Manchester 13 Flog It!


Manchester 13

Paul Martin is joined by Caroline Hawley and Micheal Baggott at Manchester's Museum of Science and Industry, which charts the city's role in the industrial revolution.


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Transcript


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The city I'm in today has a long association with this - TV.

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It's home to the world's longest-running soap drama.

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CORONATION STREET THEME TUNE

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And the award-winning programmes such as Mastermind...

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and Question Of Sport.

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And just a few miles down the road, there's a media hub,

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which boasts state-of-the-art technology for the BBC,

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ITV and dozens of other creative companies.

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The city with a massive reputation for media is, of course, Manchester.

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Welcome to "Flog It!".

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Manchester's media legacy is not just confined to the box.

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In 1821, a local newspaper called the Manchester Guardian,

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was formed by cotton merchant, John Edward Taylor.

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It became nationally important

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and nearly 200 years later is still found on newsstands

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across the country, albeit with a slightly different name.

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And you can read all about it at our "Flog It!" location -

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the Museum Of Science And Industry.

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The front-page news starts here

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at the doors of our "Flog It!" valuation day.

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We've got our cameras ready to record the moment some lucky

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person here in this queue makes a small fortune

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later on in the programme at auction.

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And sniffing out the stories

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and checking the facts are Caroline Hawley...

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Goodness me!

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She's lovely. We'll show your bust inside, sir. When you get in.

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..and Michael Baggott.

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-Bless you for coming out - not the best day in Manchester today.

-I know, I'm frozen.

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But everyone's turned out, isn't it lovely?

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Oh, yea! Oh, yea! Oh, yea! "Flog It!" is in town.

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Yes, we are here!

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And we better get the doors open to our fantastic venue today.

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The Museum Of Science And Industry charts Manchester's integral role

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in the Industrial Revolution, from a working example

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of a treacherous loom, to the steam engines that powered it all.

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"Flog It!", "Flog It!", "Flog It!", "Flog It!", "Flog It!".

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That's what it's all about here today.

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Hundreds of people have turned up.

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They're all safely seated inside, hoping they're one of the lucky ones

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to go through to the auction later on.

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Our experts are now at the valuation tables,

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so let's catch up with Caroline and see what she's found.

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I'm joined by Vic, Huddersfield's town crier,

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-who really has brought something to shout about.

-Yeah, hopefully.

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-Can we look inside?

-Yes, certainly. By all means.

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What a lovely piece!

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Well, this piece of jewellery was given to me after I'd done

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a little job at the Town Hall in Huddersfield for Age Concern.

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The lady in charge had asked all the ladies in the audience

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if they'd any pieces of jewellery,

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would they like to donate it to me because I was going to try

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-for the most pieces of jewellery on the costume.

-Right.

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And I got a message that this had been left.

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I went along and she left me this card

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and then the local paper picked it up

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because of the provenance, and so I've brought it along today.

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And the provenance is what?

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-The provenance is that it belonged to Charlie Chaplin.

-Wow.

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-Apparently he married the lady's mother...

-Right.

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..in around about 1905.

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So Charlie bought this for his wife?

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-For his wife at the time.

-Yes, at the time.

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-He was a bit of a lad, was Charlie.

-Was he? Tell me.

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He was married three, four times, over the years.

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-So, he'd have to buy quite a bit of jewellery.

-Yes.

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This is a lovely piece.

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It's around turn-of-the-century, so that would tie in.

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Sadly, it's not diamonds. It's paste.

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It's just silver plated on brass, you can see here.

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I don't know if you've noticed,

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-there's more to this little brooch than meets the eye.

-Oh, yes.

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It's a brooch here, but we can unclip these,

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so you've got the brooch and then these double as lapel badges.

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We thought they were earrings at first,

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but then you see the big points in them.

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They'd make a hell of a mess of your ears!

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They've got big, sharp teeth to clip onto lapels.

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Which are really lovely, so you get three bits of jewellery for the price of one.

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-So he was a mean old Chaplin, wasn't he?

-Yes, he was.

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But very nice indeed, so we've got a letter here which gives us

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brilliant provenance from the daughter of Charlie Chaplin, stating

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this is her mother's jewel, given by her father, Charlie Chaplin.

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And then a press cutting about you receiving

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the jewel from Charlie Chaplin's daughter.

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But as a piece of jewellery by itself,

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it isn't worth a huge amount of money -

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£10, £20, that sort of thing.

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But with all this, I think it's going to get a premium.

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-So I would say...£40-£60. Are you happy with that?

-Yes, absolutely.

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We're running the Town Crier Championships this year

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in Huddersfield, so it's all going towards that.

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That will be a noisy event? Oh, yes!

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25 town criers, all their wives in their troop, crinoline dresses.

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Oh, and what's the collective term?

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-A cacophony of town criers.

-Is it?

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Cacophony of town criers, yes.

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I look forward to seeing you at the auction.

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-Yes, it'll be nice, I shall enjoy that. Thank you very much.

-Brilliant.

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The experts at the auction house will research this provenance

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and try to validate it.

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That's the great thing about selling at auction.

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Caroline's not the only expert to spot a sparkler today,

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but can you guess what's in this box?

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Nicky, Maddie, thanks for coming along today

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and bringing some jewellery with you.

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These aren't things you're tempted, either of you, to wear?

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I haven't been tempted.

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Nicola used to wear the bracelet when she was a little girl.

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My mum used to give it to her to dress up in.

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This is a charm bracelet, it's a relatively early one,

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early part of the 20th century.

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You've got all the individual charms.

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It isn't something that's greatly of intrinsic value

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and artistically, it's something we see a lot of.

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So really, that's its weight in gold in terms of value.

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-So that's worth about £100-£150.

-Right.

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What's much more interesting

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and the reason I grabbed you both, is the contents of the mystery box.

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-Shall we open the mystery box?

-Yes, please.

-Don't be scared.

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-THEY GIGGLE

-Good God!

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I don't want to offend you but that has to be possibly the most

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grotesque pair of earrings I've ever seen in my life.

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-That's why we're trying to flog it.

-We agree!

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You've basically got something that's supposed to be

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a branch of coral or something.

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But with a fly on it!

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You get bumblebees, you get dragonflies.

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You don't get flies on things.

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And then you've got this sort of disembodied hand hanging down

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and from it you've got this little heart.

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The main parts are carved in mother-of-pearl

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and then they're set with coral, which makes me think -

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especially from the way it's constructed -

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that it's from around the Mediterranean area.

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-Yeah.

-Have you got any family history with this?

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My grandmother is from Las Palmas, Gran Canaria.

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Perfect. A sort of Spanish feel, Mediterranean jewellery.

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Of course, the coral was supposed to protect you from evil.

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So you would wear them, bad things wouldn't happen to you.

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They're quite old. Have you any idea when they were made?

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I think they might be about 100 years old.

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Probably a little bit earlier than that.

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They're probably about 1860, 1880.

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-Really?!

-Oh, my God!

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Value is difficult because we've got one little fly missing

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and a little heart missing.

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But sometimes things come along that are so quirky, you give them a go.

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Give them a go at auction. I think...

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£40-£80 and put a fixed reserve of £30 on them.

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Because that's the intrinsic value of the materials.

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We'll see, they might make 100 quid, they might make 30.

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We've got 100 to 150 for the bracelet and a fixed reserve of 100 on that.

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So, if we get the top end, what are the plans for the money?

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Buy more beads and make my own jewellery.

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-You make your own jewellery?!

-Yeah.

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I can't think of any better thing to do than to sell something old and outdated

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and make something new and beautiful with it.

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Marvellous, let's hope they do really well on the day.

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-Thank you.

-Thanks very much.

-Thanks very much.

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Love them or hate them, they are up for auction.

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Will anyone want to give these quirky earrings a new home?

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Here we are in the Power Hall, surrounded by the noisy,

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steamy engines and all that made Manchester great,

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to the peaceful pastime of card playing and this lovely box.

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Tell me about it, Edna.

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I bought it at a car-boot sale about five years ago.

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-Do you remember what you paid for it?

-£10.

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£10! I love it. Do you?

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I do, I like it, it's just been on top of the piano in my dining room.

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You don't play cards?

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-Play the odd game of snap.

-Do you?

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-That's it.

-Let's have a look at it.

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It's walnut, mid-Victorian.

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Gilded brass edges to it,

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it's mounted with ivory cards on the top.

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It's a really, lovely, quality thing.

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-Shall we look inside?

-Yes.

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This would have belonged to a fairly wealthy family.

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It's very, very good quality.

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It's lined in watermarked silk taffeta...at the top.

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Beautiful condition.

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Even the little pulls here that pull out the cards,

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perfect condition.

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Possibly would have been two other packs of cards there.

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-And I think in here there would have been counters.

-Oh, would they? right.

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And these here, are square-cut cards

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because the modern cards are rounded edges, aren't they?

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Now, it's all indicative of quality, taste.

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Somebody...perhaps made wealthy by the Industrial Revolution

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in Manchester.

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-A wealthy card player.

-Yeah.

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I think there's a lot of people that would want it,

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not least the bridge players, poker players.

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I would put a valuation on this of between £100 and £200.

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SHE GASPS

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-You happy with that?

-Very.

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Good, that's a fair return on your £10 investment.

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So many people have travelled for miles to get here today,

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carrying unwanted antiques and collectables.

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Many of them are small, in handbags and carrier bags, but look at this.

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Look what's being opened now, look at that,

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a massive, great big suitcase on wheels. Let's be nosey.

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-Hello, there.

-Hello.

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I spotted you in the queue and I said, "Are you going on holiday?"

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-Oh, no, my towel's out, don't!

-What's your name?

-Tracey.

-Tracey.

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-Are you both here together?

-Yes.

-Are you sisters?

-No.

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Just good friends, just good friends. OK.

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Come on, let's get in there. Do you need a hand?

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-Oh, that's nice. It's a little inlay cabinet, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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With a bit of a brass inlay.

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Oh!

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-This is clingfilmed up now.

-Oh, that's nice. Look at that.

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A wonderful little serpentine front to it.

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THEY OOH

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Is this something you want to sell?

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-Yes.

-Well, it looks complete, as well, doesn't it?

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-So how did you come by this?

-I bought it from the internet.

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-How much did you pay for it?

-Just under 700.

-Just under?

-Yeah.

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-There is one thing, there's only 15 gilded glasses.

-Is there one missing?

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There is one, but it's not gilded.

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It's very impressive when you open the cabinet.

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It is, yeah, especially the little decanters decorated in gilt

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with the trailing grape and vine.

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You know, it's a nice little touch, it's a beautiful little touch.

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I just like this inlay.

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-It's a good interior piece.

-It's a very good interior piece.

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It has a serpentine top and a serpentine front.

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So it's quite stylish. So typical of the period.

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We could put it in with a value of £600 to £800

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with a reserve at six.

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-And hopefully it might make £1,000.

-Yeah.

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There's three experts here going, "Go on, go on, go on!"

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I just think it's very, very pretty. It's a nice piece.

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And if you're not using it at home

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and you don't know what to do with it.

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There's a lot of detail there. There's an awful lot of detail.

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Tracey bought the 19th-century decanters for £700,

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but she's happy to set the reserve at £600 in the hope

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that it'll make more money. Will the gamble pay off?

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While everyone's busy here,

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I'm off to do something completely different.

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# Once upon a time, not too long ago

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# We took a day out in Manchester

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# We all fall down

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# There's not enough hours in a day... #

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Manchester's musical history is unique.

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It spans genres and generations.

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It's created movements in pop and rock

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that have swept right through the nation.

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But how can so much talent come from one place?

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And how is Manchester able to repeat that trick time and time again?

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Well, to find out, let's take it from the top.

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Our journey through Manchester's music history

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starts long before the rock and roll revolution.

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In the 18th century, when the Industrial Revolution

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started to paint the town black, the emerging middle classes

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had an increasing appetite for the arts

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and so they were entertained with classical concerts

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by amateur musicians.

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This gentlemen's orchestra became a fixture in the city

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over the next century under the leadership

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of German-born Charles Halle.

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The first Halle concert was held at the Free Trade Hall

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on January 30th, 1858.

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Thus becoming one of Britain's first professional symphony orchestras.

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Until 1895, Sir Charles Halle conducted

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almost every concert in the city.

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His orchestra still plays today to international acclaim.

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Perhaps Charles Halle was Manchester's first music legend.

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Classical concerts and amateur folk music

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could be heard throughout Manchester well into the 20th century.

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But it was the Second World War

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that really upped the tempo of Manchester's musical heartbeat.

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American troops were based all over the city during the '40s

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and they brought with them American style, American lingo

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and the American sounds of the day.

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The troops gave out free records to the locals

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and soon young people were tapping their feet to RnB, jazz

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and the sounds of black America.

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This coincided with the rise of the teenager,

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and these newly liberated teens wanted a place of their own,

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their own fashions and their own music.

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And for the baby-boomers of Manchester,

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the jukebox played the soundtrack of their lives and the coffee bars

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in the city were a place where they could just hang out and

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dance to their own music,

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away from the constraints of the older generation.

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Out of these coffee bars sprang the first nightclubs,

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where young people in Manchester

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could listen to their favourite music all night long.

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Legendary club, The Twisted Wheel, was the place

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and it gave birth to a home-grown genre that took its influences

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from America,

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but which is unmistakably Manchester and it's still going strong today.

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I'm being joined by Ivor Abadi, who opened the club in 1963.

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Something extraordinary happened in the '60s.

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It was the young 16 and 17-year-olds, the baby boom,

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after the war and they suddenly wanted a place to go to.

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I recognised that from five years earlier.

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With my brother Jack and Phillip, we came to 1962

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and then we found this basement in Brasenose Street

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and we opened it up. It was a coffee-dance club and

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-unbelievably it was successful from day one.

-Tell me about the music.

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We didn't want to play very commercial...

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Like The Beatles, The Kinks? Stuff that was happening...

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Yeah. We didn't really... We played The Beatles,

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-but we wouldn't be playing too much of The Kinks.

-You're obviously playing a lot of blues,

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everybody wanted to hear blues, but it started to get into soul.

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-Absolutely.

-And that's when it really kicked off?

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Well, blues was sort of The Graham Bond Organisation,

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-which you may have heard of.

-I have, yeah.

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Sonny Boy Williamson, playing his harmonica.

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But from the blues, it slowly moved

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into something a bit more Tamla Motown and soul music

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with all the American acts that we brought over, as well.

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Towards the late '60s, The Twisted Wheel DJs

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played a particular style of soul

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that had a quick tempo and a heavy beat.

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The tracks went down a storm and a craze swept the nation.

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Just define to me what is northern soul

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and where did it originate?

0:18:080:18:10

The term was coined, I think, by Dave Godin from Blues & Soul magazine

0:18:100:18:15

and he came up from London and was just astounded at the atmosphere

0:18:150:18:20

and the mood in the club.

0:18:200:18:23

And he, you know, in his big article called A Thousand Dances,

0:18:230:18:26

I think it was, called it northern soul,

0:18:260:18:29

as in distinguishing between what was going on in London.

0:18:290:18:32

I mean, people from all around, you know, Manchester

0:18:320:18:35

really gravitated to this club.

0:18:350:18:36

People came from all over the north-west and further afield.

0:18:360:18:40

They came from Yorkshire. They even came from London, you know.

0:18:400:18:43

-Sure, it was a big thing.

-We had coaches coming from London.

0:18:430:18:46

And it was... The atmosphere was theirs.

0:18:460:18:49

It was a sort of social scene. A fantastic time.

0:18:490:18:53

You mention The Twisted Wheel to anybody and...

0:18:530:18:55

Anyone in Manchester will have been. Not necessarily a regular,

0:18:550:18:59

but everyone would have been once or twice.

0:18:590:19:03

Throughout the '60s, Manchester was alive with music

0:19:030:19:06

from home-grown talent like Herman's Hermits

0:19:060:19:09

and Freddie And The Dreamers,

0:19:090:19:10

having a string of top 10 hits and there were over 200 clubs

0:19:100:19:14

in Greater Manchester to dance the night away in.

0:19:140:19:17

But the Swinging Sixties didn't last for ever.

0:19:170:19:22

Manchester in the mid-1970s was suffering as a post-industrial city.

0:19:220:19:26

Its glorious past was just a distant memory.

0:19:260:19:30

But whilst there was a backdrop

0:19:310:19:33

of economic hardship and cultural malaise,

0:19:330:19:36

the spirit in Manchester lived on with another flourish of music.

0:19:360:19:39

The legendary Tony Wilson co-founded

0:19:410:19:44

one of the most successful record labels in British history.

0:19:440:19:47

Factory Records brought the country huge bands such as Joy Division...

0:19:490:19:54

# Radio, live transmission... #

0:19:560:20:00

..New Order...

0:20:000:20:03

# How does it feel... #

0:20:030:20:06

..and the Happy Mondays...

0:20:060:20:08

# Hallelujah, hallelujah, Not sent to save ya... #

0:20:080:20:13

..who kick-started a musical movement that put Manchester

0:20:130:20:17

back on the map.

0:20:170:20:19

And here's the late Tony Wilson.

0:20:190:20:21

'The history of rock and roll is a history of small cities.'

0:20:210:20:25

And these cities have three years in the sun.

0:20:250:20:28

For nearly 20 years, Manchester was THE music city in the world.

0:20:280:20:32

These bands gave Manchester a sense of confidence and a new identity.

0:20:360:20:40

It provoked pride and inspired generations

0:20:420:20:44

to bang the drum of musical expression.

0:20:440:20:48

So what can we look forward to next?

0:20:510:20:53

Well, it's impossible to predict.

0:20:530:20:55

But if you want my opinion, whatever it is,

0:20:550:20:58

it's going to be brilliant,

0:20:580:20:59

because the appeal of Manchester for its musicians is

0:20:590:21:02

there's an audience here that's ready to embrace them

0:21:020:21:04

and they want to hear the next big thing.

0:21:040:21:08

And now a quick reminder of what's going off to auction.

0:21:130:21:16

This brooch and lapel badges have a great story behind them,

0:21:170:21:21

but will the auction house confirm the provenance?

0:21:210:21:24

The gold bracelet has a high intrinsic value,

0:21:240:21:27

so it's a sure-fire winner, but that can't be said of the earrings.

0:21:270:21:31

Will anyone fall in love with them

0:21:310:21:33

or will the damage be a FLY in the ointment?

0:21:330:21:35

And Edna's Victorian cardcase is adorned with ivory cards.

0:21:370:21:41

And because they were made before 1947,

0:21:410:21:43

it's legal to sell them at auction.

0:21:430:21:45

But what profit will she see on her £10 car-boot investment?

0:21:450:21:49

Tracey bought the 19th-century decanters for £700.

0:21:510:21:54

Will the gamble pay off?

0:21:540:21:56

Just about ten miles from Manchester city centre,

0:21:590:22:02

you find the historic town of Knutsford.

0:22:020:22:04

This is where our auction is coming from today,

0:22:040:22:06

courtesy of Frank Marshall.

0:22:060:22:07

Fingers crossed we can make some history of our own.

0:22:070:22:10

The auctioneers wielding the gavel today are Nick Hall

0:22:110:22:14

and Peter Ashburner.

0:22:140:22:16

Combined, they have 25 years of experience,

0:22:160:22:19

so we're in very safe hands.

0:22:190:22:21

All I can say is, I wish I was wearing green as well.

0:22:220:22:25

I am slightly.

0:22:250:22:27

I've just been joined by Victor and our expert, Caroline, here.

0:22:270:22:30

You're the town crier for Huddersfield. You were in the queue...

0:22:300:22:33

I was, yes.

0:22:330:22:34

..when I was doing my pieces to camera, and you were going, "ho-yea, ho-yea, ho-yea."

0:22:340:22:38

-And...

-"Oh, yea."

0:22:380:22:39

-Oh, yea.

-You were hard to miss, Victor(!)

0:22:390:22:42

Yes, but you made it onto the show with that little brooch

0:22:420:22:46

-and the two collar clips.

-Yes.

0:22:460:22:47

And that accompanying letter.

0:22:470:22:50

We thought there might be a connection with Charlie Chaplin?

0:22:500:22:52

The letter was supposed to have been...

0:22:520:22:55

The lady who gave it me

0:22:550:22:57

said her mother was married to Charlie Chaplin.

0:22:570:22:59

-The auction house have done...

-They've done a lot of research.

0:22:590:23:03

She was apparently married to Aubrey Chaplin, who was Charlie's cousin.

0:23:030:23:08

So it's not really a proper connection, there might be a tenuous connection

0:23:080:23:12

but we're not really going to play on that.

0:23:120:23:14

-It hasn't affected the value, then?

-No, no. It'll still stand alone.

0:23:140:23:17

Hopefully you will be ringing the bell outside with joy

0:23:170:23:20

because it's going under the hammer now. Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:23:200:23:23

The Art Deco paste brooch and matching collar clips.

0:23:230:23:27

I can start the bidding on this at £40.

0:23:270:23:30

Anybody got five? At £40 only.

0:23:300:23:33

Is there five? At £40 I have.

0:23:330:23:35

On commission at £40. Any advance?

0:23:350:23:37

Quickly. I am selling it, anybody else interested?

0:23:370:23:42

At £40 it goes to the maiden bid.

0:23:420:23:43

It went in on a maiden bid and straight out,

0:23:430:23:46

blink and you'll miss it.

0:23:460:23:47

It only needs one.

0:23:470:23:49

-And there was no competition.

-No, no.

0:23:490:23:52

Well, that's the advantage of auction research.

0:23:520:23:54

There was a connection to Chaplin,

0:23:540:23:56

but not the one that meant big money.

0:23:560:23:58

This is where it could go horribly wrong.

0:23:580:24:01

It's my turn to be the expert and I've just been joined by Tracey.

0:24:010:24:04

How have you been since we saw you at the valuation day?

0:24:040:24:06

Really good, thank you. Looking forward to it. Yeah.

0:24:060:24:09

It's that wonderful decanter set with glasses. It is complete.

0:24:090:24:13

One's wrong, though, isn't it?

0:24:130:24:15

-One is slightly different.

-Yeah.

-You haven't come by yourself, have you?

0:24:150:24:18

-No, I've come with my daughter, Jessica.

-She's over there.

0:24:180:24:20

-There she is.

-Hiya.

0:24:200:24:22

We need to find a new home for it.

0:24:220:24:24

We're going to do that right now. This is it.

0:24:240:24:27

A good quality 19th-century red and black lacquer

0:24:270:24:30

travelling decanter set. Where will I go?

0:24:300:24:33

Start me at 600. Five?

0:24:330:24:35

Four, start me. Who's in at £400?

0:24:350:24:38

Anywhere? Get the ball rolling at £400. Bid me now.

0:24:380:24:41

Start me now at four. Four where? Where's four?

0:24:410:24:44

Who will start the bidding at £400? Yes or no at 400?

0:24:440:24:47

-It's not going to sell, is it?

-It's not going to sell, is it?

0:24:470:24:49

Start me off at £400. Last call, last chance.

0:24:490:24:52

Last opportunity for this lot at £400 to start me off.

0:24:520:24:56

No interest, no bids.

0:24:560:24:58

-It's got the wrong look, hasn't it?

-What a shame. Never mind.

0:24:580:25:03

-I'm so sorry.

-Never mind.

-Gosh, that's auctions for you.

0:25:030:25:06

I told you there'd be one or two surprises.

0:25:060:25:08

I thought it would, you know, I thought I'd be bringing it home!

0:25:080:25:11

Well, you can't win them all.

0:25:110:25:13

Sometimes the bidders just aren't buying what you're selling,

0:25:130:25:16

but it could all be different on another day.

0:25:160:25:19

Next, it's time to play our cards right.

0:25:190:25:22

Sadly, we do not have Edna. She couldn't make it today.

0:25:220:25:25

But we do have our gorgeous expert, Caroline, with us. Wants £200.

0:25:250:25:29

-I think that's good value for money, don't you?

-I do too.

0:25:290:25:32

It's got two packs of Reynolds cards.

0:25:320:25:34

Reynolds was a great company making cards from 1809 to 1890.

0:25:340:25:40

-Square cut.

-Right, OK.

0:25:400:25:41

-Two packs.

-They're quite valuable in their own right.

-They are.

0:25:410:25:44

Recently one has got about £60 for one pack of cards.

0:25:440:25:48

So, I think two packs, plus the box, it's going to get the reserve.

0:25:480:25:51

It is. Hopefully, you are watching this, Edna, and you're going to be enjoying this

0:25:510:25:55

-because we should get the top end of the estimate plus a little bit more.

-I'm sure.

-Let's put it to the test.

0:25:550:25:59

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:25:590:26:01

Nice thing, this. I've got a bit of commission interest in this.

0:26:010:26:04

I'm going to come straight in here at...£80.

0:26:040:26:08

80 I'm bid. Bid at £80.

0:26:080:26:09

Any advance on £80? It's worth more, I'm sure. Come on. Bid it up.

0:26:090:26:12

Thank you. 85 I've got. 90 against you.

0:26:120:26:15

Five. 100.

0:26:150:26:16

110 I'm bid. At £110.

0:26:160:26:18

Cheap.

0:26:180:26:19

At £110, the bid's in the room. Any more? At 110. 120. 130.

0:26:190:26:24

-Thank goodness for that.

-Yeah.

0:26:240:26:26

Against you, sir. With me now.

0:26:260:26:28

On commission against the room. The internet's out. It's £130.

0:26:280:26:31

Hammer's going. Selling away at 130...

0:26:310:26:34

Well, it's gone. It's gone. Made estimate. You were right.

0:26:340:26:37

-But it just goes to show, on the day, you can be quite lucky.

-Yes.

0:26:370:26:41

You can get things at the lower end, rather than at the top end.

0:26:410:26:44

I'm sure Edna will be pleased.

0:26:440:26:45

-I'm sure she will.

-She wanted to sell it. She paid £10 for that.

0:26:450:26:48

Hell of a return!

0:26:480:26:49

There's a cheque in the post for you, Edna.

0:26:490:26:52

And next, that intriguing jewellery.

0:26:520:26:55

I've just been joined by Maddie and Nicky and Michael, our expert.

0:26:550:26:58

We're just about to sell a couple of lots which we've split

0:26:580:27:01

into two sales. The first lot, we're selling something that's hideous.

0:27:010:27:06

Well, I tell you what, I don't think they're hideous.

0:27:060:27:09

-I think they're quirky.

-That's the point. They are quirky.

0:27:090:27:11

-I've never seen anything like them.

-Nor have I.

0:27:110:27:14

And we've got a nine-carat gold bracelet, as well.

0:27:140:27:16

-Which is more down to its bullion value.

-Exactly.

0:27:160:27:19

Right. Anyway, let's find out what the bidders think about

0:27:190:27:21

our first lot, these earrings. They're going under the hammer now.

0:27:210:27:24

The cased pair of Victorian earrings. Start me where?

0:27:240:27:27

At £50? 40. 30 online.

0:27:270:27:29

You bidding against? I've got 30 here. Five. 35. 40. Speed up.

0:27:290:27:35

You'll lose it. £40. 45. The phone's in now. 45. 50. Have I got 60?

0:27:350:27:39

I've got £60. It's all online.

0:27:390:27:41

65. 70. It's climbing away.

0:27:410:27:44

At £70. 75. 80.

0:27:440:27:46

£80. 85.

0:27:460:27:48

Off she goes. £90.

0:27:480:27:50

There is no accounting for taste.

0:27:500:27:53

110 now. At 110. 120.

0:27:530:27:57

130. 140. The phones are out. It's online. 150. Online at £150.

0:27:570:28:03

Are we done? At 150, the bid's online. Nothing in the room?

0:28:030:28:07

Phones are quiet. It's online. At £150, I sell now...

0:28:070:28:11

£150, hammer's gone down, crack. That's good, isn't it?

0:28:110:28:15

That's £149 for the box,

0:28:150:28:18

£1 for the earrings.

0:28:180:28:21

-My mum's in shock.

-I am in shock!

0:28:210:28:23

Well, nobody expected that result and it just goes to show,

0:28:230:28:27

one person's trash is another's treasure.

0:28:270:28:30

And so to the charming bracelet.

0:28:300:28:33

Nice little lot, this.

0:28:350:28:36

Nine-carat gold, flat, curb-link charm bracelet.

0:28:360:28:40

I'm going to start the bidding straight in now at £100.

0:28:400:28:42

100, I'm bid. 110 against. 120 with me now.

0:28:420:28:46

At 120. Come back at me. Still in? 120.

0:28:460:28:49

-30 I'll take.

-Working out the bullion price in the corner.

0:28:490:28:52

160 now. This commission's against you at 160.

0:28:520:28:55

Are you coming back, try another?

0:28:550:28:58

£160. With me now. Commissions have it. Internet's out.

0:28:580:29:01

It's all on the book at 160 and selling...

0:29:010:29:03

£160. Sold.

0:29:030:29:06

So, that's a good day out for you both, isn't it?

0:29:060:29:09

Definitely. It was worth coming!

0:29:090:29:11

She's already spent it around the corner.

0:29:110:29:13

A total of £310 to put towards the jewellery making

0:29:130:29:17

and you'll get a few beads for that!

0:29:170:29:19

Back at our valuation day in the very heart of Manchester,

0:29:250:29:28

our cameras are still rolling and next up,

0:29:280:29:30

it's Michael, Jan and a plethora of pots.

0:29:300:29:34

Jan, thank you for coming in today.

0:29:340:29:36

Are there any vases left in your house, or do you have a vase fetish?

0:29:360:29:39

Erm...there are a few more,

0:29:390:29:42

but I'm trying to get rid of a lot cos I'm fed up of dusting everything.

0:29:420:29:46

So are you a vase collector, or did these come through the family?

0:29:460:29:49

No, they were left to me by my Auntie Maud.

0:29:490:29:51

Well, these are fascinating.

0:29:510:29:53

Let's look at the pot first, cos to me

0:29:530:29:55

-that's the least interesting of the group.

-OK.

0:29:550:29:58

It's Italian - it's maiolica.

0:29:580:30:01

So that's the thing that majolica was based on.

0:30:010:30:04

It's a tin-glazed earthenware, so you've got a clay body

0:30:040:30:08

and this white glaze put over it to make it look like porcelain.

0:30:080:30:12

Then you've got these lovely colours that tend to run and flow

0:30:120:30:17

a little bit like ink into blotting paper.

0:30:170:30:19

So you get this effect.

0:30:190:30:21

I've shown it to my colleague off-screen, I thought there was

0:30:210:30:24

a chance it was 18th-century.

0:30:240:30:27

She's seen more of these than I have

0:30:270:30:29

and she thinks it's early-19th century in date.

0:30:290:30:32

Let's say it's early-19th century.

0:30:320:30:34

Did you, before coming to "Flog It!" hit it hard with a hammer?

0:30:340:30:39

-No!

-So you're not responsible...?

0:30:390:30:41

It's always been like that!

0:30:410:30:43

That's a problem with it.

0:30:430:30:44

But it's not dramatically valuable - £40-£60.

0:30:440:30:49

-Yes, that's fine.

-£40 reserve, see where it goes.

0:30:490:30:53

-If two people think it's earlier, it might make over 100.

-OK.

0:30:530:30:57

Now onto these.

0:30:570:30:59

These are pretty. Let's pick one of them up.

0:30:590:31:01

We've got a matching pair and these are called cloisonne.

0:31:010:31:05

Japanese, and they're lovely.

0:31:050:31:08

There's only two things I've got against them -

0:31:080:31:11

they're not signed and the very, very,

0:31:110:31:15

very best ones always were signed.

0:31:150:31:17

And secondly, the hammer that you didn't hit this with...

0:31:170:31:21

I know what you're going to say.

0:31:210:31:22

-You didn't hit these either?

-No.

0:31:220:31:25

Erm, we've got a percussion crack there, where it's just pinged.

0:31:250:31:28

And if we look at this one, we've got a little crack there, as well.

0:31:300:31:35

But they're pretty and they're small and I love them.

0:31:350:31:39

And a huge amount of work went into making them.

0:31:390:31:41

I might be being optimistic,

0:31:410:31:43

but let's say they're worth £100-£200.

0:31:430:31:47

OK.

0:31:470:31:48

-And put a fixed reserve of £100 on them.

-Yes.

0:31:480:31:51

-Happy to sell them?

-Yes.

0:31:510:31:54

-Don't want any more dusting?

-No.

0:31:540:31:57

If they do well, what are you going to do with the money?

0:31:570:32:00

-Buy shoes.

-Buy shoes?!

0:32:000:32:03

Yes!

0:32:030:32:04

Well, let's get you a good pair, at least, possibly two.

0:32:040:32:08

Could be.

0:32:080:32:09

Thank you very much for bringing them in.

0:32:090:32:11

-OK. Thank you.

-Pleasure.

0:32:110:32:13

Back in the Power Hall, Caroline's surrounded by precision

0:32:160:32:19

engineering - big and small.

0:32:190:32:21

Can you tell me about it, Steve?

0:32:220:32:24

It belonged to my father.

0:32:240:32:26

I can vividly remember him wearing it - he had a waistcoat

0:32:260:32:31

and it was on a chain.

0:32:310:32:33

Not all the time, just on special occasions,

0:32:330:32:36

cos it was considered a special piece, really.

0:32:360:32:39

And it is a gentleman's pocket watch,

0:32:390:32:42

so he was quite right to proudly wear it for Sunday best.

0:32:420:32:46

And very dapper, I'm sure he looked in it.

0:32:460:32:48

It is a lovely piece.

0:32:480:32:50

It's 18-carat gold, and it's an American movement - Waltham.

0:32:500:32:55

Have you ever opened this up before and had a look inside?

0:32:550:32:59

-It's the first time...

-Is it, really?

0:32:590:33:02

-Really looks lovely inside.

-It does.

0:33:020:33:04

It's absolutely a precision work of engineering.

0:33:040:33:08

And the outer case is marked 18-carat

0:33:080:33:13

and the date mark is 1908,

0:33:130:33:16

which ties in with your father's dates.

0:33:160:33:19

White enamel dial, altogether a very saleable item.

0:33:190:33:25

At the moment, gold is at a very high level, very high price,

0:33:250:33:29

so I think it's a very good time to sell it.

0:33:290:33:33

I think we're going to put an estimate of £400-£600 on it.

0:33:330:33:38

-Happy? Smiling?

-Yes. Yeah.

0:33:380:33:40

And if we put a fixed reserve of 400?

0:33:400:33:43

I don't think we'll need it, I think it'll exceed that.

0:33:430:33:45

But...we'll do that. Happy?

0:33:450:33:48

-Be happy with that, yeah.

-Brilliant.

0:33:480:33:50

Well, let's go and flog it.

0:33:500:33:52

Thank you.

0:33:520:33:53

Now, for the last item of the day,

0:33:550:33:57

Michael is indulging his personal passion.

0:33:570:34:00

Janet, thank you so much.

0:34:010:34:03

I know my colleagues were almost sending you away,

0:34:030:34:06

when I swooped on your little spoon.

0:34:060:34:09

Before I tell you anything about it, what do you know?

0:34:090:34:13

The only thing I know about it is, it's just always been in the family.

0:34:130:34:17

And when my mother died, 41 years ago, I just brought it home.

0:34:170:34:22

Has it gone in the cutlery drawer?

0:34:220:34:23

Have you stirred your tea and coffee with it?

0:34:230:34:26

No, it's just been in another pot with little spoons in a cabinet

0:34:260:34:29

and that's it.

0:34:290:34:31

That's it.

0:34:310:34:32

It's very interesting.

0:34:320:34:34

It's only a teaspoon, but it is very, very interesting.

0:34:340:34:37

It's a piece of Arts and Crafts - British silver.

0:34:370:34:42

You can see that they tried to show the construction,

0:34:420:34:46

so you've got all the hammer marks still showing.

0:34:460:34:50

And these beautiful pierced-out - all by hand, terminal,

0:34:500:34:54

making it look handwrought.

0:34:540:34:56

If we turn it over...

0:34:560:34:59

Very small hallmarks. We'll have a look.

0:34:590:35:02

It was made in London in 1924...

0:35:020:35:06

1924.

0:35:060:35:08

..which, in itself, means nothing.

0:35:080:35:10

But the maker's mark is SD.

0:35:100:35:13

I've noticed that, but I've looked on the internet and I couldn't find SD.

0:35:130:35:17

SD is probably the most important

0:35:170:35:22

Arts and Crafts female goldsmith.

0:35:220:35:25

-Oh, female.

-It's Sibyl Dunlop.

0:35:250:35:27

-Oh...

-And the thing about Sibyl Dunlop,

0:35:270:35:30

there's very much more jewellery by her than there is silver.

0:35:300:35:34

-Oh.

-Her silver is rare.

0:35:340:35:36

So, it's only a teaspoon from 1924 - if it was a bog-standard one,

0:35:370:35:42

it would be worth its weight in silver of £5.

0:35:420:35:45

But it's changed it from £5 to £50.

0:35:460:35:49

-Has it really?!

-And we would put it into auction at £50-£100.

0:35:490:35:53

-Gosh.

-And we'd put a fixed reserve of say, £40, on it.

0:35:530:35:57

And it's probably...

0:35:570:36:00

only the tenth piece of silver I've ever seen by her.

0:36:000:36:04

Oh, gosh.

0:36:040:36:05

It's made my day, made my year, Janet!

0:36:050:36:07

-Made my year.

-I'm glad I brought it!

0:36:070:36:10

-I'm delighted. Thank you so much.

-Thank you.

0:36:100:36:12

It just shows, you cannot judge an item's value from its size

0:36:120:36:16

and shape alone.

0:36:160:36:17

But it's all gone quiet in the Textiles Gallery where

0:36:190:36:21

Caroline has found her last item of the day.

0:36:210:36:24

Tell me, what do you know about these?

0:36:240:36:27

Well, actually, when I bought them, about 40 years ago,

0:36:270:36:30

I didn't know anything about them. I bought them from an antiques fair.

0:36:300:36:34

Probably paid about £20 for them, something like that.

0:36:340:36:38

I didn't know what they were until just recently,

0:36:380:36:40

I saw them in a book and the book explained what they were.

0:36:400:36:45

And they are supposed to be burial mirrors to ward away evil spirits.

0:36:450:36:49

That's really all I know about them, really.

0:36:490:36:52

So I was hoping that I would come here today

0:36:520:36:55

and find out a little more about them.

0:36:550:36:56

That is exactly right, they are late 18th-century Chinese.

0:36:560:37:00

And they would have been beautifully polished, on the back here.

0:37:000:37:06

And you are quite right, they were used to bury the dead with,

0:37:060:37:10

to ward off evil spirits in the afterlife.

0:37:100:37:13

But they were also worn in life.

0:37:130:37:16

If you look closely, this fabulous working in here.

0:37:160:37:19

There is a little hole through this middle bit here and that

0:37:190:37:24

would be to thread silk through and it would be worn on your garment.

0:37:240:37:28

So you would have one, two of them,

0:37:280:37:31

and it would ward off evil spirits in life, in the here and now.

0:37:310:37:35

They are cast bronze

0:37:350:37:36

and there is a lot of interest in oriental things at the moment.

0:37:360:37:40

-So people collect this sort of thing?

-Yes, people will collect them.

-OK.

0:37:400:37:43

-Now, you have obviously enjoyed these all these years.

-Yes, I have.

0:37:430:37:48

-Have they been in a display case or something?

-Yes, they have, actually.

0:37:480:37:51

But this one here, this one we used to use as an ashtray at home...

0:37:510:37:55

-As a what?!

-An ashtray, yes.

0:37:550:37:58

-There is probably a little bit of ash in there still.

-Oh, no!

0:37:580:38:02

-It's too good for an ashtray.

-I know, but we didn't know, then.

0:38:020:38:05

We see quite a few of them. They are not uncommon.

0:38:050:38:09

And the values range from £100-£1,000, depending

0:38:090:38:13

on the detail, the quality and the size, to a lesser or greater extent.

0:38:130:38:18

These, I would think, are worth £200-£300 for the two.

0:38:180:38:23

-That's nice!

-It is. It is. And you paid what, £20?

0:38:230:38:27

-It would be nice if they were worth £1,000 each!

-It would, it would.

0:38:270:38:30

If we put a reserve of £200, are you happy with that?

0:38:300:38:33

-Yes, I am, that's fine.

-Great. So we will see if they are...

0:38:330:38:37

if they are magic when we take them to auction.

0:38:370:38:39

There you are. That's it,

0:38:420:38:43

our experts have now found their final items,

0:38:430:38:45

so it's time to say goodbye to our valuation day venue -

0:38:450:38:48

Manchester's Museum Of Science And Industry.

0:38:480:38:51

We've had a marvellous time here and learnt so much,

0:38:510:38:54

but right now, it's full steam ahead to Marshall's Auction Rooms

0:38:540:38:57

in Knutsford, and here's what's coming with us.

0:38:570:38:59

TOOT! TOOT!

0:38:590:39:01

Michael liked these vases for their beauty and their history,

0:39:010:39:04

but the damage has led to a low valuation.

0:39:040:39:07

Could he have got it wrong? Keep watching for a jaw-dropping auction.

0:39:070:39:10

Will it be a wind-up for Steve and his gentleman's pocket watch?

0:39:120:39:16

A classic Arts and Crafts design, but from a unique maker.

0:39:170:39:22

Will the bidders be as excited as Michael was about this

0:39:220:39:24

Sibyl Dunlop spoon?

0:39:240:39:26

Caroline has valued these Chinese mirrors at £200-£300.

0:39:270:39:32

Will the auction house agree?

0:39:320:39:34

And now for my favourite part of the show.

0:39:360:39:38

Let's head straight to the auction.

0:39:380:39:39

Steven, good luck.

0:39:420:39:44

The time is now up - we're selling an 18-carat gold Edwardian

0:39:440:39:47

pocket watch belonging to Steven, and it is quality, isn't it?

0:39:470:39:51

-Oh, yeah.

-18-carat, Dennison case - it's a lovely piece.

0:39:510:39:56

Let's hope we get the top end of the estimate.

0:39:560:39:58

Let's put it under the hammer now. We need top money for this.

0:39:580:40:01

Edward VII, 18-carat gold Waltham pocket watch.

0:40:010:40:05

And I can start the bidding on this one at £400.

0:40:050:40:08

420. 440.

0:40:080:40:09

460. 480. 500.

0:40:090:40:12

-520.

-It's going...

0:40:120:40:13

560. 580.

0:40:130:40:16

600. 620. 640.

0:40:160:40:19

Commission bid of 640.

0:40:190:40:21

Any advance? 660.

0:40:210:40:22

Your hand up...

0:40:220:40:24

Someone else is joining the party here in the room.

0:40:240:40:26

They want your watch.

0:40:260:40:28

700 - fresh bidder.

0:40:280:40:31

720... Yes?

0:40:310:40:33

720.

0:40:330:40:34

720 in the centre.

0:40:350:40:36

You're out left at 720.

0:40:360:40:38

Seated in the centre at 720...

0:40:380:40:41

-GAVEL BANGS

-Sold in the room.

0:40:410:40:43

720! Well done. Congratulations.

0:40:430:40:46

That was worth doing, wasn't it?

0:40:460:40:48

Stylish, useful and solid gold - no wonder it smashed the estimate.

0:40:480:40:54

Next under the hammer, the tiny teaspoon.

0:40:540:40:57

You loved that. You instantly recognised the initials.

0:40:570:41:00

-Sibyl Dunlop.

-Yes.

0:41:000:41:02

Sibyl Dunlop is very important,

0:41:020:41:04

and that is translated in a little teaspoon.

0:41:040:41:07

So somebody's buying something quite precious.

0:41:070:41:10

Let's find out what the bidders think right now.

0:41:100:41:12

The George V hallmarked silver spoon,

0:41:120:41:15

with a pierced decorated handle and a planished bowl,

0:41:150:41:18

by Sibyl Dunlop.

0:41:180:41:20

Where are we going to be for this one then?

0:41:200:41:22

£40 and start me... 40?

0:41:220:41:25

Where do you want to start?

0:41:250:41:26

25 I have. At £25.

0:41:260:41:28

Any advance on 25?

0:41:280:41:30

Take 30 now?

0:41:300:41:31

At 30. And 5.

0:41:310:41:33

Anybody got 40?

0:41:330:41:34

At £35. Any advance?

0:41:340:41:36

Anybody online?

0:41:360:41:37

Someone's woken up.

0:41:370:41:39

Is there another 5?

0:41:390:41:41

You're out in the room, and I'm selling now at 40.

0:41:410:41:45

Gosh, it's gone.

0:41:450:41:46

-The thing is, it's very...academic.

-Mm.

0:41:460:41:50

We didn't have two people that wanted it, we had one person online.

0:41:500:41:54

But we protected it with a reserve, and that's what it's for.

0:41:540:41:57

-It was so tiny. Very tiny.

-Thank you for coming in.

0:41:570:42:00

We've all learned something - you knew it all along -

0:42:000:42:02

but hopefully you have, as well.

0:42:020:42:04

So have a rummage in your cutlery drawer,

0:42:040:42:06

maybe you'll have a spoon with a two-letter mark

0:42:060:42:09

that says history and money!

0:42:090:42:12

Going under the hammer

0:42:120:42:13

we have got those two lovely Chinese bronze mirrors.

0:42:130:42:15

Well, we thought they were Chinese, but they are Japanese.

0:42:150:42:17

After a bit more research.

0:42:170:42:19

And they are later than we thought, they are not 18th-century,

0:42:190:42:21

Yes, late 19th-century, early 20th-century copies.

0:42:210:42:24

-Oh, Japanese!

-Yes!

-I thought they were Chinese.

0:42:240:42:27

Copied, copied from the original Chinese earlier ones.

0:42:270:42:30

So they have got the same symbols, they are just a century later.

0:42:300:42:34

But I think they will still sell.

0:42:340:42:36

Yes, and I had a chat to Nick, the auctioneer, yesterday.

0:42:360:42:39

And he said actually the value is spot on. It won't affect the value.

0:42:390:42:42

-OK, good. Good.

-But we are still in with the money, there. Good luck.

0:42:420:42:45

Fingers crossed. Let's find out what they are worth. Here we go.

0:42:450:42:48

Nice quality, nicely cast, good bit of patination.

0:42:480:42:52

19th-century Japanese mirrors. Where are we going to go? £200 for them?

0:42:520:42:56

£200? 150? 100? Come on, who is in? 100 I have, thank you. 100 I am bid.

0:42:560:43:01

-I've got 110...

-It's a start.

-Straight in and out. That was quick.

0:43:010:43:04

-110 I have got, then. 120. 130. 140.

-On, come on.

-140 is the bid.

0:43:040:43:10

Nothing online? I have got 140, 150 online. 160, 160 I am bid.

0:43:100:43:15

-At 160 now. At 160. Any advance on 170?

-Come on!

-It's creeping up.

-180.

0:43:150:43:20

Against you, online.

0:43:200:43:22

-At 180. 190.

-We are nearly there.

-Yes.

-I've got £190 online.

0:43:220:43:27

I think that's all. 190, the bid is online. I am selling at 190.

0:43:270:43:31

Make no mistake, the hammer is going down.

0:43:310:43:34

-It has gone.

-That was all right.

-That was close!

0:43:340:43:37

That was close, wasn't it?

0:43:370:43:40

Oh, the things you do to get on TV!

0:43:400:43:42

Nick Hall used his auctioneer's discretion to let them go at £190.

0:43:440:43:50

And now, finally, those striking, but damaged vases.

0:43:500:43:54

-You're looking very smart today.

-Thank you very much.

0:43:540:43:56

You're off shopping after this, aren't you?

0:43:560:43:59

-Could be. Depends how much we make.

-Are you, really?

0:43:590:44:01

-Yes.

-Dressed to kill - dressed to go shopping!

0:44:010:44:04

What's top of the list, what are you looking for today?

0:44:040:44:07

-Shoes!

-I knew it! I knew it!

0:44:070:44:11

I don't know if we can pay for a good pair of shoes with it.

0:44:110:44:14

-Not in Knutsford!

-No.

-Whoo!

0:44:140:44:17

Heels to go on maybe!

0:44:170:44:19

We're looking at £100-£200 with the two cloisonne vases.

0:44:190:44:22

Let's find out what the bidders think. Good luck.

0:44:220:44:25

Pair of Japanese cloisonne vases.

0:44:250:44:27

Good lot this one, we're going to open the bidding.

0:44:270:44:30

£100 and start me quickly now.

0:44:300:44:32

80?

0:44:320:44:34

80 bid. 85.

0:44:340:44:36

85. 90.

0:44:360:44:37

95, I'm bid. At 95 in the room.

0:44:370:44:40

100 online. Any advance?

0:44:400:44:41

And 10 on the phone.

0:44:410:44:43

120 online.

0:44:430:44:45

130 on the phone.

0:44:450:44:47

At 130 bid. And 40.

0:44:470:44:49

140. 50 now?

0:44:490:44:50

150 telephone bid.

0:44:500:44:52

60. 170 on the phone.

0:44:520:44:54

At 170. 80.

0:44:540:44:56

190 on the telephone...

0:44:560:44:58

This is good, getting the top end.

0:44:580:44:59

Online bidder at 200.

0:44:590:45:01

10. At 220.

0:45:010:45:03

230 now? 240.

0:45:030:45:06

250 now? 250.

0:45:060:45:08

60. 270 if you like.

0:45:080:45:09

270 telephone.

0:45:090:45:11

At 270 on the phone.

0:45:110:45:13

280. At 280. 90 now?

0:45:130:45:15

Shakes his head on the phone.

0:45:150:45:16

It's 280 and it's on the internet.

0:45:160:45:18

It's an internet bidder

0:45:180:45:20

and I'm selling at 280.

0:45:200:45:22

Hammer's gone down - £280.

0:45:220:45:24

I'm coming again now!

0:45:240:45:26

You are!

0:45:260:45:27

A great result for the cloisonne vases.

0:45:270:45:31

Next, Jan's majolica. Will it go the same way?

0:45:320:45:34

Nick Hall takes to the rostrum for the last time.

0:45:340:45:38

The 19th-century Italian maiolica vase.

0:45:410:45:43

Nice thing, this, good early look about it.

0:45:430:45:46

Start me where? Not a lot of money at £40. 30? 20?

0:45:460:45:49

I like that.

0:45:490:45:51

It's got a wonderful look.

0:45:510:45:52

Let's get the ball rolling now.

0:45:520:45:54

At 30. 5. 40.

0:45:540:45:56

45. At 45 I've got.

0:45:560:45:58

And 50 I've got. And 5 I've got.

0:45:580:45:59

And 60. 65 - it's all climbing online.

0:45:590:46:02

At £70 we're back on the phone.

0:46:020:46:04

Thank goodness for the internet, it eluded the people of Knutsford.

0:46:040:46:07

I've got 100.

0:46:070:46:09

I've got 100 and 120.

0:46:090:46:12

130. At 140.

0:46:120:46:14

You coming back in now?

0:46:140:46:15

This is good, isn't it?

0:46:150:46:16

-You've got your shoes already.

-Yes, I have.

0:46:160:46:18

210 now. The bid's on the phone at 210.

0:46:180:46:21

Against you - Italy. 220.

0:46:210:46:23

220 here.

0:46:230:46:24

Against you in Italy!

0:46:240:46:26

I think two people are convinced it's early.

0:46:260:46:28

360 now. 360 I'm bid.

0:46:280:46:30

At 380 here.

0:46:300:46:32

400. 420.

0:46:320:46:34

At 420 now.

0:46:340:46:36

440. 460 here.

0:46:360:46:38

Online at 480.

0:46:380:46:40

480 I'm bid.

0:46:400:46:42

500 now. At £500.

0:46:420:46:43

Any advance on 5? 520.

0:46:430:46:46

You might be buying a shoe shop, you realise this, don't you?!

0:46:460:46:48

560. 580 here. 600.

0:46:480:46:51

At 6 now. 620.

0:46:510:46:53

It was a come and buy me, Michael.

0:46:530:46:55

It was a run and buy me, wasn't it?

0:46:550:46:57

At £700. 720. 740.

0:46:570:47:00

740. 760.

0:47:000:47:02

780.

0:47:020:47:04

I'll buy you two a pair of shoes now.

0:47:040:47:05

Oh, thank you!

0:47:050:47:07

840. 880. 880 now.

0:47:070:47:09

At 900.

0:47:090:47:10

£900 here.

0:47:100:47:12

That's a complete outfit now - handbag and shoes.

0:47:120:47:15

They're bidding in Italy, they're bidding on the phone.

0:47:150:47:19

Fresh phone bidder - he's in at 980!

0:47:190:47:21

At 980.

0:47:210:47:23

-Wouldn't this be funny?

-1,000 I'm bid.

0:47:230:47:26

Take a 50 with you. Thank you - 1,050.

0:47:260:47:29

At 1,050.

0:47:290:47:31

1,100. 1,100 here now.

0:47:310:47:33

1,150.

0:47:330:47:34

I did have a feeling on the day it was early.

0:47:340:47:37

-No, you didn't.

-I did!

0:47:370:47:39

I said to you! I said, "I think this is early."

0:47:390:47:42

At 12 now. I've got 12 with Niall.

0:47:420:47:46

At £1,200.

0:47:460:47:47

This is a great auction. This is what auctions are all about.

0:47:470:47:50

Last and final time at £1,200...

0:47:500:47:52

£1,200! Jan!

0:47:520:47:55

Yeah, well done!

0:47:560:47:58

Oh, Jan's off shopping!

0:47:580:48:01

Oh, that's super!

0:48:010:48:02

Congratulations to you lot, by the way!

0:48:040:48:06

That is what a good auction is all about, isn't it?

0:48:060:48:09

-Course it is.

-Yeah! Well done, Jan!

0:48:090:48:11

We'd love to take the cameras and follow you shopping,

0:48:110:48:14

that's for sure. We just don't have time!

0:48:140:48:16

We've all had a brilliant time in Knutsford.

0:48:160:48:19

I hope you've enjoyed the show.

0:48:190:48:20

See you next time for plenty more surprises from "Flog It!".

0:48:200:48:23

This episode comes from Manchester's Museum of Science and Industry, which charts the history of the city's role in the industrial revolution. Antiques experts Caroline Hawley and Micheal Baggott search the queue for the best antiques and collectables to take to auction. Paul Martin takes a journey through Manchester's musical history from the Halle Orchestra to the Happy Mondays, explores the forgotten world of Manchester film and has a read of the first edition of the Guardian newspaper, where the headline news is rather surprising.