Derby 4 Flog It!


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Derby 4

Antiques series. Paul Martin presents from Haddon Hall in Derbyshire with experts Michael Baggot and Caroline Hawley. They find an oriental carving and a model of a V1 bomb.


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The magnificent Peak District

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is the second most visited national park in the world.

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Today, we are so lucky to be

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in the heart of Britain's beautiful countryside.

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Let's hope we can attract the visitors, too.

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Welcome to Flog It!

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The Peak District is about the same size as Greater London

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and it was Britain's very first national park.

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Nestled in the south of the park is the very handsome Haddon Hall,

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which looks over the graceful River Wye.

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I'll be out and about exploring the beautiful Peak District

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later on in the show, but first,

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it is time for me to get down there

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to join up with our Flog It! crowd, who have travelled across

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the hills and the dales to provide us

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with a veritable feast of antiques to take off to auction.

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And leading our Flog It! expedition today

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is the wonderful Michael Baggott.

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It's trying desperately to be earlier.

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But we all do that when we get to a certain age, don't we?

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Of course we do.

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And taking to the peak for the girls

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is Yorkshire lass Caroline Hawley.

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-Now, that's very fitting for here, isn't it?

-It is.

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Very nice.

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Armed with bags and boxes full of antiques ready to be valued,

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our crowds are all set to explore

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this magnificent medieval manor house.

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It certainly is a bit nippy out here in the Peak District,

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so let's hope the fires are lit inside.

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This is one of our best preserved buildings from the Middle Ages.

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It's nearly 900 years old. And back then, there was no central heating.

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And today, there still is no central heating.

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Time has stood still.

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So let's hope our experts have found something to warm their cockles.

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Let's go inside and find out.

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Well, I'm glad to see everyone is prepared

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and looking warmly wrapped up.

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Now, which one of the following metal items

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will forge ahead at the auction, leaving the others behind?

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Will it be this cast-iron shield?

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Or this early silver spoon?

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Or maybe this piece of Second World War memorabilia?

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Well, you'll have to keep watching to find out.

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We're going to start in the long gallery with Michael,

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who is totally delighted with his first find.

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Carol, you have absolutely made my day today,

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bringing in this wonderful spoon.

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I mean, it's an absolute delight.

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I will probably bore you in telling you so much about this spoon.

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-But before I do...

-Yes.

-How did you come by it?

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-It's a family spoon, on its own.

-Yes.

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And it has lived in the cutlery drawer for the last 30 years,

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as far as I'm concerned.

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-And I don't know where it came from.

-In the cutlery drawer?

-Oh, yes, yes.

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-Oh.

-I got it out of the cutlery drawer last night.

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To polish it.

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AC, the initials, does that relate to anyone you know in the family?

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-No, it doesn't.

-It's a very interesting spoon.

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-First of all, let's look at... I've got it this way up.

-Yes.

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With the bowl facing down and the back of the bowl up,

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because this is how this would have been placed on the table

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when it was made.

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-Yes.

-In about 1750, we started putting spoons that way up

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-on the table.

-Right.

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Which is why you have got a little bit of decoration here

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as you are holding and using it,

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but most of the decoration is on the reverse of the bowl.

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Right.

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The pattern is what we call trefid pattern now,

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because of the three lobes. And there are various forms of trefid.

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-Later ones simply have a rat tail...

-Yes.

-..to the bowl.

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-Earlier ones have this decoration which we call lace backs.

-Yes.

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So this would be a lace-back trefid spoon.

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This, rather peculiarly,

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has got a device of a backwards Z

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-struck over itself three times.

-Yes.

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And the last mark, which is nearest the stem, there is

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-a maker's mark there.

-Right.

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Which has been very poorly struck.

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And that Z mark is over-stamping it.

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-Right.

-Now, this is a provincial spoon.

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I can't be definite,

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-but from the pattern of the lacework on the back...

-Yes.

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-..I think it is more likely to be North Country...

-Yes.

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-..which is either York or Newcastle.

-Yes.

-As opposed to the Southwest.

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Well, that's where the family came from, Yorkshire.

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-That hangs together beautifully.

-It does, yes.

-That all makes sense.

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What's happened is this spoon has been made by a good silversmith

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and then sold on to someone who has put their own

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-sort of set of almost tinker marks on it.

-Really?

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And whilst that is very unusual, it doesn't really help us

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-placing it in terms of where it was made and who made it.

-No.

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Any idea when it was made?

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I thought it might be as early as 17th century, 16-something.

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-Absolutely.

-Really?

-This style of spoon comes in

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in about 1660, 1670.

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-Right.

-And this will date to anywhere between 1680 and 1690.

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-Really?

-So, we're dealing...

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You know, we're dealing with quite an age.

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-We're talking James II into William and Mary.

-Yes.

-It has got issues.

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Right.

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When you use a spoon for 300 years and you're right-handed,

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you do that in a bowl and you get wear.

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And initially, the edge of the bowl has worn down

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and then it has started to curl back on itself.

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And that is pretty much as bad as a bowl gets on an early spoon.

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-Yes.

-So, any thoughts of what it might be worth?

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Well, I was hoping it might be worth £100 or more.

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It is worth £100 all day long. It's worth £200 all day long.

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-Really?

-So, what we'll do is we'll put an estimate,

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-a tempting estimate of £200 to £400.

-Really?

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-And we'll put a fixed reserve of £200 on it.

-That's excellent.

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It's a lovely thing. They are rare.

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I mean, the harsh news is that if that had nice York hallmarks

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on it and was in good condition, it would be...

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-£5,000.

-No!

-So...

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What you need to do is go home to the cutlery drawer and see

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if you've got any others in slightly better condition.

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There are no others. It has always been one on its own. Strange!

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It's a lovely thing. Why have you decided to sell it now?

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It has been sitting there for a long time.

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I had various valuations done,

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but nothing as in-depth as what you have given me now.

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-Well, you see, I am a spoon anorak.

-Yes.

-And this is right up my street.

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-That's wonderful.

-And in fact, it is so up my street

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that I will go home tonight

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and in my large hallmark book, I will write down that I have seen

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a 1680s trefid with a backwards Z struck on it four times.

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So in 30 years' time, when I see another one, I'll say,

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"I've seen one of those before,

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"on a Flog It! valuation day at Haddon Hall."

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Gosh, that was really interesting. Michael is a font of knowledge.

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Caroline's next, and she has also picked out something special.

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Hello, Yvonne. Nice to meet you.

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Now, would you tell me what you have brought along for me to see today?

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-It's two items of Worcester.

-Right.

-Yes.

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And how did you come to have them?

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Well, it came to us by an aunt of respect.

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I've never heard of that expression, an aunt of respect,

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is it somebody you chose to call "auntie"?

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-Have you not heard of it before?

-No, I haven't.

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It's a lady that's not related, but she was an elderly lady,

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-so we called her "auntie".

-That's lovely.

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-She was a friend of my mother-in-law's.

-Yes.

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And we had to deal with her estate, and they came to us.

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So, it's a little cream and sugar basin. Very pretty.

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-Have you ever used them at all?

-No.

-They have been in a cabinet,

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-have they?

-Yeah, in a cabinet.

-Very highly prized.

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Why do you feel that now is the time to sell them?

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Well, it was really just coming to the programme

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and getting some information about them.

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-Yeah, and you are happy to sell them?

-I am.

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Now, do you know who the artist was, Yvonne?

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Well, I know the name Powell on there,

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but I don't know anything about him.

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-Right.

-Or is it a him?

-It's a him, it is.

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Now, it's William Powell -

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William or Billy, as he was known at the factory.

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He was born in 1878 and he worked right up

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until his retirement in 1950.

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He had a seven-year apprenticeship before he was allowed to

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sign his name on pieces.

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He became one of the finest small bird artists that Worcester had.

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He was seen regularly out in the countryside,

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sketchbook in hand, drawing the birds to put them onto these pieces.

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Sadly, as we say, time and time again,

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-condition is almost everything.

-I know, yeah.

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-And you know there is a slight chip here.

-I understand that, yes.

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In this one. Which does affect the value somewhat.

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They date from that early part of the 20th century,

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about 1918, 1916.

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And he is a very collectible artist.

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Do you have any idea what sort of price you would like for these?

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I don't.

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Only having seen previous programmes,

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I thought about £40, £50.

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-About £40, £50.

-I don't know.

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I would think we could hope to do a little bit better than that.

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And I think if we put an estimate of... I'm going

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to stick my neck out here and say...80,

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possibly 80 to 120.

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And we'll put a fixed reserve of £80, Yvonne.

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-Are you happy with that?

-I am happy with that, thank you.

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Thank you, very much.

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Well, I think that's great value for two little works of art.

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Our crowds today are certainly enjoying

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the Elizabethan long gallery,

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with its oak-panelled walls and its high-relief plaster ceiling.

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What they probably don't realise is

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the floorboards that are taking all their weight have been

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cut from one single oak tree that has grown here on the estate.

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Now, oak is an incredibly dense hardwood with a tight, close grain.

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And the heart of the wood itself is impervious to woodworm

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and beetle, that's why it looks as good today as it does

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when it was first laid centuries ago.

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And the same estate craftsmen have also cut semi-circular steps

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that I am sitting on from the root of the same oak tree.

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Not only is that creative, it's also resourceful.

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Back in the long gallery,

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our experts are making the very best of the resources available to them.

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And Michael has found a second item as thrilling as his first.

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John, I spotted this wonderful armorial in the queue.

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I was instantly drawn to it. It's completely my area of interest.

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But where did you get something as marvellous as this from?

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-Well, my uncle presented it to me 40 years or so ago.

-Yeah.

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He had exchanged it during the Second World War

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-for packet of cigarettes with a German soldier.

-Good grief.

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Where was he when this took place, do you know?

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As far as I am aware, in Germany.

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You don't know the region or the area?

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I believe the shield is this shield of Dortmund.

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I mean it could be, basically, the town mark of anywhere.

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It could be... Frankfurt has a single-headed eagle.

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Or it could be a family crest.

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I mean, what's fascinating is, obviously, this was towards

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-the end of the war?

-I believe so.

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The Germans must have sort of almost had defeat in their hearts

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that they were taking things like this,

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which I imagine would be fixed to the exterior of a building.

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Let's turn it over.

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-I mean, it's cast-iron.

-Yes.

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And it has got this very sturdy, this very German,

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well-engineered bracket fitting.

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And there are a couple of screws that hold it in.

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They don't to my mind look like machine-made screws.

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-Right.

-Cos we have got no marks on this at all.

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And of course, being cast-iron, it doesn't tend to weather and age

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over a period of time as wood or copper or anything else would,

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to give us an idea of the period.

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But I would place this sort of 1880 to about 1900 in date.

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When you get arms like this,

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-one thing that helps you identify them are the colours.

-Yes.

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So the different colour of eagle on a different ground.

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But of course, being cast-iron, and being black,

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it doesn't help us very much. I mean, this is a fabulous thing,

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a fabulous bit of your family history.

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Why have you decided to sell it?

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Two children, neither of them are interested in it particularly.

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You can't cut it down the middle, can you?

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-It is not the wisdom of Solomon, is it?

-No.

-I mean, value...

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-I will put a very broad estimate on it...

-Yes.

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..of £50 to £100.

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And we'll put a fixed reserve of £50 on it because,

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I promise you, if you went to a foundry today to have that made,

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it will cost several hundred pounds just to have that done.

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Well, you've got all the modelling to do. It's a fantastic thing.

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And I think... I mean, I love it. I'm sure someone at the auction...

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Well, hopefully, at least two people.

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-Two Germans.

-Two Germans.

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We're in the internet age, these things go online.

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I've never seen it on the internet.

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I don't know what the postage will cost,

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but that is the bidder in Germany's concern.

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And, now, for a little bit of local culinary history.

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A Bakewell pudding, always a good thing mid-afternoon.

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Well, most of us have heard about the Bakewell tart

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and, as I found out ten years ago,

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when I came to Derby to do one of our first valuation days,

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I found out in fact it was the Bakewell pudding up here

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-that everybody is familiar with.

-That is correct.

-And I got told off.

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What is basically...the ingredients of a Bakewell pudding?

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OK, well, the Bakewell pudding,

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back at the beginning of the 19th century,

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used to have candied peel in it, raisins, dried cherries,

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lemon peel, some had lemon brandy in, different things like that.

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It was quite a rich one.

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And food is passed down from mother to daughter,

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it has changed a little bit.

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Our pudding is the first one that was a translucent pudding.

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The young lady that made it, we think made it by mistake,

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it was a misunderstanding, so none of the fruit went in,

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and what came out was the Bakewell pudding that we've been

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making for the rest of the time.

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And what are the ingredients in there?

0:14:540:14:56

Well, in there, you've got ground almonds, eggs,

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butter and sugar...

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-Something else.

-A secret ingredient.

-Go on, tell me.

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-I can't tell you.

-Can't tell me, no, I thought not.

0:15:020:15:04

And this recipe came about ten years after the...

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Yeah, round about that.

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It was made by mistake, it became very popular in the town.

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And, now, time for the Bakewell challenge.

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Right, who wants to try one? You've gone for the special recipe.

0:15:160:15:20

You've gone for the special recipe.

0:15:200:15:22

Oh, look, one of each left,

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it's a nation divided. Well, there you go.

0:15:270:15:30

Back to business now with Caroline,

0:15:360:15:37

who has spotted an interesting picture with a musical theme.

0:15:370:15:41

Jean and Mark, lovely to meet you.

0:15:410:15:44

Tell me little bit about what you've brought today, please.

0:15:440:15:47

Well, it is this cartoon by Gillray,

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done roundabout 1800 or thereabouts.

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My father used to, when we had a holiday,

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stop at little antique shops.

0:15:570:15:59

And he would be mostly looking for Chinese porcelain.

0:15:590:16:02

But occasionally, if he saw something else,

0:16:020:16:04

he would buy that as well. And, so, we think that's how we got it.

0:16:040:16:07

Well, this is lovely. Absolutely lovely.

0:16:070:16:10

By James Gillray, a very eminent caricaturist and fabulous

0:16:100:16:14

-subject, you've obviously looked at the subject.

-Oh, yes.

0:16:140:16:18

The lady on the piano, it says next to it, "Execution!"

0:16:180:16:22

She's absolutely murdering the piece that she's playing.

0:16:220:16:25

And the assembled guests are just horrified,

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the sound that she's making, which is very amusing,

0:16:280:16:33

and signed at the bottom with this monogram.

0:16:330:16:37

JG. JG. James Gillray. Lovely lovely piece.

0:16:370:16:41

And it looks like it has a contemporary frame.

0:16:410:16:43

Little bit of damage to the frame. But, generally, a nice piece.

0:16:430:16:48

Now, value, do you have any ideas of value?

0:16:480:16:51

Well, some 15 years ago,

0:16:510:16:53

we had it looked at by someone who valued at between 200 and £300.

0:16:530:16:59

Right. Now, I would think certain things have gone down a little.

0:16:590:17:05

It's a popular subject, it's obviously very amusing,

0:17:050:17:09

you can imagine someone learning the piano,

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it would be a good present for them, wouldn't it?

0:17:110:17:14

-But I would value it between 150 and 200.

-Fair enough.

0:17:140:17:19

-And we'd put a fixed reserve of 150?

-Um...

0:17:190:17:24

-Should be all right, shouldn't it?

-Yes, yes.

-Are you happy with that?

0:17:240:17:28

It could well do...

0:17:280:17:29

With discretion to the auctioneer because, if it went for 140,

0:17:290:17:33

-that wouldn't be the end of the world.

-No, that's fine.

0:17:330:17:35

-We'll put a discretionary...

-150 discretionary.

-150 discretionary.

0:17:350:17:40

-That's it.

-Ideal. Superb. And thank you so much for bringing it along.

0:17:400:17:43

I'm glad you found it so interesting.

0:17:430:17:46

Before we head off to auction,

0:17:480:17:50

there is something I would like to show you.

0:17:500:17:53

The Peak District has a high amount of rainfall,

0:17:580:18:00

compared to the rest of England and Wales,

0:18:000:18:03

which certainly adds to its beauty

0:18:030:18:05

and all of this extra water

0:18:050:18:06

has helped play a major part in its heritage.

0:18:060:18:10

The mills that sprung up across the Derwent Valley

0:18:100:18:13

in the 18th century harnessed the natural water power

0:18:130:18:17

of the Peak District, transforming British industry.

0:18:170:18:20

Today, this part of Derbyshire has World Heritage status, attracting

0:18:210:18:25

half a million visitors a year to view these iconic buildings.

0:18:250:18:29

Nestled in the Derwent Valley,

0:18:310:18:32

it was here at Cromford that one of the forefathers

0:18:320:18:35

of the Industrial Revolution, Richard Arkwright,

0:18:350:18:38

established the first successful water-powered cotton spinning mills,

0:18:380:18:43

introducing what we now recognise today as the modern factory system.

0:18:430:18:47

This was the first factory to use a continuous process from raw

0:18:490:18:53

material to finished product.

0:18:530:18:55

Arkwright built his mill workers homes,

0:18:570:18:59

introduced working hours determined by the clock

0:18:590:19:02

instead of by daylight

0:19:020:19:04

and patent machinery that massively increased production,

0:19:040:19:09

including this spinning machine called the water frame.

0:19:090:19:12

His pioneering work inspired similar factories all across

0:19:130:19:17

the United Kingdom and all over the world.

0:19:170:19:20

But he is not the only noteworthy industrialist

0:19:200:19:23

from the Peak District.

0:19:230:19:25

In the small village of Lea Mills, which is two miles down the road

0:19:250:19:28

from Cromford, is the John Smedley factory,

0:19:280:19:31

which has been running continuously for over 200 years.

0:19:310:19:34

In 1818, John Smedley, a hosier from nearby Wirksworth,

0:19:360:19:39

bought the lease on this factory

0:19:390:19:42

which had been operating as a cotton mill.

0:19:420:19:45

But it is his son John Smedley Jr

0:19:450:19:47

who turned out to be the really remarkable man.

0:19:470:19:50

I met archivist Jane Middleton-Smith at the Smedley factory

0:19:520:19:55

to find out more about him.

0:19:550:19:57

How did he make his fortune?

0:19:570:19:59

He made his money making underwear.

0:19:590:20:01

In his early years, when his father was struggling,

0:20:010:20:05

he focused his attention on the business.

0:20:050:20:07

And he turned the machinery here

0:20:070:20:09

over from cotton spinning to wool spinning.

0:20:090:20:11

Let's face it, you know, everybody had to wear stuff like this,

0:20:110:20:15

prior to central heating, just to keep you warm in the house,

0:20:150:20:18

-literally, not just in the workplace.

-Yes, absolutely.

0:20:180:20:22

And he, using the framework knitting machine, could make

0:20:220:20:25

fully-fashioned garments, so you could fit the curves of the body.

0:20:250:20:29

Water played a large part, not only in the creation of his wealth,

0:20:290:20:33

but also in maintaining his health.

0:20:330:20:36

After being successfully treated from what

0:20:360:20:38

he thought to be typhus by water cures or hydrotherapy,

0:20:380:20:42

he became a great advocate of this fashionable treatment

0:20:420:20:46

of the day and built a splendid hydro hotel in nearby Matlock,

0:20:460:20:50

offering these water cures.

0:20:500:20:52

He became passionately interested in the power of water to cure,

0:20:540:20:59

not so much through drinking, but through bathing in it and having...

0:20:590:21:03

you know, wrap yourself in wet blankets and...

0:21:030:21:07

As well as the hotel, in 1862, Smedley built

0:21:080:21:11

a castle for his family to live in, appointing himself architect.

0:21:110:21:16

Riber Castle, sitting on the hill overlooking Matlock,

0:21:160:21:19

was a symbol of his success.

0:21:190:21:22

-Is this a picture of Riber Castle on the inside?

-It is.

0:21:220:21:26

This came in a box with some fancy dress costumes

0:21:260:21:30

that had been kept by the family.

0:21:300:21:32

And in the bottom of the box

0:21:320:21:34

were these two photographs of Riber Castle in 1873.

0:21:340:21:38

I'd never seen an interior.

0:21:380:21:39

Today, the hydro hotel is used as the county hall.

0:21:410:21:44

And the factory is still in production.

0:21:440:21:46

The machines used here today haven't changed all that much since

0:21:500:21:54

the era of Arkwright and Smedley.

0:21:540:21:56

Although they may be electric, the machines still work the same way.

0:21:560:22:00

The whole production process relies on the craft of the people,

0:22:000:22:03

the machinists, the seamstresses, and the knitters,

0:22:030:22:06

some of whom come from families that worked here when Smedley

0:22:060:22:11

first set up shop in the 1800s.

0:22:110:22:14

And, now, a quick reminder of what's going off to auction.

0:22:180:22:21

Will the early silver spoon bring drama to the saleroom

0:22:230:22:27

as the silver collectors battle over it?

0:22:270:22:28

Or could it be the sale of the little William Powell

0:22:310:22:34

Worcester jug and the sugar basin that causes the biggest stir?

0:22:340:22:37

Or will the German shield outperform both of them

0:22:370:22:40

by attracting interest from the Continent and on the internet?

0:22:400:22:44

Or will the watercolour cartoon draw the attention of the crowd?

0:22:470:22:50

Only a stone's throw away is the pretty village of Rowsley

0:22:520:22:55

and today's auction house - Bamfords.

0:22:550:22:57

And it looks like we are going to have all the fun of the fair.

0:22:570:23:00

On the rostrum later is Flog It! expert James Lewis.

0:23:050:23:08

And don't forget, there is commission to pay.

0:23:100:23:12

It does vary from saleroom to saleroom.

0:23:120:23:14

Here it is 12.5% plus VAT.

0:23:140:23:17

Well, our auctioneer, James Lewis, is on the rostrum

0:23:170:23:20

and the sale is under way. This is where it gets exciting.

0:23:200:23:23

For all of you at home, sit back, put your feet up and relax.

0:23:230:23:26

For our owners, it's going to be a roller-coaster ride.

0:23:260:23:29

Let's get on with our first lot.

0:23:290:23:31

At 450, do I see five?

0:23:320:23:34

Going under the hammer right now, we've got a 19th-century

0:23:340:23:37

German cast-iron shield belonging to John,

0:23:370:23:39

-who is standing right next to me now. Who is this?

-This is Daniel,

0:23:390:23:42

-my grandson.

-Daniel, pleased to meet you.

0:23:420:23:44

Are you getting into the antiques business at a young age?

0:23:440:23:47

-Hopefully.

-Hopefully! Has anything caught your eye here today?

0:23:470:23:50

-Not at the minute.

-What do you think of the auction?

-It's great fun.

0:23:500:23:53

-It's a cracking place, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-And what an atmosphere.

0:23:530:23:56

Hopefully, Grandad will sell this at the top end

0:23:560:23:59

and take you out for a treat.

0:23:590:24:00

In a way, you should be inheriting this.

0:24:000:24:03

-You might be.

-You might be! No!

0:24:030:24:05

-Anyway, it's going under the hammer. Ready?

-Yep.

0:24:050:24:08

Good luck, Daniel. Here we go.

0:24:080:24:09

It's the 19th-century, Continental cast-iron shield

0:24:090:24:13

of Dortmund, there it is. With the eagle with open wings.

0:24:130:24:17

And I can start the bidding here at £50. 60 anywhere?

0:24:170:24:21

At 50, and 60 now.

0:24:210:24:23

At 50, and 60, sir. 60 in the room.

0:24:230:24:25

70, 80, 90 and 100.

0:24:250:24:27

-You won't find another one in a hurry.

-It's quirky.

0:24:270:24:30

Yeah, very quirky.

0:24:300:24:31

At £100. 110, do I see?

0:24:310:24:33

At £100.

0:24:330:24:35

Any advance? At 100, 110 anywhere?

0:24:350:24:37

You're coming in online. Flashing light, you interested?

0:24:370:24:40

At £100, 110 do I see?

0:24:400:24:43

At £100, standing. All sure?

0:24:430:24:45

The hammer has gone down, it's sold, £100.

0:24:450:24:48

You're taking your grandad out shopping now, aren't you?

0:24:480:24:51

-Mm?

-They may see a little of it.

0:24:510:24:53

Not the internet interest that I was expecting,

0:24:550:24:57

but nevertheless, a good result.

0:24:570:24:59

And now for something far more delicate.

0:24:590:25:02

Going under the hammer now, we've got a Royal Worcester set,

0:25:020:25:05

with a value of £80 to £120.

0:25:050:25:07

It belongs to Yvonne, who sadly cannot be with us.

0:25:070:25:10

But we do have our expert, the gorgeous Caroline.

0:25:100:25:12

-And we should get the top end on this.

-We should, we should.

0:25:120:25:15

Very, very good artist, specialist in bird paintings.

0:25:150:25:19

Very good quality.

0:25:190:25:21

Beautiful thing. There's a tiny bit of damage on one of the pieces.

0:25:210:25:24

But I'm sure it's going to achieve more than the top estimate.

0:25:240:25:28

We have got a packed auction room here,

0:25:280:25:30

it's an electric atmosphere and I'm sure this is going to fly out.

0:25:300:25:33

-It is.

-Figures crossed? Ready?

-Fingers crossed.

-Here we go.

0:25:330:25:36

Lot 309 is very sweet, little Royal Worcester

0:25:360:25:40

coopered milk jug and sugar basin,

0:25:400:25:44

painted by William Powell.

0:25:440:25:46

There we have it.

0:25:460:25:47

And jolly pretty. And I can start the bidding straight in at £80.

0:25:470:25:51

85 now.

0:25:510:25:52

85 to the left. 95.

0:25:520:25:54

100. 110. 110 in the room to the left.

0:25:540:25:57

At 110, 120 now.

0:25:570:25:59

At 110. 120 at the very back.

0:25:590:26:01

130. 140, sir?

0:26:010:26:03

140. 150. 160?

0:26:030:26:07

160. 170? 170. 180?

0:26:070:26:10

He shakes his head at 180. At 170 to the left.

0:26:100:26:13

At £170. 180 anywhere? At 170.

0:26:130:26:17

Anybody else? At 170... It's yours, 658.

0:26:170:26:21

Good result. Yvonne, I hope you enjoyed that moment,

0:26:210:26:23

watching us back at home.

0:26:230:26:26

I'm pretty certain that the buyer will be delighted with those.

0:26:260:26:29

And now for something that is properly antique.

0:26:290:26:33

Well, so far, so good.

0:26:330:26:34

And stirring up the mix right now - there is a good link there -

0:26:340:26:37

is Carol's silver spoon, at £200 to £400.

0:26:370:26:40

And I'll tell you what, I think this is one of the oldest items

0:26:400:26:42

in the sale room, from the William and Mary period, circa 1680.

0:26:420:26:46

It is a little gem. And you brought it to the right expert.

0:26:460:26:50

-Michael loves silver.

-I know, yes.

-I am a spoon nut.

-You are.

0:26:500:26:55

And this, actually, is a very academic spoon. It is provincial.

0:26:550:26:58

-So the collectors will be out for this one.

-Sure.

0:26:580:27:01

And it is here to be sold at £200 to £400.

0:27:010:27:03

Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:27:030:27:05

Lot number 24 is this wonderful William and Mary trefid spoon,

0:27:050:27:10

circa 1685, with the lace back.

0:27:100:27:14

Brilliant, James has done back and front pictures online.

0:27:140:27:17

-This is really good.

-Markings on the back.

0:27:170:27:19

-And I have got three bids on commission.

-Great, there you go.

0:27:190:27:22

-Look at that.

-Right.

0:27:220:27:24

They are all clustered around the lower end of the estimate.

0:27:240:27:27

And I can started it at £210.

0:27:270:27:30

220 do I see in the room first?

0:27:300:27:32

220? 220 is it?

0:27:320:27:34

At 210, absentee bid.

0:27:340:27:37

At 210, 220 now? Internet, 220.

0:27:370:27:40

230.

0:27:400:27:42

-Internet bidding 240, 250.

-Come on, come on.

0:27:420:27:45

-260, 270.

-I've got my fingers crossed.

-Yes.

0:27:450:27:49

280, 290.

0:27:490:27:53

At 290. Make it 300 in the room.

0:27:530:27:56

310?

0:27:560:27:57

And a shake of the head.

0:27:570:27:58

At £310.

0:27:580:28:00

-At 310, you sure?

-It's going.

0:28:000:28:03

All right, 315.

0:28:030:28:05

-320.

-Well done, James.

0:28:050:28:07

-Carry on again.

-Tease that little bit.

0:28:070:28:10

No? £320. Absentee bid.

0:28:100:28:13

Do I see any more?

0:28:130:28:15

-You're out online, you're out in the room.

-It's gone.

0:28:150:28:18

-Great.

-You could say he was an absolute corker on it, couldn't you?

0:28:180:28:22

Caroline next, who has found a rather fun thing.

0:28:230:28:26

Going under the hammer right now,

0:28:280:28:30

the watercolour cartoon belonging to Jean and Mark.

0:28:300:28:33

Is it attributed or is it by James Gillray?

0:28:330:28:36

We're just about to find out.

0:28:360:28:39

So, this has caused an awful lot of talking.

0:28:390:28:43

Had a chat James just before the sale on the preview day yesterday.

0:28:430:28:47

-And we're still not sure.

-The jury is still out.

0:28:480:28:52

If it is by the very well-known caricaturist...

0:28:520:28:55

..you're looking at well over £500.

0:28:550:28:56

Yes, oh, well over. Into the thousands.

0:28:560:28:59

Up to £10,000.

0:28:590:29:01

Let's hope we can make the top end and a bit more.

0:29:010:29:03

Here we go. It's going under the hammer.

0:29:030:29:04

Lots of opinion on this.

0:29:040:29:06

Lots of people have looked at it and come up and decided whether

0:29:060:29:10

it is or it isn't. But there it is, it's certainly period.

0:29:100:29:12

And I've got two bids on it. And I can start at £140.

0:29:120:29:17

At 140, at 150, do I see?

0:29:170:29:20

At 140, 150, 150 bid.

0:29:200:29:22

At 150, 160 absentee. 160, 170 for you.

0:29:220:29:26

At 160, 170, 180, 190.

0:29:260:29:29

At 180 with me, 190.

0:29:290:29:32

At £180. With me at 180, 190 now.

0:29:320:29:35

At 180. At £180.

0:29:350:29:39

-Well, that answers all the speculation.

-It does, doesn't it?

0:29:390:29:41

-Yes.

-The market has decided.

-At 180. There it is.

-It's sold. 180.

0:29:410:29:47

-Well done, thank you very much.

-We're happy with that?

0:29:470:29:49

-It's what you estimated.

-Yeah.

-It is. I'm very pleased.

0:29:490:29:53

555 square miles of unspoiled moorland and limestone dales

0:30:000:30:07

make up the Peak District National Park

0:30:070:30:09

that came into being in 1951.

0:30:090:30:12

These days, we take our mighty

0:30:120:30:14

and magnificent national parks for granted.

0:30:140:30:17

We just park the car up and step out into the great outdoors.

0:30:170:30:21

Each year, more than 22 million people do exactly that right here.

0:30:210:30:26

But it hasn't always been that simple.

0:30:300:30:33

Indeed, in the early years of the 20th century, this idyllic

0:30:330:30:37

and rugged landscape became a battleground.

0:30:370:30:41

From 1600 to 1860, successive parliamentary enclosure acts had,

0:30:410:30:46

in effect, fenced off half of England's countryside

0:30:460:30:50

from the people.

0:30:500:30:51

It sounds far-fetched

0:30:530:30:55

to say that access to the open countryside here

0:30:550:30:57

ended in violence and arrests, but that is exactly what happened.

0:30:570:31:01

The moorland was owned by various different private estates

0:31:010:31:04

and landowners.

0:31:040:31:05

And they were keen not to let trespassers on their land.

0:31:050:31:09

So to the working class people of the large cities of Sheffield

0:31:090:31:12

and Manchester, the countryside was visible, but it wasn't accessible.

0:31:120:31:17

But they had some powerful allies and were determined to both

0:31:210:31:24

preserve the landscape and to open it up to the wider public.

0:31:240:31:28

Ethel Haythornthwaite, the daughter of a Sheffield scrap metal merchant,

0:31:300:31:33

used her wealthy contacts to buy up swathes of the peaks,

0:31:330:31:38

which were then gifted to the National Trust.

0:31:380:31:41

And Labour activist Burt Ward

0:31:410:31:43

campaigned for access to open countryside

0:31:430:31:46

by forming the first working-class ramblers group in Sheffield.

0:31:460:31:51

Local journalist Rory Smith tells me

0:31:520:31:54

they played a crucial part in achieving reform.

0:31:540:31:57

How close was the countryside to the working folk and why?

0:31:580:32:02

You have to remember, Paul,

0:32:020:32:03

that these wonderful moors around here,

0:32:030:32:06

all the highest peaks of the Peak District were actually

0:32:060:32:09

visible from the homes and workplaces of the people living

0:32:090:32:12

-and working in Manchester.

-You could see that from Sheffield,

0:32:120:32:15

-couldn't you?

-You could see them.

0:32:150:32:17

Yet you couldn't walk on them.

0:32:170:32:18

Kinder Scout was the forbidden mountain in those days.

0:32:180:32:21

-That's frustrating.

-It was frustrating.

0:32:210:32:23

How key was the work of Burt and Ethel?

0:32:230:32:25

Well, it was absolutely essential, really,

0:32:250:32:27

because Ethel was the founder of

0:32:270:32:30

the Campaign for the Protection of Rural England in Sheffield,

0:32:300:32:34

which later became the Friends of the Peak.

0:32:340:32:36

And Burt Ward was the founder of the first working-class

0:32:360:32:40

rambling club in the country - the Sheffield Clarions - in 1900.

0:32:400:32:45

And those two people were absolutely vital for the opening up

0:32:450:32:50

-of the countryside and the campaign to make it a national park.

-Sure.

0:32:500:32:54

I understand there was a huge atmosphere brewing up amongst

0:32:540:32:57

the working-class people.

0:32:570:32:58

You know, they were denied access to huge parts of this open land.

0:32:580:33:02

Frustration was enormous.

0:33:020:33:04

So they used to trespass.

0:33:040:33:05

And Burt Ward and others trespassed regularly on places

0:33:050:33:10

like Kinder. He called it "the gentle art of trespass."

0:33:100:33:14

And he counted gamekeepers all the time.

0:33:140:33:17

In fact, he had a writ served on him not to walk on Kinder Scout

0:33:170:33:21

at one point. But he still did.

0:33:210:33:23

And this is Kinder Scout.

0:33:250:33:26

And at 2,000 feet, it is the highest point in the Peak District.

0:33:260:33:30

And it is the scene of a major battle between,

0:33:300:33:33

on one side, the ramblers

0:33:330:33:35

and, on the other, gamekeepers, protecting their employers' land.

0:33:350:33:38

Describe the trespass, what happened?

0:33:400:33:42

Well, there was a group of ramblers from Manchester called

0:33:420:33:46

the British Workers Sports Federation.

0:33:460:33:48

In fact, they were a communist group.

0:33:480:33:49

They decided on what we would call today direct action.

0:33:490:33:53

They said, "Well, if there's enough of us, they couldn't stop us."

0:33:530:33:56

So one sunny April morning in 1932, about 400 of them

0:33:560:34:01

gathered at Hayfield, which is the other side of the hill from here...

0:34:010:34:04

-Yeah.

-..and decided they would do a mass trespass.

0:34:040:34:08

This is the first time those words had been used.

0:34:080:34:10

And they publicised it so everybody knew they were coming.

0:34:100:34:13

And they set up a right-of-way

0:34:130:34:16

and deliberately trespassed up on to Kinder Scout.

0:34:160:34:19

And they were met by a line of gamekeepers who were ready

0:34:190:34:23

and waiting for them. And there were a few scuffles.

0:34:230:34:25

But they went on and met another group who had come over from Edale,

0:34:250:34:29

this side of the mountain, and they had a victory meeting.

0:34:290:34:31

And after that, they all went back down into Hayfield.

0:34:310:34:35

The police were waiting for them.

0:34:350:34:37

Six of them were arrested and five of them

0:34:370:34:40

were actually charged with public order offences, basically,

0:34:400:34:45

and were imprisoned for periods of up to six months.

0:34:450:34:48

What was the significance?

0:34:480:34:50

As a result of this,

0:34:500:34:52

and particularly as a result of the severe sentences handed

0:34:520:34:56

down by the judge, it actually united the ramblers' cause.

0:34:560:34:59

Sure, I'd imagine it would.

0:34:590:35:00

And they were fighting then not just for access to the moorland,

0:35:000:35:03

but also for national parks all over.

0:35:030:35:05

-All over the country.

-Yeah. And here we are.

-History was made.

0:35:050:35:08

History was made.

0:35:080:35:10

And this is the first national park,

0:35:100:35:12

and it is the best, as far as I'm concerned.

0:35:120:35:15

-You live on its doorstep, don't you?

-I do.

-It's beautiful.

0:35:150:35:18

By the late 1930s, the CPRE -

0:35:220:35:24

the Campaign to Protect Rural England -

0:35:240:35:27

were running hard-hitting films in cinemas all over the country,

0:35:270:35:31

demanding that urgent changes be made to access

0:35:310:35:34

to the countryside.

0:35:340:35:36

'Will you always be content with confined spaces?

0:35:380:35:41

'Or are you going to take the road to national parks,

0:35:410:35:44

'the road to freedom, freedom of England's country?

0:35:440:35:46

'That is the case for the defence,

0:35:460:35:48

'for the defence for the right of the beauty of our land.'

0:35:480:35:51

Finally, in 1951, the first four national parks were designated -

0:35:540:35:59

the Peak District being the first to open,

0:35:590:36:02

followed by the Lake District, Snowdonia and Dartmoor.

0:36:020:36:06

People power had paid off and now vast, open tracts

0:36:060:36:09

of countryside were being protected for future generations to enjoy.

0:36:090:36:14

Welcome back to Haddon Hall, where valuations are still in full swing.

0:36:240:36:28

Our experts are working flat out to unearth gems from the past

0:36:280:36:31

fit for our historic surroundings.

0:36:310:36:34

Let's now join up with them and take a look at what they found.

0:36:340:36:37

And we are straight back in with Caroline, who has found an unusual

0:36:400:36:44

bird bath which might look quite at home here, in the gardens of Haddon.

0:36:440:36:49

Paul, I love him.

0:36:490:36:51

I saw him coming in earlier and I think I tried to chase after you.

0:36:510:36:56

I think he is delightful. Tell me what you know about him.

0:36:560:36:59

-Well, I've had him for 40 years.

-Yeah.

0:36:590:37:02

I was doing a building job

0:37:020:37:04

and the antique dealer I was working for

0:37:040:37:06

said I could have anything in this particular cupboard

0:37:060:37:08

because he felt it didn't appeal to many people because of what it is -

0:37:080:37:12

it's sort of Pan and the devil and the little horns.

0:37:120:37:16

But the detail is what impressed me.

0:37:160:37:18

-Well, why do you want to sell this lovely figure?

-Well...

0:37:180:37:23

I've had it a long time and my daughters don't really want it.

0:37:230:37:27

So I thought I might buy them for their birthday something in gold.

0:37:270:37:32

So you're trying to turn lead into gold? A lot of people have tried.

0:37:320:37:36

And it is very, very heavy.

0:37:360:37:37

I'm not going to pick him up, but I saw you struggling through with him.

0:37:370:37:41

And the detail... Can you see the little hoof here?

0:37:410:37:45

And the hair.

0:37:450:37:46

-He's really...

-There's all his muscles and then there is his hair.

0:37:460:37:50

-His back is impressive.

-Yeah. His back is very impressive, yeah.

0:37:500:37:54

He's a strong piper.

0:37:540:37:56

-Yeah, he is indeed.

-And his fingernails are even on.

0:37:560:38:00

Yeah, and they're sort of long and clawing, aren't they?

0:38:000:38:04

It's very difficult to put an exact valuation on this

0:38:040:38:07

or even a date on it.

0:38:070:38:09

There are no marks on it anywhere.

0:38:090:38:11

If I had to put a bet on it, I would say 19th century.

0:38:110:38:15

-Pan comes from the Greek "to pleasure".

-Right.

-And there is...

0:38:150:38:19

He is the god of shepherds and flocks,

0:38:190:38:22

and he is a very handsome thing.

0:38:220:38:24

And to put a figure on it, I would say between £300 and £500.

0:38:240:38:29

-Ah. Yes.

-How would you feel about that?

0:38:290:38:33

Well, I'll put a reserve on in that sort of range.

0:38:330:38:36

-Would you be happy with a 300 reserve?

-Yes, I think so.

0:38:360:38:39

-Are you sure?

-Yep.

0:38:390:38:40

Right, well, we'll do that. He's going into a good auction.

0:38:400:38:43

It will be well advertised.

0:38:430:38:45

And I think there is every chance he is going to go off

0:38:450:38:48

and play happily in someone's beautiful garden forever and a day.

0:38:480:38:52

-Thank you very much for bringing him, I love him.

-Thank you.

0:38:520:38:55

Thank you.

0:38:550:38:57

So do I - let's hope the bidders agree.

0:38:570:38:59

Michael next, with a beautiful piece of carving.

0:38:590:39:02

Alan, I actually...

0:39:020:39:04

I was resting earlier today on the stairs as you were passing me,

0:39:040:39:08

and this was poking out of a bag, and I beckoned you forward.

0:39:080:39:11

You did, yes.

0:39:110:39:13

And I wasn't disappointed when you took it out of the bag.

0:39:130:39:16

-It is a bit of a whopper, isn't it?

-It is.

0:39:160:39:18

-Now, are you a collector of Chinese works of art?

-No.

0:39:180:39:21

Where did this come from, then?

0:39:210:39:22

My father bought it in an antique shop in Brighton in the 1960s.

0:39:220:39:27

Good grief. Was it very expensive?

0:39:270:39:30

As far as I can remember, four pounds, ten shillings.

0:39:300:39:33

Well, what people tend to forget now,

0:39:330:39:35

-because we have gone through a period of Chinese mania...

-Right.

0:39:350:39:39

'60s, '70s, '80s, '90s,

0:39:390:39:44

-Chinese art was the poor cousin to Japanese.

-Right.

0:39:440:39:47

In the last five or six years,

0:39:470:39:49

-anything Chinese is flavour of the month.

-Right.

0:39:490:39:53

So I can understand why it was only four pounds in the antique shop

0:39:530:39:56

in the '60s.

0:39:560:39:58

And what we have got here is a lovely, tall,

0:39:580:40:00

carved section of bamboo.

0:40:000:40:02

It would have been done in China, probably in Canton,

0:40:020:40:06

anywhere from 1850 up to about 1880, 1890 in date.

0:40:060:40:12

So, second half of the 19th century.

0:40:120:40:15

What we've got is pagodas and Prunus trees and a procession of,

0:40:150:40:21

I imagine by their headgear,

0:40:210:40:24

monks going up to the rocky outcrop on top of the mountain.

0:40:240:40:29

Right.

0:40:290:40:30

It's well carved. All of this is one piece. All of this is undercut.

0:40:300:40:35

-Nothing has been carved and applied onto it.

-Right.

0:40:350:40:38

How many man-hours would you say to create that?

0:40:380:40:40

Because I imagine one man sort of sitting there, you know,

0:40:400:40:43

for weeks and months.

0:40:430:40:45

But remember, all that one man did

0:40:450:40:47

-for a period of time was carve bamboo.

-Right.

0:40:470:40:51

And, you know, it's like me eating cream cakes.

0:40:510:40:53

-I can eat a lot of cream cakes if I put my mind to it.

-Right.

0:40:530:40:56

It may not be the one person was so involved in this.

0:40:560:40:59

You would have a series of them

0:40:590:41:01

and one might concentrate on cutting out the rough form.

0:41:010:41:05

And someone might do the trees, someone might do the temples,

0:41:050:41:09

-someone might do the figures.

-Right.

-Why have you decided...?

0:41:090:41:12

I mean, you have lived with it for 40 years, haven't you?

0:41:120:41:14

Our children are not really interested in it,

0:41:140:41:17

so I can't see myself leaving it to them.

0:41:170:41:19

I've enjoyed plenty of years with it and it's time for someone else,

0:41:190:41:22

-time to move on.

-And it is a good time to sell.

0:41:220:41:24

-That's right, yes.

-It does happen in this business,

0:41:240:41:26

there are times to keep and times to sell.

0:41:260:41:29

-And I think this is at its peak now.

-Right.

-Value.

0:41:290:41:32

It's very decorative and it's very big,

0:41:340:41:37

-but I don't think it is the very best quality.

-OK.

0:41:370:41:40

So, we have to approach it cautiously

0:41:400:41:43

and recognise that it might fly because it is Chinese.

0:41:430:41:47

-But let's put £200 to £400 on it.

-Right.

0:41:470:41:50

And let's put a fixed reserve of £200, which is

0:41:500:41:53

not a bad return on four pounds. Even over a period of time.

0:41:530:41:56

-Thanks very much for bringing it in.

-OK, thank you.

0:41:560:41:59

With the Oriental market being so buoyant, that should do well.

0:41:590:42:03

Next, I meet someone who jogged my memory back to the last time

0:42:050:42:08

I filmed here at Haddon.

0:42:080:42:10

I bet you've done that many a time.

0:42:120:42:14

Not with salmon so much, no.

0:42:140:42:16

That's the Rolls-Royce of fishing reels, the Hardy, isn't it?

0:42:160:42:19

-Yeah.

-This is worth around £300, this reel.

0:42:190:42:21

-Right.

-Do you collect Hardys?

-I do.

0:42:210:42:24

-I started about 15 years ago.

-Do you still fish?

0:42:240:42:28

I do, yeah. I work here for the Haddon estate. I'm on the river.

0:42:280:42:32

-I've got my own fishery over the road.

-Oh, you're set up, then.

0:42:320:42:35

You are in heaven, basically.

0:42:350:42:37

-I fished here.

-It's a wonderful place.

0:42:370:42:39

It's brilliant, it's absolutely brilliant.

0:42:390:42:43

But it's not easy,

0:42:430:42:44

even with expert help from Haddon's head river-keeper Warren Slaney.

0:42:440:42:49

Come on, bite.

0:42:490:42:50

Gave me a lesson in what flies to use

0:42:530:42:56

and what particular time of day and the season.

0:42:560:42:59

-You wouldn't have been using these.

-No.

-Too big.

-Too big, far too big.

0:42:590:43:02

But thanks for showing me those as well

0:43:020:43:05

-and sharing your fishing memories with me.

-Thank you.

0:43:050:43:07

Back to Caroline now,

0:43:090:43:11

who has found an intriguing model from the Second World War.

0:43:110:43:14

Steven, you have brought along this doodlebug or buzz bomb.

0:43:160:43:21

-Can you tell me any more about it?

-The best way I can explain

0:43:210:43:25

the history of this is, I purchased this in Germany many years ago.

0:43:250:43:31

And the person I got this off of said to me that this

0:43:310:43:36

was made for one of the hierarchy of the Nazi party at that time.

0:43:360:43:40

Now, who that hierarchy... I don't know. No names were ever mentioned.

0:43:400:43:44

When the Allies were pushing back the Nazi forces,

0:43:440:43:48

they were out of range of London.

0:43:480:43:51

And all the Allied supplies were going through Antwerp,

0:43:510:43:54

so they directed all these at Antwerp.

0:43:540:43:57

And that's why you've got the "Antwerp" on the side.

0:43:570:43:59

Ah, right! So that explains... Yes, I do. So that explains the Antwerp.

0:43:590:44:03

So that's the Antwerp bit.

0:44:030:44:04

And as far as I know, I've never ever seen another one like it.

0:44:040:44:07

-Not exactly like it.

-I haven't.

-And it's a part of history.

0:44:070:44:10

That was the first flying bomb missile.

0:44:100:44:14

The first one was actually launched at London,

0:44:140:44:17

-13th June, 1944.

-That's correct.

0:44:170:44:19

-So you can imagine they're going to be pretty proud of this bomb.

-Yeah.

0:44:190:44:23

It's a desk piece. It would be used on a desk.

0:44:230:44:28

And this wonderful trail here, its use, I would think,

0:44:280:44:33

-is of a paperweight.

-Yes.

0:44:330:44:34

-I would agree with you.

-Would you?

0:44:340:44:36

I would think it would grace somebody's desk as a paperweight.

0:44:360:44:41

-It's chrome-plated.

-Right.

0:44:410:44:44

I've been told, I don't know if it's true or not, this base,

0:44:440:44:47

this type of marble, you can only get in Belgium.

0:44:470:44:50

Right! Now, I don't know the origin of that marble.

0:44:500:44:53

That is what I was told.

0:44:530:44:55

It's an interesting item.

0:44:550:44:57

And people that collect wartime memorabilia

0:44:570:45:00

from the Second World War, it's of great interest.

0:45:000:45:03

-And there is a big following.

-Yeah, I understand that.

0:45:030:45:07

So, tell me why have you decided now that the time is right

0:45:070:45:10

-to sell?

-Cos I think because of its historical value

0:45:100:45:15

and what it actually means, especially made like this,

0:45:150:45:19

I would say that it needs to go into somebody's collection,

0:45:190:45:22

someone that would really appreciate this

0:45:220:45:25

as much as I have appreciated it over the years.

0:45:250:45:27

OK. That brings us to value.

0:45:270:45:29

It's very difficult to put a value on such a thing.

0:45:290:45:33

I would say, if we put an estimate for auction of £50 to £80,

0:45:330:45:39

with a fixed reserved of 50, are you happy with that?

0:45:390:45:43

-I'm a little bit disappointed with that offer.

-OK.

0:45:430:45:46

You know, that valuation.

0:45:460:45:47

I would have thought at least from £80 upwards.

0:45:470:45:51

In that case,

0:45:510:45:53

80 to 120, with an £80 fixed reserve?

0:45:530:45:58

That sounds fine.

0:45:580:45:59

What a fascinating item.

0:45:590:46:02

Michael next, with a beautiful piece of carving.

0:46:020:46:05

Nicky, what a wonderful selection,

0:46:050:46:08

and a very unusual selection of carved ivories.

0:46:080:46:12

Can you tell me, where did they come from?

0:46:120:46:14

Well, I'm a volunteer at the local museum in Bakewell,

0:46:140:46:17

the Old House Museum, and I'm a council member

0:46:170:46:21

at the Bakewell and District Historical Society,

0:46:210:46:24

and they were left to us.

0:46:240:46:26

They were part of a much bigger bequest,

0:46:260:46:28

and some of the things we've been able to take into

0:46:280:46:30

the collection of the museum because they've got a local connection,

0:46:300:46:34

but these particular items, we can't do anything with them,

0:46:340:46:37

we can't put them on display

0:46:370:46:39

-and, so, I've been asked to bring them into Flog it!

-Marvellous.

0:46:390:46:44

Yes, there isn't much of a Derbyshire flavour about

0:46:440:46:47

-any of these, is there?

-No.

0:46:470:46:50

We must also say that all of these items I've looked at predate 1947.

0:46:500:46:56

This little turned powder box is typically 1915, 1920. Art Deco.

0:46:560:47:03

That would have been part of a large travelling set.

0:47:030:47:06

Then, we move onto these two slender pieces here.

0:47:060:47:10

This piece, I think, is part of the sceptre.

0:47:100:47:14

And I would think that this dates from the middle of the 19th century.

0:47:140:47:19

The dragon, I'm almost certain, is a parasol handle.

0:47:190:47:22

This is very much Chinese.

0:47:220:47:25

And this is tremendous fun.

0:47:250:47:27

I mean, to think of a whole scaly dragon with his head

0:47:270:47:32

crooked round for a handle,

0:47:320:47:34

and this would have been a bit of Chinese export

0:47:340:47:36

carved in about, again, 1870, 1880.

0:47:360:47:41

This large figure group,

0:47:410:47:43

-this is somewhat later than these two pieces.

-Yes.

0:47:430:47:46

I think this is about 1920, 1930.

0:47:460:47:50

It is very much made for export,

0:47:500:47:53

-maybe to British...diplomats.

-Yes, yes.

0:47:530:47:57

British civil servants working in India at the time.

0:47:570:48:01

-It's the Hindu figure of Lord Krishna.

-Yes.

0:48:010:48:04

But the base is little bit...

0:48:040:48:06

-It just lets it down slightly.

-Yes.

0:48:060:48:09

This of course is Japanese.

0:48:090:48:11

It's immediately recognisable.

0:48:110:48:13

Two young boys playing around on a horse.

0:48:130:48:18

The carving isn't terribly good.

0:48:180:48:22

It's quite difficult, when we think of values,

0:48:220:48:24

because we've also got to think of how we sell them.

0:48:240:48:26

And I think...

0:48:260:48:28

-we would be remiss to put them all together.

-Right.

0:48:280:48:31

-Any idea of what the values might be?

-Absolutely none at all. No.

0:48:310:48:35

I think we have to be cautious with this.

0:48:350:48:38

-It's not dreadfully commercial.

-Yes.

0:48:380:48:41

I mean, I'll be very cautious, actually,

0:48:410:48:43

-and say £80-£120 with a fixed reserve of 80.

-Yes.

0:48:430:48:47

-This figure, again, £100-£150. A fixed reserve of 100.

-Yes, yes.

0:48:470:48:52

And then the oddments, let's say another £100-£150 for those,

0:48:520:48:57

and a fixed reserve of 100.

0:48:570:48:59

So that gives us three bites of the cherry and hopefully one of them

0:48:590:49:02

will make substantially more than that estimate.

0:49:020:49:05

That sounds fantastic.

0:49:050:49:06

-And, then, that money can get ploughed back into the museum.

-Back into the museum, yes.

0:49:060:49:09

-Which is the point of it in the first place.

-Yes.

0:49:090:49:11

A fascinating group.

0:49:110:49:13

-Lovely.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much.

0:49:130:49:15

Well, you've just seen our experts,

0:49:200:49:23

they have made their final choices of the day.

0:49:230:49:25

It's not just about the value, it's also about the beauty

0:49:250:49:28

of the object and its contribution towards our social history

0:49:280:49:31

and the stories it can tell. We have just heard some fabulous ones.

0:49:310:49:35

It's time to say goodbye to Haddon Hall as we make our way

0:49:350:49:37

down the road to the auction room.

0:49:370:49:39

And here's a quick recap of what is coming with us.

0:49:390:49:42

The bird bath is magnificent,

0:49:420:49:43

but will it make the biggest splash at the saleroom?

0:49:430:49:46

Or will the Oriental carving turn out to be the item

0:49:480:49:51

that is a cut above?

0:49:510:49:53

Ivory from India, Japan or China.

0:49:550:49:56

How will the bidders choose between them?

0:49:560:49:59

Or will the little German model be the really explosive sale?

0:50:020:50:07

620, second row. 620.

0:50:090:50:12

650. 680.

0:50:120:50:15

680.

0:50:150:50:17

Welcome back to our auction room in the Peak District.

0:50:170:50:19

Let's now join up with auctioneer James Lewis,

0:50:190:50:22

who's on the rostrum, ready to sell our next items.

0:50:220:50:25

We're starting with a touch of grandeur.

0:50:260:50:29

Well, if you want the country house look,

0:50:290:50:31

you've got to be right here, right now, because going under the hammer

0:50:310:50:33

is a 19th century lead bird bath, and it belongs to Paul.

0:50:330:50:37

And I absolutely love this.

0:50:370:50:39

Everyone, everyone could do with this in their garden.

0:50:390:50:41

-Couldn't they?

-Yeah.

-So, why are you selling this?

0:50:410:50:44

You live in a flat and you've got no garden?

0:50:440:50:46

No, my daughters don't want it. I've had it for 40 years.

0:50:460:50:49

You've had it inside, haven't you, with fruit in it?

0:50:490:50:51

-Yes.

-I can see it with some water in it now.

-Yeah.

-Good luck both of you.

0:50:510:50:56

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:50:560:50:59

776. Here we are, this is the 19th-century lead

0:50:590:51:02

country house bird bath with Pan.

0:51:020:51:05

-And one, two, three, four, five bids on it.

-Wow.

0:51:050:51:08

But they are all below estimate.

0:51:080:51:11

-Oh.

-220, 260. 275 I have.

0:51:110:51:15

At 275, 280 now.

0:51:150:51:18

-At 275. 280. 290.

-Somebody in the room. Brilliant.

0:51:180:51:21

At £300 in the room.

0:51:210:51:24

At 300. 310 now. At £300, it's with you. 310?

0:51:240:51:27

-Fantastic!

-At £300, 310 anywhere?

0:51:270:51:30

At 300. At 310? You coming in online? At £300, any advance?

0:51:300:51:35

At 300...

0:51:350:51:36

Yes, we did it! £300, it's gone! It was close.

0:51:360:51:41

-Yes.

-Are you happy with that?

-Yes, thank you.

-Brilliant.

0:51:410:51:44

-Well done, Caroline.

-It was creeping a bit, wasn't it?

-It was.

0:51:440:51:47

Worth every penny.

0:51:470:51:49

I love this next lot belonging to Alan.

0:51:490:51:53

It's carved from a solid piece of wood, hundreds of little figures

0:51:530:51:56

going up a hill, it's exquisite.

0:51:560:51:57

It's got the look and it is flavour of the month.

0:51:570:52:00

-Let's find out what the bidders think.

-Right.

0:52:000:52:02

Lot 575 is the large Chinese bamboo section

0:52:020:52:06

and I can start the bidding at...£150 starts it.

0:52:060:52:11

150. 160, do I see?

0:52:110:52:13

The Chinese bamboo carving. At 150. 160 now.

0:52:130:52:16

At 150, 160 on the phone.

0:52:160:52:21

180, 190, 200.

0:52:210:52:24

200, 220, 240.

0:52:240:52:25

-240, 260, 280.

-He's got a bid on the book.

0:52:270:52:31

-He keeps dropping his eyesight down.

-At £280.

0:52:310:52:34

300, now. At 280 I'm out.

0:52:340:52:37

At 280, do I see three?

0:52:370:52:40

Online? 290. 290, bid. Three. 300.

0:52:400:52:45

300, bid. 310. At £300.

0:52:450:52:50

-On the phone at three. 310, if you like.

-Hovering mid-estimate.

0:52:500:52:53

No, they are out.

0:52:530:52:55

At 300, all the bidding very close.

0:52:550:52:59

Middle estimate at £300.

0:52:590:53:01

Good valuation, Michael.

0:53:010:53:03

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Yeah.

-Thank you for bringing that in.

0:53:030:53:06

-That's all right.

-It's nice to be right some of the time, isn't it?

0:53:060:53:10

Well, I've just been joined by Nicky.

0:53:130:53:15

We've got three separate lots here which we're going to add together.

0:53:150:53:18

-All the money is going towards the local museum...

-That's right.

-..in Bakewell.

-The Old House Museum.

0:53:180:53:23

Preserving the heritage of the county.

0:53:230:53:25

And the first lot is the carved Indian ivory figure of Lord Krishna.

0:53:250:53:29

Just about to go under the hammer.

0:53:290:53:30

-We'll find a buyer for this at the top end.

-I think we will.

0:53:300:53:33

And I have, uh, two bids on it, one of 80, and one higher.

0:53:330:53:37

-Straight in.

-£90 starting it. 90, 100, do I see? 100?

0:53:370:53:42

At £90, and 100. 100 by the cabinet. 110, 120, sir.

0:53:420:53:46

130, 140, 150, 160, 170, 180, 190, 200. 200.

0:53:460:53:53

220. 220 online. 200 in the room.

0:53:530:53:56

220 online. 220, 240. 260.

0:53:560:54:01

-It's small, it's postable, but it's quality as well.

-280.

0:54:010:54:05

280, 300.

0:54:050:54:07

300.

0:54:070:54:08

-300, 320, 340.

-Oh, I'm so thrilled.

-At 320 in the room.

0:54:090:54:16

340, 360.

0:54:160:54:18

At 340. Online now at 340 against you in the room.

0:54:180:54:24

-£340.

-At 340. At 340.

-Hammer has gone down.

0:54:240:54:29

That's the first of three lots.

0:54:290:54:30

And here is the second,

0:54:300:54:32

the Japanese walrus carving

0:54:320:54:35

which I think could fly again, Nicky.

0:54:350:54:37

-The first one did, but we never know, do we?

-Yes, yes.

0:54:370:54:39

Well, let's find out what the bidders think. Here we go.

0:54:390:54:42

Here's the second of the three.

0:54:420:54:44

And a little bit of interest here. And I start at £80. 80 and 90 now.

0:54:440:54:49

At £80, 90. 90, do I see?

0:54:490:54:52

At 80 and 90, now? 90, yes. 90, 100, 110. 110.

0:54:520:54:58

110 bid. 120, 130.

0:54:580:55:01

At £120, 130 now. At 120, absentee bid.

0:55:010:55:06

130, do I see?

0:55:060:55:08

Are you out online?

0:55:080:55:10

At 120. Not as good as the last, but there we go.

0:55:100:55:14

Are we all sure? 120.

0:55:140:55:16

-120.

-Well, we expected that. The quality was down, but still...

0:55:160:55:21

Still the top end, still the top end. Two down, one more to go.

0:55:210:55:25

-And, already, we have a total of £460.

-Brilliant.

-Isn't it good?

0:55:250:55:28

-Really good.

-More than what you thought?

-Much more, yes.

0:55:280:55:31

-And there's one more to come.

-Yes, I know, I can't wait.

-It's adding up.

0:55:310:55:35

507 is this Chinese ivory walking cane or parasol handle.

0:55:350:55:41

Um, and a circular box. And £80 bid, 80 and 90, now.

0:55:410:55:45

It's worth all that.

0:55:450:55:47

Yeah, this is real quality.

0:55:470:55:49

At 80, do I see 90 now? At £80, 90.

0:55:490:55:53

All done? At £80. Do I see 90?

0:55:530:55:57

At 80, then. Are you sure? At £80. At £80. Do I see 90?

0:55:570:56:02

At £80 only. Trying. No. Not sold, I'm afraid.

0:56:040:56:10

James was calling for 80 in the room.

0:56:100:56:12

And we had a fixed reserved of £100. He didn't sell it.

0:56:120:56:15

I think it's worth £100 all day long.

0:56:150:56:17

Do you know what I think it was?

0:56:170:56:19

-Putting it with two other items made it look a bit bitty?

-Yeah.

0:56:190:56:23

If the charity re-offers that on its own,

0:56:230:56:27

-I think you'll make that all day long.

-Well, we can do that.

0:56:270:56:29

Nevertheless, two out of three, as they say, ain't bad.

0:56:290:56:33

Just about to land on James's rostrum right now is

0:56:380:56:41

the doodlebug belonging to Steven.

0:56:410:56:42

We've got a value of 80 to 120.

0:56:420:56:44

Let's hope...

0:56:440:56:45

-Let's hope this does fly away, so to speak.

-I do hope so.

0:56:450:56:49

-Top end. It's quirky. It's unusual.

-Yes.

0:56:490:56:52

Have you used this as a paperweight over the years?

0:56:520:56:55

-No.

-Where has it been?

0:56:550:56:57

Er... It's been in my cabinet with my cars and stuff like that.

0:56:570:57:00

Do you collect cars?

0:57:000:57:02

I collect cars as well. I'm a bit of a magpie, really. Guitars.

0:57:020:57:06

Nothing wrong with that, is there? Hey, look, good luck!

0:57:060:57:10

Lot number 455

0:57:100:57:12

is this very interesting

0:57:120:57:15

World War II model

0:57:150:57:17

of the flying bomb.

0:57:170:57:19

Lots of enquiries about it and I can start at £100. 110, sir.

0:57:190:57:23

110 on the aisle. 120. 130.

0:57:230:57:27

140. 150. 160. 170. 180.

0:57:270:57:31

190, on the aisle.

0:57:310:57:33

At £190. At 190. 200, now.

0:57:330:57:36

At 190. Do I see two?

0:57:360:57:38

190 on the aisle at £190. Do I see two anywhere?

0:57:380:57:43

At 190, sir. All sure?

0:57:430:57:45

-190, 716.

-That was a good result.

-Yeah, very good result.

0:57:450:57:50

-That was good design.

-I presume that will go to a collector.

0:57:500:57:55

-Thank you for bringing that in.

-Thank you ever so much.

0:57:550:57:59

-Appreciate it. Thanks for doing it for me.

-Pleasure.

0:57:590:58:02

Thank you ever so much.

0:58:020:58:03

Well, that's it from our Derbyshire auction room

0:58:090:58:11

just on the edge of the national park in the Peak District.

0:58:110:58:14

I've loved exploring the great outdoors and we've had some

0:58:140:58:17

great results indoors as well and that's what it's all about.

0:58:170:58:21

From Rowsley, until next time, it's goodbye.

0:58:210:58:25

Paul Martin presents from Haddon Hall in Derbyshire with experts Michael Baggot and Caroline Hawley. Together the team pick out a selection of interesting antiques and collectables to be sold at the local auction house. Michael finds an oriental carving which he thinks is a cut above, and Caroline is drawn to a model of a Second World War V1 bomb which reveals some fascinating history. Paul gets out and about on a quest to find out the extraordinary story of the Peak District national park and explores the industrial heritage of the area by visiting Smedley's Mill, where he learns some unexpected things about John Smedley, the man who put the mill on the map.