Guildford 9 Flog It!


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Guildford 9

Antiques series. Paul Martin presents from Guildford Cathedral with experts Mark Stacey and Catherine Southon, where the team pick out a Moorcroft bowl and a music box.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Guildford 9. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

I'm here in West Sussex at a site dedicated to the

0:00:030:00:06

conservation of historic buildings and later on in the programme,

0:00:060:00:09

I'll be getting hands-on restoring an 18th century house.

0:00:090:00:13

Now, the bad news is it involves animal dung.

0:00:130:00:15

So I better find some gloves.

0:00:150:00:17

Welcome to "Flog It!"

0:00:170:00:18

We'll be back in Sussex later on in the show.

0:00:380:00:41

Today's valuations are taking place in the county town of Surrey,

0:00:410:00:45

at Guildford Cathedral.

0:00:450:00:47

It's one of only a very few cathedrals

0:00:470:00:48

built in the 20th century.

0:00:480:00:51

Construction started in the 1930s

0:00:510:00:53

and the building eventually opened its doors in 1961.

0:00:530:00:58

Some critics believed that building the cathedral away from the

0:00:580:01:01

town centre, on the top of a hill,

0:01:010:01:03

would be a crazy idea

0:01:030:01:04

but soon they were proved wrong and the cathedral attracted

0:01:040:01:07

large congregations and today it's still very much

0:01:070:01:10

at the heart of the community here.

0:01:100:01:12

And hundreds of people have turned up,

0:01:120:01:14

clutching bags and boxes full of antiques and collectibles.

0:01:140:01:17

And there's one question on your lips, which is?

0:01:170:01:20

CROWD: What's it worth?

0:01:200:01:21

And they're going to find out and so are you.

0:01:210:01:24

And the two people with the answer to that question are the

0:01:240:01:26

"Flog It!" experts and today they are the devilish Mark Stacey

0:01:260:01:31

and the angelic Catherine Southon.

0:01:310:01:34

Competition between them will be high, or should I say low?

0:01:340:01:38

-Oh, that's pathetic.

-There we are.

-You've got to give it a bit of oomph.

0:01:380:01:41

-Well, you have a go.

-All right, go on, then. I don't want to break it.

0:01:410:01:45

Come on. Oh, I'd love to see you fall over, Catherine Southon.

0:01:450:01:48

Oh!

0:01:500:01:51

That was awful, Catherine.

0:01:510:01:54

So as the people of Guildford make their way inside,

0:01:540:01:56

our experts prepare for a busy day of valuations.

0:01:560:01:59

And here's what's coming up on today's programme.

0:01:590:02:03

See if you can guess which of these items will do best

0:02:030:02:06

when they go under the hammer later on in the show.

0:02:060:02:09

Will it be this wooden shoe-shaped snuff holder?

0:02:090:02:12

Or this Moorcroft bowl?

0:02:120:02:14

Or this music box?

0:02:140:02:16

All will be revealed later on in the show.

0:02:160:02:19

Well, everyone is now safely seated inside the cathedral

0:02:190:02:21

and this is what I love to see, hundreds of happy faces.

0:02:210:02:24

Are you all having a good time?

0:02:240:02:26

CROWD: Yes!

0:02:260:02:27

And they're all hoping they're one of the lucky ones who've got

0:02:270:02:30

something that's worth a small fortune.

0:02:300:02:32

They've come from miles away, hundreds of them!

0:02:320:02:34

Which means thousands of antiques to look at

0:02:340:02:37

and this is where all the action's taking place.

0:02:370:02:39

Look, it's lights, camera, action right here.

0:02:390:02:41

Let's now catch up with Catherine Southon who has spotted

0:02:410:02:44

a real classy gem and I love it.

0:02:440:02:47

Anne, this is absolutely super. I love it in every shape or form.

0:02:490:02:54

-It's a piece of WMF.

-Yes.

-Do you know what WMF stands for?

0:02:540:02:58

-Well, I can't pronounce it.

-Oh, go on.

0:02:580:03:00

-It's always a giggle when we try.

-No!

0:03:000:03:02

You'd have to help me.

0:03:020:03:04

Well, it's something along the lines of

0:03:040:03:06

Wuttembergische Metallwarenfabrik, but don't quote me on that.

0:03:060:03:12

Anyway, we've got something here which is rather charming.

0:03:120:03:15

-It's something like a visitor's card tray.

-A butler's tray, maybe.

0:03:150:03:20

And it's stamped right on the back, quite clearly, WMF.

0:03:200:03:26

-It's got the number here, 369, now that would be the shape.

-OK.

0:03:260:03:31

But what I love about it is the little doggie, the little dachshund.

0:03:310:03:37

And I love the way he's looking down at the lizard crawling across.

0:03:370:03:41

It's just divine.

0:03:410:03:43

Where did you get it from, Anne?

0:03:430:03:44

Well, I'm not exactly sure but there is a German connection.

0:03:440:03:49

My brother lived in Germany

0:03:490:03:53

and I assume he bought it in an antiques shop out there.

0:03:530:03:58

-Yeah.

-And gave it to my mother.

-Right.

0:03:580:04:02

And I've...then passed to my sister and she then passed it onto me

0:04:020:04:06

because she wasn't all that keen on it.

0:04:060:04:08

So, you think that your brother probably bought it in Germany?

0:04:080:04:11

In Germany, yes.

0:04:110:04:12

-Well, it's 1900 in date.

-Is it?

0:04:120:04:15

They made pieces in pewter and silver plate.

0:04:150:04:17

This is definitely silver plate.

0:04:170:04:20

The very early pieces had like an ostrich stamp on them

0:04:200:04:23

but this is clearly marked with the initials WMF.

0:04:230:04:26

But I really think it's around 1900...

0:04:260:04:28

-Oh, I thought it would be later...

-..in date.

-..than that.

0:04:280:04:30

I mean, it is quite typical of WMF because of the style of the time.

0:04:300:04:35

The Art Nouveau, the Jugendstil, these kind of lines

0:04:350:04:37

and these curves.

0:04:370:04:40

But it's just the lizard for me.

0:04:400:04:42

The way he's looking down, it's just really, really nice.

0:04:420:04:46

A really special thing.

0:04:460:04:48

And I think today,

0:04:480:04:49

I could see antique dealers fighting for this at an auction.

0:04:490:04:52

Oh, that would be good.

0:04:520:04:53

And perhaps putting that in their shop,

0:04:530:04:56

just to put their business cards on. I mean, I'd love to have that.

0:04:560:04:59

If I was a dealer, I would love to put...

0:04:590:05:02

-That's good.

-Display it in my shop.

0:05:020:05:04

-Do you have any idea of value on this?

-Not really.

0:05:040:05:08

-I'm going to put £100 to £150 on.

-That's good.

-Is that good?

-Yes.

0:05:080:05:13

Reserve of £90?

0:05:130:05:15

£90 to £100?

0:05:150:05:17

-To £100?

-Yes.

-Oh, all right, then. You want £100 fixed on it?

0:05:170:05:20

That would be nice.

0:05:200:05:21

OK, as it's a family piece, we'll put £100 fixed, £100 to £150.

0:05:210:05:26

-Lovely.

-Coming along to the auction?

-Of course.

0:05:260:05:29

Let's watch it fly.

0:05:290:05:30

Yes, I've always wanted to go to an auction so...that would be great.

0:05:300:05:34

-It'll be great fun. Thanks very much, Anne.

-OK.

-Thank you.

0:05:340:05:37

So, let's hope Anne's first trip to an auction room is a successful one.

0:05:370:05:41

But not everyone who comes along is laden with antiques.

0:05:410:05:45

-What have you brought in today?

-Ourselves.

-Yourselves!

0:05:450:05:48

OK, are you after a valuation?

0:05:480:05:51

Back to Mark, who's also talking to some glamorous ladies.

0:05:530:05:57

-Hello, Shirley, Susan.

-Hello.

-Hello there.

0:05:570:05:59

Thank you so much for coming in.

0:05:590:06:01

Looking very glamorous there in your outfits and the necklace.

0:06:010:06:04

-Thank you very much.

-Now, tell me about these watercolours.

0:06:040:06:07

These watercolours, I bought them about...nearly 40 years ago,

0:06:070:06:11

off of a friend and I've had them ever since.

0:06:110:06:14

And you've liked them all that time?

0:06:140:06:16

-My husband loved them.

-Did he?

-Mm-hm.

0:06:160:06:18

And why have you decided now to bring them along to sell?

0:06:180:06:21

Well, I've got some other pictures and we're changing all

0:06:210:06:23

the decoration and things like that

0:06:230:06:25

so we thought we'd just bring these along.

0:06:250:06:27

-You've got too many pictures really, haven't you?

-Well, quite a lot!

0:06:270:06:30

-Well, they're by quite a well-known artist. F J Aldridge.

-I never knew.

0:06:310:06:36

Yes, he specialised in sort of marine scapes.

0:06:360:06:40

Obviously these are Dutch marine scapes and you can see

0:06:400:06:44

the windmill and the Dutch type houses in the background there.

0:06:440:06:48

-Often painted in pairs.

-Right.

0:06:480:06:50

He died in 1933, born in 1850 and actually

0:06:500:06:55

-he lived just up the road from where I live.

-Oh, really?

0:06:550:06:58

I live in Brighton, he lived in Worthing.

0:06:580:07:00

-That's how you knew right away?

-Well, I've had his work before.

0:07:000:07:04

-Oh, I see.

-Sneakily, I knew that.

-Right.

0:07:040:07:07

And they're in quite nice frames actually.

0:07:070:07:10

They suit the picture very well.

0:07:100:07:11

Yes, they've been in those frames all the time I've had them.

0:07:110:07:14

They probably need rebacking. You see where the backing has faded.

0:07:140:07:17

Yes, I did.

0:07:170:07:19

And there's been a little, slight bit of fading around the pictures.

0:07:190:07:22

I think they're charming, I think

0:07:220:07:24

-they're very pleasant looking pictures.

-Yes.

0:07:240:07:26

The only downside, I suppose,

0:07:260:07:28

-is the market is a bit more realistic for these.

-Right, OK.

0:07:280:07:32

Some people might consider them a little bit old-fashioned these days.

0:07:320:07:35

Right, OK.

0:07:350:07:36

I mean, although they're beautifully painted, and also I think the

0:07:360:07:39

younger market, they're looking for things with a bit more cutting edge,

0:07:390:07:42

-a little bit cleaner line.

-Yes, yes.

0:07:420:07:45

Susan, what do you think about them?

0:07:450:07:47

I mean, I do think they're lovely and my dad always used to say,

0:07:470:07:51

"Oh, I think these will be worth something".

0:07:510:07:53

But I haven't got the room for them.

0:07:530:07:55

I mean, houses are getting smaller and...

0:07:550:07:57

-Have you thought about the value?

-No, that's why I came here.

0:07:570:08:01

And do you remember what you paid for them, then? All those years ago?

0:08:010:08:04

-About £50.

-£50 for the pair? Well, that's not bad, is it, really?

0:08:040:08:08

I suspect actually that ten years or

0:08:080:08:10

so ago they would been worth a little bit more than they are now.

0:08:100:08:14

Right.

0:08:140:08:15

I mean, as a pair of pictures now,

0:08:150:08:17

we would estimate them at something like £200 to £300.

0:08:170:08:20

-Right.

-Something in that order.

-Yes.

0:08:200:08:23

-We'd have to think of a reserve, of course.

-OK.

0:08:230:08:26

Because we wouldn't want to put them into auction without a reserve.

0:08:260:08:29

-No, no. OK.

-I would suggest you to be a bit on the realistic side.

-OK.

0:08:290:08:34

And maybe put a fixed reserve of £150.

0:08:340:08:38

-So we don't sell them below that figure.

-OK.

-Yes.

0:08:380:08:41

-How would you feel about?

-I'd feel fine, yes, that's OK.

0:08:410:08:43

-Is that all right?

-Yes, fine.

0:08:430:08:44

And you're not going to put the money to more paintings, are you?

0:08:440:08:47

-No more paintings!

-No!

-No more paintings.

0:08:470:08:51

-You don't want any more paintings at home, do you?

-Definitely not.

0:08:510:08:54

Well, that's lovely.

0:08:540:08:56

We'll sail along to the auction together

0:08:560:08:58

and let's hope we get a good result.

0:08:580:08:59

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:08:590:09:02

Let's go back to Catherine Southon who's up on high

0:09:020:09:05

for her next valuation.

0:09:050:09:07

Elizabeth, we come to the cathedral to hear the sounds of the organ

0:09:070:09:11

and the sounds of the choir,

0:09:110:09:12

but also to hear the sounds of this beautiful musical box.

0:09:120:09:17

As soon as I just see the lid of it,

0:09:170:09:19

I know that that's actually a special musical box there.

0:09:190:09:23

The detail of that marquetry is something very special.

0:09:230:09:27

It's not just a bog-standard boxwood stringing or a transfer on the top.

0:09:270:09:32

The marquetry is superb.

0:09:320:09:35

Where did you get this little gem from?

0:09:350:09:38

I had another musical box and it needed some work doing to it

0:09:380:09:42

and I couldn't afford to get it done and somebody said

0:09:420:09:46

"Well, I'll swap you for the old musical box for this musical box."

0:09:460:09:52

So I have this one but it doesn't have the sentimental value for me.

0:09:520:09:56

-So that's why I'm...

-Right.

-..going to let it go.

0:09:560:09:59

But it's very expensive to have something like that restored.

0:09:590:10:02

-Well, can we take a little peek inside?

-Please do.

0:10:020:10:05

Well, it is a cylinder musical box and what we see straightaway

0:10:050:10:09

when we open the lid is the

0:10:090:10:11

magical name of Nicole Freres,

0:10:110:10:13

who was like the Rolls-Royce of musical boxes and it tells us

0:10:130:10:17

Nicole Freres, Geneva.

0:10:170:10:19

This was made in Switzerland.

0:10:190:10:23

Now, there's two different types of cylinder boxes which is

0:10:230:10:26

essentially what this is, a cylinder musical box.

0:10:260:10:29

There's the ones that are made with a lever wind

0:10:290:10:32

and they are late 19th century.

0:10:320:10:33

They're about 1880s,

0:10:330:10:36

1890s and then there's the earlier ones which are worked with a key.

0:10:360:10:41

Now this one is worked with a key.

0:10:410:10:46

So that means we can date it to about 1860, 1865.

0:10:460:10:51

You would put this key in the side here.

0:10:510:10:54

And turn that round and that is how it would work.

0:10:570:11:00

Now this one is in fantastic condition, it really is

0:11:000:11:03

because quite often these teeth get damaged

0:11:030:11:06

and they need to be replaced and as you say,

0:11:060:11:08

they're expensive to do, but it's just absolutely pristine.

0:11:080:11:12

Yes, I mean, when you say the pins got damaged,

0:11:120:11:15

-I think the other one was a bit squeaky in places...

-Was it?

0:11:150:11:18

..so that would indicate that the pins had been broken.

0:11:180:11:21

-Do you have any idea on value?

-No, not really, no.

0:11:210:11:25

The market was stronger a while ago but now

0:11:250:11:29

I would say a very conservative price would be £700 to £1,000.

0:11:290:11:32

You might get a bit more, which would be nice.

0:11:320:11:35

I think we should fix the reserve of £600, how does that sound to you?

0:11:350:11:38

Yes, that's fine, thank you.

0:11:380:11:40

But really, we have to have a listen, don't we?

0:11:400:11:43

-Oh, it's beautiful.

-We have to see what this really sounds like.

0:11:430:11:46

So, I'm going to give it a wind up.

0:11:460:11:49

MUSIC BOX PLAYS

0:11:490:11:55

Away from the valuation tables, I've found a very different piece of art.

0:11:550:12:00

Although this cathedral is relatively young,

0:12:000:12:02

it's still full of historic and interesting items.

0:12:020:12:05

Take this carpet, for instance,

0:12:050:12:07

which lies between the oak altar rails and the altar itself.

0:12:070:12:11

It depicts two angels supporting the diocese of Guildford.

0:12:110:12:15

And there above here, a stag, which represents Stag Hill,

0:12:150:12:20

the site which this cathedral's built on.

0:12:200:12:23

Not only is this carpet famous for its symbolism

0:12:230:12:25

but also for its historic content.

0:12:250:12:28

It was made by the world famous Wilton factory in 1957

0:12:280:12:31

and it's believed to be the last handmade carpet they ever made.

0:12:310:12:36

# Not your stepping stone... #

0:12:360:12:38

A fascinating piece of brass work there.

0:12:380:12:40

Over to Catherine Southon,

0:12:400:12:41

who's found something that's a long way from home.

0:12:410:12:44

Karen, I love your silver purse.

0:12:440:12:49

Your Russian silver purse, I should say.

0:12:490:12:52

That little mark down on the bottom,

0:12:520:12:54

that tells us that it's a Russian silver purse.

0:12:540:12:57

It's so slim and elegant.

0:12:570:13:00

There's not a huge amount to it, but I just think it's so stylish.

0:13:000:13:05

Where did you get this from?

0:13:050:13:06

I just found it in a box in the attic when we were clearing out one day.

0:13:060:13:10

No idea where it came from. Must have been lurking.

0:13:100:13:13

-So, a family piece?

-Possibly, possibly. I don't really know.

0:13:130:13:16

How can something like this,

0:13:160:13:17

something as precious, something as beautiful, just be lurking?

0:13:170:13:21

I don't know. It was very grubby when I found it.

0:13:210:13:23

-Oh, really?

-It wasn't nice and shiny.

0:13:230:13:25

I never find anything lurking like this.

0:13:250:13:27

Silk lined, really fine quality.

0:13:270:13:31

So often these are frayed or dirty or damaged.

0:13:310:13:34

The date of this is 1900.

0:13:340:13:37

You can imagine this lovely slender shape, this is what I love -

0:13:370:13:41

a lady putting this into her bag when she goes off,

0:13:410:13:45

perhaps to the opera or something like that.

0:13:450:13:47

I mean, it's quality in every single sense.

0:13:470:13:50

It's not something that you would just leave in a box.

0:13:500:13:53

It's something you'd probably want to shout about.

0:13:530:13:56

I think you'd be quite proud to open it.

0:13:560:13:59

I love the way that it's been engraved on the outside.

0:13:590:14:02

Beautiful pattern here.

0:14:020:14:04

And you've got a rather stylish cabochon jewel there,

0:14:040:14:09

an amethyst jewel.

0:14:090:14:11

-Karen, have you ever used it?

-Never.

0:14:110:14:13

-No? It's not really practical, is it?

-Definitely not.

0:14:130:14:15

-You couldn't get your credit cards in it today, could you?

-You're right there.

0:14:150:14:18

And to be honest,

0:14:180:14:20

you couldn't get an awful lot of coinage in there, could you?

0:14:200:14:22

You'd probably get a few little pennies in there

0:14:220:14:24

and that's not going to buy you an awful lot today.

0:14:240:14:26

-The value of it, I would suggest, £150 to £250.

-OK.

0:14:260:14:32

-How does that sound to you?

-That sounds great, yes.

0:14:320:14:35

-Would you be happy to sell it at that price?

-Would be, yes.

0:14:350:14:38

-Shall we say £130 reserve?

-OK, OK.

0:14:380:14:41

And 150 to 250 in the estimate.

0:14:410:14:43

-Right.

-And see what happens.

-Yes.

0:14:430:14:45

-Now, I understand you can't make it to the auction?

-That's true.

0:14:450:14:48

-I've just booked a holiday.

-Oh, well.

-Never mind.

0:14:480:14:51

That's quite exciting.

0:14:510:14:53

I will do my very best for you

0:14:530:14:54

-and try and get a good price for you at the auction.

-Thank you.

0:14:540:14:58

-Thanks very much, Karen.

-Thank you.

-Super piece.

-Lovely, thank you.

0:14:580:15:01

-And it won't lurk at the auction.

-Good, I'm pleased about that.

0:15:010:15:05

While everyone's busy here,

0:15:050:15:07

I'm off to do something completely different.

0:15:070:15:10

The year was 1907. Edward VII was on the throne.

0:15:170:15:21

Number Ten was occupied

0:15:210:15:22

by the little-known Henry Campbell Bannerman

0:15:220:15:25

and the upper classes of Great Britain had a new obsession -

0:15:250:15:28

motorsport.

0:15:280:15:30

-COMMENTARY:

-'Here come the cars.

0:15:300:15:33

'And he wins the race!'

0:15:360:15:38

I'm here at what was

0:15:380:15:39

the world's first purpose-built motor racing circuit, Brooklands.

0:15:390:15:43

It opened in the very same year, 1907,

0:15:430:15:46

and for the next 30 years it was the venue for hundreds of races

0:15:460:15:50

and the track was absolutely huge - 2.75 miles in length,

0:15:500:15:54

100 feet in width and in sections it was banked, as you can see,

0:15:540:15:59

30 feet in the air to allow the drivers

0:15:590:16:02

to take these bends at even greater speeds.

0:16:020:16:05

Scary stuff.

0:16:050:16:07

The track's golden years were in the 1920s and '30s,

0:16:070:16:10

when thousands of spectators would gather to watch

0:16:100:16:13

the fastest cars of the day break record after record.

0:16:130:16:17

'The track is now home to a museum

0:16:210:16:23

'and I'm going to meet its director, Allan Winn.'

0:16:230:16:26

So, why was Brooklands built and who came up with the idea?

0:16:260:16:28

It was Hugh Locke King who actually owned this land,

0:16:280:16:31

a very wealthy landowner who was a very keen motorist himself.

0:16:310:16:35

He went to the Coppa Florio race in Sicily in 1905

0:16:350:16:39

and he found there were no British cars competing, no British drivers.

0:16:390:16:42

When he asked the question, it was simply that

0:16:420:16:45

there was nowhere in the UK

0:16:450:16:47

where you could legally develop and operate a fast motor car.

0:16:470:16:52

So, he came back with the idea if he built a test track,

0:16:520:16:55

the manufacturers could then develop fast cars capable of more than 20mph,

0:16:550:17:00

which was the national speed limit at the time, and this was

0:17:000:17:03

real ground-breaking stuff -

0:17:030:17:05

running motor racing on a closed circuit.

0:17:050:17:08

This was the first place in the world where it happened.

0:17:080:17:10

So, they had to learn everything from scratch.

0:17:100:17:13

And in fact, when they set up motor racing here,

0:17:130:17:15

because there was no role model,

0:17:150:17:17

they based everything on the rules of horse racing,

0:17:170:17:20

which is why to this day you still have a clerk of the course

0:17:200:17:24

in charge of a motor racing circuit

0:17:240:17:26

and the cars get assembled in the paddock before they go out.

0:17:260:17:30

-That all came direct from horse racing.

-Gosh, I never knew that.

0:17:300:17:33

And, indeed, before 1914,

0:17:330:17:35

all the drivers wore their own coloured silks.

0:17:350:17:39

You know, it proved to be a very inaccurate way of identifying

0:17:390:17:42

cars going at high speed

0:17:420:17:44

so they very quickly adopted big racing numbers as well.

0:17:440:17:48

Back in its heyday you're looking at cars going round that track,

0:17:480:17:51

I would say bombing around that track, at over 100mph,

0:17:510:17:54

no power steering, no helmets, absolutely nothing.

0:17:540:17:58

Dangerous stuff, surely? Lots of accidents?

0:17:580:18:01

There were quite a few accidents,

0:18:010:18:04

but over the 32 years that the track was open in total,

0:18:040:18:08

there were about 15 people killed at the track.

0:18:080:18:10

It was dangerous. It was bumpy. The cars were very fast.

0:18:100:18:13

This car here, for instance,

0:18:130:18:15

lapped at an average speed of 143mph in 1935.

0:18:150:18:21

-Now, that is seriously fast.

-Serious motoring.

0:18:210:18:23

So, if you had a big accident, you would get seriously hurt or killed

0:18:230:18:26

if you hit something going at that sort of speed.

0:18:260:18:29

But it wasn't just the men

0:18:290:18:31

who risked life and limb pushing the limits.

0:18:310:18:34

The circuit was about to play

0:18:340:18:35

another major part in the history of motorsport.

0:18:350:18:38

A group of female drivers decided they, too,

0:18:380:18:41

wanted a piece of the high-speed action

0:18:410:18:44

and the Belles of Brooklands were born.

0:18:440:18:46

Away from the track, the suffragette movement were campaigning

0:18:460:18:49

for the right for women to vote, while here at Brooklands,

0:18:490:18:52

the female drivers were finding it hard

0:18:520:18:54

to be accepted behind the steering wheel.

0:18:540:18:57

One male official commented, "Well, you don't see lady jockeys

0:18:570:19:00

"so it would be wrong to see a lady behind a steering wheel."

0:19:000:19:04

But despite all this, they carried on competing,

0:19:040:19:06

although they were kept apart from their male counterparts.

0:19:060:19:09

This is the ladies' reading room,

0:19:110:19:13

and it's where they would prepare before races and relax between them.

0:19:130:19:17

These comfy surroundings are a huge contrast to the girls

0:19:170:19:21

who used these rooms, often covered in grease and dirt after a day's racing,

0:19:210:19:25

like Kay Petre,

0:19:250:19:26

one of the most successful female drivers of the era.

0:19:260:19:29

She actually broke the lap speed record here at Brooklands three times.

0:19:290:19:34

The Brooklands Belles were later banned from racing

0:19:350:19:37

by the governing body at the racetrack.

0:19:370:19:40

But that didn't stop them from taking part in the sport they loved.

0:19:400:19:43

Undeterred, the Belles bypassed the ban

0:19:430:19:46

by racing at other unofficial meetings.

0:19:460:19:49

Their determination would eventually pay off

0:19:490:19:51

and a whole new chapter of female motorsport would begin.

0:19:510:19:55

By 1932, the Belles were reinstated and officially recognised.

0:19:550:19:58

Not only were they back on track but this time,

0:19:580:20:01

they were competing against the men.

0:20:010:20:03

But despite all this, all eyes were on one competition -

0:20:030:20:06

who could be crowned the queen of speed?

0:20:060:20:08

By 1935, Kay Petre and her rival Gwenda Hawkes

0:20:080:20:12

were both hardened drivers and seasoned racers.

0:20:120:20:15

Both drove powerful machines

0:20:150:20:16

and in a tit-for-tat battle to be the fastest,

0:20:160:20:19

they each broke the speed record a number of times

0:20:190:20:22

before Hawkes finally reached 135.95mph and won the title.

0:20:220:20:29

It's a track record that still stands today.

0:20:290:20:32

Unfortunately, that would be

0:20:320:20:33

one of the last great battles to take place on the track.

0:20:330:20:36

In 1939, World War II came along

0:20:360:20:38

and an aircraft factory was built right on the finishing straight.

0:20:380:20:42

As you can see, it's still here today.

0:20:420:20:44

This is the finishing straight.

0:20:440:20:46

Over the years, much of the track has been built over

0:20:460:20:49

and it's really disappeared.

0:20:490:20:51

But there are sections that are still open

0:20:510:20:53

and I'm going to experience it today with a very special driver.

0:20:530:20:57

She started racing go-karts aged just nine.

0:20:570:21:01

She got her professional racing licence aged 13.

0:21:010:21:04

And now, aged 19, she's a professional driver.

0:21:040:21:08

This is Zoe Wenham,

0:21:080:21:10

and she's one of the best female motor racers in the country.

0:21:100:21:14

Thanks for meeting up with me here today.

0:21:140:21:16

It's such a historic place of motorsport.

0:21:160:21:18

-Look at this! What does it feel like for you?

-It's incredible.

0:21:180:21:22

In ten years of motorsport, I haven't been and visited yet.

0:21:220:21:24

-I've read loads about it in the books.

-So this is a first?

0:21:240:21:27

Absolutely. It's great to stand on the ground.

0:21:270:21:29

We've heard about the Brooklands Belles.

0:21:290:21:31

Has their story inspired you?

0:21:310:21:33

Yeah, they raced cars and their ABS traction control was very basic,

0:21:330:21:37

and in skirts and silk tops.

0:21:370:21:39

It's just incredible and it's such an inspiration with our modern-day cars.

0:21:390:21:43

Well, we have a car from that era -

0:21:430:21:45

a 1932 MG M-type Midget, and it feels warm.

0:21:450:21:48

You've taken this out for a ride already, haven't you?

0:21:480:21:50

-Just a little bit of practice.

-What was it like?

-It was incredible.

0:21:500:21:53

Well, can we have a go around some of these bends? Do you mind?

0:21:530:21:56

-We can try.

-It's a two-seater.

-We can try.

-Let's go!

0:21:560:21:59

Wow!

0:21:590:22:00

Zoe currently competes in the GT Championship

0:22:010:22:04

and this is a very different type of car to the one she's used to.

0:22:040:22:08

She was given a lot of instruction earlier on

0:22:080:22:10

and she got to grips with it in no time.

0:22:100:22:12

So, what do you normally drive every day?

0:22:150:22:17

-I've got the Volkswagen Polo.

-Have you? Right, OK.

0:22:170:22:19

And what do you normally race with?

0:22:190:22:21

I've got a Ginetta G50, which is a modern-day car,

0:22:210:22:23

3.7 litre V6 engine.

0:22:230:22:26

Wow, that's big. That's totally different to this.

0:22:260:22:29

Is motorsport still considered a man's world?

0:22:290:22:32

Slightly, yes.

0:22:320:22:35

The mainstream people don't actually class it as a female sport.

0:22:350:22:41

-So, how do you feel about that?

-They treat us all the same, to be honest.

0:22:410:22:45

What do you hope to achieve in your career?

0:22:450:22:48

-Love to take part in Le Mans 24-hour race.

-Wow, gritty stuff!

0:22:480:22:51

-Yeah, lots of professional motorsport.

-Well, good luck.

0:22:510:22:55

There you are.

0:22:580:22:59

Although racing here at Brooklands has since long gone,

0:22:590:23:02

its spirit still remains,

0:23:020:23:03

and the achievements of drivers from the past

0:23:030:23:06

still continue to inspire a new generation to go faster and faster.

0:23:060:23:11

And right now, I need to get back to Guildford Cathedral

0:23:110:23:13

to join up with our experts

0:23:130:23:14

to see what else can we find to take off to auction.

0:23:140:23:17

-Any chance of a lift, Zoe?

-Absolutely.

-Let's go there in style!

0:23:170:23:21

What a fabulous time we're having here at Guildford Cathedral.

0:23:280:23:30

Hundreds of people have come through the doors

0:23:300:23:33

to have their antiques and collectibles valued.

0:23:330:23:35

But right now we are going to up the tempo.

0:23:350:23:37

This is where it gets exciting, we're putting our first

0:23:370:23:40

batch of antiques to the test in the saleroom.

0:23:400:23:42

Don't go away, anything can happen

0:23:420:23:44

and here's a quick recap of what we're taking with us.

0:23:440:23:47

There's Anne's German silver plate.

0:23:480:23:50

We've got that Russian plate brought along by Karen.

0:23:520:23:56

A pair of watercolours.

0:23:590:24:00

And let's hope the music box hits the right note at auction.

0:24:020:24:08

We're in the neighbouring county of West Sussex for today's auction.

0:24:080:24:12

And in charge of proceedings is auctioneer Rupert Toovey.

0:24:120:24:15

At £350...

0:24:150:24:19

Well, our next item has certainly been passed around the family

0:24:190:24:22

-a few times, am I right, Anne?

-Yes, that's right.

-It was your brother's,

0:24:220:24:25

-then your sister's and now yours.

-That's right.

0:24:250:24:27

We're talking about that little tray, the WMF tray with the dog

0:24:270:24:30

on it looking at a lizard, and I'm so pleased you had

0:24:300:24:32

a go at pronouncing it because I cannot pronounce it.

0:24:320:24:34

-I just say WMF.

-Oh, WMF, yes.

-It's really difficult, isn't it?

0:24:340:24:37

-It is, you say it very quickly.

-I won't put you through it.

0:24:370:24:40

You did it once, didn't you? You're very brave.

0:24:400:24:42

But it is quality, it's absolute quality.

0:24:420:24:44

It's beautiful. I just think the way that that little dog is

0:24:440:24:48

looking down at the lizard... love it.

0:24:480:24:50

Fingers crossed. It's going under the hammer right now.

0:24:500:24:53

We're opening the bidding on this lot at £70. £70 here.

0:24:530:24:56

£75, can I see?

0:24:560:24:57

At £70 here. £75, can I see? £75.

0:24:570:25:00

And 80. And 5, sir, centre?

0:25:000:25:02

And 90, and 5, sir?

0:25:020:25:04

95, and 100, sir. 110.

0:25:040:25:06

110 now with you, sir, in the room.

0:25:060:25:08

£110 centre now. £110.

0:25:080:25:11

Is there any advance on £110?

0:25:110:25:15

It's fair warning. 110.

0:25:150:25:17

-110.

-Just over.

-Just over!

-Well...

0:25:170:25:21

-They were sitting on their hands, weren't they, for that one?

-Yes.

0:25:210:25:23

-Thanks for bringing that in, anyway.

-Thank you.

-It's quality,

0:25:230:25:26

-again you see that...

-It's been a great day.

-..quality always sells.

0:25:260:25:29

So, despite a slow start,

0:25:290:25:30

that silver plate now has a new home and Anne was happy with the result.

0:25:300:25:34

Let's see if those watercolours float the bidders' boat.

0:25:340:25:38

Susan, Shirley, great to see you again. Fingers crossed.

0:25:380:25:41

This is your moment. Let's hope we get the top end of that estimate.

0:25:410:25:45

We're talking about those two framed watercolours,

0:25:450:25:47

the sailing barges by Aldridge.

0:25:470:25:48

-Wonderful, with little windmills in the background as well.

-Yes.

0:25:480:25:51

Gilt frames. You paid quite a lot of money for these, didn't you?

0:25:510:25:54

-£50, quite a long time ago.

-Yes.

-Long time ago.

0:25:540:25:56

That was a lot of money long time ago.

0:25:560:25:58

-It was, but the market was better for them.

-Yes.

0:25:580:26:02

The market for these types of watercolours is very...

0:26:020:26:04

Never the less, never the less, it's a pair.

0:26:040:26:06

-It's always nice to have something original on the wall.

-It is.

0:26:060:26:09

-And these aren't a lot of money really.

-They're not.

0:26:090:26:11

And the interior decorators like pairs a lot because they match up.

0:26:110:26:15

-Yes.

-And they make the room symmetrical which is nice.

0:26:150:26:17

Well, let's hope they sail away and they're going under the hammer

0:26:170:26:20

right now. This is it!

0:26:200:26:21

The Frederick James Aldridge,

0:26:210:26:23

a pair of watercolours, both signed.

0:26:230:26:25

Lovely, lovely things those and bids to match.

0:26:250:26:28

We're opening the bidding on this lot at £250.

0:26:280:26:31

-250 is the lowest we've got.

-That's good.

-On commission at 250.

0:26:310:26:34

250 here. 280, can I see?

0:26:340:26:36

At £250. At £250, on commission at £250.

0:26:360:26:41

250.

0:26:430:26:45

-That's strange.

-Blink and you'll miss it. £250, gone.

-Fantastic.

0:26:450:26:49

You've enjoyed them on the wall, haven't you? For quite a few years.

0:26:490:26:52

-Somebody else can enjoy them.

-Thank you very much.

0:26:520:26:54

Going under the hammer right now

0:26:580:26:59

we've got a Russian silver purse belonging to Karen.

0:26:590:27:01

Unfortunately, she cannot make it to the auction today,

0:27:010:27:04

but we do have Catherine Southon, our expert, and of course,

0:27:040:27:07

that lovely silver purse with stylised foliate decoration.

0:27:070:27:11

I mean, it's a nice piece. £150 to £250.

0:27:110:27:13

It's lovely.

0:27:130:27:15

It's beautiful, it's elegant, but it's not practical, is it?

0:27:150:27:18

You can't get your cards in there today, Paul!

0:27:180:27:20

No, no, but will we sell it, do you think?

0:27:200:27:22

I hope so. I want to give her some really good news.

0:27:220:27:24

OK, we're going to find out right now - it's going under the hammer.

0:27:240:27:28

We have a multitude of conflicting bids

0:27:280:27:30

and the lowest we can start here is £170.

0:27:300:27:34

-We sold it.

-We've sold it.

0:27:340:27:36

£170? 180.

0:27:360:27:38

190. 200?

0:27:380:27:40

190 here. £190.

0:27:400:27:42

190!

0:27:420:27:43

£190, on commission at £190, and against the room. Fair warning.

0:27:430:27:47

£190.

0:27:470:27:50

-Great, it's gone. Karen will be so happy.

-She will be really pleased.

0:27:500:27:53

-£190.

-She will be very pleased.

0:27:530:27:55

I'm glad we sold it because I was a bit worried. But I'm very pleased.

0:27:550:27:59

Job done.

0:27:590:28:00

Next we've got that music box.

0:28:030:28:05

Right, we're going to hit the high notes right now with this

0:28:050:28:08

Swiss music box belonging to Elizabeth.

0:28:080:28:10

It's got six airs, it's absolute quality

0:28:100:28:12

-and I had a chat to Rupert before the sale started.

-Oh, did you?

0:28:120:28:15

We both went quality, quality, quality. Great maker. Nicole Freres.

0:28:150:28:18

I mean, it doesn't get any better than that. Key wound,

0:28:180:28:21

the inlay on the box, everything was divine about it.

0:28:210:28:24

So, we're confident.

0:28:240:28:25

There are plenty of collectors out there and we've seen them

0:28:250:28:28

time and time again on "Flog It!" and I've interviewed quite

0:28:280:28:30

a lot of them and they really are passionate about things like this.

0:28:300:28:34

Anyway, let's put it to the test. Here we go.

0:28:340:28:36

Late 19th century Swiss music box

0:28:360:28:39

by Nicole Freres playing six airs.

0:28:390:28:42

Beautifully inlaid case with honeysuckle sprays

0:28:420:28:45

and opening the bidding here at £550.

0:28:450:28:48

-550 here, can I see the 600?

-Oh, come on, we need 600.

0:28:480:28:50

We need a bit more than that.

0:28:500:28:52

550 here. Can I see the 600?

0:28:520:28:54

£550 here. 600, can I see?

0:28:540:28:56

At £550. Is there any advance on 550?

0:28:560:28:59

And 600 now. £600.

0:28:590:29:02

Can I see the 650? At £600 and selling!

0:29:020:29:05

At £600.

0:29:050:29:07

600.

0:29:070:29:09

-It's gone! You didn't want to take it home, did you?

-I didn't, no.

0:29:090:29:12

-Thank goodness, it's too heavy.

-Yeah, it's very heavy. Oh, well done.

0:29:120:29:15

-Thank you very much.

-That's OK.

-Thank you.

0:29:150:29:18

Auction rooms are great places to pick up items that you can admire

0:29:210:29:24

and preserve to look after for future generations to enjoy.

0:29:240:29:28

Now while we were in the area filming,

0:29:280:29:30

I visited a museum where preservation is a key part of their

0:29:300:29:34

work, but we're not talking about looking after paintings or

0:29:340:29:36

furniture or porcelain.

0:29:360:29:38

We're talking about looking after buildings.

0:29:380:29:40

Take a look at this.

0:29:400:29:42

The Weald & Downland Open Air Museum is located in the idyllic

0:29:550:29:58

South Downs National Park.

0:29:580:30:00

The museum originally opened in 1970

0:30:000:30:03

and now it's home to around 50 traditional buildings which

0:30:030:30:06

have been saved from destruction, carefully restored and rebuilt

0:30:060:30:10

to bring back to life the story of the people who lived in them.

0:30:100:30:16

The museum owes its existence to the devotion of one man,

0:30:160:30:19

its founder Roy Armstrong.

0:30:190:30:21

And as a local historian, Roy had an increasing

0:30:210:30:23

passion in the conservation of buildings from the past.

0:30:230:30:27

The eruption of modern housing estates threatened many

0:30:270:30:30

traditional homes and buildings with demolition.

0:30:300:30:33

Roy Armstrong feared that many historic buildings in the area

0:30:350:30:38

were being destroyed as a consequence, even listed buildings.

0:30:380:30:42

And he feared that without such structures, people's links

0:30:420:30:45

to the past would be lost forever, so something had to be done

0:30:450:30:48

and this place was born.

0:30:480:30:51

The rescued buildings had been carefully dismantled

0:30:510:30:54

and conserved but now the process of reassembling them could begin.

0:30:540:30:58

And in 1969, the first building was erected on the site.

0:30:580:31:02

In the first month of opening, thousands of visitors

0:31:020:31:05

came through the door. The museum was officially a success.

0:31:050:31:08

And some 40 years later, it's still a thriving visitor attraction.

0:31:080:31:11

Now I'm here today to meet the museum's director,

0:31:110:31:13

Richard Pailthorpe, to find out more about the work that's being

0:31:130:31:16

done to continue Roy's vision for the museum.

0:31:160:31:19

Richard, why is it so important to have a museum like this?

0:31:230:31:26

Well, I think we have to put the clock back, sort of 40, 50 years.

0:31:260:31:29

Back to the sort of 1950s, '60s,

0:31:290:31:31

post-war Britain, where overnight, literally,

0:31:310:31:35

these traditional buildings, barns, farm houses, etc were disappearing.

0:31:350:31:40

-And being replaced by, you know, sorts of glass and steel...

-Yes.

0:31:400:31:45

..and everything else, you know.

0:31:450:31:47

So, conservation is key to what you do here.

0:31:470:31:49

How much work is involved in actually maintaining

0:31:490:31:51

-the buildings once they're here on site?

-Right.

0:31:510:31:54

Well, like all buildings, they need to be, you know, conserved...

0:31:540:31:57

-Bit of TLC.

-..and TLC, etc.

0:31:570:32:00

And that's what we're having to do increasingly much more of.

0:32:000:32:04

Thatched roofs, for example, are a major issue.

0:32:040:32:07

Got a barn down there desperately in need now of having new thatch

0:32:070:32:12

and so we'll be doing that this year.

0:32:120:32:14

Now I hear you've got a cottage which is being

0:32:140:32:17

-constructed at the moment or reconstructed I should say.

-Yes.

0:32:170:32:20

-Is it something I can get involved in and help?

-Oh, very much so.

0:32:200:32:22

-You've come at a, you know, just at the right time!

-Wonderful!

0:32:220:32:25

-Is that is over there?

-Just over there.

0:32:250:32:27

We're at the stage where we're about to do some wattle and daubing.

0:32:270:32:30

-Here is...that's an opportunity for you to...

-To get mucky!

0:32:300:32:34

Absolutely, that's right.

0:32:340:32:35

Thank you very much for talking to me, Richard.

0:32:350:32:37

Shall I make my way down that path to the cottage?

0:32:370:32:40

-That's right, there you are. Just down there.

-OK.

-Cheerio!

0:32:400:32:42

Tindalls cottage was originally built in the early 18th century,

0:32:450:32:49

probably as the home of a labourer.

0:32:490:32:52

It remained in its original position in East Sussex until 1974

0:32:520:32:56

when the construction of a reservoir threatened its survival.

0:32:560:33:00

Rescued by the museum,

0:33:000:33:02

the timber frame has been in storage ever since.

0:33:020:33:04

But now it's in the process of being restored back to its former glory.

0:33:040:33:09

And the man responsible for this precious restoration is

0:33:090:33:12

carpenter in residence, Joe Thompson.

0:33:120:33:15

Joe, you've got your work cut out.

0:33:150:33:17

Yeah, we've got a bit to do but it's good you're here.

0:33:170:33:21

It's essentially a timber frame building, isn't it?

0:33:210:33:23

Apart from the brick fireplace and obviously the chimney breast.

0:33:230:33:26

Once you get that working, you're going to keep warm.

0:33:260:33:29

That's right, it'll be wonderful. You've got all mod cons here,

0:33:290:33:31

there's a bread oven out the back,

0:33:310:33:33

there's a copper and a furnace to brew beer through there

0:33:330:33:36

so you can bake your bread, drink your beer, you've got your

0:33:360:33:38

warm kitchen, hall in here and your storeroom's out the back.

0:33:380:33:42

Today on a timber frame building with these oak uprights it'll all

0:33:420:33:46

be dry lined with plasterboard,

0:33:460:33:48

but obviously we're not going to do that, are we?

0:33:480:33:50

No, this is wattle and daub.

0:33:500:33:52

We're going back to the old ways, tried and tested.

0:33:520:33:54

Yeah, talk me through the ingredients. You've got some buckets here.

0:33:540:33:58

This is loam from the vicinity where the cottage came from.

0:33:580:34:01

Then we've got the straw, a little bit of dung and we've got the water.

0:34:010:34:04

So, we're going to basically mix them all together.

0:34:040:34:07

Just looking at the little pot of poo, there.

0:34:070:34:10

-What's that? Cow or horse?

-That's cow.

-Or pig?

0:34:100:34:12

Traditionally it all would've been trodden by the cows.

0:34:120:34:14

Well, I guess I need some gloves really, don't I?

0:34:140:34:16

-Who's got the gloves?

-Here we go, Paul.

-Look at that, thank you.

0:34:160:34:19

Here's our bucket of loam.

0:34:210:34:23

We've got a bit of the cow dung, mixed in.

0:34:250:34:28

Well, that's quite dry.

0:34:280:34:30

-Yeah, this is some stuff I put aside the other week.

-Right, OK.

0:34:300:34:33

-Then mixing in the water.

-But you could literally pick fresh stuff up,

0:34:330:34:36

-couldn't you?

-Yes, you could.

0:34:360:34:38

-So, we've got to get this well mixed.

-Well, it's certainly

0:34:400:34:43

-doing the trick, look, it's sticking to your wellies.

-Oh, yes.

0:34:430:34:46

So if it sticks to those, it's definitely going to stick to this.

0:34:460:34:49

That's right.

0:34:490:34:50

If you wouldn't mind chucking bits and pieces of that in as we go.

0:34:510:34:54

Lovely.

0:34:540:34:55

Keeps you fit.

0:34:570:34:58

I'm going to ask you to help me.

0:34:580:35:01

We're going to unload this and we're going to put it into the bucket.

0:35:010:35:06

-Look at that. What a sausage.

-Yeah.

0:35:070:35:09

Right, we've got a bucket full of it, Joe.

0:35:120:35:15

-Let's put it on the wall.

-Yeah, come on, then. Let's throw it on.

0:35:150:35:19

Let's start at face height. Where would you normally start then?

0:35:190:35:21

At the bottom and work up or...

0:35:210:35:23

I think we'll start at the top and work our way down.

0:35:230:35:26

I'd like to do this without gloves on.

0:35:260:35:27

I think I'd like to feel it going in. I can't feel anything.

0:35:270:35:30

-Do you mind if I take these off?

-Please do.

-They're quite tight.

0:35:300:35:33

-I feel like I need to feel the material.

-Excellent.

0:35:330:35:36

Yeah, exactly. It's that sort of thing.

0:35:360:35:38

I'm going to get myself what we call a cat.

0:35:380:35:40

-So it's a piece about the size of an apple.

-OK.

0:35:400:35:42

-I'm going to squeeze it once or twice in my hands.

-Yeah.

0:35:420:35:45

-And then, we're going to slap it on the wall.

-OK.

0:35:450:35:47

So I've got about the right amount.

0:35:470:35:49

-That's it, you've got yourself a cat there.

-Gosh, that's sticky.

-Yeah.

0:35:490:35:52

So, push it on there and with your fingers,

0:35:520:35:58

push it into there.

0:35:580:36:00

-It wants to go through the gaps.

-Yeah.

0:36:000:36:04

That's perfect. Yeah, that's coming along nicely.

0:36:040:36:07

Ah, do you know what? It makes you feel like a kid again,

0:36:110:36:14

it makes you feel like playing with mud.

0:36:140:36:16

It's so satisfying because at the end of the day,

0:36:160:36:18

it's just clay really, isn't it?

0:36:180:36:20

-Look at that. Look how sticky that is.

-It's good fun.

0:36:210:36:24

And what I'd do, after a couple of days,

0:36:240:36:25

I'd come back and I'd give that another rub up just to

0:36:250:36:28

sort of smooth out any little lumps and bumps.

0:36:280:36:30

It's all pretty wet and sticky now. Let it go off for a bit.

0:36:300:36:32

Come back again.

0:36:320:36:34

And I guess with the air blowing through this building

0:36:340:36:36

-because there are no windows or doors...

-It'll dry nice and quickly.

0:36:360:36:40

It's great. That's very satisfying. Joe, I'll shake your hand.

0:36:400:36:45

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

-You're doing a great job.

0:36:450:36:47

-I'm going to leave you to do the rest, I think.

-That's great.

0:36:470:36:50

Only one problem, have you got the sink fitted yet?

0:36:500:36:53

No.

0:36:530:36:54

Well, I've got great admiration for the work they're doing here today.

0:36:580:37:02

Not only are they taking the responsibility of the preservation

0:37:020:37:05

of these buildings through sheer hard work and determination but

0:37:050:37:08

also they're using them to educate and inform us about our past.

0:37:080:37:12

And that's what's so important. And who knows?

0:37:120:37:14

Maybe some of the buildings we live in today will become

0:37:140:37:17

exhibits of the future.

0:37:170:37:18

Welcome back to Guildford Cathedral.

0:37:280:37:30

Let's now catch up with our experts and see what other antiques

0:37:300:37:33

and collectibles we can find to take off to auction.

0:37:330:37:36

As you can see, there's still a lot of people here which means

0:37:360:37:38

hundreds of antiques to sift through.

0:37:380:37:41

Let's now catch up with Mark Stacey. He's found a real gem.

0:37:410:37:44

Jane, Michael. I don't have to look underneath to tell you what this is.

0:37:490:37:53

Because it screams Moorcroft, Moorcroft, Moorcroft, doesn't it?

0:37:530:37:56

-Yes.

-But I tell you what. They don't come much more impressive than this,

0:37:560:38:00

-do they?

-It's stunning, isn't it? I love it.

-It's absolutely amazing.

0:38:000:38:04

It's fabulous. I can't say any more than that. It's absolutely fabulous.

0:38:040:38:08

One of these ones with so much pink in the actual glazing.

0:38:080:38:12

-It really glows, doesn't it?

-It really does.

0:38:120:38:14

It really is a sort of very shepherd... What is it they say?

0:38:140:38:18

Red sky at night, shepherd's delight.

0:38:180:38:21

It's certainly Mark's delight today, I can tell you

0:38:210:38:23

because it's wonderful.

0:38:230:38:25

-How have you come to own it?

-I've inherited it.

0:38:250:38:29

And my husband, with courtesy of my husband,

0:38:300:38:32

I'm allowed to keep all these things, or I have been.

0:38:320:38:35

You've been very patient, have you, Michael?

0:38:350:38:38

Yes.

0:38:380:38:39

Very discreet and gentlemanly about it.

0:38:390:38:41

-And, Michael, what do you think of it?

-I think it's terrific, yeah.

0:38:410:38:45

-It's an impressive piece, isn't it?

-Oh, yes.

0:38:450:38:48

Now, what pattern do you think it is?

0:38:480:38:50

Erm...

0:38:500:38:53

Well, I thought it was landscape.

0:38:530:38:54

Well, it certainly is a landscape with those trees

0:38:540:38:57

but the official pattern name is Hazeldene.

0:38:570:39:00

-You see this pattern on vases, on other things.

-Right.

0:39:000:39:03

-And it's known as Hazeldene.

-Hazeldene.

0:39:030:39:06

-There's another one...

-Now we know.

0:39:060:39:07

-..called Eventide which is very similar.

-Right.

0:39:070:39:10

And another one called Claremont which looks like big mushrooms.

0:39:100:39:13

-And I love this jazzy pattern...

-That's lovely.

-..on the outside

0:39:130:39:17

-which, of course, helps to date it immediately.

-Yes, does it?

0:39:170:39:20

-Yes, because it's very Art Deco.

-Oh, right.

0:39:200:39:23

-So, we're looking at about 1925.

-Oh.

0:39:230:39:26

That would fit in with my mother's...could've been

0:39:260:39:29

-a wedding present.

-Oh, were they married around then?

0:39:290:39:32

My mother and father were married in about 1927, I think.

0:39:320:39:35

-Yes, so it could've been, couldn't it?

-Yes.

0:39:350:39:37

It's got a few flaws. There are a couple of chips on there.

0:39:370:39:41

-Oh, yes.

-There's a little bit of restoration.

0:39:410:39:43

But it is a cracking item which I think the collectors would love.

0:39:430:39:47

-Good.

-The damage holds it back a little bit.

0:39:470:39:51

I would want to put an estimate of £800 to £1,200 on it.

0:39:510:39:54

-Really?

-As much as that?

-That's quite a sum.

0:39:540:39:57

-It's more than you thought?

-Yes, it is.

-Oh, good. What did you think?

0:39:570:40:01

Well, I sort of thought £500 to £800, maybe.

0:40:010:40:03

No, I think it's a bit more impressive, even with the damage.

0:40:030:40:06

You know, it wouldn't surprise me if it made a bit more than that

0:40:060:40:10

-on the day...

-Really?

-..but we'll protect it with an £800 reserve.

0:40:100:40:13

-Right. Yes, I think...

-If that's all right with you.

-Yes.

-Very good.

0:40:130:40:16

-Perfect.

-It's fine.

-If we do get you, say...

0:40:160:40:20

..the top end of the estimate, £1,200,

0:40:210:40:23

would you put it towards anything in particular?

0:40:230:40:26

Erm...

0:40:260:40:27

-Not sure.

-Ooh.

0:40:270:40:30

-You've got ideas, Jane.

-I've got ideas.

-Go on, tell them.

0:40:300:40:32

Well, I think we'd go and have a nice holiday in France.

0:40:320:40:35

-Oh, wonderful!

-Don't you think?

-What a wonderful idea.

0:40:350:40:38

-Well, I can't think of a better idea.

-Well, there you are then.

0:40:380:40:40

I think that would be wonderful

0:40:400:40:42

-because then while you're sipping a nice bottle of red...

-Right.

0:40:420:40:45

..you could be thinking, "This is all on my chipped Moorcroft bowl."

0:40:450:40:49

Fingers crossed that bowl will deliver

0:40:490:40:51

when it goes under the hammer later on.

0:40:510:40:53

Let's catch up with Catherine who's found one of her favourite things.

0:40:530:40:57

Well, Juliet, it's wonderful to be up here at Guildford Cathedral

0:40:570:41:03

and equally exciting to see something as delicious as this.

0:41:030:41:08

Tell me a bit about it.

0:41:080:41:09

I don't know anything about it, Catherine, I'm afraid.

0:41:090:41:12

It came from my mother, who in turn would've got it from

0:41:120:41:16

her father's antique shop.

0:41:160:41:18

Not a family heirloom or anything like that.

0:41:180:41:20

So, do you think this is something that perhaps somebody

0:41:200:41:23

came in to sell to him one day in the antiques shop

0:41:230:41:26

-and perhaps he saw that and thought...

-I would say so.

0:41:260:41:29

-..I like that. I'm taking that home.

-Yes, a bit like you, then, Catherine.

0:41:290:41:32

Well, I'll tell you what.

0:41:320:41:33

If I saw that, if I had an antiques shop and someone brought

0:41:330:41:35

that in to me to sell, I would pick it up and take that straight home.

0:41:350:41:38

-It is, it's a nice item.

-Which is probably what he's done.

0:41:380:41:41

-It's very tactile.

-Absolutely,

0:41:410:41:42

I mean, it's a great piece essentially of treen.

0:41:420:41:45

-But...

-Right.

0:41:450:41:47

..it is a snuff box.

0:41:470:41:50

-They're normally the smaller ones, the pocket sized ones.

-Yes.

0:41:500:41:53

But this is the sort of thing that you would have had on the table

0:41:530:41:56

so, perhaps it would've been passed around the table

0:41:560:41:59

but what makes this different from others is all this inlay.

0:41:590:42:06

The mother of pearl and the ebony.

0:42:060:42:08

There's an awful lot of work that's gone into this.

0:42:080:42:11

It's absolutely super.

0:42:110:42:13

It's head and shoulders above anything else I've seen.

0:42:130:42:16

Well, let's have a look at this inscription and try

0:42:160:42:18

and clarify what it says.

0:42:180:42:21

A...

0:42:210:42:22

Present...

0:42:220:42:24

And then I love the way it's got the hand in mother of pearl with

0:42:240:42:28

the word to, so "A present to", arrow up,

0:42:280:42:33

"Miss C M Brae"

0:42:330:42:36

and we know nothing about Brae. We don't know who she is.

0:42:360:42:39

Nothing at all. No.

0:42:390:42:41

The...

0:42:410:42:42

sinner...sinners

0:42:420:42:45

because what they've done here is they've forgotten the S.

0:42:450:42:47

-So they've quickly studded it up the top.

-I know. Very sort of...

0:42:470:42:52

It's wonderful.

0:42:520:42:53

-That's their mistake.

-Yeah, wonderful.

0:42:530:42:55

The sinners...earthly...friend.

0:42:550:42:58

Sinners earthly friend, lovely.

0:42:580:43:00

Then underneath, of course, you've got the important bit to me.

0:43:000:43:04

-He died for me. And there's a little picture of her there.

-Yeah.

0:43:040:43:09

And they've got a name stamped in here of...H Lodge.

0:43:090:43:14

That's possibly the maker.

0:43:140:43:16

-Maker, would you think? I don't know.

-Maybe the owner.

0:43:160:43:19

What I love about it is there are all these questions over it.

0:43:200:43:23

Who owned it? Who was Miss Brae?

0:43:230:43:25

And I think that's what makes it interesting.

0:43:250:43:28

I know. We've always wondered.

0:43:280:43:30

-It's a shame we've got this split in front.

-I know.

0:43:300:43:32

-Have you always known it...?

-Yes, it's always been like that.

0:43:320:43:35

-Ever since I can remember.

-Right.

0:43:350:43:36

But only one piece, I think, after all those years!

0:43:360:43:39

I don't know, but how old is it?

0:43:390:43:41

-I would date it to 1860s.

-Right.

0:43:410:43:43

That sort of period. It's just pure class, isn't it?

0:43:430:43:48

-It's absolutely super.

-Thank you.

0:43:480:43:50

Now, the question of flogging it,

0:43:500:43:53

-that's what it all comes down to.

-Yeah.

0:43:530:43:55

I can see a lot of people getting excited about this in the same

0:43:570:44:01

-way that I have.

-OK.

0:44:010:44:03

I would like to put

0:44:030:44:05

a saleroom estimate on

0:44:050:44:08

-of £150 to £250.

-That is very nice.

0:44:080:44:10

-Is that good?

-Yes, that's great.

0:44:100:44:12

-But I wouldn't be surprised if it went very high.

-OK.

0:44:120:44:16

Pure...

0:44:170:44:19

-..class. Thank you.

-You really do like it, don't you?

0:44:200:44:22

I really do like it.

0:44:220:44:24

-Really, really do.

-Oh, I'm really pleased. I'm glad you like it.

0:44:240:44:28

# Hey, I put some new shoes on and suddenly everything's right... #

0:44:280:44:33

I've found a quiet corner away from the valuation table to take

0:44:330:44:36

a closer look at one of the many interesting items in the cathedral.

0:44:360:44:41

Earlier on, I discovered a fascinating carpet

0:44:410:44:44

here in the cathedral but the whole place is full of wonderful

0:44:440:44:47

treasures and behind me there's another one.

0:44:470:44:49

A crosier.

0:44:490:44:50

Which resembles, as you can see here, a shepherd's staff.

0:44:500:44:54

Normally carried by the abbot or the bishop as a symbol of office.

0:44:540:44:58

Now this particular crosier was designed by one of the greatest

0:44:580:45:01

craftsman and designers of the Art Nouveau period,

0:45:010:45:04

Omar Ramsden.

0:45:040:45:06

Born in Sheffield, he worked designing throughout his life

0:45:060:45:09

on many church commissions, right up until his death in 1939.

0:45:090:45:13

This was made for the first bishop of Guildford, sterling silver,

0:45:130:45:17

it's all hallmarked with the London Assay office

0:45:170:45:20

with the leopard's head and the date letter telling us 1927.

0:45:200:45:25

I love this carved ivory ram here within the hook

0:45:250:45:28

but look at this wonderful, wonderful enamel work.

0:45:280:45:32

Something that you associate Omar Ramsden with.

0:45:320:45:35

Glass, coloured glass fused at high temperatures.

0:45:350:45:38

I particularly like this little image of the tree of life.

0:45:380:45:41

It works perfectly well here in this cathedral.

0:45:410:45:44

Sitting on a wonderful rosewood shaft.

0:45:440:45:48

Now, isn't that a real treasure?

0:45:480:45:50

And we come across Omar Ramsden's work a lot on the show

0:45:500:45:53

and it's a big name to look out for.

0:45:530:45:56

Well, right now, let's hook up with our experts

0:45:560:45:58

and see what else we can find to take off to auction.

0:45:580:46:02

Anne, where did this pocket watch come from?

0:46:100:46:13

Well, I inherited it through my parents

0:46:130:46:16

and it belonged to my great grandfather.

0:46:160:46:18

And I really can't tell you that much more about it.

0:46:180:46:20

It's for long service, it's inscribed in the back.

0:46:200:46:23

-I think we should really see the inscription, don't you?

-Yes.

0:46:230:46:27

So, it says...

0:46:270:46:28

For 46 years' service in 1938.

0:46:350:46:38

Do you know what he did for ICI?

0:46:380:46:40

-Well, I believe he worked in the salt mines.

-Oh, wow.

0:46:400:46:43

Because he always used to put loads of salt on everything.

0:46:430:46:46

-I can just remember him.

-So, he smothered his food with salt?

0:46:460:46:50

-Absolutely.

-It's that old adage, isn't it?

0:46:500:46:52

When you did 25 years' service as a retirement gift you got

0:46:520:46:55

a gold pocket watch.

0:46:550:46:57

I don't think they do it quite so much today.

0:46:570:46:59

No, well, because we don't use pocket watches like we used to.

0:46:590:47:03

No, nobody does.

0:47:030:47:04

The nice thing about it, in this case, it is actually a gold one.

0:47:040:47:08

A lot of gold pocket watches we see are actually only gold plated.

0:47:080:47:12

-But this one is hallmarked.

-Yes.

0:47:120:47:14

Nine carat gold and hallmarked in 1938,

0:47:140:47:16

so it was brand-new at the time.

0:47:160:47:18

But it's got a fairly straightforward movement on it.

0:47:180:47:21

-Right.

-And a fairly straightforward maker.

0:47:210:47:23

It's nice that it's got its box.

0:47:240:47:26

But sadly, the value lies in the fact that it is nine carat gold.

0:47:260:47:30

-Yeah.

-And it will probably end up being melted down

0:47:300:47:33

-to be made into something else.

-Yes, I expected that.

0:47:330:47:36

-So, you're not worried about that?

-Not at all, no.

0:47:360:47:39

So, it just lives in a drawer at home?

0:47:390:47:41

It lives in the loft with lots of other bits and bobs.

0:47:410:47:44

Who do I give it to? Two sons, three grandsons.

0:47:440:47:47

-Can't split it in three, can you?

-They don't want it,

0:47:470:47:49

-they'd rather have a phone.

-Of course they would.

0:47:490:47:51

That's absolutely right.

0:47:510:47:53

Now, have you got an idea of how much it's worth?

0:47:530:47:56

-A couple of hundred, I thought.

-I think that's probably about right.

0:47:580:48:01

I mean, we've weighed it as much as we can because obviously...

0:48:010:48:05

Without the workings.

0:48:050:48:06

And a sensible auction estimate is probably in the region

0:48:060:48:10

-of £150 to £250.

-Yeah.

0:48:100:48:13

And it will fluctuate, of course, because when the auction comes up,

0:48:130:48:16

it will be affected by the price of gold on that particular day.

0:48:160:48:19

But I think we should put a fixed reserve of £150 on it.

0:48:190:48:22

Yes, that's absolutely fine.

0:48:220:48:24

-And then it protects it a little bit.

-Yes.

0:48:240:48:26

-And it's...really not a lot more one can say about it.

-I know.

0:48:260:48:29

Other than it's time for it to go and be turned into something else,

0:48:290:48:33

-isn't it?

-Yes, I think you're absolutely right.

0:48:330:48:35

-Thank you, Anne.

-Time to go.

-Time to go.

0:48:350:48:38

Robert, I don't know about you but I do like a glass of champagne.

0:48:390:48:43

-Are you a champagne drinker?

-I am and always have been.

0:48:430:48:46

And you've brought me along a champagne swizzle stick

0:48:460:48:50

for dipping in your champagne,

0:48:500:48:54

giving a little swizzle and getting rid of your bubbles.

0:48:540:48:57

I don't know about you, Robert, but I like bubbles in my champagne.

0:48:570:49:00

I mean, that's the whole point of it, at the end of the day, isn't it?

0:49:000:49:03

In many ways you're right.

0:49:030:49:05

I agree with you, I prefer them.

0:49:050:49:08

But I think the ladies of the 19th and 18th century,

0:49:080:49:12

rather than get the champagne up their nose

0:49:120:49:14

or going over their dresses,

0:49:140:49:16

liked to disperse them somewhat and that became the style.

0:49:160:49:20

-Not so much now.

-Nowadays, it's just a novelty, isn't it?

0:49:200:49:24

-Absolutely, yes, it is.

-So, where did you get this from?

0:49:240:49:27

From a friend who gave it to me in 1990, roughly.

0:49:270:49:34

We'd rather enjoyed champagne, particularly Krug.

0:49:340:49:40

Ohhh!

0:49:400:49:42

But, of course, those were the days

0:49:420:49:44

when I was working reasonably successfully.

0:49:440:49:46

Right, OK, so you were a bit of a champagne drinker 20-odd years ago?

0:49:460:49:49

I was, yes.

0:49:490:49:51

It's a bit of fun, isn't it? It's a novelty piece, really.

0:49:510:49:54

It's something you could have when you've got all your friends round,

0:49:540:49:57

having a dinner party or a drink, cheese and wine, or what have you,

0:49:570:50:01

and you have a glass of champagne.

0:50:010:50:03

-It's a talking point, isn't it?

-Very much so.

0:50:030:50:05

This is nine-carat gold, as you may know.

0:50:050:50:10

It's stamped here. And it's quite nice quality, it's engine turned.

0:50:100:50:14

Quite a simple piece.

0:50:140:50:16

-But, at the end of the day, it's a bit of class, isn't it?

-Yeah, maybe.

0:50:160:50:21

-Not for you any more?

-I think not, no.

-Time to move on. Well, ish.

0:50:210:50:26

It must be quite sentimental to you.

0:50:260:50:27

Quite special as a friend gave it to you.

0:50:270:50:30

-Are you sure you're wanting to sell this?

-Well, yes, I think so.

0:50:300:50:34

It's not going to be a huge amount of money.

0:50:340:50:36

I'm not going to dazzle you with a big figure.

0:50:360:50:39

-I would say £70-£100, how's that?

-Lovely, to buy a bottle of Krug.

0:50:390:50:43

BOTH LAUGH

0:50:430:50:46

I like your answer, that's perfect! OK, let's put it in the sale.

0:50:460:50:51

£70-£100, with a £70 reserve because it was a gift,

0:50:510:50:56

so I think we need to protect it. Are you happy with that?

0:50:560:51:00

-I'm very happy with that.

-And I tell you what, if you get your champagne,

0:51:000:51:04

-can I have a glass as well?

-Well, of course you can! THEY CHUCKLE

0:51:040:51:08

An interesting and unusual find for Catherine there.

0:51:080:51:11

What a fabulous turn out we've had here today at Guildford Cathedral.

0:51:120:51:16

Such a memorable day. We've found some wonderful treasures as well.

0:51:160:51:19

We're heading off to the auction room for the very last time

0:51:190:51:22

so it's time for us to say goodbye to this magnificent venue

0:51:220:51:26

and all of these wonderful people who have turned up today.

0:51:260:51:29

Let's put those last valuations to the test

0:51:290:51:31

and here's a quick recap of what we're taking with us.

0:51:310:51:35

Mark was enthusiastic about the Moorcroft bowl

0:51:350:51:38

but will the bidders feel the same?

0:51:380:51:39

Time's definitely up for the gold pocket watch.

0:51:410:51:43

And there's that fascinating snuff shoe.

0:51:450:51:48

Let's hope the champagne swizzle stick will pop some corks.

0:51:500:51:53

Welcome back to the auction room here in Washington.

0:51:570:52:00

Auctioneer Rupert Toovey is on the rostrum

0:52:000:52:02

and ready to sell our next item and the bidders are raring to go.

0:52:020:52:05

Let's hope we see lots of action.

0:52:050:52:08

I had a quick chat with Rupert before the auction started

0:52:080:52:10

and he had some reservations about one of our items.

0:52:100:52:13

Right, the Moorcroft bowl, the dawn landscape.

0:52:140:52:17

It's got some damage. It's a lovely bowl, a generous size as well.

0:52:170:52:21

Beautiful, that English interpretation of the Art Nouveau

0:52:210:52:24

is wonderful and especially in these landscape patterns with Moorcroft,

0:52:240:52:27

-don't you think?

-And I love that colourway as well.

0:52:270:52:29

-Without the damage, £2,000.

-I think you're right.

0:52:290:52:33

But with this restoration on the rim, I'm afraid, you know,

0:52:330:52:36

we might struggle to get £800, you know.

0:52:360:52:39

Is that because there hasn't been a lot of presale interest

0:52:390:52:42

or is it your gut feeling?

0:52:420:52:43

Huge amount of interest but real concerns about this nick on the rim.

0:52:430:52:47

-As soon as they see it, they go...

-Yeah.

-.."that's put me off."

0:52:470:52:50

Collectors are a fussy breed and I totally agree with them.

0:52:500:52:53

If you want to invest in something, you invest in the best.

0:52:530:52:56

And now it's the moment of truth for the bowl.

0:52:580:53:00

Jane and Mike, it's good to see you again.

0:53:010:53:04

-We've been talking about your large Moorcroft bowl.

-Thank you.

0:53:040:53:07

Oh, it's created all sorts of topic of conversation because

0:53:070:53:10

-of that little bit of damage around the rim...

-I know, it's a shame.

0:53:100:53:13

-..which has been restored.

-Yes.

-I think at the valuation day

0:53:130:53:15

Mark probably said to you without the damage,

0:53:150:53:17

you'd be looking at around £2,000.

0:53:170:53:19

-That's why we have a value of around £800 on this.

-That's right.

0:53:190:53:22

It's really knocked it down a size or two.

0:53:220:53:25

-Not in my time.

-Not in your time it didn't happen, no.

0:53:250:53:28

-It's still a lovely piece.

-Oh, it's gorgeous, isn't it?

0:53:280:53:30

We're going to find out right now exactly what damage matters

0:53:300:53:34

-to a piece of Moorcroft.

-Lovely.

-Let's see.

0:53:340:53:36

Large Moorcroft pottery lustre,

0:53:360:53:38

glazed dawn landscape patterns, circular bowl. Circa 1928.

0:53:380:53:42

It's beautifully decorated with a little restored chip.

0:53:420:53:45

But I'm opening the bidding here at £700. At £700, can I see the 720?

0:53:450:53:50

At £700. 720, can I see?

0:53:500:53:52

At £700. Can I see the 720?

0:53:520:53:54

Come on, we need one more hundred.

0:53:540:53:56

At £700. Anything online?

0:53:560:53:59

No, sir.

0:53:590:54:00

No? At £700 then, all done.

0:54:000:54:03

At £700 and we're passing it at 700.

0:54:030:54:07

-It didn't sell, Jane.

-Never mind.

-That's such a shame.

0:54:090:54:12

-I'm pleased you protected it with a reserve.

-Yes, I shan't mind.

0:54:120:54:16

Because I shall be able to...I actually took a photograph of it

0:54:160:54:20

-so I had it if it did sell. Oh, well.

-Sorry about that.

-Sorry.

0:54:200:54:23

We tried our hardest but, you know, the collectors are fussy,

0:54:230:54:26

-aren't they?

-Yes.

0:54:260:54:28

Going under the hammer right now, something from the '70s

0:54:290:54:32

and I wouldn't necessarily say '70s when I think of this.

0:54:320:54:35

It's a champagne twizzle stick, belonging to Robert.

0:54:350:54:38

Are you still knocking back the champagne?

0:54:380:54:40

-A bit, but not quite as much as I was.

-Not so much.

0:54:400:54:42

-Right, well, let's put it to the test, shall we?

-Absolutely.

0:54:420:54:45

See what it makes.

0:54:450:54:47

And we're opening the bidding here at...£85.

0:54:470:54:50

£85, can I see the 90? Conflicting bids on the books here at £85.

0:54:500:54:55

At £85, 90 going to see? At £85 and 90 and five for 100? 95 here?

0:54:550:55:01

At 95 against the room?

0:55:010:55:03

At 95, all done?

0:55:030:55:05

-At 95! 95.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:55:050:55:08

95 and the hammer's gone down!

0:55:080:55:10

-That's a good result. Are you happy with that?

-I am.

0:55:100:55:14

-And I'm going to enjoy a lunch on Worthing front.

-Brilliant.

0:55:140:55:18

-Very nice, with champagne.

-Fish and chips.

-Fish and chips and champagne.

0:55:180:55:21

-Now, that...that is style, isn't it?

-Yes!

0:55:210:55:25

So, Robert's going home happy and hopefully,

0:55:250:55:27

someone will be enjoying a glass or two with that swizzle stick.

0:55:270:55:30

Fingers crossed for our next item, it belongs to Anne.

0:55:300:55:33

We're selling a gold keyless wind open face pocket watch

0:55:330:55:36

and this is quality.

0:55:360:55:37

-We've got how much? £150 to £250?

-Yes.

0:55:370:55:40

Why are you selling this?

0:55:400:55:42

I have three grandsons, two sons, who do you give it to?

0:55:420:55:46

-Yeah.

-And they don't want it.

-No. Do you know something?

0:55:460:55:48

-No-one uses them, do they?

-Never.

-No.

0:55:480:55:50

The older they get, the more they'll want it, that's the problem.

0:55:500:55:52

-Too late now.

-It's too late.

-Grandma's spending the money.

0:55:520:55:55

-Going to spend it on yourself?

-I'm going to buy something, yes, I am.

0:55:560:56:00

Well, right, let's put this to the test,

0:56:000:56:02

let's see if we can get the top end.

0:56:020:56:04

A nine carat gold keyless wind, open face gentlemen's pocket watch.

0:56:040:56:07

Opening the bidding here with conflicting bids.

0:56:070:56:09

All the way up to £280.

0:56:100:56:13

-£280!

-£280.

0:56:130:56:15

£280.

0:56:150:56:17

All the bidding on the book at £280.

0:56:170:56:19

Is there any more, anywhere?

0:56:190:56:21

At £280.

0:56:210:56:24

Selling then at 280. 280.

0:56:240:56:26

-Good result.

-Well done.

-Top end of the estimate.

-That's marvellous.

0:56:260:56:29

-Fantastic.

-That's great.

0:56:290:56:31

Easy, wasn't it?

0:56:310:56:33

So, Anne's going home happy with a bit more than she expected.

0:56:330:56:36

Let's see if our final item can do just as well.

0:56:360:56:40

We've seen them on the show before but not as good as this

0:56:400:56:42

-and as big as this.

-No, never.

-Wow, wow, wow!

0:56:420:56:45

-I know, it's pretty, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Lovely.

0:56:450:56:47

This is a piece of social history and I think, you know,

0:56:470:56:49

we should easily double, if not triple what you've put on it.

0:56:490:56:53

-That's what I hope.

-That's what I'd like to think.

-Yes.

0:56:530:56:55

-I knew you would like this.

-Oh, I love it. Absolutely love it.

0:56:550:56:58

-It's fab.

-Yes, yes, yes. Great item of treen.

-I know.

0:56:580:57:01

And thank you for bringing it in, put a smile on all our faces.

0:57:010:57:03

-Yes.

-And I shall smile watching this as well.

-I know.

-Anyway, good luck!

0:57:030:57:06

-I'm excited. Thank you.

-Let's get that top end plus. Here we go.

0:57:060:57:10

19th century mahogany snuff box in the form of a shoe.

0:57:100:57:13

It's inlaid with mother of pearl and has the most wonderful

0:57:130:57:16

presentation inscription inside it, lovely thing.

0:57:160:57:19

And we're opening this lovely thing with conflicting bids at £320.

0:57:190:57:23

-320, commission bid.

-Straight in!

-Wow!

0:57:230:57:27

£320. Can I see the 350?

0:57:270:57:30

£320. Is there any advance?

0:57:300:57:32

350, 380, 400.

0:57:320:57:34

420. 450.

0:57:340:57:36

-£420 here.

-Well, I'm not surprised.

0:57:360:57:39

£420. Can I see the 450?

0:57:390:57:42

At £420 and fair warning then.

0:57:420:57:45

At £420.

0:57:450:57:48

-Wow!

-£420.

-You said so.

-I did, I told you £400 to £500, didn't I?

0:57:490:57:53

-Yes, you did.

-Yeah, I told Catherine that as well back at the cathedral.

0:57:530:57:57

Well, that's it. It's all over for our owners and what a day it's been.

0:58:010:58:04

I hope you've enjoyed the show and do remember

0:58:040:58:07

if you've got any antiques you think would do well in auction,

0:58:070:58:10

we would love to see you at one of our valuation days.

0:58:100:58:13

Details of up and coming dates and venues you can find on our

0:58:130:58:16

BBC website, or check the details in your local press.

0:58:160:58:19

We would love to see you but until then,

0:58:190:58:22

from West Sussex, it's goodbye.

0:58:220:58:23

Paul Martin presents from Guildford Cathedral with experts Mark Stacey and Catherine Southon, where the team pick out a selection of antiques and collectables to be sold at auction. Mark discovers a large Moorcroft bowl, and Catherine finds a wooden snuff holder in the shape of a shoe, but the real star of the show is a music box.

Paul also visits Weald and Downland Museum, where they preserve entire buildings from the local area for generations to come, goes hands-on with part of the restoration process and takes a look at the world's first motor racing track, going for a spin in a 1930s sports car.