyster strap,

0:28:330:28:35

-lots of interest...

-Classic date for a Rolex.

0:28:350:28:38

340. At £340.

0:28:380:28:41

Any advance? 360, 380,

0:28:410:28:43

at £400.

0:28:430:28:45

-420, 440...

-There's someone in the room bidding now.

0:28:450:28:49

440, 460, 480, 500.

0:28:490:28:50

At £500, any advance on 500?

0:28:500:28:53

550. At 550 in the room, gent's bid at 550.

0:28:530:28:57

Any advance on 550?

0:28:570:28:59

600 on the net.

0:28:590:29:01

At £600, on the internet at 600.

0:29:010:29:03

We've sold it, haven't we?

0:29:030:29:06

Any further interest? £600, then.

0:29:060:29:09

-Sell away for 600, all sure?

-He's selling.

0:29:090:29:12

-Good result!

-Yes!

-Hammer's gone down. £600. We're happy with that.

0:29:120:29:16

-Yes.

-Absolutely, very happy, yes.

0:29:160:29:19

And the box really did help.

0:29:190:29:21

Time to see if the Clarice Cliff tea set can improve on that.

0:29:230:29:27

It wouldn't be "Flog It!" without it, would it?

0:29:280:29:31

-Ever used it?

-No.

0:29:310:29:32

It's just been locked in the back of a cupboard before I had it

0:29:320:29:36

and I have been storing it in boxes.

0:29:360:29:39

A lovely thing like that shouldn't be stuck in a box

0:29:390:29:42

or in a wardrobe or at the back of a cupboard.

0:29:420:29:45

-It should be out, making people happy.

-Very much so.

0:29:450:29:48

Let's put it to the test. It's going under the hammer. This is it.

0:29:480:29:52

Lot 380. Clarice Cliff. Hand-painted. Six-piece coffee set.

0:29:520:29:57

Showing there. Bids of £100. 110. 120.

0:29:570:30:00

At £120. Any advance on 120?

0:30:000:30:03

130, right at the back at 130. In the room at 130.

0:30:030:30:06

At £130. Any advance on 140?

0:30:060:30:09

At 140. 150. At 150.

0:30:090:30:12

160. 170.

0:30:120:30:14

At 180. 190.

0:30:150:30:18

Come on. Let's get 200. Come on, come on, come on.

0:30:180:30:21

-Yes, we've got it!

-220.

0:30:210:30:23

240. 260.

0:30:240:30:27

£260. £260 in the room.

0:30:270:30:31

Any advance on £260? All sure at 260.

0:30:310:30:35

-£260!

-No further interest.

0:30:350:30:37

-Yes!

-Wasn't that wonderful?

0:30:390:30:42

Clarice doesn't let us down.

0:30:420:30:44

It's a great name, isn't it? It's a great name in design, basically.

0:30:440:30:47

-Yes.

-Happy? You've got to be over the moon.

-I'm just shocked.

0:30:470:30:51

There you go.

0:30:510:30:53

If you've got anything like that as well, we want to sell it.

0:30:530:30:55

Bring it along to one of our valuation days

0:30:550:30:57

and you could be standing in the next room next to us next time.

0:30:570:31:01

Blackpool is a place best known for fun and laughter,

0:31:060:31:09

but the County of Lancashire itself has had a scary and sinister past,

0:31:090:31:13

with tales of witchcraft and magic throughout its history.

0:31:130:31:17

And I've been off to investigate one of the most famous stories of all.

0:31:170:31:22

From our early childhood, most of us have heard tales of witches,

0:31:280:31:31

and they seem to be warted women concocting deadly potions,

0:31:310:31:35

stirring a cauldron and casting wicked spells on people

0:31:350:31:38

and they seem to have black cats and ride around on broomsticks.

0:31:380:31:42

Well, such stories have thrilled and frightened us for centuries

0:31:420:31:45

so today I've come to Lancaster Castle

0:31:450:31:47

to unearth one of the greatest witchcraft tales of our history,

0:31:470:31:51

that of the Pendle witches.

0:31:510:31:53

It all began in March 1612,

0:31:550:31:58

when an argument in a small town spiralled out of control

0:31:580:32:01

and soon led to 20 people being arrested and accused of witchcraft.

0:32:010:32:05

Colin Penny is the manager of Lancaster Castle

0:32:050:32:08

and an expert on the Pendle witch trials.

0:32:080:32:10

20 people were arrested. On what grounds?

0:32:100:32:15

Well, the whole incident of the Lancashire witches begins

0:32:150:32:18

with an argument between two people.

0:32:180:32:21

Alison Device, who is very poor, she was a beggar,

0:32:210:32:25

and John Law, a pedlar

0:32:250:32:26

who basically is travelling around, selling things.

0:32:260:32:29

He passes by, she asks him for some pins.

0:32:290:32:32

He says, "Have you got any money?" She says no.

0:32:320:32:34

"Well, you can't have any pins, then."

0:32:340:32:37

He walks off, but he almost immediately becomes very ill.

0:32:370:32:40

He has what we think was a stroke,

0:32:400:32:42

judging from his symptoms as described at the time.

0:32:420:32:45

He believes himself to have been bewitched. So did his son.

0:32:450:32:50

Alison was arrested. That then began a snowball effect.

0:32:510:32:55

Her friends, her family are also interviewed

0:32:550:32:57

and the charges against them basically spiral out of control.

0:32:570:33:00

There was a genuine belief in the power of magic,

0:33:000:33:03

both for good and for evil, not least because James I

0:33:030:33:08

was obsessed by witches and by witchcraft.

0:33:080:33:12

He wrote the Daemonologie in the late 16th century,

0:33:120:33:15

which is essentially, if you like,

0:33:150:33:18

a handbook in how to identify and go through the process

0:33:180:33:22

of what you should look for

0:33:220:33:25

in a potential witch suspect, if you like.

0:33:250:33:29

And it's no coincidence that there is a huge rise

0:33:290:33:33

in the number of witch accusations under James I.

0:33:330:33:38

The 20 accused were held in Lancaster Castle for five months

0:33:380:33:41

between April and August 1612.

0:33:410:33:44

And the conditions at the prison were far from comfortable.

0:33:440:33:48

Back then there were no rules or rights when it came to the treatment

0:33:480:33:51

of prisoners at the castle, and here are a few examples

0:33:510:33:53

of the kind of things that were used to restrain the prisoners.

0:33:530:33:57

Here you have got some neck and wrist irons,

0:33:570:33:59

so you would literally be clamped to the wall. Handcuffs.

0:33:590:34:02

These weren't items really designed to hurt you,

0:34:020:34:04

but to humiliate you for hours on end.

0:34:040:34:07

This one in particular, the scold's bridle,

0:34:070:34:10

used mainly on women who were deemed too aggressive and outspoken.

0:34:100:34:15

They'd be paraded through the town with all the folk jeering at them

0:34:150:34:18

because they were too aggressive and a little bit lippy.

0:34:180:34:21

And if you look inside there, that actually opens up,

0:34:210:34:23

clamps all the way over the head

0:34:230:34:25

and there's a gagging piece of metal that actually goes in your mouth.

0:34:250:34:29

Clamps your tongue down to stop you from speaking

0:34:290:34:32

as you are paraded through the streets.

0:34:320:34:34

Nasty thing.

0:34:340:34:36

All 20 of them were held together in one small, windowless cell,

0:34:370:34:41

much like this one.

0:34:410:34:43

And whether they had access to daylight or fresh air

0:34:430:34:46

was down to the discretion of the jailer who was on duty at the time.

0:34:460:34:50

One of the accused, an elderly lady named Old Demdike,

0:34:520:34:56

died in the jail before the case could begin.

0:34:560:34:59

However, in August that year, the remaining 19 stood trial.

0:34:590:35:03

The proceedings were unusual

0:35:060:35:08

because they were documented by the court clerk, Thomas Potts,

0:35:080:35:11

in his account, The Wonderful Discovery Of Witches,

0:35:110:35:14

which became a historical document of the trial.

0:35:140:35:17

What was unusual was evidence was given from a nine-year-old girl.

0:35:170:35:22

Now, that is totally out of the question normally, but here,

0:35:220:35:27

the rules were bent to help the prosecution.

0:35:270:35:30

The jury, no doubt basing their decision on their own fears

0:35:310:35:35

and prejudice of witchcraft, found ten of the accused,

0:35:350:35:37

including the original girl, guilty and they were sentenced to death.

0:35:370:35:43

And it was here on Gallows Hill, overlooking the town,

0:35:430:35:45

that the ten guilty people were hung

0:35:450:35:48

and later their bodies were buried at a crossroads

0:35:480:35:51

so if their spirits returned,

0:35:510:35:53

they couldn't find their way back to haunt those that they cursed.

0:35:530:35:57

What about the castle itself?

0:36:030:36:05

Well, it's still playing its part in law and order.

0:36:050:36:08

The castle was used as a fully functioning prison

0:36:080:36:10

right up until March 2011.

0:36:100:36:14

This room today is still being used as a fully working courtroom.

0:36:140:36:18

Luckily enough, there are no witches to be put on trial any more.

0:36:180:36:22

Welcome back to Blackpool and our valuation day

0:36:340:36:36

here at the Tower Circus, where hundreds of people have turned up

0:36:360:36:39

today with their unwanted antiques and collectables,

0:36:390:36:43

all hoping to make a small fortune at auction.

0:36:430:36:45

Now, which item will get a standing ovation?

0:36:450:36:48

We are about to find out. Let's catch up with our experts.

0:36:480:36:51

Jeanette, are you a collector, are you a trader,

0:36:530:36:56

are you a car-booter that's found it for a bargain 50p?

0:36:560:36:59

Tell me the history.

0:36:590:37:00

I've not got a lot of history.

0:37:000:37:01

It's been in the family for a while, but I don't know a lot about it.

0:37:010:37:04

-I'm a bit of a hoarder.

-OK.

0:37:040:37:06

But it's time to unleash some of these things I'm hoarding.

0:37:060:37:10

Righty-ho. Well, do you know how much about it?

0:37:100:37:13

Nothing. I'm hoping you can tell me.

0:37:130:37:15

Well, let's start with the trinket pot for the dressing table

0:37:150:37:18

that is combined with a hat pincushion.

0:37:180:37:20

If we look around the edge, this is repousse work,

0:37:200:37:23

which is very much in the Dutch style,

0:37:230:37:25

but I was very surprised to see

0:37:250:37:28

a Chester hallmark there

0:37:280:37:31

for 1905.

0:37:310:37:32

GN and RH, George Nathan and Ridley Hayes, good local makers,

0:37:320:37:36

so we are talking about an Edwardian pincushion

0:37:360:37:40

in the Dutch style.

0:37:400:37:42

They've obviously just been inspired by a bit of Continental silver.

0:37:420:37:45

The scrap value of the silver is next to nothing,

0:37:450:37:48

it's a very thin, oval band, so very little silver there,

0:37:480:37:52

but there are lots of collectors for silver trinkets

0:37:520:37:56

and especially pincushions,

0:37:560:37:58

so what do you think will be affecting the value of this?

0:37:580:38:00

-The weight?

-What else?

0:38:000:38:02

The intricate figuring on it.

0:38:020:38:05

-I'm not sure about the pincushion because it is worn a bit.

-Bit worn.

0:38:050:38:09

Whenever you look at any object,

0:38:090:38:11

the things that generally make its value are the market,

0:38:110:38:15

how fashionable it is, whether it has anything intrinsically valuable,

0:38:150:38:19

like a scrap value to it, and whether it has any great provenance.

0:38:190:38:23

Condition is the other thing, but in terms of pincushions,

0:38:230:38:26

a bit of wear to the surface of the velvet is acceptable wear,

0:38:260:38:30

but if we just push this up, you can see

0:38:300:38:33

what a lovely plum-colour velvet it would have been,

0:38:330:38:37

but that thing that is important is this,

0:38:370:38:40

because as you polish,

0:38:400:38:41

the first thing that is going to rub through

0:38:410:38:44

is the noses on the figures, the ends of the hats

0:38:440:38:47

and, as it wears through,

0:38:470:38:49

you see light through, so if you hold it up,

0:38:490:38:51

if you can't see any pinholes of light, then it's in good order.

0:38:510:38:56

If you can see holes coming through, it halves the value.

0:38:560:39:01

-Right.

-Right? So, there we go.

0:39:010:39:03

Don't worry about a bit of rubbed velvet.

0:39:030:39:06

With it, we have three solid-silver... Oh, hang on...

0:39:060:39:10

Correction, two solid-silver and one silver-plated thimble.

0:39:100:39:14

-Right.

-Those are worth £10 each, that one is worth next to nothing,

0:39:140:39:19

so £20 worth of silver thimbles.

0:39:190:39:22

What do you think the pincushion is worth?

0:39:220:39:25

No idea.

0:39:250:39:26

OK, guys, you've been watching long enough.

0:39:260:39:28

What do you think that is going to make?

0:39:280:39:31

120 - 150.

0:39:310:39:33

-OK.

-115?

0:39:330:39:35

You are all fairly close.

0:39:350:39:37

100 - 150, I recognise is what it's worth,

0:39:370:39:40

so I think I might as well retire and leave it to you lot, so I'm off!

0:39:400:39:45

Bobby, welcome to "Flog It!". It's lovely to have you along.

0:39:460:39:51

I had a wee blether with you in the queue

0:39:510:39:53

and I know you're not from around these parts. Where are you from?

0:39:530:39:57

-I am from Texas.

-Texas! That's fabulous!

0:39:570:40:01

-What are you doing here?

-I came, my husband lured me over.

0:40:010:40:06

After he moved back here, I came back with him.

0:40:060:40:08

-So now you are a Lancashire lass.

-Yes.

0:40:080:40:11

Now, you have brought along a wee group of things.

0:40:110:40:15

-Can you tell me where you got these?

-Yes.

0:40:150:40:18

These watches were my husband's grandfather's.

0:40:180:40:22

This necklace my mother-in-law gave me

0:40:220:40:25

and this necklace was my brother-in-law's.

0:40:250:40:29

He worked for a lady in a large house

0:40:290:40:32

-and so she gave it to him.

-As a gift.

-Yes.

0:40:320:40:35

-Maybe she thought it suited him.

-THEY LAUGH

0:40:350:40:38

So these are all stuff that's maybe come from your husband's family.

0:40:380:40:42

-Yes.

-Right.

0:40:420:40:44

And it really is the type of thing which anybody

0:40:440:40:48

might have in a drawer, passed down in the family.

0:40:480:40:52

Nothing of any great value, but a nice wee group.

0:40:520:40:56

And if we look at them closely, this is a Victorian necklet.

0:40:560:41:01

It is silver.

0:41:010:41:03

It's not hallmarked but I think it is silver.

0:41:030:41:06

-You are probably talking about 1880 to 1890.

-Oh.

0:41:060:41:10

Going on to this one, this necklet is a Norwegian necklet.

0:41:110:41:16

It is sterling silver and it's marked sterling,

0:41:160:41:20

but it has this wonderful enamel finish on the leaf design

0:41:200:41:25

and the Norwegians were masters of enamel work.

0:41:250:41:30

We have three pocket watches here that are all in various states of...

0:41:300:41:37

..disrepair.

0:41:380:41:40

We have hands missing on this one, we have the second hand missing

0:41:400:41:43

on this one and we have this Waltham here,

0:41:430:41:46

which is an American watch but it's not silver.

0:41:460:41:51

So, it is a wee sort of mixed lot.

0:41:510:41:54

If you put them all together,

0:41:540:41:57

we could have some interest in the saleroom.

0:41:570:42:00

-Do you like any of this stuff?

-Not...

0:42:000:42:02

I like the pocket watches, but the necklaces, no, not personally.

0:42:020:42:06

-You wouldn't wear them?

-No.

0:42:060:42:08

-Does your husband know you have brought them along here?

-Yes!

0:42:080:42:11

-Is he quite happy?

-Yes.

0:42:110:42:14

If they were coming into auction I would put an estimate,

0:42:140:42:19

grouped together, between £40 and £60.

0:42:190:42:24

Would you and your husband be happy to put them

0:42:240:42:27

-to auction at that price?

-Yes. That's fine.

-Shall we do that?

-Yes.

0:42:270:42:31

They may get more than that, but for a wee mixed lot,

0:42:310:42:34

I think we keep the estimates conservative on them.

0:42:340:42:38

-We'll put a reserve price on them. Would you want to do that?

-Yes.

0:42:380:42:43

We will put £40, but we will put "with discretion"

0:42:430:42:47

-so the auctioneer has a little discretion if he needs it.

-OK.

0:42:470:42:51

-But I think they will sell away.

-OK. Sounds good.

0:42:510:42:54

Back to James Lewis now, who has discovered something

0:42:550:42:59

that looks a bit and usual and even a little bit spooky.

0:42:590:43:02

Helen, Doulton are very well known for making little models

0:43:030:43:09

of girls in frilly dresses, little clowns, ladies and parasols.

0:43:090:43:15

Really, as far as I'm concerned they should be smashed onto the floor,

0:43:150:43:19

rolled over with a digger and used as road fill. I hate them.

0:43:190:43:24

I hate them, I hate them, I hate them. But that is fantastic!

0:43:240:43:28

He's a great little figure!

0:43:280:43:30

He's called Spook and he's really sort of naughty,

0:43:300:43:35

mysterious, hiding under a cloak.

0:43:350:43:38

Modelled after my mother-in-law, I think, originally.

0:43:380:43:42

-You'll be in trouble!

-I think he's fantastic. What do you think?

0:43:420:43:47

I'm not really keen on him myself.

0:43:470:43:49

My husband bought him but I just don't like his evil-looking face.

0:43:490:43:53

As if he's up to no good.

0:43:530:43:55

-I like them ladies what you would like to smash!

-You don't like those!

0:43:550:43:59

You can't like those! No! No! I prefer him.

0:43:590:44:02

He is in a titanium glaze, which is this wonderful iridescent blue.

0:44:020:44:09

They came in different models. This titanium glaze was a trial glaze.

0:44:090:44:13

The original and most well-known of the Spook,

0:44:130:44:16

he's known as the Spook,

0:44:160:44:18

is actually hand-coloured and decorated fairly naturally.

0:44:180:44:22

If we turn him over, there we have the Doulton mark.

0:44:230:44:27

But it is very faint.

0:44:270:44:29

I can understand why people probably wouldn't have recognised it

0:44:290:44:32

as being a Doulton.

0:44:320:44:34

But I think also, being a trial glaze,

0:44:340:44:36

it's something that's slightly more difficult to identify.

0:44:360:44:39

The date is 1916, 1917. Something around there.

0:44:390:44:45

Modelled by Tittensor, one of Doulton's leading modellers.

0:44:450:44:49

So, your husband liked him, he bought him,

0:44:490:44:52

brought him home, fell in love with him

0:44:520:44:54

and now you've brought it here to "Flog It!".

0:44:540:44:56

-Yes, that's right.

-That's not really fair. Where did he find him?

0:44:560:45:00

-He found him in a car-boot sale.

-Really?

-Really. Yeah.

-Recently?

0:45:000:45:06

-About a month ago.

-OK. And how much did you pay?

0:45:060:45:10

£2. £2.

0:45:100:45:12

-Would he take 3?

-No.

0:45:120:45:15

-4?

-No.

-10?

0:45:150:45:18

No.

0:45:190:45:22

50?

0:45:220:45:23

-Yeah. Possibly 50.

-Would he take 50?

0:45:250:45:27

I'll buy it for 50.

0:45:270:45:29

I'm not allowed to do it. I'm not allowed to and I wouldn't.

0:45:290:45:33

It's not worth 50, it's worth 200 to 300.

0:45:330:45:36

-Oh! Crikey!

-Well done!

0:45:360:45:38

Your £2 has turned into 200 or 300. That is a car-boot dream.

0:45:380:45:43

-Well done. It's a great little object.

-I like him now!

0:45:430:45:47

Do you? You are going to take him home?

0:45:470:45:50

No, he can go.

0:45:500:45:52

No, he's really brought you a bit of luck.

0:45:520:45:54

He's a great little figure.

0:45:540:45:57

You can see how the Spook does later on in the auction.

0:45:570:45:59

It's coming towards the end of the valuation day now

0:45:590:46:02

but Anita has found one last item that's caught her eye.

0:46:020:46:05

Molly, this is a charming little snuffbox.

0:46:060:46:09

Can you tell me where you got it?

0:46:090:46:11

It was left to my husband and myself

0:46:110:46:13

with quite a few other things in 1989 from a dear friend.

0:46:130:46:19

-So you've had it for a wee while.

-I have, yes.

0:46:190:46:22

-Have you had it on display?

-Not really.

0:46:220:46:24

It's been in the china cabinet, inside a teapot.

0:46:240:46:28

-Inside a teapot? Not doing much good there.

-Not really.

-I like this one.

0:46:280:46:34

If we open the lid we can see your silver marks here.

0:46:340:46:39

It was made in Birmingham in the 1860s, so it's a good age.

0:46:390:46:44

And this is important - when you look at an item like this,

0:46:440:46:47

the hinges must be pristine to keep the snuff fresh.

0:46:470:46:53

It's in very good condition, but one of the things

0:46:550:46:58

I like most about this is the little dedication on the cartouche.

0:46:580:47:04

Usually in items of silver we like to see the cartouche empty

0:47:050:47:11

because it means if it is given as a gift

0:47:110:47:14

then it can be engraved afterwards,

0:47:140:47:18

but this one has a marvellous little dedication.

0:47:180:47:23

"To Old Copey, from Scissors."

0:47:230:47:28

-Do you know anything about that?

-I'm sorry.

0:47:280:47:31

-We know nothing at all.

-You know nothing about it.

0:47:310:47:34

If you think about it,

0:47:340:47:37

I can see these names as being nicknames

0:47:370:47:42

of two old friends.

0:47:420:47:44

Two old pals.

0:47:440:47:47

And to have something like that really does

0:47:470:47:50

spark off your imagination.

0:47:500:47:53

It makes us wonder who Old Copey was and who Scissors was.

0:47:530:47:57

What about value, then?

0:47:570:47:59

Snuffboxes were making a little more,

0:47:590:48:02

say, ten years ago, five years ago.

0:48:020:48:04

-In today's market they are a little less.

-Yeah.

0:48:040:48:10

I would put a value on that of between £60 and £80.

0:48:100:48:15

-Yes.

-Would you be happy to sell it at that?

0:48:150:48:18

Yes, that would be quite all right.

0:48:180:48:21

It would go to a collector and I think that is

0:48:210:48:23

a far better place for it to go than in an old teapot.

0:48:230:48:28

I think so too.

0:48:280:48:30

-Shall we put a reserve on it?

-We will leave that to you.

0:48:300:48:33

We will put £60 with a little bit of discretion

0:48:330:48:36

but I'm sure it will go higher.

0:48:360:48:39

The buyers will like the condition

0:48:390:48:42

-and they will like the inscription on this cartouche.

-Lovely.

0:48:420:48:46

There you are.

0:48:510:48:53

What a wonderful time we have had at the Tower Circus in Blackpool.

0:48:530:48:56

Everyone has thoroughly enjoyed themselves,

0:48:560:48:58

I know I have, and our experts. And I can't wait to come back.

0:48:580:49:01

But right now we've got some unfinished business

0:49:010:49:03

in the auction room down in Lytham St Annes.

0:49:030:49:05

While we make our way down the coastline,

0:49:050:49:07

here's a quick recap of all the items going under the hammer.

0:49:070:49:10

These silver sewing trinkets.

0:49:100:49:13

Time is up for Bobby's collection of pocket watches and two necklaces.

0:49:150:49:19

There is Helen's unusual ceramic Spook

0:49:210:49:23

that was bought at a car-boot sale.

0:49:230:49:26

And, finally, Molly hopes her snuffbox

0:49:270:49:29

isn't something to be sniffed at.

0:49:290:49:31

I caught up with today's auctioneer Jonathan Cook at the preview day

0:49:310:49:35

to take a closer look at one of our items.

0:49:350:49:39

Jonathan, I'm absolutely in love with this lot.

0:49:390:49:41

Royal Doulton Spook figure.

0:49:410:49:43

Not the kind of thing you associate Doulton with

0:49:430:49:46

-when you look at their figures.

-Not at all.

0:49:460:49:48

I think he's quite rare, a lovely blue lustre to him.

0:49:480:49:52

Belongs to Helen.

0:49:520:49:54

Her husband bought it in a car-boot sale. Guess how much for?

0:49:540:49:58

I don't think... A fiver?

0:49:580:50:01

Less than that. It's horrible. It's horrible.

0:50:010:50:03

-It's £2.

-£2!

-I mean, that's bonkers, isn't it?

0:50:030:50:07

Somebody sold that for £2.

0:50:070:50:09

They are going to be sick if they are watching.

0:50:090:50:12

James, our expert, has put £200 to £300 on this.

0:50:120:50:15

Could this be a little sleeper? Could this go for a lot more?

0:50:170:50:19

I think this is a prototype. I've not seen this colour before.

0:50:190:50:23

I've seen various other colours

0:50:230:50:26

and some of them can fetch £2,000 to £3,000.

0:50:260:50:28

-I'm not saying this one will.

-£2,000 to £3,000!

0:50:280:50:31

-Yes.

-This is exactly what we like. This is what auctions are all about.

0:50:310:50:35

I can't wait.

0:50:350:50:37

Good luck on the rostrum with the rest of the lots

0:50:370:50:39

but we are looking forward to this one.

0:50:390:50:42

A bit of a mixed lot going under the hammer right now.

0:50:460:50:49

Two necklaces and three pocket watches belonging to Bobby,

0:50:490:50:52

all the way from Texas, who married a man from Lytham

0:50:520:50:55

a couple of years ago.

0:50:550:50:56

-Happy here? Like it?

-Yes! I love it!

-Great stretch of coastline.

0:50:560:51:00

We originally had £40 to £60 put in by Anita.

0:51:000:51:03

You've now upped the reserve to 80, new valuation of £100 to £120.

0:51:030:51:08

-I think you're spot on with the money, I really do.

-Yeah.

0:51:080:51:10

I think it should. We have got...

0:51:100:51:12

We've got watches and those two

0:51:120:51:15

lovely enamelled pieces of jewellery.

0:51:150:51:17

And that is very popular in today's market

0:51:170:51:20

so we have put it up a wee bit but I think we're in with a great shout.

0:51:200:51:24

Let's find out what the bidders think. This is our lot. Here we go.

0:51:240:51:28

Bids of £70. Any advance on 70?

0:51:280:51:31

At £70. 75 on the net.

0:51:310:51:33

80 on the net. 85, 95, 100.

0:51:330:51:36

110. 120. At 120 on the net. Any advance in the room?

0:51:360:51:40

-At £120 on the internet. At 130 now on the net.

-Good!

0:51:400:51:44

Any advance in the room? At £130.

0:51:440:51:48

Are we all sure at 130?

0:51:480:51:50

Any further interest? At 130. All sure?

0:51:500:51:54

At £130.

0:51:540:51:56

-It's gone. The hammer's gone down. That was a good result.

-Well done.

0:51:580:52:02

-I'm pleased with that.

-You're pleased with that.

0:52:020:52:04

I know you are. And your husband will be as well.

0:52:040:52:06

Thanks very much for bringing that in.

0:52:060:52:09

Now, time for some pieces of silver.

0:52:110:52:14

Our next lot coming up is the silver pincushion

0:52:140:52:16

with some thimbles, belonging to Jeanette.

0:52:160:52:19

I think this is a cracking little lot.

0:52:190:52:21

Back at the valuation day,

0:52:210:52:22

there was no discussion within the valuation of a reserve,

0:52:220:52:26

but I know you have got in contact with the auction room

0:52:260:52:28

and you have sensibly put £100 on,

0:52:280:52:30

which is what James recommended.

0:52:300:52:32

-Yes.

-Yeah.

-I think the thing is,

0:52:320:52:35

with something like that, it's best to just put a safety net.

0:52:350:52:38

-Of course!

-Silver at the moment, so much of the silver

0:52:380:52:41

is selling for its scrap value, but it can go for very little,

0:52:410:52:43

but having said that, this is so pretty, it's in lovely condition,

0:52:430:52:47

it's not holed.

0:52:470:52:48

-This won't go to melt.

-No, it won't.

-No, no, it won't.

0:52:480:52:50

It's too worked, it's too beautiful.

0:52:500:52:52

Let's do it, here we go.

0:52:520:52:53

Edwardian fine silver pincushion trinket box,

0:52:530:52:56

decorated in high relief, together with three silver thimbles.

0:52:560:52:59

Bid's with me of £70.

0:52:590:53:02

-Any advance on 70?

-Straight in, aren't we? We need a bit more.

0:53:020:53:05

85, 90. 95, 100.

0:53:050:53:08

And 10? At £110.

0:53:080:53:10

120, 130, 140,

0:53:100:53:13

at 140 on the net.

0:53:130:53:15

150 in the room, lady's bid at 150.

0:53:150:53:18

Are we all...? 160.

0:53:180:53:20

-At 160, then, on the internet at 160.

-Come on!

0:53:200:53:24

Any advance on 160? 165 if it helps?

0:53:240:53:27

Go on!

0:53:270:53:28

-Yay!

-165, at 165 in the room.

0:53:280:53:31

Any advance on 165?

0:53:310:53:33

At £165,

0:53:330:53:35

are we all sure?

0:53:350:53:37

-Well done.

-Thank you.

-Quality, you see? Quality, quality!

0:53:370:53:40

-You were right.

-It's lovely, very pretty.

0:53:400:53:43

-Will you treat the granddaughter now?

-Yes.

0:53:430:53:44

Next up we've got a Victorian silver snuffbox.

0:53:470:53:50

Is it a pinch at £60 to £80?

0:53:500:53:52

We are about to find out. Anita's laughing her head off. Hello, Molly.

0:53:520:53:55

I know this is yours. You've had it from the 1980s.

0:53:550:53:58

-You've decided to sell it.

-Yeah.

-Good time to sell silver.

0:53:580:54:01

The cracking thing about this little snuffbox

0:54:010:54:04

is that it has this marvellous inscription,

0:54:040:54:07

-"To Old Copey from Scissors."

-I wonder who that was.

0:54:070:54:11

-I've no idea, unfortunately.

-Here we are.

0:54:110:54:14

Let's find out what it's worth.

0:54:140:54:16

It's going under the hammer now.

0:54:160:54:18

Victorian silver snuffbox marked for 1861.

0:54:180:54:21

42, 44, 46, 48, 50.

0:54:210:54:25

55. 60. 65. 70. 75.

0:54:250:54:28

80. 85.

0:54:280:54:30

90. 95.

0:54:300:54:33

At £95 on the internet. Any advance in the room?

0:54:340:54:39

At £95, then. Are we all done at £95?

0:54:390:54:43

Sell away, then, at 95. No further interest.

0:54:430:54:47

It's sold.

0:54:470:54:49

The hammer has gone down. Short and sweet.

0:54:490:54:51

-Lovely.

-Above the upper estimate.

-Very nice.

0:54:510:54:53

Good little things to collect, snuffboxes. They really are.

0:54:530:54:56

We were lucky enough to have it left to us.

0:54:560:54:59

Snuffboxes are a regular on "Flog It!",

0:54:590:55:02

but now for something we've never seen before.

0:55:020:55:05

Are you all sitting comfortably in your chairs?

0:55:050:55:07

This could get exciting. Could get scary. It's quite spooky.

0:55:070:55:10

It's the Doulton Spook belonging to Helen. Hello there.

0:55:100:55:13

Thank you so much for bringing this along to our valuation day.

0:55:130:55:16

I had a chat to the auctioneer yesterday and he said

0:55:160:55:19

he's seen them come up for sale before in different colourways.

0:55:190:55:23

Exactly. Different colour.

0:55:230:55:25

I'm not going to tell you how much he said

0:55:250:55:28

just in case it ruins the surprise

0:55:280:55:30

-but, I mean, what are you thinking of getting? 200?

-Hopefully.

0:55:300:55:34

Maybe 300. If we're really lucky today, we could get 300.

0:55:340:55:37

Good luck. That's all I can say. Fingers crossed.

0:55:370:55:40

I think this will go online. It'll go on the internet.

0:55:400:55:42

But let's watch this and hopefully,

0:55:420:55:45

hopefully it will go through the roof. Here we go.

0:55:450:55:47

Lot 360. Royal Doulton.

0:55:470:55:51

Rare lustre figure. Spook.

0:55:510:55:54

Lots of interest and we can start it off at...

0:55:540:55:56

£650. 650 on commission.

0:55:560:56:00

Any advance on 750?

0:56:000:56:02

850.

0:56:020:56:05

950. 1,000 with me.

0:56:060:56:08

At 1,000 on commission.

0:56:090:56:11

1,100 on the net. Any advance on 1,100? 1,200.

0:56:110:56:16

1,200.

0:56:160:56:18

Any advance on 1,200? 1,300 on the phone.

0:56:180:56:21

1,400.

0:56:220:56:24

1,500. 1,500. 1,600.

0:56:250:56:28

-1,600!

-1,600.

0:56:280:56:31

1,700.

0:56:310:56:33

I love this, and they love it as well.

0:56:330:56:35

1,800. 1,900.

0:56:350:56:38

-2,000.

-I'm tingling.

0:56:400:56:42

I hope you're tingling at home.

0:56:420:56:45

2,200.

0:56:450:56:47

2,400.

0:56:480:56:51

-2,600.

-2,600!

0:56:510:56:53

-Helen! You're in the money.

-I know!

0:56:530:56:56

3,000.

0:56:560:56:58

-3,200.

-3,200.

0:57:000:57:04

3,400.

0:57:040:57:06

3,600.

0:57:060:57:08

3,700. 3,800.

0:57:090:57:11

Now we know what they are worth!

0:57:130:57:15

£3,900.

0:57:150:57:17

-4,000.

-Wow!

0:57:180:57:20

-4,100.

-£4,100, and don't forget,

0:57:220:57:26

this was bought at a car boot for £2!

0:57:260:57:29

-4,200.

-£4,200.

0:57:290:57:34

4,250, if it helps.

0:57:340:57:36

4,250.

0:57:380:57:40

4,250.

0:57:410:57:43

At 4,250. Are we all sure?

0:57:450:57:47

At £4,250. Fair warning.

0:57:480:57:52

Fantastic!

0:57:520:57:54

APPLAUSE

0:57:550:57:57

Bang! 4,250!

0:57:570:58:00

-Thank you.

-£4,250.

0:58:000:58:03

Bought in a car boot for just £2.

0:58:030:58:06

And you said to me at the start of the sale you would be happy

0:58:060:58:08

-with 200 to 300.

-I would.

-How about that?

0:58:080:58:11

We didn't know what it was worth, now we do and now you do.

0:58:110:58:14

Helen, enjoy that money, won't you?

0:58:140:58:16

What's going through your mind? What will you do with that?

0:58:160:58:19

I'm going on holiday next week with my daughter.

0:58:190:58:21

It doesn't get much better than that. Have a good time.

0:58:210:58:23

-Bit of spending money.

-You will just love it.

0:58:230:58:25

Thank you so much for bringing that in.

0:58:250:58:27

That's what auctions are all about. That's why we love them.

0:58:270:58:30

I hope you've enjoyed watching today's show.

0:58:300:58:32

More surprises to come in the future so keep watching "Flog It!",

0:58:320:58:34

but for now, from Blackpool, it's goodbye from all of us.

0:58:340:58:38

Antiques series. Paul Martin presents from Blackpool Tower Circus with experts Anita Manning and James Lewis.

The team picks out a selection of antiques and collectibles to be sold at auction. James discovers a scary-looking tribal mask from Africa, and Anita finds a Clarice Cliff tea set. But will a Doulton figure bought at a car boot sale cause a surprise at the auction?