Derbyshire 10 Flog It!


Derbyshire 10

This edition of the antiques series comes from Haddon Hall in Derbyshire, where Paul Martin is joined by experts Michael Baggot and Adam Partridge.


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Transcript


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Our venue today has been the inspiration of authors,

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poets, songwriters and musicians for over five centuries.

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It's a glorious example of a medieval manor house

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set in the rolling hills of the Peak District.

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Haddon Hall has even inspired its own romantic legend

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and now it's inspired "Flog It!" to return to Derbyshire.

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THEME MUSIC PLAYS

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Haddon Hall has been home to the Manners family since Tudor times

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when Dorothy Vernon eloped with John Manners,

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creating Haddon's own Romeo and Juliet story.

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It is such a marvellous location that Jane Eyre has been

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filmed here, not once, not twice,

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but three times...and counting.

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Hopefully, this beautiful period setting

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will inspire our experts to find some antiques of their own to

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take off to auction. It's certainly fired up the imagination of

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this lot, because it looks like all of Derbyshire has turned up.

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Joining us today is expert Adam Partridge who seems to be

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finding out the secret of a happy marriage.

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-When the wife says jump, I just say, "How high?"

-Are you still jumping?

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Well, I've stopped now, she let me stand a bit.

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And Michael Baggott who knows the true worth of things.

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Any gold bars or diamond jewellery?

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-Just some pottery and stuff.

-You're more precious than that, aren't you? You're more precious.

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There's history in every room of this hall

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and we're using all of them for our valuation day.

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There are "Flog It!" visitors in the banqueting hall,

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the Long Gallery, and all the rooms in-between.

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In today's show, we have three unloved items brought in by their owners.

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One will go for double its estimate.

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Will it be this decorative vase?

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I never particularly liked it.

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Or these impressive medals?

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-I mean, they're no interest in my family now.

-They're somebody else's.

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Or this detested piece of pewter?

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How long have you had it?

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Too long.

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Stay with us to find out later on.

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Adam is first up and he's decided to make the most of the wonderful

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gardens here at Haddon.

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-Good morning, Louise.

-Good morning, Adam.

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-Welcome to "Flog It!"

-Thank you.

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Please tell me about yourself

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and how you came to own this rather nice silver vase.

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Well, I found it in a box that I inherited along with

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all sorts of things.

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I never particularly liked it, but it...and

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I didn't even know it was silver until last night. I thought it was...

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-Did it get a clean last night?

-It did.

-I thought it...

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-You can tell by the white bits in all the hollows.

-Yeah.

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-It's come up quite nicely, hasn't it?

-It's not so bad.

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And I believe you used to work in this wonderful building?

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-I did for 16 years.

-16 years. In what capacity have you worked here?

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-Everything.

-Have you? Give us some...

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-From cleaning loos to working in Lord Edward's office.

-Gosh.

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-I finished off there.

-From the bottom...

-To the top!

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Brilliant. Well, back to your vase. I presume you want to sell it.

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-I do.

-Thank goodness for that. It's Edwardian, 1907, makes it, uh...

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..just over 100 years old, 105 or so.

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By the Sheffield firm of Atkins Brothers.

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See the "HA", Harry Atkins, they were a large Sheffield manufacturer.

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They produced lots and lots of things like this.

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So, it's not a rare maker, but it's a nice example.

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It's a pleasing quality, it's not flimsy at all.

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Some of these will bend as soon as you look at them.

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So, why have you decided to sell it?

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I don't need it any more.

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It's in a cupboard more than it's got some flowers in it.

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-Oh, right, so it's not in daily use.

-Not at all, no.

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-It's not leaving a gap on the mantelpiece.

-It certainly isn't, no.

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Any idea on value?

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-Not a clue.

-No?

-Not a clue, except it's silver...

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-Have a guess.

-Oh...£60?

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-More, yeah.

-80?

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No, I think it'll probably make 200.

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-SHE GASPS

-Yeah.

-Wow!

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That was a good reaction, I don't get that very often!

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-That was genuine.

-Yeah, I know. £200 is what it'll make, about that.

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I think we should probably put a reserve slightly below,

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say about 180 reserve.

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-Excellent!

-Below 180, I wouldn't sell it, if it was mine

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and my advice to you is don't take less than 180 for it,

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and we'll put an estimate of maybe 200 to 250.

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-A nice, punchy, bullish estimate.

-Gosh, that is quite incredible.

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-Good news?

-Yeah, thank you.

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It's always satisfying to give people a nice surprise.

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Back inside now to the lovely Long Gallery

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to see what Michael has found.

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-Janet, Roger...

-Hello.

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..thank you for you bringing in this lovely little vase,

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even though it is, um...

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as I believe many people are screaming at the television,

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I can almost hear them, "Moorcroft!" It's unmistakable.

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Where did you get it from?

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It was about 30 years ago.

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I used to sort of be interested in little bits of pots

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and anything bric-a-brac, I used to collect them.

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-I think I got it from a flea market.

-So, you would magpie round for...

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-Yeah.

-Was it anything in particular?

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Was it Moorcroft that you were interested in?

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-No, I didn't even know it was Moorcroft.

-Didn't you?

-No idea.

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I only realised that a few months ago when I saw your programme.

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Watching "Flog It!" is almost a prescription to have the

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piece of Moorcroft on.

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Um, I mean, if we turn it over, we've just got the label there

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-and the signature will be underneath that.

-Yeah.

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Uh, obviously, the label is rarer for having survived.

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I know, I nearly picked it off.

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-When?

-Well, when I realised it was Moorcroft.

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-You thought, "Let's have a..."

-"Oh, well, look for the signature."

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-I was going to pick off the label.

-What stopped you? Did Roger stop you?

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Did Roger run in? "Don't take the label off!"

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No, I can't really stop her doing anything. She does what she wants.

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Something clicked in my brain.

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If anyone takes anything away today, don't take the labels off.

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There will be a little Moorcroft signature under there,

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but it'll just be his monogram, little initials.

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-Do you know how old it is?

-No.

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Because Moorcroft, obviously, has been produced for a long time.

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This is...well, the giveaway is here,

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"Potters to the late Queen Mary."

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-And also the colour palette, so we're into sort of 1950s.

-Right.

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So, it's freesia pattern, because it's got freesias on it,

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and it's on it rather jolly

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and I think these later Moorcroft pieces are lighter

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and they're a bit brighter and a bit more refreshing,

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and if you think of the '50s

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and of the energy that was sort of going on at that time,

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it sort of lifted it out of that rather dark, muddy 1930s palette.

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It's a shame, in the 30 years you've had it, it hasn't grown,

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-because it's a bit small.

-It's quite small.

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I mean, what did you pay for it 30 years ago? Can you remember?

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About a fiver, I wouldn't have paid more than that.

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A fiver, well, you'll get a return on that.

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It's kept in rate with inflation.

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-£50 to £100 on it.

-That's fine.

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-So, a sort of tenfold return on your fiver.

-Yeah.

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And hopefully it's going to reach the top end of that, you know,

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and, if you're happy, we'll put a fixed reserve of £50 on it,

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pop it into the auction and see where it ends up,

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but Moorcroft collectors always battle these things out.

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Remember Michael's advice,

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don't take the label off if you have anything like that at home.

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And now for something that I feel is rather good.

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So, tell me about the history of this. How long have you had this?

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Well, I've always known it from being a child.

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It was at my grandparents' house and I had it as a dressing up box.

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It's a good size for a dressing up box, it really is.

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You can get all your clothes and things in there.

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-I think it had a gas mask in it at one point.

-Did it!

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-This dates back to the latter part of the 18th century.

-Really?

-Yes.

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This was made to suit a particular object or maybe a map chest

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-or a deeds box.

-Right.

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Something of large proportions,

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because, look at the volume you can get in there.

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-Mmm.

-Yeah?

-A lot of deeds!

-A lot of deeds, yes, exactly.

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There's one or two things I want to point out about the front

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-if you go that side.

-One thing does bother me.

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-Can you see here these chevrons?

-Yeah.

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-They've been cut in at a later date.

-Really?

-Yes.

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And it's been stained to look like a bog oak,

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oak that's been left in mud for 200 or 300 years.

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The Victorians have later embellished this box,

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so it's going to be worth around about £80 to £120.

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I think I might have to persuade the children that they'd like to

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take it off my hands one day.

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Yeah, it's been polished up over the years.

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It's got a nice patina to it, a sort of nutty patina as opposed to...

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-look at the dry oak here, which has never been polished at all.

-Yes.

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But here's so much of this to polish.

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-This room's 110ft long, you wouldn't want to polish it!

-No!

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Well, that's going home, where it belongs.

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Back outside now to catch up with Adam.

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Very pleased to see you both on "Flog It!" today.

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You're both smiling beautifully, you look like a very happy couple.

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-Can you tell me...?

-We are.

-That's nice to hear.

-We are.

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It's Reg and Karen, isn't it?

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-It is, yes.

-Reg, and I'm admiring your moustache.

-Oh, thank you.

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That's going to look really good in high definition!

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I've had it since I was about 17. I'm not going to part with it now.

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Sounds as though we're going to be selling it!

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-It's been in the family a long time.

-It has.

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Well, let's draw a line under that

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and move on to the toys collection that you've got here.

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We've got a basket full, we've got

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eight or ten different ones in their original boxes.

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Can you just briefly tell me how you've come to own them

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and why you've decided to sell them?

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-Well, they were left to me by a male family member.

-Right.

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And I put them into a wardrobe,

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and that's where they've been for 19 years.

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OK. And then you heard "Flog It!" were coming to town.

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Well, when I got married to Reg, he noticed them and he asked me about

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-them and I said, "I think I'm going to take them to a charity shop."

-Ah!

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And he said, "No! You can sell these.

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I've seen these sold on "Flog It!"" I said, "There's nobody going to

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-want these." He says, "Oh, I think you might be wrong!"

-Well done, Reg.

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Well done. Well spotted.

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What I've done is I've singled out some of the more interesting

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or valuable ones,

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and they all happen to be Foden trucks of one sort or the other.

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First of all, you've got the box. They're all boxed, of course.

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The flat truck with the tailboard.

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Another one with chains and this 14-ton tanker.

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I'm going to just show this one,

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because you can't appreciate them until they're out of the box.

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There you go. It's been played with a bit, but he's in pretty good order.

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-Right.

-Also, there are different variations,

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sometimes with different colours of wheel hubs and different

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liveries, but it's pretty collectable bunch of toys here.

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Quite some time back, I took that one out

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and I was playing with it, or rather looking at it on the carpet.

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-They never grow up, do they, Karen?

-No.

-We never grow up.

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She was so amused, she laughed and said,

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-"You're just like a little boy!"

-Was he making the noises as well?

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Yeah, he was, yes!

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-I've got two little boys like that.

-Have you?

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But you use them as an excuse to become a little boy as well.

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-Regression can be quite fun, really, can't it?

-It can, it can.

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Any idea on what they might be worth?

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-Presumably you don't because you were going to give them away.

-Hmm.

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What about you, Reg? Are you going to have a stab at the value?

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Yes, well, there's a gentleman in the queue today

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and the very model you've got in your hand there,

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he said, "These really can be worth something."

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He says, "I'll give you £100 for that one now."

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So, I said, "No, thank you very much, but we'll just go along."

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But it reinforced your ideas that you knew there was some value in that.

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Some value attached to them, yes.

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Well, I think it was a pretty prudent offer.

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Um, I reckon these three are probably worth about £100 each.

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-Really?

-And these are the sort of residual ones here.

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They're worth, individually...

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We've got a tank transporter, a couple of tanks,

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and, of course, this one, which is pretty cool.

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-It's a mobile space rocket.

-It is.

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-What noise would you make for that, Ray? Reg, sorry.

-Zoom and it's gone.

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-I didn't think that would be worth anything.

-Well, it's not.

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I mean, what I would suggest...Crescent Toys,

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-a minor collection worth about £20.

-Yeah, yeah.

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-You, what I'd suggest is we sell them as one lot.

-All right.

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-And I would suggest an estimate of £300 to £500 for the collection.

-Oh!

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-Really?

-Yeah. And I think that's quite conservative, I think

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-that's one that should get people interested.

-Oh, yes.

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-Does that sound all right?

-It does sound all right.

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-That's a nice surprise.

-Well, that's great to see.

-It is.

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I think, even though you probably don't want them back,

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it would be sensible to put a reserve on so that people don't

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buy them too cheaply and, for that, I would suggest a figure of £300.

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And, with your permission, just give them 10% discretion leeway,

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just in case. It would be a shame if they got to 280, 290,

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-and he went, "No, can't sell 'em."

-OK.

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And then I'm hoping they're going to make £500 or so.

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-Oh, right, thank you.

-If that's the case,

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any plans on what you'd do with that proceeds of sale.

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Um, I'm going to treat Reg to something out of it.

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Well, certainly, he deserves something, doesn't he?

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And once you've spent that £20, what are you going to do with the rest of it?

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Who told you that? It was £20!

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Well, that was fun.

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Well, you've just seen three wonderful items,

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you've heard what our experts have had to say,

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you've probably got your own opinions,

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but, right now, let's find out what the bidders think as we go

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over to the auction room for the very first time today

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and here's a quick recap of what we're taking with us.

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The Edwardian silver vase is good quality,

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but will the bidders take a shine to it.

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With the little piece of Moorcroft, it's not, "Will it go?",

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But "How much will it go for?"

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And will the boys be out in force to drive up

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the price of the Dinky Toys?

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Stay with us and you'll find out in the auction room.

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From Haddon Hall, it's off to the quaint village of Rowsley

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and to Bamfords Auctioneers.

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The village sits between Bakewell and Matlock,

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so, hopefully, we'll pull in the bidders from both directions.

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-420...

-'And don't forget there is commission to pay.

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'Here, it's 12.5% plus VAT.'

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Now, this is what I like to see, a saleroom packed full of bidders

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and fine art and antiques.

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The classic recipe for a perfect auction and I know our owners are

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feeling really nervous right now. They're over there.

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I'm going to catch up with them as we get on with our first lot.

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"Flog It!" expert and auctioneer James Lewis is on the rostrum

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today and we're starting off with a bit of nostalgia.

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Going under the hammer right now,

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a collection of Dinky Supertoys belonging to Karen and Reg.

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-They've been at the back of a wardrobe for 19 years.

-Yes.

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So, hopefully, they're going to find a new home, going to a collector.

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-A grown-up boy.

-Yes!

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And, you never know, you could have one or two surprises here.

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-Well, I hope so.

-Anyway, we're going to put it to the test.

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They're going under the hammer now.

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I've got three bids, one of 270, one of 310, and one higher.

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320 starts it.

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-Fantastic.

-At 320, 330 anywhere?

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At 320, 330 now. At 320, 330, 340.

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350, 360.

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At £360, absentee bid, at 360, any advance? At £360...all sure?

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That's a good price, £360. Well done, Adam. Happy with that?

0:15:480:15:52

-Yes, I am, very.

-Absolutely.

0:15:520:15:54

They will have gone to a collector, as I suspect our next lot will.

0:15:540:15:59

Janet and Roger, it's good to meet up with you again.

0:15:590:16:02

Fingers crossed for your Moorcroft pot. I think we can get the top end.

0:16:020:16:06

It's sweet, it's small, and it's there and the market's always there.

0:16:060:16:10

Yeah, exactly. It's a great name and a good name will always sell.

0:16:100:16:14

-Absolutely.

-Yeah, we're going to find out what the bidders think.

0:16:140:16:17

-So, I think it's time to say goodbye to this.

-Yeah, it is.

0:16:170:16:20

393 is the Moorcroft, the freesia patterned cylindrical vase

0:16:200:16:25

-and I have one, two, three, four, five bids on it.

-There you go.

0:16:250:16:28

And I can start at £75. 75, 80 now.

0:16:280:16:33

-At 75...

-See, quality always sells.

-80.

0:16:330:16:37

5, 90...

0:16:370:16:39

-(Unbelievable.)

-At £85, 90 now. At 85, 90 do I see?

0:16:390:16:43

At 85, 90 coming back for one more online?

0:16:430:16:47

Coming back? No, at 85. At 85, two of you hovering now.

0:16:470:16:51

-Come on, come on, come on, come on.

-90...

0:16:520:16:54

90 bid. 95.

0:16:560:16:58

-No, at 90. £90 has it. At £90...

-You happy with that?

0:16:590:17:02

-Brilliant.

-That's really good.

-Really happy, yes.

0:17:020:17:04

At 90 and selling, anybody else? At £90, are we sure?

0:17:040:17:08

-90.

-£90, the hammer's gone down.

0:17:100:17:12

See, a good maker's name and quality.

0:17:120:17:14

-It's a collectors' base.

-Yeah.

0:17:140:17:17

Good valuation there from Michael.

0:17:180:17:21

And now for that elegant silver vase.

0:17:210:17:24

Louise, it's great to see you. Fingers crossed we get

0:17:240:17:26

top end of the estimate. Who's with you right now?

0:17:260:17:28

-My daughter, Tori.

-Tori, I'm pleased to meet you.

0:17:280:17:31

-Mum's flogging the family silver!

-I know!

-Isn't she?!

0:17:310:17:34

-This is your inheritance!

-I know!

-Or are you getting it early.

-I am.

0:17:340:17:38

Yes, she's getting the proceeds, if it's sold. I'm sure this will sell.

0:17:380:17:41

-I'd like to think so!

-A bit of Edwardian silver.

0:17:410:17:44

Don't they call that skiing if you're spending kids' inheritance?

0:17:440:17:47

-I've never heard that before!

-No?

-No, I haven't!

0:17:490:17:51

No, no, I hear it a lot from my parents!

0:17:510:17:54

-Right, here we go. This is it.

-Have you got butterflies in your tummy?

0:17:540:17:58

And I can start the bidding here at £100 and 10, do I see?

0:18:000:18:04

At 100 straight in, 110 to the left and 20 now. At 110, 120 bid.

0:18:040:18:08

130, 130, 140. Winking at 140, 150, 150, 160. 160, winking, 170.

0:18:080:18:16

170, 180. At 170 to the left, 180 now. 180, at £170, 180, 180 online.

0:18:180:18:25

-Well done, Adam.

-There you are, it's not going to be melted.

-Thank you.

0:18:250:18:28

220, 240.

0:18:280:18:30

At 220, standing to the left, at 220, 230 if you like, 230 bid,

0:18:300:18:35

-240...

-Good estimate.

0:18:350:18:38

At 240 to my left, at 240, anybody else in the room?

0:18:380:18:42

At £240, you're out, internet's out at 240.

0:18:440:18:48

-Louise, £240. Brilliant!

-I'm absolutely delighted with that!

0:18:480:18:51

Oh, that's fabulous, isn't it?

0:18:510:18:53

We got a squeal and everything!

0:18:530:18:54

What's really nice to know, and thanks to Adam,

0:18:540:18:57

is that's actually sold as a work of art,

0:18:570:18:59

rather than a lump of silver in weight going to melt.

0:18:590:19:02

It's an object and it's a nice looking object.

0:19:020:19:04

Even though you didn't like it, it's still a work of art to somebody.

0:19:040:19:06

Well, thank you to Granny.

0:19:060:19:08

That's right. Thank you, Granny.

0:19:090:19:12

'Over the years on "Flog It!",

0:19:120:19:13

'we've seen hundreds of items of military history'

0:19:130:19:16

at our valuation days, including some fascinating medals

0:19:160:19:19

which are coming up later on in the show.

0:19:190:19:21

Inspired by the stories behind these objects, I took a trip to the

0:19:240:19:28

Imperial War Museum in London to look at their collection of war art.

0:19:280:19:32

Artists have always portrayed war,

0:19:420:19:44

but I'm here today to explore how the relationship between artists

0:19:440:19:48

and war has developed in Britain over the 20th century.

0:19:480:19:52

Both the First and Second World War have completely revolutionised

0:19:560:19:59

the way war has been captured on canvas and camera.

0:19:590:20:04

At a time when you may have thought a discipline like art

0:20:040:20:06

would have suffered, it, in fact, flourished.

0:20:060:20:10

Before the First World War, paintings and drawings were

0:20:100:20:12

usually artistic interpretations

0:20:120:20:14

created by an artist who had not actually witnessed the fighting,

0:20:140:20:19

but instead used their imagination to create a picture

0:20:190:20:23

based on written accounts.

0:20:230:20:25

But all this was about to change at the start of the First World War.

0:20:280:20:32

The government took the unprecedented

0:20:320:20:33

step of appointing official artists, photographers and cinematographers

0:20:330:20:38

to document war in a way that would support morale back at home.

0:20:380:20:42

During the First World War,

0:20:420:20:44

the Imperial War Museum was given the job of collecting a wide range

0:20:440:20:48

of material documenting the war, including commissioned works of art.

0:20:480:20:53

There was a plan to house them

0:20:540:20:55

separately in a specially built hall of remembrance.

0:20:550:20:59

However, when the war ended, due to lack of funding,

0:20:590:21:02

the hall was never built.

0:21:020:21:04

Lucky enough for us, the collection of paintings was given to the

0:21:040:21:07

Imperial War Museum and they're on display just through there.

0:21:070:21:11

The gallery houses, among others, Gassed, a painting by John Singer Sargent

0:21:140:21:19

completed following his visit to the Western Front.

0:21:190:21:22

Sargent, one of the leading society portrait painters of his day,

0:21:240:21:28

was commissioned to create this centrepiece.

0:21:280:21:31

It's 20ft long and graphic in detail.

0:21:330:21:36

Gassed is based on a chaotic scene at a dressing station which

0:21:360:21:40

took in casualties suffering from a mustard gas attack

0:21:400:21:44

on the Western Front in August 1918.

0:21:440:21:47

The 11 central soldiers are almost life-size

0:21:490:21:52

and you can see their eyes are bandaged up

0:21:520:21:54

with the effects of blindness.

0:21:540:21:56

Sargent's original brief was to paint a scene with

0:21:560:21:59

Anglo-American soldiers both at the same situation,

0:21:590:22:03

but, while he was out there, he struggled to find this.

0:22:030:22:06

He was determined to paint a picture of epic proportions

0:22:080:22:11

with many characters in it.

0:22:110:22:13

The result is this, a scene showing catastrophic human suffering.

0:22:130:22:18

This went on to become one of the most iconic images

0:22:180:22:20

of the First World War.

0:22:200:22:23

Sargent was just one of many war artists, photographers,

0:22:230:22:26

film-makers, writers and cartoonists who were deployed making war art

0:22:260:22:31

or propaganda on the Western Front.

0:22:310:22:34

All of them working under the watchful eye

0:22:340:22:37

of military intelligence and field censors.

0:22:370:22:39

However, as well as capturing some of the victorious scenes

0:22:410:22:44

that the government were keen on publicising, the artists

0:22:440:22:47

explored other aspects of the conflict.

0:22:470:22:50

From the violence of industrial warfare to

0:22:500:22:53

the hastened social and industrial change,

0:22:530:22:56

and the desolate destruction caused by the theatres of war.

0:22:560:23:00

This is The Menin Road by Paul Nash,

0:23:140:23:17

based at the Flanders Fields,

0:23:170:23:19

and it shows two soldiers struggling through a devastated battlefield.

0:23:190:23:23

There are rain-filled shell holes and flooded trenches,

0:23:230:23:26

as you can see, as these two characters follow this road,

0:23:260:23:29

which has been clearly decimated beyond recognition.

0:23:290:23:33

In fact, look closely and Nash has rearranged the whole landscape.

0:23:340:23:39

The bursts of sunlight have become gun barrels,

0:23:390:23:42

and the shattered trees are more like steel structures

0:23:420:23:46

lit by an apocalyptic sky.

0:23:460:23:48

The Ministry of Information processed

0:23:500:23:52

a quarter of a million photos and thousands of films

0:23:520:23:55

and paintings during the war years, but,

0:23:550:23:58

despite all its achievements, when the war was over, it was closed.

0:23:580:24:03

Its role was seen as redundant during peacetime.

0:24:030:24:06

With the start of the Second World War, it was back in action...

0:24:070:24:10

its job, to raise morale and to promote Britain's image abroad.

0:24:120:24:15

As the Second World War progressed,

0:24:180:24:20

the Ministry of Information became known as the All Talents Ministry.

0:24:200:24:24

The world had moved on and film and photography

0:24:250:24:28

had moved to the foreground.

0:24:280:24:30

Hilary Roberts, head curator here, has been charting how the

0:24:320:24:36

creative use of photography flourished during war years.

0:24:360:24:41

Would you say that the war acted as a catalyst for artistic development?

0:24:410:24:44

Absolutely.

0:24:440:24:45

Artist like Bill Brandt, who were relatively unknown when the war

0:24:450:24:49

broke out, built their careers on

0:24:490:24:51

commissions from the Ministry of Information.

0:24:510:24:54

Bill was commissioned to photograph the London Underground

0:24:540:24:57

during the Blitz and took many iconic images of Londoners sheltering

0:24:570:25:01

on the platforms, but Cecil Beaton's work was particularly special.

0:25:010:25:05

He was a recognised photographer though.

0:25:050:25:07

He was already, unlike Bill Brant, he was a recognised photographer.

0:25:070:25:11

He was one of the hardest working photographers of the war.

0:25:110:25:14

He was certainly the only one that was able to get his name

0:25:140:25:17

credited whenever the photographs were published

0:25:170:25:20

and he brought to it his own techniques, his background,

0:25:200:25:24

his skills and knowledge as a portrait photographer

0:25:240:25:27

and lover of theatre, fashion and design.

0:25:270:25:31

So, the photography that he produced was instantly recognisable.

0:25:310:25:35

He certainly took, I think,

0:25:350:25:37

probably one of the six best known

0:25:370:25:40

photographs of the Second World War, which is of a little girl with

0:25:400:25:44

her head bandaged who has been injured in an air raid in 1940.

0:25:440:25:48

He captured war, I guess, more vividly

0:25:480:25:51

and graphically than a lot of other war artists.

0:25:510:25:53

Did that inspire the next generation?

0:25:530:25:56

It absolutely did, yes.

0:25:560:25:57

Don McCullin grew up with photographs that he

0:25:570:26:00

saw in Picture Post, Illustrated Magazine and so on and so forth.

0:26:000:26:05

He was a child during the Second World War and,

0:26:050:26:08

when he became a photographer, the Ministry of Information photographs

0:26:080:26:13

that he had seen were his starting point and he went on from there.

0:26:130:26:17

-Now, he, of course, inspires a generation again.

-Sure.

0:26:170:26:20

It's thanks to the powerful images created by the bravery

0:26:230:26:26

and integrity of the war artists,

0:26:260:26:28

which were way beyond propaganda, that our understanding of war,

0:26:280:26:32

the suffering, and the triumph is so vivid.

0:26:320:26:35

We've got 40 members of the "Flog It!" team, eight cameras, and

0:26:410:26:44

an army of behind-the-scene experts working hard at Haddon Hall today.

0:26:440:26:49

And here is Michael with some more military history.

0:26:500:26:54

George, Joyce, I think before we get started,

0:26:550:26:57

what an absolutely splendid tie you are wearing, that's...wonderful.

0:26:570:27:01

-Are you a big Laurel and Hardy fan?

-Yes, I am.

-They are fantastic.

0:27:010:27:05

I used to watch them as a boy when they were on the television early.

0:27:050:27:08

They don't show them any more, it's a great shame.

0:27:080:27:11

Are these something you've collected or are these family medals?

0:27:110:27:14

Uh, they're not in the family, I inherited them from a friend.

0:27:140:27:19

Oh, so your friend didn't have anyone else to pass them

0:27:190:27:21

-onto in his family.

-No, no, no family, no.

0:27:210:27:23

And he's given them to you,

0:27:230:27:25

because often we'll see a group of medals on "Flog It!" and people

0:27:250:27:28

will think, you know, "Why don't they keep them in the family?

0:27:280:27:31

"Why don't they go on through the line?"

0:27:310:27:33

But, of course, they've got no real associations to you, have they?

0:27:330:27:37

-I mean, they're no interest to my family now.

-They're somebody else's.

0:27:370:27:40

-Yeah, yeah.

-Have you done any research on them?

0:27:400:27:42

-No, not really, no.

-Well, we're lucky because,

0:27:420:27:45

what we've got is we've got two groups of medals,

0:27:450:27:49

some from the First War, some from the Second War,

0:27:490:27:52

and they've all been mounted together and worn, which,

0:27:520:27:55

I think...Second World War medals aren't named, which is

0:27:550:27:58

the frustration to a lot of collectors

0:27:580:28:01

because collectors love to do research.

0:28:010:28:03

Now, we've got the standard three First World War medals,

0:28:030:28:07

but we've also got the military medal, which is for an act

0:28:070:28:10

of bravery, and we've got it named on the bottom for a Private H Brown.

0:28:100:28:15

Yeah.

0:28:150:28:16

And he was in the 16th Machine Gun Corps,

0:28:160:28:19

and he was awarded this in around November 1916. Um, then we move on.

0:28:190:28:26

We've got the standard Second War medals here, the stars,

0:28:260:28:30

but, at the end, very interestingly, we've got

0:28:300:28:32

-this territorial medal, which is for efficient service.

-Yeah.

0:28:320:28:37

And it's also got twin bars which suggests a long-serving member...

0:28:370:28:42

-Yeah.

-..in the territorial army, and we've got a different name on this.

0:28:420:28:48

-But this person also, MM, won a military medal.

-Yeah.

0:28:480:28:53

And it's H Percival. Now...

0:28:530:28:56

..it's peculiar that you've got the military medal here,

0:28:560:29:00

these are all together, and then you've got this medal...

0:29:000:29:03

and he's won a military medal, even though it's a different name,

0:29:030:29:07

-but the initial is the same.

-Yeah.

0:29:070:29:09

They may be associated, or it might be the case, rather

0:29:090:29:13

intriguingly, we'll never know, whether Mr Brown, for some reason...

0:29:130:29:17

changed his name to Percival.

0:29:170:29:20

So, it's something for a collector to get their teeth in there.

0:29:200:29:24

I mean, have you got any idea as to value for them?

0:29:240:29:27

-No, no, no...

-Not really, not really thought about it.

0:29:270:29:30

So, a crisp £50 note, if I could...

0:29:300:29:32

..no, I can't! I mustn't, mustn't!

0:29:350:29:38

Um, I mean, Joyce,

0:29:380:29:40

-are they something that you've admired or liked or...? No?

-No, no.

0:29:400:29:44

No, she said if I'd have gone, she'd have thrown them in the bin!

0:29:440:29:47

So, if you weren't selling them,

0:29:470:29:49

you dropped off, they were going in the bin!

0:29:490:29:52

I've got to clear the garage out.

0:29:520:29:54

Let's put £300 to £500 on them.

0:29:540:29:59

-And let's put a fixed reserve of £300 on them.

-No!

0:29:590:30:03

And let's see where they go.

0:30:030:30:06

I mean, hopefully, we'll be touching the middle of that estimate

0:30:060:30:10

and make the top end of it.

0:30:100:30:12

Thanks for bringing them in and thanks really because today

0:30:120:30:15

we've saved them, maybe ultimately, from being discarded by Joyce!

0:30:150:30:21

There's a story behind those.

0:30:210:30:23

And now over to Adam with an interesting

0:30:240:30:26

piece of pewter in the courtyard.

0:30:260:30:28

Haddon Hall is known for its beautiful gardens and,

0:30:300:30:33

until recently I believe, this was in your garden, was it, Julianne?

0:30:330:30:36

It certainly was, yes.

0:30:360:30:38

Now, why on earth is an intelligent lady like you keeping

0:30:380:30:41

a piece of art in the garden?

0:30:410:30:44

Well, it was a very beautiful garden!

0:30:440:30:47

Did it have a function in the garden,

0:30:470:30:48

or was it just sitting out there?

0:30:480:30:50

-It was sitting out there.

-Yeah? Gathering water and leaves and...

0:30:500:30:54

-No, I put a plant in it.

-Oh, did you?

-I actually put a plant in it, yeah.

0:30:540:30:57

What made you think of bringing it into "Flog It!"?

0:30:570:31:00

-I don't like it.

-You don't!

0:31:000:31:01

-It's as simple as that! I don't like it.

-OK.

0:31:010:31:04

Did you think it was valuable? Did someone tell you it was valuable?

0:31:040:31:06

-Erm, I knew it was worth a bit...

-Right.

-..but...

0:31:060:31:09

How long have you had it?

0:31:090:31:11

Too long.

0:31:120:31:13

-Eh...about 30 years I've had it.

-Yes.

0:31:130:31:16

So, we've got an Art Nouveau Arts and Crafts Period

0:31:160:31:20

pewter jardiniere marked Tudric on the body.

0:31:200:31:24

-Heard of Tudric?

-I have now, yes.

0:31:240:31:27

Tudric was a range designed mainly by a famous designer,

0:31:270:31:30

Archibald Knox, and retailed at Liberty's,

0:31:300:31:33

the famous store Liberty's.

0:31:330:31:35

And they're quite distinctive with these stylised designs going

0:31:350:31:39

round and quite a funky, angular shape.

0:31:390:31:42

Early 20th century and it should be fully marked on the bottom,

0:31:420:31:46

"Tudric", with a number.

0:31:460:31:48

And indeed it is, there we have the little word Tudric there,

0:31:480:31:53

it's quite hard to read, and it's got a number on it, "0-2-2-9",

0:31:530:31:57

which will be the shape number

0:31:570:31:58

and you'll be able to look that up in the design books and it'll

0:31:580:32:01

say "0-2-2-9" and it'll have a name for this twin-handled bowl.

0:32:010:32:04

It's a really, really nice piece of early 20th century decorative arts.

0:32:040:32:09

Arts and Crafts, Arts Nouveau style to it.

0:32:090:32:12

I feel almost guilty now!

0:32:120:32:14

So, you clearly know it's of some value. What do you think?

0:32:160:32:19

Let's talk price.

0:32:190:32:21

SHE CLEARS THROAT Yes, go on, then.

0:32:210:32:23

What do you think it's going to make?

0:32:230:32:24

How much do you want for it? As much as possible?

0:32:240:32:26

-As much as possible, yes.

-What do you think it's going to make?

0:32:260:32:29

-Well, I should like 200 to 300.

-Ooh, punchy!

0:32:290:32:33

200 to 300 would be what you put on one in better condition

0:32:330:32:37

and I'd like to bring it down just a little bit.

0:32:370:32:39

I'd suggest 150 to 250 as the estimate.

0:32:390:32:43

At a push.

0:32:430:32:44

-Silence!

-Silence.

0:32:450:32:47

And what about a reserve? £150 reserve?

0:32:470:32:50

-Yes, that'd be good, yeah.

-Fix it or discretion it?

0:32:500:32:52

A bit of discretion.

0:32:520:32:53

A bit of discretion, yeah, I think that's a good idea. 150, discretion.

0:32:530:32:57

-Yes.

-But I think it'll do a bit better, don't you?

-I hope so, yes.

0:32:570:33:00

Especially with you and me staring at him...

0:33:000:33:02

-Certainly, yes, yes.

-All right.

0:33:020:33:05

I think that should be achievable.

0:33:050:33:07

Now, Michael is in his element with this next item.

0:33:090:33:12

Diane, Ronaldo, thank you so much

0:33:140:33:16

for bringing in this wonderful set of knives,

0:33:160:33:19

but, I mean, the first question is, where have all the forks gone?

0:33:190:33:23

Why have we only got one fork?

0:33:230:33:25

Where do they come from? Was it through the family or...?

0:33:250:33:28

No, no. I bought them at Newark Antique Fair.

0:33:280:33:31

-Oh, the large antiques fair?

-Yes, many, many years ago.

0:33:310:33:34

It's an unusual combination. Are there more forks at home, or...?

0:33:340:33:38

-No, that's it.

-So, that was how it came to you.

-Yes.

0:33:380:33:43

This is very long and we would use it as a carving fork today,

0:33:430:33:47

but in the 18th century, there was

0:33:470:33:49

a fashion sometimes for absolutely massive...

0:33:490:33:52

two-pronged wrought times.

0:33:530:33:55

Any idea of who made them or where they were made?

0:33:550:33:58

-No, no.

-I have to pop into my pocket for the device and,

0:33:580:34:04

if we pick one of these...

0:34:040:34:05

Right. Sometimes they're stamped in a machine

0:34:060:34:11

and that was how they made them in Sheffield, and they would be quite

0:34:110:34:14

thin, and you would fill them with pitch and they would wear over time.

0:34:140:34:18

These have been cast,

0:34:180:34:21

which is a little bit better.

0:34:210:34:22

They're top quality actually

0:34:220:34:24

and you can see the seam very faintly running down where

0:34:240:34:28

they've been joined together and these are by Moses Brent,

0:34:280:34:32

who was working in London at the end of the 18th century

0:34:320:34:35

-and he was a specialist haft maker, specialised in handles.

-OK.

-Ah!

0:34:350:34:41

And you'll see a lot of his handles on Georgian services and silver.

0:34:410:34:45

-Sometimes the blades are silver and have nothing to do with him.

-Yeah.

0:34:450:34:49

-He just provides the handles.

-What are they? They're not plated silver?

0:34:490:34:55

-They're not plated, they're wrought steel.

-Oh, they're wrought steel.

0:34:550:34:58

But nicely finished and polished steel, which is

0:34:580:35:01

how they would have looked originally.

0:35:010:35:03

Also, they're very nicely crested and I think anything like this

0:35:030:35:06

-is helped with its original family crest on it.

-Hmm.

0:35:060:35:10

In terms, of date, they've just got a standard mark

0:35:100:35:13

-and a duty mark, which means they postdate 1786.

-Ah.

0:35:130:35:18

-And they probably date 1786 up to 1790.

-OK.

0:35:180:35:24

Right, thorny question of price. Dare I ask what you paid for them?

0:35:240:35:28

I don't remember. I wrote it in a little book and I don't remember.

0:35:280:35:31

Well, that's a good start. I can say anything then.

0:35:310:35:34

I think...I think because it's an odd set, that will

0:35:340:35:38

hold it back a little.

0:35:380:35:39

Seven and one is a bit of a difficult sell,

0:35:390:35:42

so let's say 150 to 250.

0:35:420:35:45

-Yes.

-OK.

-And put a fixed reserve of 150.

-Yes, yes.

0:35:450:35:48

They may or may not go at that, but it's touch and go,

0:35:480:35:51

-but it's worth giving them a try.

-Yes.

0:35:510:35:53

So, thank you for bringing along

0:35:530:35:55

-a lovely set of Georgian knives.

-Thank you, Michael.

0:35:550:35:58

Well, let's hope the person with the forks is in the saleroom on the day.

0:35:580:36:02

Michael Baggott there with a collection of Georgian knives.

0:36:060:36:09

Trust Michael to find the silver.

0:36:090:36:11

That's it, we've found our last items.

0:36:110:36:13

We're about to head off down the auction room to put those

0:36:130:36:15

valuations to the test, so it's time to say goodbye to

0:36:150:36:18

our wonderful host location, Haddon Hall,

0:36:180:36:21

and here's a quick recap of what we're putting under the hammer.

0:36:210:36:23

Now, will the collection of medals make the top price in the saleroom?

0:36:250:36:29

Or will it be the stylish Arts and Crafts pewter jardiniere

0:36:310:36:35

that attracts all the attention?

0:36:350:36:36

Or it could be the knives that achieve the sharpest sale,

0:36:380:36:40

snapped up to complete someone's set of cutlery.

0:36:400:36:43

Stay with us and you'll find out soon.

0:36:440:36:47

And don't forget, sellers pay commission on

0:36:470:36:50

anything that finds a new home.

0:36:500:36:52

Here, that's 12.5% of the hammer price plus VAT.

0:36:520:36:56

First up, it's the cutlery.

0:36:580:37:00

Going under the hammer right now, we've got

0:37:000:37:02

a set of seven George IV silver knives,

0:37:020:37:04

a combination of steel as well, belonging to Ronaldo and Diane.

0:37:040:37:07

Ronaldo's with me right now. Where is your wife?

0:37:070:37:09

Oh, she's not very well, unfortunately.

0:37:090:37:11

Oh, dear, we'll wish her our best and, hopefully, you can

0:37:110:37:14

-go home with some good news for her.

-I hope so.

0:37:140:37:16

When you pick them up, they feel good, don't they?

0:37:160:37:18

Yeah, we've been using them very well for a long time, you know,

0:37:180:37:21

and now...it's the end.

0:37:210:37:23

You're going to miss those!

0:37:230:37:25

-Oh, aye!

-Look, good luck.

-Thank you.

0:37:250:37:27

Anything can happen in an auction and we're going to find out now.

0:37:270:37:31

Lot number 34,

0:37:310:37:33

a set of seven George IV silver-hafted knives

0:37:330:37:36

and the similar fork as well, and I can start the bidding at £120.

0:37:360:37:41

120, 130 now. At 120, 130 anywhere?

0:37:410:37:45

At 120, single bid on it.

0:37:450:37:48

120, 130 now. 130, 130 bid. 140...

0:37:480:37:52

Are we going to do it? Do you know that, Ronaldo? We would just do it.

0:37:520:37:55

Come on, come on, come on...

0:37:550:37:57

-150, one bid, 160...

-There you go.

-Online bidders.

0:37:570:38:00

150, 160.

0:38:000:38:01

160, 170.

0:38:010:38:03

-170, 180.

-Someone's weighed the handles. This is what's happened.

0:38:040:38:08

180 is against you. Are you sure?

0:38:080:38:12

170, it's here at 170,

0:38:120:38:15

any advance at £170?

0:38:150:38:17

At 170, 180 anywhere?

0:38:170:38:20

170, are you sure?

0:38:200:38:22

Yes, the hammer's gone done. £170. Great result, Ronaldo.

0:38:220:38:26

-I am pleased, yes.

-Who's got the forks?!

0:38:260:38:28

Exactly, somebody might have the forks out there. It might be you.

0:38:280:38:31

You just don't know, do you?

0:38:310:38:32

-Well done, anyway.

-Thank you very much, a pleasure.

0:38:320:38:36

What a bargain price for such beautiful Georgian craftsmanship.

0:38:360:38:39

And now for what I consider to be a pleasing piece of pewter.

0:38:410:38:44

Well, it's all in the name, Archibald Knox,

0:38:450:38:48

-to get this one away and it belongs to Julianne.

-Hello, yes.

0:38:480:38:52

We had a chat about this and, it is a little bit damaged,

0:38:520:38:55

but we think it's still going to sell.

0:38:550:38:57

Good, well, we bore that in mind when we were estimating.

0:38:570:39:00

Julianne obviously wanted more than I told her,

0:39:000:39:02

because she's a farmer and they want the most for everything, of course.

0:39:020:39:05

We always want a little more than...

0:39:050:39:08

Well, I tried to inject some reality into a conservative guide to

0:39:080:39:11

-get it away.

-OK.

-Do you think we'll get it?

-You bribed me.

0:39:110:39:13

Yes, I think you'll get it, I think it's spot on.

0:39:130:39:15

You'll probably get what Julianne wanted in the first place,

0:39:150:39:18

-which was about 250, 300, wasn't it?

-Yes, something like that, yeah.

0:39:180:39:21

-Well, you came to the right expert, that's for sure.

-Good, good.

0:39:210:39:24

So, why are you raising the money?

0:39:240:39:26

Uh, I want to buy some wood to make a log cabin.

0:39:260:39:29

-I can see you sitting there now.

-Oh, yes, hopefully.

0:39:310:39:35

-Well, look, good luck.

-Thank you.

0:39:350:39:36

There's always a market for this. Archibald Knox sells well.

0:39:360:39:39

It's going under the hammer now.

0:39:390:39:41

494 is the Liberty pewter two-handled hemispherical bowl

0:39:410:39:47

designed by Archibald Knox and I can start the bidding here at £150,

0:39:470:39:51

straight in at 150, 160 now.

0:39:510:39:55

-'You're giving one of your stares, Julianne.'

-Oh, yeah?

0:39:550:39:58

160, 170, 170, 180.

0:39:580:40:02

The internet, the internet's in now.

0:40:020:40:04

-190, 190, 200.

-That's it.

0:40:040:40:07

-Oh!

-200 do I see? At 190...

0:40:070:40:10

Two of them hovering now at 190.

0:40:100:40:13

200, 200 you're back.

0:40:130:40:15

-There you go.

-200 online.

0:40:150:40:17

At 200, 210 now. 210, online at 210.

0:40:170:40:21

-220, 230...

-So, they're logging on online for your log cabin, eh?

0:40:210:40:24

-That's right.

-220, 230 now, 230.

0:40:240:40:28

240 now. 250. At 240...

0:40:280:40:31

Well done, James. He's worked that up to the top.

0:40:310:40:34

240, two of you hovering. At £240, 250 do I see?

0:40:340:40:38

At 240 you're out and selling.

0:40:400:40:43

-Yes, £240.

-Oh, lovely!

-There's a load of logs there.

-There is, yeah.

0:40:440:40:48

-Especially if they're split.

-Yes, yeah.

0:40:480:40:50

A log cabin! What fun.

0:40:500:40:52

And now for those splendid medals.

0:40:540:40:57

George and Joyce, it's great to see you.

0:40:570:40:59

-We've got a group of medals, World War I and World War II.

-Yes.

0:40:590:41:03

Just about to go under the hammer. Remind me why you're selling them.

0:41:030:41:07

We're selling them to donate money for the British Legion.

0:41:070:41:10

OK, to the British Legion. Great charity, OK. Ready for this?

0:41:100:41:14

Here we go, let's put it to the test.

0:41:140:41:16

Lot 488, we've just got another additional...

0:41:160:41:21

commission bid. A combination of First and Second World War.

0:41:220:41:26

Private H Brown of the Notts & Derby Regiment,

0:41:260:41:29

and let's start at £320.

0:41:290:41:34

Straight in. Let's hope for a battle now.

0:41:340:41:37

350 on the phone, 380, 400.

0:41:370:41:41

420, 450, 480, 500.

0:41:410:41:47

520, 550, 580, 600.

0:41:470:41:52

At £580 with me, at 580, internet are you coming in?

0:41:530:41:59

600.

0:42:010:42:02

620, 650.

0:42:020:42:04

650 on the internet, 680.

0:42:060:42:08

700.

0:42:080:42:09

-£700, George.

-Marvellous.

-This is fantastic.

0:42:090:42:13

-'There's two people buying history...

-Yes.'

0:42:130:42:15

..and not medals.

0:42:150:42:16

750 bid. 800 with me.

0:42:160:42:20

850.

0:42:200:42:21

I think they're out.

0:42:210:42:23

At 800, are you sure? Internet's out. Phones?

0:42:230:42:27

Phones out. At £800, last chance in the room. At £800, 850 do I see?

0:42:270:42:32

-£800.

-At £800...

0:42:320:42:36

Yes! That's so exciting.

0:42:360:42:37

£800 and it's all going to the British Legion.

0:42:370:42:40

George, thank you so much. What a surprise!

0:42:400:42:42

-It was, weren't it?

-Yes, I was very surprised.

0:42:420:42:45

Do you know, it is hard to put a price on history. You cannot

0:42:450:42:47

really, really put a price on that, can you?

0:42:470:42:49

There are people that research particular regiments.

0:42:490:42:52

This guy had a very interesting story.

0:42:520:42:54

-There's still more work to be done on it.

-Yeah.

0:42:540:42:56

So, we pitch them in to attract them.

0:42:560:42:59

-But 800 for the charity is just a fantastic result, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:42:590:43:02

And to think they could have ended up in the bin!

0:43:040:43:07

Well, there you are.

0:43:090:43:10

You can never predict what's going to happen in an auction room.

0:43:100:43:13

That's why they're so exciting.

0:43:130:43:15

And all credit to our experts,

0:43:150:43:17

because it's not an exact science, putting a value on an antique.

0:43:170:43:21

Sadly, we've run out of time, so from all of us here

0:43:210:43:24

in the Peak District, it's cheerio until the next time.

0:43:240:43:27

Flog It! comes from historic Haddon Hall in Derbyshire.

Paul Martin is joined by experts Michael Baggot and Adam Partridge. Together they pick out a selection of interesting antiques and collectables to be sold at the local auction house. Michael is attracted by a collection of medals, and Adam admires a liberty pewter bowl detested by its owner.

Inspired by the many pieces of war memorabilia brought to the show, Paul takes a look at 20th century British war art at the Imperial War Museum.


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