Blackpool 1 Flog It!


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Blackpool 1

Paul Martin and experts Anita Manning and James Lewis are at the historic Blackpool Tower Circus to pick out a selection of interesting antiques and collectables.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

Today's show comes from the northwest coastline.

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I'm 500 feet up in the air. Can you guess where I am?

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Yes, you've got it. Blackpool. Welcome to "Flog It!"

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The town of Blackpool hit the big-time

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when visiting the seaside became affordable for the masses,

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with attractions including a theme park,

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three piers, and, of course, the world-renowned Tower Ballroom,

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where many a Strictly celeb has samba-ed the night away.

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The most famous attraction, of course, has to be the tower

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itself, providing thousands of tourists with spectacular

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views along the coastline, alongside the ornate

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luxury of the ballroom and the excitement of the Tower Circus

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drawing in thousands of people over the years.

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There's a great queue here today.

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This lot are here laden with antiques

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and collectables, all hoping they're going to make a small

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fortune in auction later on in the programme.

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And there's one question on everybody's lips, which is...

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-ALL: WHAT'S IT WORTH?!

-They're going to find out.

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Ready and waiting to entertain the crowds today is our main man,

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-James Lewis.

-Is it full?

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And warming up for her first performance at the circus is

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leading lady Anita Manning.

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I think it would be nice to do a wee piece on that

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because we are in Blackpool, the home of the naughty postcard.

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So, without further ado, let's open the doors and start the valuations.

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Today, we will find out which of these is worth the most.

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Some Chinese terracotta animals that could be over 1,000 years old,

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or this concertina that could hit the right note at auction.

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Find out which fares best later on in the show.

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And kicking off the proceedings, Anita's taking a closer

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look at those postcards that she spotted in the queue.

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Richard, Sonia, father and daughter. Welcome to "Flog It!".

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It's lovely to have you along in this fabulous venue.

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You've brought me along an album of postcards.

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Richard, tell me, where did you get them?

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Many years ago my great aunt, who was a spinster lady,

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liked to frequent all of the hotels and places,

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and she would have Blackpool and Morecambe

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and all the other areas around,

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so everybody, we got this huge build up of cards.

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Let's have a look.

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This is your original album here and it's nice to have kept them

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in the album because it's kept them in good condition

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and condition is important.

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If we look at these ones, we can see at the beginning some early

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Donald McGill postcards, and we see

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a little reference to a soldier here.

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"The voice that breathed o'er Eden fall in the draft!"

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And we've got two...

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Not the most glamorous girls, and again they are discussing

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the Army, and here we've got a reference to old Churchill.

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You've got early Donald McGills and that is good.

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They're smashing. Do we know how many we have, Richard?

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-164.

-You've counted?

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Yes.

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Tell me, why are you selling them, Richard?

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Now that the family is spread about,

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I wouldn't know who to give it to, I wouldn't know where to leave it

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and I have visions of it being dropped into a skip.

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Sonia, you've obviously enjoyed looking through these.

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Do you have any sentimental attachment to them?

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I do for the joy they've brought looking at them, but I agree with my dad -

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if we could sell them to someone who would appreciate them

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as much as we have, then I would rather they go to

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someone like that than, like my dad said, they could get lost.

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Postcards are good in today's market.

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You've got 160-odd there - some are worth more than others.

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I would like to put between £100 and £200.

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Would you be happy to sell them at that?

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-Yes.

-I was thinking a reserve of £100.

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-Would you feel happy?

-Yeah.

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And a low and wide estimate will encourage the bidding.

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So, I am hoping that does very, very well indeed.

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James Lewis is taking a trip down Memory Lane.

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I think if most people said that

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poison bottles and drug jars

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reminded them of their childhood, the first thing

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that would happen is the social services could be called in!

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But I have to say, when I look at these,

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that's exactly what it makes me think of.

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Times when I was a kid, because my mum

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is a qualified pharmacist, my dad

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was a pharmacist, my grandmother was a pharmacist,

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so whenever I used to go to my grandparents' house,

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they used to keep the sugar in a drug jar,

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and oil and vinegar and all this sort of thing.

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So slightly strange, I admit, but jolly practical!

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How did you come to have them - a pharmaceutical background?

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My brother-in-law was a chemist,

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-who retired 25 years ago now.

-OK.

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And when he retired, the shop was closed down.

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Some of these bottles, he took with him to his new house,

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-put them in the cellar and forgot about them.

-Really?

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So when they decided to move a couple of weeks ago,

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they said, "Would you like to take these bottles to the car boot?"

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-And I thought, "They're too good to take to the car boot."

-Yeah.

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So I brought them along today.

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-There was a whole pile more in the box that I saw earlier.

-Yeah.

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So on top of the ten plain ones that we're not seeing on the table,

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we've got these, and these are by far the most interesting.

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S-Y-R stands for "syrup".

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So these are syrup jars, syrup bottles,

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that have a slightly strange stopper,

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because most drug jars and drug bottles have a ground glass stopper,

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where the outside of the stopper and the inside of the neck of the bottle

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are ground so they make a very good seal.

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But if you imagine having something sticky and sugary

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-in a ground glass stopper...

-Yeah.

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..as soon as you've put the stopper in, leave it overnight,

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it's going to set fast and you're never going to get it off.

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So these syrup jars have that. It's like a little dropper almost.

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But it prevents the bottle getting stuck with the stopper.

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The other interesting feature

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is a bottle like this, the green glass one.

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As soon as you pick that off the shelf,

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you realise that it's ribbed, so if you're a pharmacist in your shop,

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that suddenly tells you you've picked up a poison bottle,

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the fact that it's ribbed. It's an immediate warning.

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-No family, great family link for you with...?

-No, no.

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-No sentimental...?

-No sentimental value at all.

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Well, the blue glass with the labels in good order,

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are worth about £10, 12, 14 each.

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Some with chipped stoppers, so we'll make a bit of an allowance.

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The ribbed glass without the labels are less.

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-Then we've got the oil jar, worth maybe £6 or £7.

-Right.

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So I reckon, if we put an estimate of £60-100

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on the collection, it's not huge,

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it's better than car boot prices,

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but not a massive difference.

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-It's a day out for the children.

-It is, and for something

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that was just left in the cellar,

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-it's better than nothing.

-It is.

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-You never know, it might make a bit more.

-That'd be great.

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A great collection found by James.

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Alana, welcome to "Flog It!"

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It's wonderful of you to come along and be in this fabulous circus ring.

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-So good.

-Have you ever been here before?

-The circus, yes.

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Um, well, I essentially grew up here,

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my family have been involved since...

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-..decades ago, since the first Tower ballet.

-That's my fantasy.

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I want to be the woman who stands on the back of the big white

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horse trotting around the ring.

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-What was your favourite act?

-I loved the elephant.

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I used to love when we took him for walks on the beach and stuff.

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You took an elephant for a walk on the beach? Ha-ha! For a paddle.

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Well, it was more of a dunk rather than a paddle, really.

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They were a bit heavy. Yeah, it was a lot of fun.

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-It's things I'll always remember.

-It's wonderful.

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Tell me, what have you brought me along today?

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Well, I've got some retro games - Mouse Trap and Risk!

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-Some pretty awesome games.

-Where did you get these?

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I found these in a charity, spotted them

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and you know when you get that nostalgia of, like, days gone by?

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-Did you play board games as a kid?

-A lot, yeah.

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Who did you play with?

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I played with my grandma loads - in between toast time

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and snuggles there was always a board game.

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Always.

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So, this has taken you back to lovely times with your granny.

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-Definitely, yeah.

-Well, I think this is great fun.

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You're the expert on this, what sort of dates would this be, maybe 1960s?

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These are the first-edition ones.

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As far as I am aware from what I've seen on the internet and things.

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How much did it cost you?

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I haggled a little bit and got them down to both of them

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for 40, which I thought was pretty good because they are quite old

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and I have looked online

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and they are selling online, but incomplete.

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This type of thing was mass produced, but it is reflecting the time

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and because it was a toy, many of them were discarded or broken

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and what you're telling me is this is a first-edition one

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and it has everything there.

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-Yeah.

-You paid retail for them - auction is slightly different.

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I would like to put them in estimated, say, 20 to 30.

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Would you be content with that?

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-Yeah.

-If we say £20 reserve with a little bit of discretion.

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If they don't get that, you will get them back again.

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Yeah, that's fine.

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Obviously I've bought it for a bit more,

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but that's the risk you take, isn't it?

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Who knows? But let's hope they do well in auction,

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and it's been great fun looking at them.

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Thank you for bringing them along.

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That's all right. No problem.

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And you can see if those games win or lose at the auction.

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I think every child grows up being told by their parents,

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"Don't get a motorbike, it's too dangerous,"

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but there's something almost

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very basic in the human instinct that wants to

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go as fast as possible,

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and that danger to give you the rush of adrenaline and there's nothing

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more dangerous than in the 1920s and '30s than these guys were doing.

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Speedway.

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My word, these are all speedway riders from that period?

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They are, they were my mother's collection from her

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days from mainly Belle Vue, Manchester.

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Belle Vue and White City, the two big speedway tracks.

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-That's right.

-So, was your mother a massive speedway fan?

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I think she was.

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I had three uncles who were obviously her brothers

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and they were all into bikes. She was the younger of them.

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I suppose she's grown up with the brothers with motorbikes around,

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so they went to Belle Vue and she went with them, as far as I know.

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I think even took me in my younger days when I was a young child.

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-So young, I couldn't remember it.

-Are you a biker?

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-No, can't ride a push-bike!

-Come on. Everyone can ride a push-bike.

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-I can drive a car, but not a push-bike. No, I can't.

-How funny!

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OK. So, how old was your mother

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when she was going to the races - eight, ten?

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Probably she started from that young age and into her teens.

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I suppose it's what you could call the pop of her day.

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On a Saturday night at Belle Vue was the speedway racing

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and you got to meet them afterwards.

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Here we have proof of the fact she met them.

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Max Grossenburg, who was an Australian speedway

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and one of the most famous of his day,

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and there he is standing looking dashing in his long leather coat.

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-I think he must have been known for that.

-I'm sure.

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We have some of the guys up here. Look at what they're wearing.

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It's padded, but it wouldn't give anywhere near the protection

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of the guys that they have today.

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It's a really interesting collection,

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but it is quite a varied mix.

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We've got the scraps that are put together for personal interest,

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the cigarette cards appeal to one market, autographs that appeal

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to a separate market and photographs that are a different market again.

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The one thing that links them all is the biking interest.

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I think the thing of most value is the photograph.

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I think that's probably worth 30, £35, but by the time we add it

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all together we've got a lot of worth probably 50 to 80.

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-Is that all right for you for a starting bid?

-Fine.

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The right thing to do is to find a home,

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somebody who has a passion for it and let these things live on.

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-Let's see who turns up at the sale.

-Yes, OK. Fine.

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Just up the coast from Blackpool is another seaside resort.

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I'm here at the Winter Gardens in Morecambe, once home to

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some of the biggest names in show business

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and arguably one of the grandest theatres in Lancashire.

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But the heyday has long gone and the glamour has faded,

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but thankfully all is not lost.

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The theatre was built in 1897 and formed part of an entertainment

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complex that included a ballroom and seawater baths.

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Most of those features have long since been demolished,

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but the theatre still remains,

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although it has been closed for more than 40 years.

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And it's here in the main auditorium that generations

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of theatre-goers flocked to see some of their favourite performers.

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This stage has seen the likes of Laurel and Hardy,

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Laurence Olivier, and not forgetting the comic genius

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Eric Morecambe and his stage partner Ernie Wise.

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It must have been terrifying walking on stage to a packed house

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because that is a big space.

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All those eyes looking down on you, what an atmosphere!

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And the acoustics are superb in here with the barrelled ceiling.

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-ECHO:

-Hello, Morecambe!

-APPLAUSE

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When it was full, over 2,150 pairs of eyes would have been on the stage.

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If you bought the cheapest tickets available,

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it got you a seat in this area.

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While it may be a long way from the stage, it is close to that.

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This is the original ceiling that was put in in 1897.

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It would have been cast out of plaster in smaller

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sections at ground level and then raised into position and decorated.

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If you look through that hole up there,

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it gives you a marvellous view of the ceiling detail,

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but also how this incredible plasterwork is held up.

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There's a great deal of weight up there, it is

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secured into place by ties -

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lots of strands of wire which have been tightened up,

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looped over this rolled steel joist so it takes the complete weight.

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The ties, the wire, is then covered over with more plaster of Paris

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and decorated into the ornate work so it is completely hidden.

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But it's not just the ceiling that is full of detail here.

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The whole place is full of architectural delights.

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In its prime, the theatre would have been a grand

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and ornate place to visit and also, in the days before TV, it would

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have been a centre of entertainment for the local

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community as well as for visiting holiday-makers.

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Going to the theatre was thirsty work back in the day.

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There would have been five bars here serving drinks to the audience

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and in this one bar there's a team of dedicated volunteers working

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hard to restore it back to its former glory.

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Evelyn, you've been involved with this restoration

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-project from day one. What year was that?

-1986.

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So, have you got fond memories as a theatre-goer, a young girl,

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coming to watch performances here?

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Yes, the first time I ever came into the Winter Gardens,

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my mum brought me and my sister to see Cinderella, the pantomime.

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And I thought it was absolutely wonderful.

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The theatre was all lit up.

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So, you and a group of friends got together to form an action team,

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-to get this restoration project under way.

-We did.

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We got the opportunity in 2006 to purchase the building,

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which we did, and we've been slowly trying to do work to reopen it again.

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Is there anything I can get involved with?

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I am sure, Paul, we can get something for you to do.

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Come on, then!

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Along with Morecambe's Winter Gardens,

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it's estimated that around 50 theatres in the UK

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are at risk of being lost for ever.

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It makes the work of the volunteers even more important.

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I'm going to give a helping hand to local artist Shane Johnstone,

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who's restoring some of the original mosaic in the entrance hall.

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He, like the rest of the team, offer their skills

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to bring the theatre back to life one tile at a time.

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So, you've got a bit of damage here.

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What's the first thing you're going to do?

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First we'll take a tracing of the damaged hole.

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Do you want to have a go?

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Yes, I can rub that around the edge...

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All you do is rub round the edge,

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gently look for the edge of the hole, and the damage.

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So, what happens next?

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What we need to do now is to find a piece that's undamaged,

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and take a tracing from that.

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-Like that section over there.

-That looks good to me.

-OK.

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I can see what you're doing now.

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You know, it is so simple when you really think about it.

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OK, lots of buckets of mosaic tiles here.

0:18:180:18:21

Yeah, these are all the salvaged tiles.

0:18:210:18:23

So what we need to do now is recreate the pattern

0:18:230:18:26

by sticking the tiles on here.

0:18:260:18:28

You can't rush this, can you?

0:18:280:18:29

No, you can't rush it. You've got to do it carefully and thoroughly.

0:18:290:18:33

Get a sense of achievement quite quickly, really, don't you?

0:18:350:18:38

Once you get two colours down, working together.

0:18:380:18:41

You make progress, and you see the artwork develop in front of you,

0:18:410:18:45

and it's very satisfying work.

0:18:450:18:47

Well, we've cut it out now. We've got rid of the excess brown paper.

0:18:490:18:53

One more dab of glue - I've got the last mosaic to put on.

0:18:530:18:56

-In we go.

-There we are.

0:18:560:18:58

I'll leave that up to you to carry over there

0:18:580:19:00

and put into place.

0:19:000:19:02

There's a sense of achievement's gone on there.

0:19:030:19:06

-Do you want to put it in?

-No, go on, you do it.

0:19:060:19:09

I know, obviously, that's got to go down on adhesive,

0:19:090:19:11

-but we won't do that right now. Let's just see the process.

-Yes.

0:19:110:19:14

So, once that's adhesived in, we fold this over,

0:19:140:19:18

we flip it down, insert into the space...

0:19:180:19:22

Once that's set in adhesive and it's gone off,

0:19:220:19:25

you can get a sponge with some warm water on it

0:19:250:19:27

and just soak that brown paper off, and it'll just peel off, won't it?

0:19:270:19:30

It'll peel off and it'll reveal a lovely new restored mosaic.

0:19:300:19:34

Well done. What a lovely process.

0:19:340:19:36

If you visit the theatre,

0:19:360:19:38

you can actually walk over our work now, can't you?!

0:19:380:19:40

-How about that?

-Thanks for your help.

0:19:400:19:43

Well, I've thoroughly enjoyed my visit here to the Winter Gardens,

0:19:450:19:48

and it's great to see the work of the volunteers

0:19:480:19:50

who are so clearly passionate about protecting their local heritage.

0:19:500:19:53

And talking about mosaics, there's a lovely example here.

0:19:530:19:56

This was first put down in the late 1880s,

0:19:560:19:59

and as you can see, "pavilion" was misspelt.

0:19:590:20:02

But I'm sure that's going to be left

0:20:020:20:04

for everybody else to look at and admire.

0:20:040:20:06

And I must say, if you are ever in the area,

0:20:060:20:09

do pay the theatre a visit, because it's well worth seeing.

0:20:090:20:13

It's nearly time to put our first items under the hammer,

0:20:200:20:23

but before we do, let's have a quick recap of all the items

0:20:230:20:27

we think will be entertaining the bidders.

0:20:270:20:29

Wish you were here -

0:20:310:20:32

it's the collection of postcards brought along by Richard and Sonia.

0:20:320:20:37

John's hoping his chemist bottles can brew up a profit.

0:20:370:20:41

And Alana is willing to take a risk on these board games.

0:20:420:20:46

Let's hope she traps the big money.

0:20:460:20:48

There's that collection of Speedway memorabilia.

0:20:500:20:53

For today's auction, we've travelled nine miles south to Lytham St Annes,

0:20:550:20:59

also a Mecca of entertainment, but this time of a sporting nature.

0:20:590:21:04

It is famous for its internationally renowned golf course,

0:21:040:21:07

but let's hope today's lots are not under par.

0:21:070:21:10

The man in charge today is auctioneer Jonathan Cook

0:21:150:21:17

and the room is full of potential bidders.

0:21:170:21:20

Our first lot is the collection of postcards.

0:21:200:21:23

So, this was a family tradition collected by your great aunt

0:21:230:21:27

and it stopped around the '60s and that's

0:21:270:21:29

when I started to collect saucy postcards

0:21:290:21:32

going on holiday in the '60s and '70s, and this is your great aunt.

0:21:320:21:37

-Yeah.

-Can we show the camera?

-She was born in 1898.

0:21:370:21:40

Doesn't she look happy?

0:21:400:21:42

-Is this a sad moment, selling this, really?

-Not really, no.

0:21:420:21:46

-I would rather they went to someone who would appreciate it.

-OK.

0:21:460:21:50

Good luck, everybody. It's time to put those values to the test.

0:21:500:21:52

Let's hope they find a new home and get looked after

0:21:520:21:55

and are kept together.

0:21:550:21:56

This is it.

0:21:560:21:58

Early 20th-century album. Comical postcards.

0:21:580:22:01

We can start them off at £80. 85. 90. Five. At £95. Any advance on 95?

0:22:010:22:08

100. At £100 on the net. Any advance on £100?

0:22:080:22:12

At £100 on the internet. Are we all sure? 110. And 20. And 30.

0:22:120:22:18

And 40. And 50. And 60. 170. 180.

0:22:180:22:23

-At £180.

-We are nearly at the top end of the estimate.

-At £180, then.

0:22:240:22:29

All on the net at 180. Any further interest in the room? At 190.

0:22:290:22:35

On the net at 190. Any advance in the room? At 190, all sure?

0:22:360:22:43

All finished. At 190.

0:22:430:22:45

-That's wonderful.

-Oh, good.

0:22:470:22:48

That's good, isn't it? Everyone is happy. It was worth doing.

0:22:480:22:53

Definitely worth doing. Well done. A good result there.

0:22:530:22:56

Now, it's time to roll the dice for our next lot.

0:22:560:22:59

Alana, fingers crossed,

0:22:590:23:00

and I know you are crazy about board games, aren't you?

0:23:000:23:04

-Yeah.

-Not a lot of money involved. £20, hopefully £40.

0:23:040:23:08

I just wanted to meet you guys! That's all it was.

0:23:080:23:11

-I've got to get on.

-Good luck.

0:23:110:23:14

Let's put it to the test

0:23:140:23:15

and find out what this lot think - it's now down to the bidders.

0:23:150:23:19

Lot 220. 1960s. Ideal mouse game. Risk! by Waddington. 1960s.

0:23:190:23:26

On the internet at £20. 22. 24.

0:23:270:23:32

At £24 on the net.

0:23:320:23:34

-Any advance in the room? At 24 on the net. Are we all sure?

-At £24.

0:23:340:23:41

Selling.

0:23:410:23:42

-We can all live without it.

-£24.

0:23:440:23:47

It has gone within estimate.

0:23:490:23:52

-What did you pay for those two games?

-I did pay a bit more.

0:23:520:23:55

I was hoping there might have been some big kids in the room. But no!

0:23:550:23:59

But somebody else will have a lot of fun playing with them.

0:23:590:24:03

-Definitely.

-Whoever bought that got a real bargain and hours of fun.

0:24:030:24:09

Let's see how James does with his first lot.

0:24:090:24:11

-Good luck with the chemists' bottles, John.

-Thank you.

0:24:110:24:14

I'm pleased you decided to put them into auction,

0:24:140:24:16

rather than sell them at a car boot.

0:24:160:24:18

-Definitely.

-The interesting thing

0:24:180:24:19

-with these chemist bottles is a rare label can make a massive difference.

-Yes.

0:24:190:24:23

And you've got some lovely enamelled labels amongst them,

0:24:230:24:25

some ribbed poison bottles. They're a good bunch.

0:24:250:24:27

And I bet if you took these to that car boot,

0:24:270:24:29

like, it was your brother that was telling you to?

0:24:290:24:31

That's correct, yeah.

0:24:310:24:33

I bet you would only have got a tenner for them.

0:24:330:24:35

-I'd be lucky if you get that at the car boot.

-Exactly.

0:24:350:24:37

-A tenner for the lot.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:24:370:24:39

Well, let's hope - let's hope we get the top end of James's estimate,

0:24:390:24:42

and get a little surprise.

0:24:420:24:43

Collection, 20 chemists' pharmacy bottles,

0:24:430:24:46

various sizes and shapes.

0:24:460:24:48

Bids there of £30, 32, 34.

0:24:480:24:52

At £34, 36, 38, 40.

0:24:520:24:55

At £40, 42, 44.

0:24:550:24:57

6, 8, 50.

0:24:570:24:59

-5, 60.

-Look, all the bids are coming in online,

0:24:590:25:01

can you see that? They're not in the room at all.

0:25:010:25:03

At 75 on commission, looking for 80.

0:25:030:25:06

At £75, are we all sure at 75?

0:25:060:25:09

-Any further interest?

-I think that's a good result.

-Yeah.

0:25:090:25:12

At £75, are we all done?

0:25:120:25:15

Are we all sure?

0:25:150:25:16

-80. £80 bid...

-Fresh legs, right at the end.

0:25:160:25:19

£80, are we all done at 80? Any further interest

0:25:190:25:22

at £80? All sure at 80?

0:25:220:25:25

£80, the hammer's going down.

0:25:250:25:27

-Good result. Well done, James.

-Good, yeah.

0:25:270:25:29

Yeah, you wouldn't have got that at a car boot, would you?

0:25:290:25:31

-Definitely not, no.

-No.

-Well done.

0:25:310:25:35

Time to bring down the chequered flag on our first visit to

0:25:350:25:38

the auction room. Vroom, vroom! We are revving up now.

0:25:380:25:41

Things are going well and you know what I'm talking about right now.

0:25:410:25:45

Yes, the speedway memorabilia. It is a hard thing to put a value on.

0:25:450:25:49

You have 50, £60.

0:25:490:25:51

Yeah. It was a very difficult one to estimate

0:25:510:25:54

because there's not a massive collectors field for them.

0:25:540:25:57

If it had been in Grand Prix or motor racing it would have been

0:25:570:26:00

really sought-after.

0:26:000:26:02

-Anyway, good luck.

-This was the old days.

0:26:020:26:06

Lot 435. Speedway interest.

0:26:060:26:10

Bids of £34 on the net. £36. 38. 40.

0:26:100:26:15

44. 46. 48. 50. Five. 60. Five. 70.

0:26:150:26:20

Better than I thought.

0:26:200:26:23

-Five.

-90. We're getting to £100.

0:26:230:26:27

100.

0:26:270:26:29

At £100 on the internet.

0:26:310:26:32

Any advance in the room? 110. New bid in the room at 110.

0:26:320:26:37

-Any advance on 110?

-This is brilliant!

0:26:370:26:41

140. 150. 160. 170. 180.

0:26:410:26:47

190. 200. 220.

0:26:470:26:52

Must be something worthwhile in there to someone.

0:26:520:26:54

-It's rare, isn't it?

-Well, it is.

0:26:540:26:57

All finished at 240? 250 if it helps. 250.

0:26:570:27:02

-Good auctioneering.

-Fantastic, Jonathan. Well done.

-At £260, then.

0:27:040:27:09

All finished at 260? No further interest at £260.

0:27:090:27:14

-Gosh, I didn't expect that.

-Nor did we. £260.

0:27:180:27:22

It's only bits of paper, after all.

0:27:220:27:25

Yeah, but it's speedway memorabilia. A lesson to us all -

0:27:250:27:28

don't chuck things away.

0:27:280:27:30

Show them to experts first, bring them along to a saleroom

0:27:300:27:32

and find out what they're worth before you chuck things.

0:27:320:27:35

There's plenty more of my mother's I could bring again.

0:27:350:27:37

Let's get round there! Come on.

0:27:370:27:39

Are we all done at 90?

0:27:390:27:42

At most auction rooms there are loads of paintings for sale.

0:27:430:27:47

Some range from £20, by unknown artists,

0:27:470:27:50

right up to millions of pounds by masters of the medium.

0:27:500:27:54

While we were here filming in the area, I decided to try

0:27:540:27:57

my hand at the art of watercolour and have a lesson with a master.

0:27:570:28:01

See if you think if I've got what it takes.

0:28:010:28:05

This is Towneley Hall near Burnley.

0:28:050:28:07

For over 500 years it was home to the Towneley family.

0:28:070:28:11

But for the last century it's been owned by the local authorities,

0:28:110:28:14

who now use it as a museum and art gallery.

0:28:140:28:17

I'm here to meet local artist Jeff Butterworth,

0:28:170:28:19

whose talent with watercolours has made him one of

0:28:190:28:22

the country's most prolific painters.

0:28:220:28:23

-Hello, Jeff!

-Hi, Paul.

0:28:240:28:27

-Good to see you.

-Pleased to meet you.

0:28:270:28:29

-The weather's on our side, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Shall we get going?

0:28:290:28:32

Yeah, follow me.

0:28:320:28:33

How long have you been painting? All your life?

0:28:360:28:38

More or less. Yeah.

0:28:380:28:40

I did start in 1980,

0:28:400:28:43

and I joined the British Watercolour Society.

0:28:430:28:47

The first exhibition I did, I won the competition.

0:28:470:28:50

-That's quite an accolade, isn't it?

-Yeah. And then...

0:28:500:28:53

-You won it again...

-..to top it all, I won it three times.

0:28:530:28:56

-Yeah, I won it actually three times.

-That's quite an impressive CV -

0:28:560:28:59

you are a well-established watercolour artist,

0:28:590:29:02

you've exhibited all over the place. How would you describe your style?

0:29:020:29:05

As a realist.

0:29:050:29:07

OK, so it's photographic representation to a degree.

0:29:070:29:10

-It is, yeah.

-Yeah.

0:29:100:29:12

Why are we meeting up here today? What's special about this place?

0:29:120:29:14

Well, I've been coming here since...

0:29:140:29:16

Well, the first time I came here I was five.

0:29:160:29:18

-Really? Lots of childhood memories.

-Yeah.

0:29:180:29:20

And now I'm artist in residence at Towneley Hall.

0:29:200:29:24

Gosh, that's nice, isn't it? It's come full circle for you.

0:29:240:29:27

It has, yeah. It's been quite a good time, really.

0:29:270:29:30

-I mean, that's a beautiful-looking shot there, isn't it?

-It is.

0:29:300:29:33

Is that something that we hope to capture today?

0:29:330:29:35

Well, if I take a photograph of the view now,

0:29:350:29:37

it's got a good composition,

0:29:370:29:39

the path's leading me right towards the hall.

0:29:390:29:42

-Well, I'm up for going inside.

-Yeah, let's...

0:29:420:29:44

You've got your camera with you.

0:29:440:29:45

..take a photograph of it and then we can work off the result.

0:29:450:29:50

-There we go.

-Happy with that one?

-Yeah.

0:29:500:29:52

The art of watercolour evolved around the 18th century,

0:29:520:29:57

when artists would use watercolours to create an initial snapshot

0:29:570:30:00

before committing to an oil painting,

0:30:000:30:03

much like Jeff uses his camera to capture the landscape today.

0:30:030:30:07

Right, where do we start? We've got our image, we've printed it out...

0:30:080:30:11

Yeah, we've got our image.

0:30:110:30:12

So now we've got to do an outline drawing of the buildings

0:30:120:30:15

and the path and the trees.

0:30:150:30:17

-All right.

-So that's the first step.

0:30:170:30:18

OK. Can I do my own interpretation of this, or am I copying your style?

0:30:180:30:24

No, you interpret it how you think fit.

0:30:240:30:27

Watercolour paintings are still hugely popular,

0:30:270:30:30

and the collection here at Towneley includes work

0:30:300:30:32

by some of the best-known practitioners of the art,

0:30:320:30:35

including this one by the world-renowned Joseph Turner.

0:30:350:30:39

I think I've got something I can work with,

0:30:410:30:43

-I'm quite happy with that.

-Good.

0:30:430:30:45

So, shall we start to paint?

0:30:450:30:46

-Yeah.

-What do you start with,

0:30:460:30:48

the sky and work downwards, or dark to light or light to dark...?

0:30:480:30:52

-I always work from top to bottom.

-Right.

0:30:520:30:53

But more importantly, from background to foreground.

0:30:530:30:57

So if there's anything that's lighter than the dark background,

0:30:570:31:02

-we use a masking fluid.

-Right, OK,

0:31:020:31:04

so you paint over it with the other colours,

0:31:040:31:07

but then rub that paint off so it leaves the blank paper to paint on.

0:31:070:31:10

That's it, yeah.

0:31:100:31:12

You've got a wonderful assortment of brushes here -

0:31:120:31:14

sort of flat brushes, fine brushes, mixing brushes...

0:31:140:31:17

Yeah, that one's for you.

0:31:170:31:19

I've got a nice selection here, some sable brushes...

0:31:190:31:23

-OK, that's the best hair to use, is it?

-Yeah, it is,

0:31:230:31:26

it's a very expensive brush, but very good quality.

0:31:260:31:30

-Well, we need to choose some colours.

-Right.

0:31:300:31:32

So, are we going for blues with some whites that we have to mix

0:31:320:31:36

in order to get that?

0:31:360:31:38

In watercolour there is no white, it's the paper.

0:31:380:31:42

So if there's any areas that are pure white,

0:31:420:31:45

then it's areas that we're not going to touch.

0:31:450:31:47

Do you know, I didn't know that.

0:31:470:31:49

-Can I watch YOU for a little while?

-Yeah.

0:31:490:31:51

See what you tackle to start with and how you do it,

0:31:510:31:53

-and I'll try and copy.

-Yeah.

0:31:530:31:55

-OK.

-I'll start with the sky...

0:31:550:31:57

-Right.

-..and take it from here.

0:31:570:32:00

Right. Um...

0:32:000:32:03

What we want to do first of all is to wet the paper,

0:32:030:32:07

ready to accept a colour on it.

0:32:070:32:10

-So it's harder to paint detail on dry paper, then?

-Yeah.

0:32:100:32:14

Right, I've learned something there.

0:32:140:32:15

You want to carefully work round the building...

0:32:150:32:18

Notice there's not much colour on it at the moment.

0:32:180:32:21

Now I'm going to put some of the masking fluid on.

0:32:210:32:24

-Because you've come to a tree.

-Yeah.

-OK.

0:32:240:32:26

-I see, yes - as if the sky's sort of grinning through the branches.

-Yeah.

0:32:270:32:31

Well, while you finish off that

0:32:310:32:32

I can at least make a start on the sky now.

0:32:320:32:34

Yeah. Well, this is about done now, so we'll leave this to dry.

0:32:340:32:38

It's a lovely brush to work with.

0:32:410:32:44

Flat bushes are really nice.

0:32:440:32:45

-They cover the paper...

-Cover a broad area.

-Yeah.

0:32:450:32:49

-Right. Are you going to do some masking fluid?

-Yeah. Can I?

0:32:490:32:53

-I've never used that before.

-Yeah. I'll show you how to do it.

0:32:530:32:56

Just a quick dip in.

0:32:570:32:59

-And then a few dabs?

-Yeah.

0:32:590:33:01

And paint on where it's dry - don't go onto the watercolour.

0:33:010:33:05

It's a gentle process. What's the most difficult thing to paint?

0:33:090:33:13

-Architecture, really.

-Do you think so?

-Yeah.

0:33:130:33:16

You've not much scope, really, to be loose with architecture

0:33:160:33:20

if you're trying to get the thing right.

0:33:200:33:22

OK...

0:33:220:33:23

What's next?

0:33:230:33:25

We'll work our way across and do the background trees,

0:33:250:33:29

and then work on the building, work on this section.

0:33:290:33:33

I'm finding it really relaxing.

0:33:330:33:36

-But it's something you can't rush.

-No.

0:33:360:33:38

I understand that now from watching you.

0:33:380:33:41

Although you're working at quite a good pace.

0:33:410:33:44

Have you a critical eye at this stage?

0:33:440:33:46

Well, I'm working out the technicalities of it,

0:33:460:33:49

building the thing up.

0:33:490:33:50

Cos all of a sudden, I'm sort of working with

0:33:500:33:53

three different shades of green here and making them merge

0:33:530:33:57

and seeing what happens,

0:33:570:33:59

and just letting the paper

0:33:590:34:00

-and the water dictate what's happening.

-Yeah.

0:34:000:34:03

'The thing that makes watercolours

0:34:030:34:05

'more difficult than oils or acrylics

0:34:050:34:07

'is the paint is much more liquid, and it wants to move.

0:34:070:34:09

'With thicker materials, it stays where you put it.

0:34:090:34:12

'But with this kind of painting, you have to learn to work

0:34:120:34:15

'with the materials and adapt your technique accordingly.'

0:34:150:34:19

A good tip for doing foliage

0:34:190:34:21

is to get an old brush,

0:34:210:34:24

something like this...

0:34:240:34:26

get a little bit of colour on it and then just...

0:34:260:34:29

do that.

0:34:290:34:31

-It'll make things like that, you see?

-Yeah.

0:34:310:34:34

But you need to do it on a dry background

0:34:340:34:36

so you can build it up like that.

0:34:360:34:39

That's a nice look, isn't it?

0:34:390:34:41

-I'm kind of happy with that in my own way.

-Yeah, it looks...

0:34:420:34:45

-Shall we move on to the buildings?

-Yeah,

0:34:450:34:48

I've already started with the roof.

0:34:480:34:50

And at the top is Payne's grey,

0:34:500:34:52

-which we've already used a little bit on the trees.

-OK.

0:34:520:34:56

So, basically, it's the same as we've done already -

0:34:560:34:59

-we start at the top of the building and work down.

-OK.

0:34:590:35:03

You've painted all over the country, Jeff, landscapes everywhere,

0:35:030:35:06

in different lights and different conditions -

0:35:060:35:08

it must change dramatically for you.

0:35:080:35:10

Yeah. I find that there ARE differences in the light -

0:35:100:35:13

southern England has perhaps a mellower feel to the landscape

0:35:130:35:19

and the light.

0:35:190:35:20

The further north you go

0:35:200:35:22

the more harsh the colours can be, but...

0:35:220:35:25

basically you still work with the same palette.

0:35:250:35:28

Should I carry on with

0:35:280:35:31

this building here,

0:35:310:35:33

or do I do the tree first?

0:35:330:35:35

-Which comes first?

-Finish off each section before you move on.

0:35:350:35:38

-What, even the window detail?

-Yeah, do it all.

-Right, OK.

0:35:380:35:41

Bear in mind that it's not all red, there is some green...

0:35:410:35:44

I know. And there's a bit of brown, isn't there?

0:35:440:35:47

It's quite tricky, really.

0:35:470:35:48

I can see why you work from a colour photograph now.

0:35:510:35:53

Yeah. Although I have done quite a few black-and-white ones.

0:35:530:35:58

'A few hours in, and I'm finding this really relaxing.

0:35:580:36:01

'It takes a lot of concentration, but when you're in the flow,

0:36:010:36:04

'it's really easy to let your mind wander

0:36:040:36:06

'as the picture comes together.

0:36:060:36:09

'Although I think I need a lot more practice

0:36:090:36:11

'before I reach Jeff's standards.'

0:36:110:36:13

Well, Jeff, three hours is up...

0:36:130:36:15

Yeah.

0:36:150:36:17

I've rushed ahead, I know I've finished mine...

0:36:170:36:19

I'm happy with it, but when I look at mine compared to yours,

0:36:190:36:23

this looks typical of a schoolboy compared to a professional.

0:36:230:36:27

But I've learnt a lot today in my three hours.

0:36:270:36:29

And I've learnt that there's a lot of control in your work.

0:36:290:36:32

-Yeah.

-There really is.

0:36:320:36:33

Thank you so much for giving me a lesson here today.

0:36:330:36:36

-Shall I sign this?

-Certainly, yeah.

0:36:360:36:39

Who knows - maybe the gallery'll hang it on the wall for a week.

0:36:390:36:42

Put a price on it, yeah!

0:36:420:36:44

-I'll sign it with watercolour, shall I, rather than pencil?

-Yeah.

0:36:440:36:48

There you are.

0:36:480:36:49

-I enjoyed that. Thoroughly enjoyed that.

-Excellent.

0:36:490:36:52

Now, this is Jeff's finished piece.

0:36:550:36:58

It's easy to see why his work is held in such high regard.

0:36:580:37:02

We're back in Blackpool for today's next lot of valuations.

0:37:090:37:12

Let's go straight to the Circus Ring,

0:37:120:37:15

where Anita is dolled up...

0:37:150:37:16

-Ladies, welcome to "Flog It!" You're mum and daughter.

-Yep.

0:37:160:37:21

-Whose dolls are these?

-Mine.

0:37:210:37:25

-Where did you get them from?

-From an antiques fair about 30 years ago.

0:37:250:37:30

-Do you collect dolls, Jean?

-Yes.

-How many do you have?

0:37:300:37:34

Probably about...

0:37:340:37:36

-Near enough 50, 60.

-50, 60?

0:37:360:37:39

Gail, what do you think about your mum collecting all these dolls?

0:37:390:37:42

-She's mad.

-Is she a mad collector?

-Yeah.

0:37:420:37:46

And what sort of period do your dolls come from?

0:37:460:37:50

From when they were babies. And they're going up to 50 now. So...

0:37:500:37:54

-Right, so...did your mum take your dolls from you?

-Yes, she did.

-Yes.

0:37:540:37:59

-They'd rather play out.

-Right.

0:37:590:38:02

Well, it's nice to think that you have kept dolls.

0:38:020:38:06

These ones are baby dolls, and they're probably from the 1940s.

0:38:060:38:10

Early '50s. I remember having this type of doll myself.

0:38:100:38:16

What I like about them is that we've got a little bit of music.

0:38:160:38:20

-Music, yes.

-And we get a little tune.

0:38:200:38:23

DOLL PLAYS TUNE

0:38:230:38:26

What is the tune?

0:38:260:38:28

I don't know what the one is, I can't get it. One plays Rock-A-Bye Baby...

0:38:280:38:33

Ah, right.

0:38:330:38:35

So these are obviously lullabies to send our babies to sleep.

0:38:350:38:39

That's it.

0:38:390:38:40

On this little doll here,

0:38:400:38:42

she's fallen down like Humpty Dumpty

0:38:420:38:45

and broken her crown. She has been repaired at some point.

0:38:450:38:49

This one we have some condition issues. Her face is a bit crackly.

0:38:490:38:53

And she's lost her thumb.

0:38:530:38:55

THEY LAUGH

0:38:550:38:56

But this little girl here has a little teddy bear,

0:38:560:39:00

and he's quite sweet. Where did you get him?

0:39:000:39:04

It was my daughter -

0:39:040:39:05

she worked in a care home, and one of the ladies gave it to her.

0:39:050:39:08

It's quite an interesting little creature.

0:39:080:39:11

It's from Germany, where the best teddy bears were made.

0:39:110:39:15

And this little one was pre-war.

0:39:150:39:18

-Right.

-So there's a good bit of age.

0:39:180:39:20

And the little teddy bear

0:39:200:39:22

comes in the shape of a wee purse.

0:39:220:39:25

And that's quite sweet.

0:39:250:39:26

There's no factory name there,

0:39:260:39:28

but we do know that he is German.

0:39:280:39:31

And he's quite an interesting wee creature.

0:39:310:39:33

Coming to auction,

0:39:330:39:36

I would put these as a group.

0:39:360:39:37

Because we have condition issues with the baby dolls.

0:39:370:39:41

And the little teddy bear is probably

0:39:410:39:43

the item which is going to sell this group.

0:39:430:39:45

Now - did you pay a lot of money for these at the time?

0:39:450:39:48

No, not really.

0:39:480:39:50

-£20 I think. Something like that.

-£20.

0:39:500:39:54

What I'd like to do is to put quite a modest estimate

0:39:540:39:57

on this little group.

0:39:570:39:59

-I would like to put an estimate of 80-120.

-Yeah.

-Is that fine with you?

0:39:590:40:05

Um, yeah. Maybe a little more than that, if I can.

0:40:050:40:09

Would you like me to go 100-150?

0:40:090:40:11

-Yeah.

-You would prefer that? OK. 100-150. The reserve, £100.

0:40:110:40:17

-With auctioneer's discretion.

-Right.

0:40:170:40:20

-We might get a surprise, especially with that wee guy in tow.

-Mm-hm.

0:40:200:40:25

-Right.

-Yeah.

0:40:250:40:27

JAMES SNORTS LIKE A PIG

0:40:320:40:34

I have to say, Norman, it's a while since I played farmyards.

0:40:360:40:39

-Yeah.

-But these, actually, they're not toys, are they?

0:40:390:40:43

They're something far more interesting.

0:40:430:40:45

Now, the fact that you've got two

0:40:450:40:47

makes me think that you actually probably know what they are.

0:40:470:40:51

-More or less, yeah.

-So, tell me, did they come from the same place?

0:40:510:40:55

No, the big pig came from York - bought that in an antique...

0:40:550:40:59

-In York, right.

-This one I actually got from a market in Shanghai.

0:40:590:41:03

-Oh, did you?

-Yeah.

0:41:030:41:05

-And how long ago did you buy that?

-About eight years ago.

0:41:050:41:08

-Right.

-I found out that I was born in the year of the pig,

0:41:080:41:11

so that led me to buying pigs.

0:41:110:41:14

-Oh, so you collect pigs?

-Yeah. I had over 2,000 at one stage.

0:41:140:41:18

Do you go to China a lot?

0:41:180:41:20

I've been a couple of times, yeah.

0:41:200:41:22

It's an amazing country, isn't it?

0:41:220:41:24

It's an amazing country, with an amazing culture,

0:41:240:41:27

and amazing skills.

0:41:270:41:29

One of their best skills is faking and copying other things -

0:41:290:41:34

whether it's English Royal Crown Derby or whatever,

0:41:340:41:38

they just copy everything, and they do it brilliantly.

0:41:380:41:41

These are meant to be

0:41:410:41:44

Han dynasty/Tang dynasty tomb figures.

0:41:440:41:49

The idea was they would accompany the dead person to the afterlife,

0:41:490:41:54

and be a source of food and something to trade in the new world.

0:41:540:42:00

Now, the way of telling would be to drill a section

0:42:000:42:05

and do what they call the Oxford test,

0:42:050:42:08

where they drill down into the leg - almost always into the leg -

0:42:080:42:12

and they take a carbon date of the clay

0:42:120:42:14

and they tell you whether it's old or a reproduction.

0:42:140:42:17

But the fakers have now discovered

0:42:170:42:21

that this is what they're doing.

0:42:210:42:23

So, they get a genuine old piece,

0:42:230:42:26

grind up the clay

0:42:260:42:28

and make the legs of the old piece.

0:42:280:42:30

So it is very, very difficult to tell.

0:42:300:42:32

It would be nice to be able to do the Oxford test on it,

0:42:320:42:36

but it costs about £200 to do it.

0:42:360:42:39

So, what did you pay for them?

0:42:390:42:42

-I paid £50 for the pig...

-OK.

0:42:420:42:45

..and £15, possibly, for that.

0:42:450:42:48

-Your Shanghai piece...

-Yeah?

0:42:480:42:50

..I think is definitely a fake.

0:42:500:42:53

-Yeah.

-The pig is more interesting.

0:42:530:42:55

My gut reaction is it's got a bit of age,

0:42:550:42:59

but I don't think anything like 300-600AD.

0:42:590:43:03

We come to value, I guess,

0:43:030:43:07

and this is going to be one of the most difficult parts of it,

0:43:070:43:10

because without that Oxford test

0:43:100:43:13

you can't say for sure

0:43:130:43:15

that it's genuine.

0:43:150:43:17

What to do?

0:43:180:43:21

I think the best way of cataloguing this

0:43:210:43:24

is to say a Chinese "Han" -

0:43:240:43:28

in inverted commas - dynasty

0:43:280:43:31

terracotta pig.

0:43:310:43:33

Give them a good description,

0:43:330:43:35

it will then be picked up online,

0:43:350:43:38

but we're not saying it's a genuine Han dynasty -

0:43:380:43:40

it's "Han" in inverted commas.

0:43:400:43:42

I think if we put an auction estimate of £60-100 for the two,

0:43:420:43:48

it's not going to show you a great return if it only makes that,

0:43:480:43:51

but it does give them a chance to fight for it

0:43:510:43:54

if they think it's right.

0:43:540:43:55

-Yep.

-Happy with that?

-Fine, yeah.

0:43:550:43:58

Bit of a gamble, but you never know -

0:43:580:44:01

-you might end up taking home the bacon.

-Yeah.

0:44:010:44:04

A tricky one there for James.

0:44:040:44:06

We'll find out if the bidders at the auction

0:44:060:44:08

think they're real or fake a little bit later on.

0:44:080:44:11

Let's go back to Anita now and see what she's discovered.

0:44:110:44:15

Eric, Carol, what a wonderful thing you've brought in

0:44:150:44:18

for "Flog It!" today.

0:44:180:44:20

It's a concertina.

0:44:200:44:22

Can you tell me a bit about the background - where did you get it?

0:44:230:44:26

Were you ever a busker yourself?

0:44:260:44:28

No, no. I can't play it.

0:44:280:44:31

I acquired it somewhere down the line.

0:44:310:44:34

Whether it was in the loft of a house that I purchased

0:44:340:44:37

or whether I acquired it in connection with a business I was running,

0:44:370:44:41

I haven't a clue -

0:44:410:44:42

I've had it that long, 25, 30 years,

0:44:420:44:46

and it's always been there, and I just couldn't get rid of it!

0:44:460:44:49

Well, let's hope WE can pass it on to someone who will play it,

0:44:490:44:54

-or perhaps a collector of concertinas.

-Yes.

0:44:540:44:58

This one, I think, hasn't been pulled in and out too much,

0:44:580:45:01

so the condition...

0:45:010:45:03

SHE STRIKES A NOTE

0:45:030:45:05

..is good.

0:45:050:45:07

I'm tempted to give a wee tune here!

0:45:080:45:10

SHE PLAYS DISCORDANTLY

0:45:100:45:13

I'm afraid I'm making it sound like a squeaky cat!

0:45:160:45:19

But the bellows are good.

0:45:190:45:22

I think it maybe needs a wee bit of love and attention

0:45:220:45:27

with these little pegs here,

0:45:270:45:29

but, in the main, in good condition.

0:45:290:45:32

If we look at the front here

0:45:320:45:34

we can see we can see the little plate...

0:45:340:45:36

-Mm-hm.

-..which tells us that it is a Wheatstone

0:45:360:45:40

and that's what we look for.

0:45:400:45:42

That was a 19th-century instrument maker.

0:45:420:45:46

They made up till the 1930s, '40s - maybe even the '50s.

0:45:460:45:50

But it was the best of instruments.

0:45:500:45:53

If we look at the back of it,

0:45:530:45:56

we can see this number here.

0:45:560:45:59

Now, each concertina has its own individual number,

0:45:590:46:04

and you can trace that back to when it was made.

0:46:040:46:09

-Yes.

-Did you know that, Eric?

0:46:090:46:11

Yes, I actually did it - went onto their web page,

0:46:110:46:15

and I traced it back, and it was made in 1913.

0:46:150:46:18

You can actually see the ledger that it was written out on.

0:46:180:46:23

-So just at the very beginning of the war.

-Yeah.

0:46:230:46:26

Just at the beginning of the war.

0:46:260:46:28

-Valuation... Have you had it valued before, Eric?

-No.

-No.

0:46:280:46:33

I would put a value of £500-800 on it.

0:46:330:46:37

I can be a wee bit conservative at times,

0:46:370:46:40

so I'm sure that that type of estimate will attract the bidding.

0:46:400:46:44

-Yes.

-And it may fly - it may go above the top estimate.

0:46:440:46:49

-But would you be happy to sell it at that?

-Yes, yes.

0:46:490:46:53

-You're happy with that.

-No problem.

0:46:530:46:55

-Reserve £500...

-Yeah.

-Bottom estimate.

0:46:550:46:58

I'm sure it'll play a fine tune for us when it's sold.

0:46:580:47:01

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:47:010:47:04

In the past, concertinas have had mixed fortunes on "Flog It!",

0:47:040:47:08

making anything from a couple of hundred pounds to over a thousand.

0:47:080:47:12

We'll see how that one does a little later on.

0:47:120:47:15

Now, if you're a fan of the show,

0:47:150:47:17

you're bound to recognise today's final item.

0:47:170:47:20

Joan, can you hear that?

0:47:200:47:22

No.

0:47:220:47:23

All those people shouting at home, "Clarice Cliff, Clarice Cliff!"?

0:47:230:47:27

Yes - because if you're a "Flog It!" viewer,

0:47:270:47:30

you know exactly what that is.

0:47:300:47:32

-Clarice Cliff.

-It's one of the "Flog It!" favourites,

0:47:320:47:34

it just wouldn't be a "Flog It!" without a bit of Clarice Cliff.

0:47:340:47:37

So, tell me, we know all the history of Clarice,

0:47:370:47:41

we've been over it so many times.

0:47:410:47:43

But, what's the history of this one?

0:47:430:47:46

Your personal history.

0:47:460:47:48

Just always having it in the family.

0:47:480:47:51

Just there, full of daffodils and tulips and that.

0:47:510:47:54

-And it belonged to your parents?

-Yeah.

0:47:540:47:57

And do you remember it as a little girl?

0:47:570:47:58

Yes. I remember my mother saying she paid half a crown for it.

0:47:580:48:02

Half a crown!

0:48:020:48:03

Do you remember where she got it from?

0:48:030:48:05

-Er, yes - a pot shop that used to do auctions.

-Really?

0:48:050:48:09

-Over in Yorkshire.

-OK. Well, I think your mum did very well,

0:48:090:48:14

because she's obviously got a good eye.

0:48:140:48:16

Clarice Cliff being the archetypal leading designer

0:48:160:48:19

of the Art Deco period

0:48:190:48:22

and the Art Deco movement.

0:48:220:48:23

This is known as Melon pattern, for obvious reasons -

0:48:230:48:27

we've got a very stylised green and pink melon on this side.

0:48:270:48:32

The bands are in blue, pink and green.

0:48:320:48:34

There was one with reds and oranges that was more common than this,

0:48:340:48:38

but also slightly more popular.

0:48:380:48:41

This would have been produced around 1935,

0:48:410:48:45

so it was in the height of Clarice Cliff's Bizarre, Fantasque period,

0:48:450:48:50

when everyone believes that Clarice Cliff was at her best.

0:48:500:48:54

After the war she sold her name, so a lot of wares are produced

0:48:540:48:59

that have a bit of a weak design with a Clarice Cliff name to it.

0:48:590:49:02

Yeah.

0:49:020:49:03

But the reason why they're weak is that Clarice Cliff never saw them.

0:49:030:49:07

This is a piece that Clarice would have designed, would have executed

0:49:070:49:10

and would have been a key person

0:49:100:49:12

-in the production of this piece.

-Would she?

0:49:120:49:15

-So she paid half a crown for it...

-Yeah.

-..in the 1930s.

0:49:150:49:17

Now, half a crown in today's money is what?

0:49:170:49:19

-Half a crown is...

-About two shillings, and 2½p...

0:49:190:49:24

-Two shillings and...

-Six...

0:49:240:49:26

See, that - I'm no wiser with two shillings

0:49:260:49:28

-than I am with half a crown!

-No...

0:49:280:49:31

Two shillings and sixpence - sixpence is 2½p,

0:49:310:49:34

-a shilling is 5p, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:49:340:49:36

-So... That's 12½p!

-Yeah.

0:49:360:49:39

That's not bad.

0:49:390:49:41

-Must be.

-12½p.

0:49:410:49:42

Well, your 12½p

0:49:420:49:44

has changed into about £100-150.

0:49:440:49:50

-That's not bad for 12½p!

-That's not bad, no.

0:49:500:49:53

-Pleased with that?

-Yeah.

0:49:530:49:55

-Flog it!

-Flog it! Let's flog it, why not?!

0:49:550:49:58

Well, we certainly had a show-stopping day

0:50:000:50:03

here at the Blackpool Tower,

0:50:030:50:04

with hundreds of people coming through the door

0:50:040:50:06

to have their antiques and collectibles valued.

0:50:060:50:08

It's now time to say goodbye to the Tower

0:50:080:50:10

as we head down the coastline south to Lytham St Annes,

0:50:100:50:13

to the auction room.

0:50:130:50:15

And here's a quick recap of what's sailing with us.

0:50:150:50:18

There's the well-loved dolls and that teddy bear.

0:50:180:50:21

Norman's sending his little piggies off to market.

0:50:230:50:26

This concertina will try to squeeze out the big money.

0:50:300:50:34

And there's the "Flog It!" favourite - the Clarice Cliff jug.

0:50:360:50:40

Welcome back to the auction room in Lytham St Annes.

0:50:470:50:50

As you can see, it's a busy day here.

0:50:500:50:51

The room is still packed full of bidders,

0:50:510:50:53

and hopefully this lot will be eager to buy our next batch of lots.

0:50:530:50:57

Now let's catch up with our owners,

0:50:570:50:59

who are waiting nervously in the wings. Let the action begin.

0:50:590:51:02

First up, it's those terracotta tomb figures,

0:51:020:51:05

and time to find out if the bidders think they're real.

0:51:050:51:09

Norman, you've been collecting terracotta pigs for about -

0:51:090:51:12

what, 20-odd years?

0:51:120:51:13

-20 years, yeah.

-Yes. You're fascinated by pigs.

0:51:130:51:16

I had up to 2,000 at one stage.

0:51:160:51:18

Why are you starting to sell off this particular pig?

0:51:180:51:22

-I'm going to move into a one-bedroom...

-Oh, you're downsizing.

0:51:220:51:24

-Into sheltered accommodation.

-There's no room for the pigs.

0:51:240:51:27

Right, James, you've seen a lot of this.

0:51:270:51:29

Yeah, I mean, very difficult to say whether they're right or wrong,

0:51:290:51:33

so all we can do is wait and see.

0:51:330:51:35

It's now down to the bidders. This is it.

0:51:350:51:38

Bids of £40 on these two, any advance on 40?

0:51:380:51:41

At £40, have we got...? 42, on the net at 42.

0:51:410:51:46

Any advance in the room?

0:51:460:51:47

At 42. 44, 46.

0:51:470:51:50

50, 55.

0:51:500:51:53

At £55, any advance on 55?

0:51:530:51:56

60.

0:51:560:51:58

£60, on the net at 60.

0:51:580:51:59

Any advance on £60?

0:51:590:52:01

On the net, then, at £60. Are we all sure? All finished?

0:52:030:52:07

No further interest?

0:52:070:52:09

-You were spot on.

-Well...

0:52:100:52:12

-You were spot on.

-They're great value.

-Yes.

0:52:120:52:14

People often say, "It's gotta be worth more than that, it's old!"

0:52:140:52:18

-Yeah.

-But it just shows - it doesn't make any difference.

0:52:180:52:21

They're still only £60.

0:52:210:52:22

It is mad, isn't it?

0:52:220:52:23

I particularly like those, a lot. Very sculptural.

0:52:230:52:26

That's about what I paid for them both.

0:52:260:52:28

-You got your money back, did you?

-Yeah.

0:52:280:52:30

Good luck with the downsizing, good luck with the move, as well.

0:52:300:52:33

-And hang on to the rest of the pigs.

-I will do, yeah.

-Well done!

0:52:330:52:36

So, just a small addition to Norman's piggy bank.

0:52:360:52:39

Jean and Gail, it's good to see you. Joining in the fun now.

0:52:400:52:42

What are we selling? We've got two dolls and a teddy bear.

0:52:420:52:45

-That's right.

-Why have you decided to sell now?

-I don't know.

0:52:450:52:48

-It's just because you were coming into Blackpool.

-Yeah...

0:52:480:52:51

We thought we'd have a try.

0:52:510:52:53

-Come along, bring something for Anita to look at.

-Join in the fun.

0:52:530:52:56

We've got a reserve of £100.

0:52:560:52:58

We have the two dolls - the condition isn't pristine,

0:52:580:53:02

but we've got a sweet little teddy bear purse,

0:53:020:53:05

-and that's quite an unusual wee thing.

-Yes.

0:53:050:53:07

So as a group, I think we'll pull through,

0:53:070:53:10

-hopefully to the bottom estimate.

-OK.

0:53:100:53:12

It's all down to this lot now - the bidders in the room.

0:53:120:53:15

Two similar composition baby lullaby dolls. Musical movements.

0:53:150:53:20

On the net at £80. 85.

0:53:200:53:22

-They've gone, haven't they?

-Good start.

0:53:220:53:24

-Any advance on 85?

-90.

-Five. 100.

0:53:240:53:27

And 10. 20. 30. 40. 50. 60. 70.

0:53:270:53:31

180. 190...

0:53:310:53:32

It's just gone straight to 190!

0:53:320:53:35

240. 260.

0:53:350:53:37

-Wow!

-280. 300.

0:53:370:53:41

At £300 on the internet. Any advance in the room?

0:53:410:53:45

-£300 online.

-I can't believe it!

0:53:450:53:48

£300 then, are we all sure at 300? On the net at 300...

0:53:490:53:53

Hammer's gone down.

0:53:560:53:58

-Oh, well!

-£300. You did all right, didn't you?

0:53:580:54:01

-You're not buying any more, are you?

-No. THEY LAUGH

0:54:010:54:04

-You made a good investment.

-Exactly. At the right time.

0:54:040:54:07

-A good investment.

-That's what it's all about.

0:54:070:54:09

Time to see if the Clarice Cliff collectors

0:54:090:54:11

are willing to part with THEIR cash.

0:54:110:54:14

We've come downstairs to the cafe area,

0:54:140:54:17

because Joan has a few mobility problems. There's a lot of stairs

0:54:170:54:19

to the auction room, which is on the first floor,

0:54:190:54:22

so we've set up a laptop with a live feed to the sale room,

0:54:220:54:24

so we can hear and see all the action, Joan.

0:54:240:54:27

And that's where it's going on, look, upstairs.

0:54:270:54:29

-But we're now part of this.

-Right, lovely.

0:54:290:54:32

-So, how are you?

-Very well.

-Excited?

-Yes, very.

-Looking forward to this?

0:54:320:54:36

-Be glad when it's finished.

-I bet you will!

0:54:360:54:38

Nerve-racking, aren't they, auction rooms?

0:54:380:54:41

Why have you decided to sell your Clarice Cliff today?

0:54:410:54:45

Just cos it's Clarice Cliff, and I thought it was going well.

0:54:450:54:48

Well, we always seem to do well on "Flog It!" with our Clarice items

0:54:480:54:52

and I don't think this one will be any exception - do you, James?

0:54:520:54:55

No, I mean, Clarice is one of those things that everybody knows.

0:54:550:54:58

Loads of collectors,

0:54:580:54:59

and especially when it's online across the whole world, like this.

0:54:590:55:03

-Yep.

-It's bound to sell. And it's a rare colour, as well, this one.

0:55:030:55:06

It broadens the market, doesn't it?

0:55:060:55:07

Well, fingers crossed,

0:55:070:55:09

we're going to get that top end right now, because this is it.

0:55:090:55:11

Here we go!

0:55:110:55:13

Lot 259, Clarice Cliff hand-painted Melon pattern jug,

0:55:140:55:18

pastel shades, interest here, starting of at £90.

0:55:180:55:21

Interest, look, straight in at 90.

0:55:210:55:23

100.

0:55:230:55:25

At £100. 110 at the back, 120.

0:55:250:55:28

130 and I'm out.

0:55:280:55:29

Any advance on 130?

0:55:290:55:31

130, 140, 150 on the net.

0:55:310:55:33

At 160, 170, 180.

0:55:340:55:37

At 180 in the room, at 180.

0:55:370:55:39

It's in the room.

0:55:390:55:40

Any advance on 180?

0:55:400:55:42

190 on the phone. 200.

0:55:420:55:44

220.

0:55:460:55:48

240.

0:55:480:55:49

240!

0:55:490:55:51

260. 280.

0:55:510:55:53

300.

0:55:540:55:56

-£300.

-Lovely.

0:55:560:55:58

£300, then, are we all sure?

0:55:580:56:00

At £300, then. All finished at 300...

0:56:000:56:03

Joan, that was brilliant. That was a brilliant result,

0:56:060:56:08

and it was great to watch it live down here.

0:56:080:56:10

Thank you for being a part of that and bringing in your Clarice.

0:56:100:56:13

Oh, I have to bring Clarice in, it's not "Flog It!" without Clarice.

0:56:130:56:16

It's not, is it? No! Job done.

0:56:160:56:19

A good result for Joan and her jug.

0:56:200:56:22

We're back upstairs now for today's final item -

0:56:220:56:25

Eric and Carol's concertina.

0:56:250:56:27

We've sold them on the show before, and they have made around £800,

0:56:280:56:32

so you're right on there. £500-800. I wonder if we'll get it.

0:56:320:56:36

-Well, Wheatstone's really the Rolls-Royce...

-It is.

0:56:360:56:41

..of concertinas. And if you've got one, that's the make that you want.

0:56:410:56:45

Let's put this to the test, shall we?

0:56:450:56:47

-And I'm sure this is going to fly away. Here we go. Good luck, everyone.

-Hopefully.

0:56:470:56:50

Lot 160, early 20th century concertina.

0:56:500:56:56

Bids of 300, 320, 340.

0:56:560:56:58

At 340, 60, 80, 400.

0:56:580:57:01

420, 440.

0:57:010:57:03

60, 80.

0:57:030:57:04

£500. In the room at 500.

0:57:040:57:07

550.

0:57:070:57:08

600 I've got on the net.

0:57:080:57:10

-Any advance on 600?

-Come on!

0:57:100:57:13

At £600. 650.

0:57:130:57:15

At £650 on the internet.

0:57:160:57:19

Come on, please, more. More. Come on, please.

0:57:190:57:21

-700 on the phone.

-Yes!

-£700.

0:57:210:57:23

At £700 on the telephone. 750.

0:57:230:57:27

Yes!

0:57:270:57:28

800.

0:57:290:57:31

On the telephone at £800.

0:57:310:57:33

Any advance on 800?

0:57:330:57:35

850.

0:57:350:57:37

900.

0:57:370:57:38

Yes!

0:57:380:57:40

At £900 on the telephone. Any advance?

0:57:400:57:44

At £900, then, are we all sure at 900?

0:57:440:57:48

Any further interest?

0:57:480:57:49

£900, on the telephone at 900.

0:57:490:57:52

-Yes!

-Brilliant.

-Isn't that wonderful?

0:57:550:57:57

Brilliant result.

0:57:570:57:59

-900!

-£900. Don't forget, though, there is commission to pay.

0:57:590:58:04

Everybody pays it. It's 15% plus VAT,

0:58:040:58:08

but still a lot of money for something you found in the loft.

0:58:080:58:11

-That's right, yeah.

-If you've got something like that in the loft...

0:58:110:58:14

-Played a pretty tune!

-..we want to see it.

0:58:140:58:17

-Yeah, he pushed all the right buttons there...

-He did.

0:58:170:58:19

-..that's for sure.

-He certainly did.

0:58:190:58:21

Thank you very much for bringing that in.

0:58:210:58:22

And do you know what? That's just rounded off such a brilliant day

0:58:220:58:25

-here in Lytham St Annes.

-Absolutely.

0:58:250:58:27

I hope you've enjoyed the show - we've loved being here.

0:58:270:58:29

Join us again soon for many more surprises.

0:58:290:58:32

But until then, it's bye-bye.

0:58:320:58:34

This episode comes from the historic Blackpool Tower Circus. Paul Martin is joined by experts Anita Manning and James Lewis. Together the team pick out a selection of interesting antiques and collectables to be sold at a local auction. James discovers some terracotta tomb figures that could be over 1,000 years old, and Anita gets her hands on a collection of seaside postcards. But the real star of the show is a well-preserved concertina. Paul also takes a look at one of Lancashire's most famous theatres, the Morecambe Winter Gardens, and tries his hand at some watercolour painting with renowned artist Geoff Butterworth.